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Other Name
MILITARY RIBBON BAR
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, CLOTH
Catalogue Number
P19738775000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY RIBBON BAR
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
ALUMINUM, CLOTH
No. Pieces
1
Length
2.6
Width
2.0
Description
"TZ" IN A CIRCLE ON BACK. RED, WHITE, BLACK & BLUE RIBBON ON FRONT. CROSSED SWORDS AT ONE END.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
RIBBONS INDICATE INDIVIDUAL AWARDED WAR MERIT MEDAL, 2ND CLASS, HINDENBURG CROSS, CROSS OF HONOR COMBATANT (1914-1918), & BALTIC CROSS. (L. TO R.) RIBBONS INDICATE INDIVIDUAL WAS VETERAN OF W.W.I. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. SHE WAS UNABLE TO UNCOVER ANY NEW INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT.
Catalogue Number
P19738775000
Acquisition Date
1973-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20170034001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
STEEL, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
4
Description
SILVER HOMEMADE CROSS SOLDERED TOGETHER AT CENTER; CROSS HAS WIDENED, SQUARE NAIL ENDS WITH HEAD AND ARM POINTS ENGRAVED WITH “W” SHAPE. FRONT OF CROSS HAS ADDITIONAL NAIL BENT OUT IN SHAPE OF BODY ON CROSS; SOLDERED UNDER NAIL HEAD AT CROSS CENTER AND AT END OF NAIL AT BASE OF CROSS. BACK OF CROSS HAS LOOP BENT AND SOLDERED AT ENDS TO TOP AND CENTER OF CROSS. CROSS IS RUSTED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON NOVEMBER 20, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RITA BERLANDO REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GIFTED RING AND CRUCIFIX. BERLANDO WAS GIFTED THE OBJECTS FROM A PREVIOUS EMPLOYER, GLADSTONE VIRUTE, OF LETHBRIDGE. THE CRUCIFIX WAS HANDMADE, FASHIONED FROM MASS-PRODUCED HORSESHOE NAILS. ON THE CRUCIFIX, BERLANDO RECALLED, “I HAVE NO IDEA…HOW [IT] BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION…WHEN HE GAVE [IT] TO ME, I WAS INTRIGUED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT IT BUT HE DIDN’T HAVE TOO MUCH HISTORY ON THEM. NOT TO ME, ANYWAY.” ON GLADSTONE VIRTUE’S MILITARY SERVICE, BERLANDO NOTED, ““I DON’T THINK HE WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK HE HAD A PAST THAT HE WOULD RATHER NOT DISCUSS. IT WAS ALWAYS STRICTLY BUSINESS. IT WAS NEVER SITTING THERE AND DISCUSSING WHAT HIS LIFE WAS OR ANYTHING OF THAT NATURE.” “I DIDN’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT HIM BUT I KNOW THAT HE WAS A MAN THAT PEOPLE RESPECTED, AND FOR HIM TO RESPECT ME, I THINK THAT WAS AN HONOUR.” “I WOULD LOVE TO KNOW HOW THESE TWO LITTLE ITEMS BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION AND WHERE WAS HE WHEN THEY WERE GIVEN TO HIM AND WAS HE PRESENT AT SOME TIME…I JUST FIND THAT HE MUST HAVE HAD THEM IN HIS POSSESSION FOR SOME TIME.” BERLANDO ELABORATED ON HOW THE CRUCIFIX CAME INTO HER POSSESSION, “[THIS ITEM] MEANS AN AWFUL LOT TO ME BECAUSE IT WAS GIVEN AT THE TIME THAT I WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE LAW FIRM OF VIRTUE AND COMPANY. IT WAS MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, SEMI-RETIRED WHEN I WAS EMPLOYED THERE, THAT HAD ASKED THAT I GO INTO HIS ROOM AND TAKE LETTERS [AND] NOTES FOR LETTERS THAT HE WISHED TO HAVE TYPED. I WAS HIRED AS A RECEPTIONIST, NOT FEELING THAT I WOULD HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY AS A SECRETARY, SO I INFORMED