Collections
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Date
1957
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.2
Length
24.3
Width
17
Description
A. BOOK, 24.3 CM LONG X 17 CM WIDE X 3.2 CM TALL. BOOK HAS RED COVER AND SILVER TEXT “34TH EDITION, 1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THE STANDARD MANUAL OF AMATEUR RADIO COMMUNICATION, $3.50 U.S.A. PROPER, PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE”; COVER HAS SILVER IMAGE OF RADIO TOWER OVER A HOUSE ROOF AND TREES IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. SPINE HAS SILVER TEXT PRINTED “1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THIRTY-FOURTH EDITION”. INSIDE FRONT PAGE HAS TEXT WRITTEN IN PENCIL IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER “E.K. REDEKOPP, 305-7 AVE. A. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, OCTOBER 16, 1957”. INSIDE TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, BY THE HEADQUARTERS STAFF OF THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, WEST HARTFORD, CONN., U.S.A.”; BACK OF TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “COPYRIGHT 1957 BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE…LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMER: 41-3345…THE RUMFORD PRESS, CONCORD, NEW HAMPSIRE, U.S.A.”. INSIDEOF BOOK HAS HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON PAGES. SPINE IS DAMAGED AND LIFTING FROM PAGES INSIDE; COVER IS WORN AND SCRATCHED ON FRONT AND SPINE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. PAPER INSERT, 22.2 CM LONG X 10.2 CM WIDE. LIGHT BROWN PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT ON FRONT; FRONT HAS DARK BROWN BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “Q CODES”; BELOW BORDER ON FRONT IS LISTING OF Q CODES IN BLACK INK WITH THEIR DEFINITIONS, INCLUDES “SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS ADOPTED BY ARRL”. FRONT OF CARD SHOWS 35 CODES PRINTED AND ONE HANDWRITTEN AT TOP IN PENCIL “QRA-WHAT IS THE NAME OF IN ST.? NAME OF THE ST”. CARD HAS PENCIL MARKS MADE BESIDE CERTAIN CODES ON LIFT. BACK OF CARD IS PRINTED WITH BROWN TEXT ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND “SSR” AND THREE BLACK BANNERS ACROSS PAPER WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “LESS DISTORTION, MORE TALKING POWER, DECREASAED BANDWIDTH”. CARD IS SEVERELY DISCOLOURED WITH FADING ON BACK; BACK IS CREASED AND HAS TEAR IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; BACK AND FRONT ARE STAINED; FRONT HAS ADHESIVE STAIN ALONG UPPER EDGE; CARD IS SEVERELY CREASED AT BOTTOM EDGE OF UPPER BROWN BORDER. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT, 43.5 CM LONG X 28 CM WIDE. INSERT IS WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT AND IMAGES PRINTED; FRONT HAS HEADER WITH BLACK TEXT “RADIO SUPPLY, HAM NEWS, MCLEOD BUILDING EDMONTON, MARCH 1947, 134-12TH AVENUE W. CALGARY, HAM HEADQUARTERS FOR EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION”. INSERT FRONT INCLUDES PHOTO AND PRINTED STORIES; INSIDE OF INSERT HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIO PARTS AND EQUIPMENT; BACK PAGE HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIOS, AND WRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL UPPER RIGHT CORNER “12, 267 50/56 00/211 50”. PAPER IS FOLDED AND CREASED TWICE ACROSS; PAPER SHOWS SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. PAPER INSERT, 21.5 CM LONG X 13.4 CM WIDE. PAPER IS BLACK LINED WITH BLUE HAND-DRAWN DIAGRAMS ON FRONT AND TEXT; TEXT IS WRITTEN IN BLUE INK IN CURSIVE, “IF NO TONE OBTAINED WITH KEY CLOSED, [RECEIVE] VALUE OF R8. REDUCE VALUE IF CONSTANT [TOL] IS RECEIVED REGARDLESS OF KEY UP OR DOWN POSITION”. PAPER HAS BLACK PRINTED BORDER AT BOTTOM WITH TEXT “CHRYCO “ALL-MAKE” PARTS…FINEST FOR ALL CARS”. PAPER HAS HOLE PUNCHED IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER. PAPER SHOWS MINOR SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION AROUND EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “I USED TO GET THE AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. THIS IS [AN] AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. IT COMES OUT ANNUALLY, AND ALL THE LATEST TRANSMITTERS AND DEVELOPMENTS, ANTENNAS INCLUDED…[ARE]ALL IN HERE. THE DEVELOPMENTS. I THINK IT’S IN THIS MANUAL THAT THIS TRANSMITTER THE ENGINEER HAD DESIGNED, AND I WAS READING UP ON IT AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, THAT’S A TERRIFIC TRANSMITTER. I LIKE THAT.” IT COVERS ALL THE BANDS THAT I WOULD BE USING: 80, 40, 20, 15 AND 10, AND SO I THOUGHT, “I HAVE TO BUILD THAT THING.” THAT’S WHAT GOT ME GOING ON IT. IT TOOK ME ABOUT FOUR MONTHS TO BUILD IT BECAUSE YOU ONLY DO SO MUCH EVERY DAY, AND YOU [HAVE TO] TEND TO THE FAMILY.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail