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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Other Name
POP SOCKET
Date Range From
2014
Date Range To
2019
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190020018
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
POP SOCKET
Date Range From
2014
Date Range To
2019
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
12
Width
7.6
Description
POPPER SOCKET BACK IN UNOPENED PLASTIC PACKAGING; ROUND SOCKET INSIDE PACKAGING IS WHITE WITH LETHBRIDGE PRIDE FEST 2014-2019 LOGO. LOGO DEPICTS A RED HEART WITH ORANGE AND BLUE BANNER RUNNING HORIZONTALLY ACROSS; WHITE TEXT ON THE BANNER READS, “LETHBRIDGE PRIDE FEST”. A WHITE PAPER INSERT INSIDE PACKAGING SHOWS INSTRUCTIONS FOR ATTACHING SOCKET TO A PHONE, WITH GREY, WHITE, AND ORANGE VISUALS. PLASTIC PACKAGING IS UNOPENED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
LEISURE
History
ON JULY 25, 2019, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT AND COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELISABETH HEGERAT REGARDING HER DONATION OF PRIDE MATERIALS. ON THE CELLPHONE POP SOCKET, HEGERAT NOTED, “EIGHTEEN IS THE PREVIOUS PRIDE FEST LOGO ON A POP-SOCKET FOR USING WITH YOUR PHONE. THAT WAS JUST MERCHANDISE WE HAD FOR SALE AS A FUND RAISER.” “[IT WAS A] FUNDRAISER/STEALTH COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT I GUESS. THE FIRST YEAR WE HAD THE WHOLE SELECTION [OF BUTTONS AND MERCHANDISE] A COUPLE OF OTHER PEOPLE AND I DRAGGED THEM OUT TO ALMOST EVERY PRIDE FEST EVENT WHERE IT IS CONDUCIVE TO SELL MERCHANDISE AND SET THEM UP.” “WE [MADE FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS FROM BUTTON SALES] THE FIRST YEAR…I THINK THAT WAS ALL IN. JUST ME COUNTING THE CASH AT THE END OF THE NIGHT, NOT COUNTING THE SUPPLIES. [THE PROFIT] GOES TOWARDS ALL THE VARIOUS PROGRAMS PRIDE FEST OFFERS. SOME OF IT MIGHT GO TOWARDS BUYING MERCHANDISE FOR NEXT YEAR, BUT WE DON’T PUT THE BUTTON MONEY STRAIGHT BACK INTO MAKING BUTTONS. IT ALL GOES INTO A GENERAL REVENUE.” IN AN INTERVIEW WITH HEGERAT FROM JULY 25, 2019, HEGERAT RECALLED HER TIME WORKING WITH THE LETHBRIDGE PRIDE FEST SOCIETY, NOTING, “I THINK IT WAS 2016 THAT I FIRST STARTED VOLUNTEERING WITH THE PRIDE BOARD…WHEN WE MOVED HERE IN 2006…PRIDE IN THE PARK DIDN’T EXIST, OR THE PARADE, OR ANYTHING ELSE. THERE WAS A BARBECUE, AND WE NEVER REALLY WENT TO IT, BECAUSE WE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…WE KNEW WE COULD SHOW UP AND PEOPLE WOULD BE GLAD WE WERE THERE, AND EVERYTHING ELSE, BUT IT STILL KIND OF FELT LIKE WE WOULD HAVE BEEN CRASHING SOMEBODY’S FAMILY BARBECUE, BECAUSE WE DIDN’T KNOW ANYONE.” “WHEN PRIDE IN THE PARK STARTED, I KNOW THERE WERE A COUPLE OF YEARS WHERE WE WANDERED OVER AND CHECKED IT OUT, AND EVERYTHING ELSE, BUT [I] DIDN’T REALLY KNOW ANYBODY. WHEN, I THINK IT WAS 2015, [ONE OF THE PRIDE IN THE PARK PROGRAMS] WAS THEY HAD AN AUTHOR FROM CALGARY, A POET, COME AND DO A READING…WE WENT, AND WE LISTENED TO HER READ, AND I KNOW THE PEOPLE AT THE U OF L BOOKSTORE QUITE WELL THROUGH DOING LIBRARY STUFF, AND SO WAS HANGING OUT WITH BECKY COLBECK, AND KARI TANAKA, AND ONE OF THEIR BOOKSTORE