HIM THAT I COULD NOT DO THIS DUTY. HE ASKED THAT I GET HIS SECRETARY TO TAKE HIS NOTES. AS THE MONTHS WENT BY, HE BECAME VERY – AND I USE THE WORD ‘ATTACHED’ – BECAUSE HE WOULD ALSO ASK ME TO DO SERVICES FOR HIM, WHICH I WOULD HAVE TO GO TO THE ROYAL BANK TO DO HIS BANKING [AND] HIS INVESTMENTS. WHEN HE WAS NO LONGER TO BE WITH THE FIRM, HE HANDED ME A LITTLE GIFT. THAT GIFT CONSIST[ED] OF A RING AND A CROSS THAT WAS MADE FROM A BELL OF A CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED IN THE FIRST WAR. THAT MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME SO I HAVE TREASURED IT CONTINUALLY AND [THE GIFTING] HAS TO DATE BACK TO [1965].” “[MR GLADSTONE VIRTURE] MUST HAVE KEPT IT AS A REMEMBRANCE FROM SOMEWHERE IN THE PAST THAT HE HAD THAT HE DID NOT [WANT TO] LEAVE IT TO HIS FAMILY, BUT [WITH] ME. THEREFORE, I DEFINITELY FELT THAT [IT] WAS A GIFT THAT I SHOULD TREASURE AND I HAVE TREASURED, AND I HAVE KEPT IT UNDER LOCK AND KEY. EVEN IN THE TRANSITION OF DOWNSIZING, I LIVED IN FEAR THAT FOR SOME REASON, THERE WERE ITEMS THAT I NO LONGER HAVE. I KEPT THINKING, ‘OH, DEAR LORD, I BETTER MAKE SURE I STILL HAVE THAT GIFT FROM MR. VIRTUE.’ WHEN I FOUND IT, THAT’S WHEN I REALLY SERIOUSLY THOUGHT I HAD TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THEM.” “AT [THE TIME I WAS HIRED], FINANCES WERE DIFFICULT IN THE FAMILY HOME SO I APPLIED FOR THE POSITION OF RECEPTIONIST. THE POSITION REQUIRED NOT ONLY [WORKING] AS A RECEPTIONIST BUT AS A BOOKKEEPER AND AN OFFICE MANAGER. I HESITATED ONCE I WAS INFORMED OF THIS RESPONSIBILITY, BUT I UNDERTOOK THE POSITION AND DID ALL OF THE REQUIREMENTS THAT WAS EXPECTED OF ME. THE LAW FIRM AT THAT TIME CONSISTED OF CHARLES VIRTUE, WILLIAM RUSSELL, MR. GORDON AND THEN LATER ON, THERE WAS VAUGHN HEMBROFF THAT BECAME PARTNER AND GLENN MORRISON. IT’S ALWAYS MEANT A LOT OF THE PAST HISTORY OF MY LIFE. THINKING HOW I WAS HONOURED TO BE WITH THAT FIRM, THESE LITTLE ITEMS THAT WERE GIVEN TO ME JUST EVEN MEANT ALL THE MORE.” “BUT I REMEMBER DISTINCTLY THAT THEY SAID I COULDN’T LEAVE [IN 1964] UNTIL I HIRED SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME. THEY GAVE ME THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FINDING SOMEONE. MY INTENTION AT THAT TIME WAS TO LEAVE AND MOVE TO MONTREAL. I WAS LIMITED IN THE TIME THAT THIS RESPONSIBILITY WAS GIVEN, AND I DID SUGGEST A PARTICULAR PERSON BUT SHE ONLY WORKED THERE FOR A SHORT TIME AND THEY DIDN’T FEEL THAT SHE QUALIFIED AND COULD HANDLE THE WORK THAT I HAD TAKEN ON. THEN I HAD TO CONTINUE TO STAY UNTIL THEY FELT COMFORTABLE THAT THERE WAS SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME AND IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1965 [THAT I LEFT].” “EACH ONE OF THE LAWYERS HAD THEIR OWN PRIVATE SECRETARIES. ONE WOMAN IN PARTICULAR…MARY, WAS EXCELLENT IN TAKING LETTERS AND WAS AN EXCELLENT LAW SECRETARY, BUT COULD NOT DO THE BOOKKEEPING. I UNDERTOOK TO DO THE BOOKKEEPING FOR THE SECRETARIES AND THEREFORE, THERE HAD TO BE, AT LEAST FOUR EXTRA GIRLS AS SECRETARIES THERE. AS THEY INCREASED WITH STAFF, THEY WOULD ALSO HIRE MORE SECRETARIES.” ON MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, BERLANDO STATED, “I ADMIRED HIM BECAUSE HE DEMANDED RESPECT, HE DEMANDED PROFESSIONALISM. HE WAS VERY SERIOUS ABOUT HIS CLIENTS AND THEY HAD TO BE TREATED LIKE IT WAS AN HONOUR TO HAVE HIM AS THEIR LAWYER. HE WAS NOT A TALL MAN IN STATURE BUT HE STOOD OUT AS A SPECIAL PERSON…BUT HIS CLIENTS CAME FIRST. HE WOULD NEVER HESITATE TO MAKE SURE THAT IF HE HAD A CLIENT OR HAD AN APPOINTMENT THAT I HAD TO MAKE SURE THEY WERE TAKEN CARE OF. HE USED TO INVEST THROUGH THE ROYAL BANK AND HE WOULD HAVE ME GO DOWN AND MEET WITH THE MANAGER. [I WOULD] LET THEM KNOW THAT I WAS THERE ON BEHALF OF MR. VIRTUE AND PRESENT THEM WITH WHATEVER INFORMATION HE GAVE ME…THEY WERE TO TAKE CARE OF THAT. SO HE REALLY MADE ME HIS PERSONAL PERSON TO LOOK AFTER ALL OF HIS PRIVATE AFFAIRS, WHICH TO ME WAS AN HONOUR…EVEN THE LAWYERS HAD SO MUCH RESPECT FOR HIM. WHEN HE MADE A STATEMENT OR A COMMAND OR MADE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHANGES, THEY WERE MADE AND THEY HAD TO BE ABIDED.” BERLANDO SPOKE ABOUT HER SENTIMENTS ON DONATING THE CRUCIFIX TO THE MUSEUM, NOTING, “AT THE AGE OF NINETY-ONE, WHICH I HAVE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE THIS LENGTH OF TIME, I HAVE TO TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION MANY ITEMS THAT I FEEL SHOULD BE INHERITED BY MY FAMILY…BUT NOT KNOWING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS GIFT…[I WISH TO] LEAVE IT TO NO ONE OTHER THAN I FEEL THAT DESERVES TO HAVE IT, [WHICH] WOULD BE THE GALT MUSEUM. I DO WISH TO LEAVE IT TO SOMEONE THAT I THINK MAYBE COULD CARRY ON A LITTLE IMPORTANCE OF THE GIFT THAT WAS HANDED TO ME.” “I THINK THAT IT PUTS SUCH A TRUST IN ME, THAT I FEEL NOW, EVEN IN THE YEARS GONE BY, HOW I’VE ALWAYS WANTED SOMEONE, OR ANYONE THAT HAD ANY CONNECTIONS WITH ME, THAT THEY COULD TRUST ME. THAT I WOULD NEVER WANT TO HURT ANYONE AND I WOULD WANT TO CONTINUE TO HELP PEOPLE. WHEN I HEAR PEOPLE IN DISCUSSION OR IN COMMENTS THAT THEY CAN RECALL THINGS THAT I HAVE DONE FOR THEM THAT I CAN’T REMEMBER…I GUESS IT’S JUST MY NATURE TO BE THAT TYPE OF PERSON. [BUT] IF SOMEONE LIKE MR. VIRTUE COULD TRUST ME, AND THEN CLIENTS CAN TRUST ME, I THINK IT INSTILLED [A] TRUST THAT I’LL CARRY TO MY GRAVE.” ABNER GLADSTONE VIRTUE GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA IN 1913 AND BEGAN HIS CAREER IN LAW SHORTLY BEFORE THE START OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1915, VIRTUE ENLISTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE MILITIA UNIT, THE 25TH FIELD ARTILLERY. UPON ITS FORMATION, VIRTUE ENLISTED AS A LIEUTENANT WITH THE LETHBRIDGE 61ST BATTERY THAT JOINED FRONT LINES IN FRANCE IN 1917. VIRTUE RESUMED HIS LAW PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE FOLLOWING HIS RETUN FROM THE WAR, AND BECAME A SENIOR PARTNER IN THE FIRM OF VIRTUE, RUSSELL, MORGAN AND VIRTUE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES ON THE BELL AND VIRTUE’S INVOLVEMENT FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170034001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170034001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
REMEMBRANCE DAY FLAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19980048056
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
REMEMBRANCE DAY FLAG
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
28.8
Length
6.1
Width
18.2
Description
THE FLAG IS ATTACHED TO A BLACK PLASTIC MAST, AND STAND. THE FLAG ITSELF IS PREDOMINANTLY WHITE, WITH TWO RED POPPIES WITH A GOLD MAPLE LEAF IN THE BACKGROUND. THE WORDS WRITTEN ON THE FLAG ARE, "CANADA REMEMBERS LE CANADA SE SOUVIENT 1939 - 1945". THE TOP OF THE FLAG HAS A GOLD SPEAR HEAD.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