STAFF, NICK ANTSON—HE AND HIS HUSBAND, DERRICK, WERE ON THE PRIDE BOARD. SO I ENDED UP TALKING WITH THEM, AND THEN STARTED THINKING…“MAYBE WE SHOULD DO SOMETHING AT THE LIBRARY NEXT YEAR.” AND THAT, AND SORT OF A FEW OTHER COMMITMENTS WITH WORK, AND A PUSH FROM THE LIBRARY TO GET MORE INVOLVED…IN THE COMMUNITY…I SHOWED UP FOR THE FIRST PRIDE FEST BOARD MEETING, AND JUST KEPT SHOWING UP…AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR IN, I THINK THE MEETING WOULD HAVE BEEN LIKE OCTOBER, 2015, BUT IT WAS FOR THE 2016 PRIDE. SO, I HAVE BEEN INVOLVED AS A VOLUNTEER SINCE THEN, AND HAVE DONE SOME WORK LIAISING BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN PRIDE FEST AND THE LIBRARY FOR PARTNER PROGRAMS…FOR 2019 PRIDE, I’M FINISHING MY FIRST TERM AS AN ELECTED BOARD MEMBER.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENENT FILE P20190020001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190020018
Acquisition Date
2019-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BOY SCOUTS
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, WOOD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19970107058
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOY SCOUTS
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
BAKELITE, WOOD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
6.5
7.0
Length
15
18.0
Width
7.6
7.4
Description
2 PIECE TELEGRAPH KEY AND SPEAKER. TELEGRAPH KEY IS BLACK METAL, WITH A BLACK PLASTIC HANDLE, AND IS MOUNTED ON A SHELLACED RECTANGULAR PIECE OF WOOD. ITEM IS ATTACHED TO SECOND PIECE WITH ONE OFF-WHITE WIRE. SPEAKER IS A RECTANGULAR BLACK BAKELITE BOX, WITH A SMALL LIGHT BULB IN THE TOP LEFT HAND CORNER, NEXT TO A BLACK SWITCH ON THE RIGHT. BELOW THE SPEAKER ITEM IS MARKED "HEATHKIT CODE OSCILLATOR MODEL CO-1", "HEATH COMPANY - BENTON HARBOR, MICH. A SUBSIDIARY OF DAYSTROM, INC.". KEY IS MARKED IN WHITE "CJB26003A", AND BOTTOM IS COVERED IN BEIGE FELT. BOTH PIECES ARE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ACCORDING TO DONOR ITEMS WERE USED TO HELP BOY SCOUTS LEARN MORSE-CODE. *UPDATE* IN 2015 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED A BIOGRAPHY OF AB CHERVINSKI, THE DONOR OF THIS OBJECT, WITH INFORMATION FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM 1982, 1989, AND 2011. ADAM ABRAHAM 'AB" CHERVINSKI WAS BORN ON FEBRUARY 24, 1920 IN LETHBRIDGE. AS A TEENAGER HE WORKED AS A MESSENGER BOY FOR THE CPR TELEGRAPH OFFICE. CHERVINSKI BRIEFLY LIVED IN ONTARIO DURING HIS SERVICE WITH THE AIR FORCE, BUT RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE WORKED FOR ALBERTA GOVERNMENT TELEPHONES FOR 37 YEARS. HE WAS A LIFELONG COLLECTOR OF ANTIQUES, AVID LOCAL HISTORIAN, AND HEAVILY INVOLVED IN MUSICAL THEATRE. AB CHERVINSKI DIED ON JUNE 2, 2011. SEE PERMANENT FILE P19970107001-GA FOR HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ABOUT CHERVINSKI. *UPDATE* IN 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK CONDUCTED AN ARTIFACT SURVEY, WHICH INCLUDED A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED BY ADAM ABRAHAM CHERVINSKI. EXTENSIVE RESEARCH CONDUCTED TO LOCATE THE DONOR'S LIVING NEXT-OF-KIN WAS UNSUCCESSFUL.