FROM REMEMBRANCE DAY CEREMONIES.
Catalogue Number
P19980048056
Acquisition Date
2002-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
NAZI SWASTIKA, BATTLE FLAG
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, COTTON, ROPE
Catalogue Number
P19910064006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
NAZI SWASTIKA, BATTLE FLAG
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
1945
Materials
WOOL, COTTON, ROPE
No. Pieces
1
Length
251.5
Width
141.0
Description
HEAVY COTTON FLAG. RED FLAG HAS WHITE DISC IN CENTRE OUTLINED IN WHITE AND BLACK. CANTED SWASTIKA OUTLINED IN WHITE AND BLACK ON DISC. UPPER CORNER OF FLAG HAS BLACK IRON CROSS; ARMS OF A BLACK CROSS EXTEND TO EACH SIDE OF FLAG. RED COTTON PATCHES ON BODY NEAR CORNERS OF BUNTING. SINGLE SIDED, CLEAN. CLEAN BUNTING WITH ROPE LOOPED AT TOP END; ROPE EXTENDS FROM FLAG AT OTHER. 6 ROWS OF STITCHING, OPPOSITE END RUNNING ACROSS WIDTH AND PARALLEL TO END SEAM. SOME SOILING, STAINS, AND SMALL HOLES. SEE CONSERVATION REPORT.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
FLAG WAS OFFICIAL NATIONAL FLAG DURING THE NAZI ERA OF GERMAN HISTORY FROM 1933 TO 1945. THIS FLAG WAS ACQUIRED AS A WAR SOUVENIR BY COLIN CAMPBELL & PASSED ON TO DONOR AFTER CAMPBELL'S DEATH. CAMPBELL WAS A MILITARY COLLECTOR. THIS SINGLE PIECE FLAG IS THE NATIONAL WAR FLAG OR "REICHSKREIGSFLAGGE". THE SWASTIKA SYMBOL IS VERY ANCIENT & WAS HISTORICALLY REPRESENTED OPPOSITE, OR FLIPPED OVER FROM THE NOW RECOGNIZED NAZI SWASTIKA. THE SWASTIKA HAS FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS REPRESENTED GOOD LUCK, THE TERM SWASTIKA IS DERIVED FROM SANDSCRIT & MEANS "WELL BEING" OR "GOOD BEING". APPRAISAL IS BASED ON A SIMILAR BUT SMALLER FLAG WHICH SOLD IN BIRMININGHAM ALABAMA, IN 1992 FOR $180 IN U.S. FUNDS. CANADIAN APPRAISAL TAKES INTO ACCOUNT SIZE, CONDITION & CURRENCY DIFFERENCES. INFORMATION PROVIDED BY LOCAL COLLECTOR 5/5/93. WILLIAM HERBERT SCORESBY SKELTON WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE ON 6 APRIL 1920. HIS PARENTS WERE MARION SCORESBY SKELTON AND HERBERT SCORESBY SKELTON. EDUCATED LOCALLY, MR. SKELTON WORKED AT THE DOMINION EXPERIMENTAL FARM (NOW THE LETHBRIDGE RESEARCH CENTRE) FOR SEVERAL YEARS. HE BEGAN HIS CAREER AS A REPORTER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1943. AFTER FIVE YEARS AT THE NEWSPAPER, HE BECAME NEWS DIRECTOR AT RADIO STATION CJOC ON 15 FEBRUARY 1948. DURING HIS FIRST TWO YEARS AT THE RADIO STATION, MR. SKELTON WAS THE ONLY EMPLOYEE IN THE NEWS DEPARTMENT. MR. SKELTON ORGANIZED THE FIRST FULL-TIME NEWS DEPARTMENT AT THE RADIO STATION AND WAS NEWS DIRECTOR FOR THE JOINT RADIO – TELEVISION OPERATIONS OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SOUTHERN ALBERTA. BY THE TIME OF HIS RETIREMENT IN APRIL 1978, CJOC HAD EIGHT EMPLOYEES IN THE NEWS DEPARTMENT. WILLIAM SKELTON MARRIED MARY THERESA FRANCIS IN SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH, LETHBRIDGE ON 3 AUGUST 1957. THE COUPLE DID NOT HAVE CHILDREN. DURING HIS LIFE MR. SKELTON WAS VERY ACTIVE AS A VOLUNTEER WITH MANY COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS: THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA BOY SCOUT COUNCIL, WINSTON CHURCHILL HIGH SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION, LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, YWCA BUILDING FUND DRIVE, 1975 CANADA WINTER GAMES PROTOCOL COMMITTEE, LETHBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 1981 ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES, PUBLIC RELATIONS ADVISOR FOR THE SIR ALEXANDER GALT MUSEUM, A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE JAYCEES, SOUTHERN ALBERTA COUNCIL ON PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND THE LETHBRIDGE & DISTRICT UNITED WAY, AMONG OTHERS. HE ALSO VOLUNTEERED HIS SERVICES WITH LETHBRIDGE OVERTURE CONCERTS, THE ALBERTA MOTOR ASSOCIATION, LETHBRIDGE AND DISTRICT JAPANESE GARDEN SOCIETY AND THE LOCAL BRANCH OF THE COMMITTEE FOR AN INDEPENDENT CANADA. WILLIAM SKELTON DIED ON 13 JULY 1998, AGE 78, AND IS BURIED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY IN LETHBRIDGE. MARY THERESA SKELTON (NEE FRANCIS) WAS THE DAUGHTER OF DR. AND MRS. JAMES R. FRANCIS AND THE GRANDDAUGHTER OF REVEREND JAMES ROBERTSON D.D., A FORMER MODERATOR OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. A TEACHER AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE FROM 1945 UNTIL HER RETIREMENT, MARY SKELTON WAS ALSO ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY. MRS. SKELTON WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN; THE SENIOR HIGH NOVELS, NON-FICTION AND DRAMA AD HOC CURRICULUM COMMITTEE OF ALBERTA EDUCATION; THE LETHBRIDGE SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION; AND A DRIVER FOR LETHBRIDGE MEALS ON WHEELS. MRS. SKELTON WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF THE SIR ALEXANDER GALT MUSEUM DURING THE TIME OF THE MUSEUM’S FIRST RENOVATION AND EXPANSION IN 1983-1985. MARY SKELTON DIED ON 23 AUGUST 2000, AGE 80, AND IS BURIED BESIDE HER HUSBAND IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY. [SOURCES: THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, VARIOUS ISSUES; WHO’S WHO IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA 1988-1989 (HISTORICAL RESEARCH CENTRE, 1989) PAGES 739-740] *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF THIS ARTIFACT'S ORIGINAL COLLECTOR, COLIN CAMPBELL, FROM INFORMATION IN THE GALT ARCHIVES AND HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY. COLIN CAMPBELL WAS BORN ON DECEMBER 20, 1903 IN SCOTLAND, AND CAME TO CANADA IN 1911, SETLLING IN EDMONTON. HE WAS COMMISSIONED A 2ND LIEUTENANT IN THE EDMONTON FUSILIERS IN 1936, AND SERVED OVERSEAS DURING WORLD WAR II WITH THE SASKATOON LIGHT INFANTRY. IN THE EARLY 1950S CAMPBELL MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE HE WORKED AS AN ACCOUNTANT FOR STERN'S FURNITURE. CAMPBELL WAS A MEMBER OF THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION NO. 4, WHICH HE MANAGED. HE WAS THE NEIGHBOUR OF THE DONORS, BILL AND MARY SKELTON. COLIN CAMPBELL DIED IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 2, 1979. SEE PERMANENT FILE P19910064001 FOR HARDCOPY OF CAMPBELL'S OBITUARY.
Catalogue Number
P19910064006
Acquisition Date
1991-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL
Catalogue Number
P19780036000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1945
Materials
STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
54.6
Width
20.3
Description
MAPLE LEAF DESIGN. EMBOSSED IN RED LETTERS IS "HE SERVED HIS COUNTRY".
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
USED TO MARK SERVICE GRAVE (UNKNOWN WHICH ONE) BY ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION (GENERAL STEWART BRANCH). FOUND IN LEGION BUILDING BEFORE DEMOLITION. BUILDING WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT BY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. USED FOR IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT. IT WAS CALLED THE DOMINION PUBLIC BLDG.