Catalogue Number
P19970107058
Acquisition Date
1997-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, BRASS, VELOUR
Catalogue Number
P19694116000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, BRASS, VELOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
128.0
Length
65.8
Width
42.5
Description
OAK CABINET, CARVED TOP. VELOUR AND WOOD SPEAKER PANEL. BRASS FITTINGS AND SWITCHES. PAPER LABEL ON BACK. "CAUTION DISCONNECT ELECTRICALPLUG BEFORE REMOVING CABINET BACK". STILL FUNCTIONAL. "WESTINGHOUSE 99".
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
EDUCATION
History
HISTORY UNKNOWN-DONATED TO SCHOOL FOR TEACHING PURPOSES. *UPDATE* IN 2010 NICOLE HEMBROFF, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT, CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF PALLET RACKING. SHE WAS UNABLE TO FIND CONTACT INFORMATION FOR DONOR OR NEXT OF KIN.
Catalogue Number
P19694116000
Acquisition Date
1969-06
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1925
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OAK, PLASTIC, TIN, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P19683246000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1925
Materials
OAK, PLASTIC, TIN, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
20.6
Length
39.4
Width
24.1
Description
TWO DIALS NO. 1 TO 100 IN FRONT. CRACKED AND CHIPPED CABINET. WOOD BODY WITH HINGED LID AT TOP. FRONT DISPLAYS BROWN BAKELITE DIALS (2) MARKED "1" TO "100" IN ADDITION TO TWO CONTACTS, 1 JACK, AND 3 POINTERS. FRONT BOTTOM CRACKED. APPEARS THAT LABEL WAS REMOVED FROM ONE SIDE.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
Catalogue Number
P19683246000
Acquisition Date
1968-05
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
HAND HELD RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P19970041557
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAND HELD RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.5
Length
15.1
Width
7.8
Description
RECTANGULAR HAND HELD RADIO HAS PERFORATED ALUMINUM COVER AND CIRCULAR TUNING DIAL AT TOP RIGHT CORNER. TOP LEFT CORNER OF FRONT READS "LLOYD'S FM/AM RECEIVER". RADIO HAS EXTENDABLE ANTENNA AND PLASTIC WRIST STRAP ON LEFT SIDE. ON BACK IS LABEL WHICH READS "MODEL NO. N701" AND "SERIES 772A". BATTERY COVER IS MISSING.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
HAND RADIO BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, REV. G.G. NAKAYAMA. DONOR RELATES THAT HER FATHER OFTEN TOOK RADIO WITH HIM ON INTERNATIONAL TRIPS. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041557
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
HOMEMADE SHORTWAVE RADIO, TUBES AND SPEAKER
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CLOTH
Catalogue Number
P20090031014
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HOMEMADE SHORTWAVE RADIO, TUBES AND SPEAKER
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1950
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CLOTH
No. Pieces
7
Height
18.0
Length
25.7
Width
45.7
Description