Catalogue Number
P19780036000
Acquisition Date
1978-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190007006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
91
Width
28
Description
BLUE PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF BURGUNDY TIE STRAPS AT HOIST END; PENNANT HAS BURGUNDY BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNANT HAS WHITE, GREEN, AND RED CREST PAINTED ON WITH WHITE SHIELD AND BANNER, RED AND WHITE CROWN AT TOP, GREEN MAPLE LEAF AND THISTLES IN CENTER, AND TEXT AROUND SHIELD, “113 OVERSEAS BATTALION, CANADA, LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS”. PENNANT HAS WHITE TEXT PAINTED ON FRONT, “113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS”. PENNANT HAS DISCOLORATION ON TEXT FROM LIGHT DAMAGE, AND IS FADED ON FRONT; BACK HAS MINOR SOILING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE ONES [I FIND IMPORTANT], AFTER MY BREAK- IN, THERE WERE SOME OTHER THINGS THAT WERE TOTALLY IRREPLACEABLE TO ME…SOME OF THE THINGS TOO THAT I CHOSE, THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL FOR ME TO HAVE AND THEY’RE AWESOME TO SIT IN MY BASEMENT AND I CAN GO LOOK AT THEM ANY TIME I WANT, BUT NO ONE ELSE GETS TO SEE THEM. THERE’S A BROADER STORY TO BE TOLD IN A MORE, COMMUNITY APPRECIATION, I THINK, THAN JUST SITTING IN MY BASEMENT, IN MY MAN CAVE, LOOKING AT IT.” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, “WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN”. BRETT WOULD SAY, “I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN”. I’M LIKE, “WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.” BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, “WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW”. WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY SO IT’S NO BIG DEAL, WE’LL DO ANYTHING WE CAN AFFORD TO GET THE STUFF.’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT. HE WORRIED ABOUT [IT] LATER, “WELL, GEE, SHOULD I HAVE BOUGHT IT OR NOT? YEAH, OF COURSE I SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT IT.” IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE BUT HIS CREDIT CARD COMPANY AND HIM. IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT AND ASKED QUESTIONS LATER. [HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’S DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’S RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN BRETT [CLIFTON] DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE. THE SECOND REASON IS THAT BRETT HAD AN UNFORTUNATE BREAK-IN AT HIS HOUSE LAST FATHER’S DAY, AND MANY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS OF THINGS WERE TAKEN, BUT VERY LUCKILY, NONE OF THE LOCAL HISTORY ITEMS OR THE MILITARY ITEMS WERE TOUCHED. THEY WERE FAR MORE VALUABLE THAN THE THINGS THAT WERE TAKEN, BUT WERE NOT TOUCHED, AND WE BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT WE’RE ONE BREAK-IN AWAY FROM LOSING A LOT OF HISTORY.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007006
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190007007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
94.7
Width
27
Description