HANDMADE METAL RADIO WITH BROADCAST DIAL. ALSO INCLUDES SPEAKER, OSCILATOR COIL, BOXED WESTINGHOUSE TUBE AND BOXED ROGERS TUBE - 7 PIECES. 1. RADIO, HANDMADE. RECTANGULAR METAL BASE. TOP HAS FOUR PERFORATED METAL COLUMNS, FIVE UNPERFORATED METAL COLUMNS, ONE HOLLOW BROWN COLUMN WRAPPED IN COPPER WIRE, THREE MEDIUM SIZED GLASS TUBES AND A SQUARE BOX MARKED "HADLEY TRANSFORMERS, LOS ANGELES". THE FRONT OF THE BASE HAS ONE ROD STICKING OUT AND ONE LARGE DIAL WITH MARKED WITH NUMBERS "BROADCAST KILOCYCLES" AND DEPICTING A WORLD. THE DIAL IS ATTACHED TO A METAL BOX WITH AN OPEN TOP WHICH EXPOSES MULTIPLE SLATS. ALSO ATTACHED IS A ROWN CLOTH ELECTRICAL CORD WITH TWO-PRONG PLUG. 18.0 CM HIGH BY 25.7 CM LONG BY 45.7 CM HIGH. 2. OSCILATOR TUBE, WIRE, PAPER AND UNKNOWN MATERIALS. ONE END OF TUBE HAS A HOLE IN IT. TUB IS WRAPPED IN WIRE. SOME PAPER IS EXPOSED. TUBE IS LARGELY BLACK/BROWN IN COLOR EXCEPT FOR ONE END WHICH SHOWS AN UNKNOWN WHITE SUBSTANCE. 8.6 CM HIGH BY 4.8 CM IN DIAMETER. 3. SPEAKER, UNMOUNTED. FRONT OF SPEAKER IS CONCAVE, LINED WITH HEAVY, GREY PAPER. OUTSIDE IS SILVER COLORED METAL WITH A COLUMNAR SILVER COLORED BACKING PIECE HELD ON BY A SINGLE SCREW. ATTACHED TO THE BACK OF THE SPEAKER IS A SQUARE BOX FILLED WITH PAPER AND WIRES WHICH CONNECTS TO A BROWN CLOTH ELECTRICAL CORD WITH A FOUR-PRONGED PLUG. BLUE LABEL MARKED, "OXFORD... OXFORD TARTAK, RADIO CORP., MADE IN USA". 10.9 CM HIGH BY 21.0 CM IN DIAMETER. 4. BOXED TUBE. BLACK, GOLD AND WHITE, RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD BOX MARKED, "WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRONIC TUBE..." TUBE TYPE "6CA7/EL34". GLASS TUBE INSIDE MARKED "6CA7/EL34" AND "XF5, L2E" BOTTOM OF TUBE IS BROWN PLASTIC WITH SINGLE PLASTIC PRONG SURROUNDED BY EIGHT METAL PRONGS. 2 PIECES. 5.0 CM HIGH BY 13.0 CM LONG BY 5.0 CM WIDE. 5. BOXED TUBE. GREEN, YELLOW AND WHITE CARDBOARD BOX MARKED, "GUARANTEED, ROGERS, ELECTRONIC TUBE". TUBE TYPEE "12AF6". SMALL GLASS TUBE INSIDE HAS A POINTED TOP. GLASS MARKED, "12AF6, AUTOMATIC". BOTTOM OF TUBE HAS 7 METAL PRONGS. 2 PIECES. 2.5 CM HIGH BY 7.9 CM LONG BY 2.3 CM WIDE.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
TRADES
History
ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WENDY AITKENS IN AN INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY NICOLE HEMBROFF, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT, IN JULY OF 2011, THE RADIO AND ITS COMPONENTS WERE LIKELY MADE BY HER FATHER, WALLY JAMIESON. SHE SAID, "WALLY STUDIED RADIO TECHNOLOGY AT THE NATIONAL SCHOOL IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA FROM 1937-1939. HE WAS FASCINATED BY RADIOS AND ALL THINGS ELECTRICAL. THIS RADIO MAY HAVE BEEN A SCHOOL PROJECT OR IT MAY HAVE BEEN SOMETHING HE MADE FOR THE PURE CHALLENGE OF BUILDING HIS OWN RADIO. I REMEMBER HIM MENTIONING HIS HOMEMADE RADIO WHEN HE WAS NEAR THE END OF HIS LIFE. IT IS WRAPPED IN LETHBRIDGE HERALDS AND EDMONTON JOURNALS FROM THE LATE 1940S." AITKENS SAID HER DAD'S INTEREST IN RADIOS STARTED WHEN HE WAS A BOY. WHEN HER FATHER WAS GROWING UP IN SYLVAN LAKE, AB HIS "UNCLE GOT HIM A CRYSTAL RADIO SET WHEN HE WAS ABOUT 12 YEARS OLD. HE'D BEGGED FOR IT. ONCE HE PUT IT TOGETHER HE WAS HOOKED. I HAVE DAD'S RADIO OPERATOR'S LICENSE [FOR THE PROVINCE OF] ALBERTA. IT'S NUMBER 7. IT DIRECTED THE REST OF HIS LIFE. HE HAD THE KNOWLEDGE OF AN ELECTRICAL ENGINEER. " ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, HER FATHER GAINED HIS KNOWLEDGE THROUGH EXPERIENCE - LIKE MANY MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY. WHILE SOME OF HER FAMILY HAD GONE TO NORMAL SCHOOL, HER GENERATION WAS THE FIRST TO ATTEND UNIVERSITY. FOR FAMILY HISTORY SEE P20090030001.