BURGUNDY PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF WHITE AND BURGUNDY TIE STRAPS AT END; PENNANT HAS WHITE BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNAT HAS WHITE TEXT SEWN ONTO FRONT, “43RD BATTALION”. BACK OF PENNANT SHOWS WHITE STITCHING FOR LETTERS AND BAND SEWN AT HOIST. PENNANT IS FADED ON FRONT AND HAS SEVERE LIGHT DAMAGE AT END TIP; LETTERS ON FRONT ARE DISCOLOURED FROM LIGHT DAMAGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE ONES [I FIND IMPORTANT], AFTER MY BREAK- IN, THERE WERE SOME OTHER THINGS THAT WERE TOTALLY IRREPLACEABLE TO ME…SOME OF THE THINGS TOO THAT I CHOSE, THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL FOR ME TO HAVE AND THEY’RE AWESOME TO SIT IN MY BASEMENT AND I CAN GO LOOK AT THEM ANY TIME I WANT, BUT NO ONE ELSE GETS TO SEE THEM. THERE’S A BROADER STORY TO BE TOLD IN A MORE, COMMUNITY APPRECIATION, I THINK, THAN JUST SITTING IN MY BASEMENT, IN MY MAN CAVE, LOOKING AT IT.” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, “WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN”. BRETT WOULD SAY, “I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN”. I’M LIKE, “WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.” BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, “WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW”. WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY SO IT’S NO BIG DEAL, WE’LL DO ANYTHING WE CAN AFFORD TO GET THE STUFF.’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT. HE WORRIED ABOUT [IT] LATER, “WELL, GEE, SHOULD I HAVE BOUGHT IT OR NOT? YEAH, OF COURSE I SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT IT.” IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE BUT HIS CREDIT CARD COMPANY AND HIM. IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT AND ASKED QUESTIONS LATER. [HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’S DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’S RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN BRETT [CLIFTON] DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE. THE SECOND REASON IS THAT BRETT HAD AN UNFORTUNATE BREAK-IN AT HIS HOUSE LAST FATHER’S DAY, AND MANY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS OF THINGS WERE TAKEN, BUT VERY LUCKILY, NONE OF THE LOCAL HISTORY ITEMS OR THE MILITARY ITEMS WERE TOUCHED. THEY WERE FAR MORE VALUABLE THAN THE THINGS THAT WERE TAKEN, BUT WERE NOT TOUCHED, AND WE BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT WE’RE ONE BREAK-IN AWAY FROM LOSING A LOT OF HISTORY.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007007
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190007008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
11
Length
98
Width
27
Description
ARMY GREEN PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF ORANGE TIE STRAPS SEWN ONTO END; PENNANT HAS ORANGE BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNANT HAS ORANGE TEXT SEWN ONTO FRONT, “43RD BATTALION”. BACK OF PENNANT SHOWS ORANGE STITCHING FROM BAND AT HOIST END AND LETTERS. PENNANT FRONT IS FADED AND HAS LIGHT DAMAGE BELOW TEXT; END TIP IS CREASED WITH LOSS IN CENTER; BACK HAS FADING AND LIGHT DAMAGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE ONES [I FIND IMPORTANT], AFTER MY BREAK- IN, THERE WERE SOME OTHER THINGS THAT WERE TOTALLY IRREPLACEABLE TO ME…SOME OF THE THINGS TOO THAT I CHOSE, THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL FOR ME TO HAVE AND THEY’RE AWESOME TO SIT IN MY BASEMENT AND I CAN GO LOOK AT THEM ANY TIME I WANT, BUT NO ONE ELSE GETS TO SEE THEM. THERE’S A BROADER STORY TO BE TOLD IN A MORE, COMMUNITY APPRECIATION, I THINK, THAN JUST SITTING IN MY BASEMENT, IN MY MAN CAVE, LOOKING AT IT.” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, “WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN”. BRETT WOULD SAY, “I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN”. I’M LIKE, “WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.” BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, “WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW”. WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY SO IT’S NO BIG DEAL, WE’LL DO ANYTHING WE CAN AFFORD TO GET THE STUFF.’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT. HE WORRIED ABOUT [IT] LATER, “WELL, GEE, SHOULD I HAVE BOUGHT IT OR NOT? YEAH, OF COURSE I SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT IT.” IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE BUT HIS CREDIT CARD COMPANY AND HIM. IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT AND ASKED QUESTIONS LATER. [HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’S DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’S RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN BRETT [CLIFTON] DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE. THE SECOND REASON IS THAT BRETT HAD AN UNFORTUNATE BREAK-IN AT HIS HOUSE LAST FATHER’S DAY, AND MANY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS OF THINGS WERE TAKEN, BUT VERY LUCKILY, NONE OF THE LOCAL HISTORY ITEMS OR THE MILITARY ITEMS WERE TOUCHED. THEY WERE FAR MORE VALUABLE THAN THE THINGS THAT WERE TAKEN, BUT WERE NOT TOUCHED, AND WE BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT WE’RE ONE BREAK-IN AWAY FROM LOSING A LOT OF HISTORY.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007008
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON"
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160017002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON"
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
67.6
Width
18.7
Description
GREEN FELT PENNANT WITH TWO WHITE FELT TIES SECURED IN LOWER LEFT CORNER WITH METAL STAPLE; PENNANT HAS METAL STAPLE IN UPPER LEFT CORNER. PENNANT FRONT HAS WHITE AND BLUE PAINTED IMAGE OF A MILITARY MEDICAL SHIP BESIDE YELLOW AND ORANGE TEXT “H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON” AND YELLOW AND ORANGE ANCHOR. FRONT IS FADED FROM LIGHT EXPOSURE WITH MINOR SOILING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017002
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
U-BOAT PLAQUE
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20080033017
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
U-BOAT PLAQUE
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.2
Length
13.7
Width
7.9
Description
WOODEN DESK PLAQUE WITH OVERSIZED METAL U-BOAT BADGE TACKED ONTO FRONT WITH TWO NAILS. METAL BADGE DEPICTS EAGLE CLUTCHING CANTED SWASTIKA ABOVE GERMAN U-BOAT, BORDERED BY WREATH. METAL IN UPPER LEFT CRACKED.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
HANDMADE BY P.O.W. IN CAMP 133 DURING WORLD WAR II. METAL EMBLEM BASED ON U-BOAT BADGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE P20080033001 AND PERMANENT RECORD. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE.
Catalogue Number
P20080033017
Acquisition Date
2008-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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