Catalogue Number
P20090031014
Acquisition Date
2009-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.5
Length
28.5
Width
10.1
Description
MORSE CODE KEY ATTACHED TO COMPRESSED WOOD BOARD; KEY CODE HAS SILVER UNFINISHED STEEL BODY WITH STEEL FITTINGS AND BAR ATTACHED BLACK METAL KEY. SILVER BAR ATTACHED TO BLACK KEY HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AT BASE “IOF/556”. WOOD BOARD HAS HOLE DRILLED THROUGH ALONG RIGHT EDGE. BOARD HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER IN PENCIL “E.K. REDEKOPP”. BOARD IS STRATCHED ON TOP AND HAS BLACK STAINING BELOW BLACK KEY; BACK OF BOARD HAS STAINING AND DISCOLORATION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE CODE KEY, REDEKOPP NOTED, “LATER ON, I JUST DROPPED [USING THIS] HAND KEY AND WENT TO [THE] DOW KEY.” “MORSE CODE, WE HAD TO LEARN. THAT WAS A MUST. IN AMATEUR RADIO, YOU STARTED WITH IT. YOU DIDN’T START WITH [THE MICROPHONE] AT ALL. IN FACT, IN SECOND CLASS YOU COULDN’T USE A MICROPHONE; YOU HAD TO USE THE KEY ONLY IN MORSE CODE. [THE DOW KEY] IS WHAT I USED BECAUSE MY AWKWARD HAND WOULD NOT HANDLE THAT [HAND KEY]. [IT] DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL FOR ME. I DON’T KNOW HOW ANYONE CAN SEND FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THAT THING AND THAT’S WHAT THEY USE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
17
Length
25.5
Width
15.3
Description
HOMEMADE ANTENNA TUNER; GREY, UNFINISHED STEEL BASE WITH TWO COPPER COILS ON TOP SECURED WIT SCREWS AND FOUR WHITE CERAMIC MOUNTS. COILS ARE JOINED TOGETER WITH METAL BAR AT SCREWS IN THE CENTER, AND JOINED BY CLOTH-COVERED WIRE AT SCREWS ON ENDS; CENTER METAL BAR JOINING COILS HAS BLUE PLASTIC COVER WRAPPED AROUND IT. COILS JOINED AT END SCREWS WITH CLOTH-COVERED WIRE TO WHITE METAL MOUNT WITH SILVER METAL DISCS. MOUNT HAS TWO SETS OF NINETEEN DISCS; DISCS ARE SHAPED LIKE HALF-CIRCLES; DISCS ARE JOINED AT TOPS WITH METAL ROD RUNNING THROUGH. TUNER SHOWS SIGNS OF WEAR, AND IS STAINED WITH SOILING; TUNER BASE HAS HOLES PUNCHED IN SIDES AND TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE ANTENNA IS ALMOST THE KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL STATION. THERE’S TWO THINGS: YOU CAN EITHER GET YOUR RADIO WAVES THROUGH THE ANTENNA, OR YOU CAN HEAT YOUR CONDUCTOR, YOUR TRANSMISSION LINE, IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, TOO.” “YOU HAVE TO HAVE YOUR ANTENNA TUNED. FREQUENCY AND WAVE LENGTH GO TOGETHER AND THEY ARE VERY IMPORTANT. YOU HAVE TO HAVE THIS TUNED TO THE CORRECT FREQUENCY SO IT WILL MATCH THE ANTENNA. IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, YOU’RE JUST [HEATING] YOUR CONDUCTOR AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING ANYWHERE FAR. THAT’S THE KEY. THERE’S WHAT THEY CALL A STANDING WAVE RATIO…IF IT’S TOO HIGH, IT’S JUST HEATING A WIRE AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING [A SIGNAL] OUT. THE NEARER TO ONE-TO-ONE THAT YOU CAN GET–THREE-TO-ONE IS GOOD…NOT IDEAL, BUT GOOD—FOUR-TO-ONE, FIVE-TO-ONE-–FORGET [IT]. YOU’RE JUST HEATING THE WIRE. ANTENNAS [ARE] AMAZING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, IT’S A SCIENCE. ANTENNAS [ARE] A SCIENCE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO C/W CASE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P19950073043
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO C/W CASE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, PAPER
No. Pieces
3
Height
3.3
Length
10.9
Width
9.9
Description
1. 8 TRANSISTOR RADIO: WHITE PLASTIC HOUSING WITH CHROME FACE AND PERFORATED PLATE ON TOP. PLASTIC CONTROLS FOR TUNING AND VOLUME ON LEFT, WITH RED BUTTON BELOW. "ROXY" IN RED CIRCLE IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. TUNING DIAL ALONG TOP, MARKED WITH "53 6 7 8 10 16". OUTLET FOR PLUG AT BOTTOM, WITH EARPHONE OUTLET ALONG RIGHT SIDE. BACK HAS HORIZONTAL SLITS FOR SPEAKER, AND IS EMBOSSED AT BOTTOM WITH "8 TRANSISTOR JAPAN". 2. CASE: BLACK LEATHER, WITH GREEN FELT LINING OVER CARDBOARD INTERIOR. ZIPPERED AROUND THREE SIDES, WITH STRAP ATTACHED BELOW WITH SNAP FASTENERS. BOTTOM OF CASE IS PERFORATED, WITH VARIOUS HOLES FOR ACCESS TO TRANSISTOR CONTROLS. ZIPPER RIPPED FROM CASE ALONG ONE SIDE. STAMPED WITH "JAPAN" AND "EAR". 3. INSTRUCTION MANUAL: WHITE PAPER LEAFLET WITH BLUE PRINT. FRONT READS "CARSISTOR 8-TRANSISTOR RADIO UR-701", WITH "MRS. HARRY ING 538-27 ST.S. CITY" HANDWRITTEN. CONTAINS INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE, AND DIAGRAMS. SLIGHTLY WORN AND SOILED IN PLACES.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073043
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
Catalogue Number
P19950073019
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.8
Length
17
Width
11.5
Description
BLACK PLASTIC TEXTURED CASING WITH CHROME TRIM. TOP OF RADIO HAS BLACK PERFORATED PANEL FOR SPEAKER, WITH TWO DIALS ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE LABELLED "VOLUME" AND "SELECTOR", AND ONE ON THE RIGHT FOR TUNING. SELECTOR BAND ACROSS TOP, WITH CLEAR PLASTIC PANEL. "3 BAND 10 TRANSISTOR LLOYD'S" PRINTED BELOW SPEAKER. ANTENNA EXTENDS FROM TOP LEFT SIDE, WITH SHORT HANDLE WHICH CAN ALSO BE EXTENDED FROM MAIN CASE. BACK HAS SMALL PLATE READING "MODEL NO. TR-103 MB IS DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY FOR LLOYD'S". BATTERY COMPARTMENT AT BOTTOM OF BACK, WITH BATTERY HOLDER CONNECTED ONLY BY WIRING. PAPER LABEL WITHIN, READING "SERIAL NUMBER 12647" WITH "INSPECTED AS ANO" STAMPED IN ORANGE. BACK OF CASE EMBOSSED WITH "LLOYD'S", "EXT. ANT.", "EAR.", "AC ADP.", AND "JAPAN". SMALL CRACK IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF CASE.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073019
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail

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