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Other Name
HANGING, CHINESE AND ENGLISH TEXT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, INK
Catalogue Number
P20110031014
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HANGING, CHINESE AND ENGLISH TEXT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
NYLON, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
105
Length
156
Description
RECTANGULAR PIECE OF RED NYLON. VERTICAL EDGES ARE FACTORY FINISHED; HORIZONTAL EDGES ARE CUT AND FRAYING. FABRIC IS SIGNED WITH NAMES IN BLACK PERMANENT MARKER IN CHINESE CHARACTERS AND ENGLISH TEXT. FABRIC IS CREASED. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT COMES FROM INTERVIEWS HELD WITH MAY LEE AND JUDY CHAN, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND JANICE WONG. PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE FOUND BELOW THE ARTIFACT DETAILS AND BELOW THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY BUILDING. RICHARD THINKS THAT THIS BANNER WAS IN THE PEKING RESTAURANT AND THAT MEMBERS PROBABLY SIGNED IT, “OR THE GUESTS. I THINK THIS HAPPENED AT THE PEKING, I THINK. PEKING RESTAURANT.” A SERIES OF ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD GIVE BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY AND ITS BUILDING: THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY WAS BUILT IN 1909-1910 IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 2 AVENUE SOUTH AND IT WAS ORIGINALLY A RESTAURANT. BY 1915 IT HAD BECOME THE HEADQUARTERS FOR THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH OF THE KAO MIN TANG (ALTERNATIVE SPELLINGS INCLUDE KUOMINTANG, KUO MIN TANG, GUOMINDANG, AND GUO MIN DANG). THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNATED AS A PROVINCIAL HERITAGE RESOURCE IN 1995 BECAUSE OF ITS VALUE AS A SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CHINESE COMMUNITY. THE BUILDING WAS USED IN A VARIETY OF WAYS BY THE SOCIETY AND INCLUDED, AT VARIOUS TIMES, A RESTAURANT, A SCHOOL, AND LIVING ACCOMODATIONS. IN FEBRUARY 2011 A SECTION OF THE BRICK FAÇADE FELL OFF THE BUILDING AND CITY INSPECTORS DETERMINED THAT THE TIMBER AND RED BRICK STRUCTURE WAS POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE. THE BUILDING WAS TORN DOWN A SHORT TIME LATER. LETHBRIDGE'S CHINATOWN EMERGED IN 1901, A RESULT OF THE CHINESE POPULATION BEING RELEGATED TO A SECTION OF THE CITY BETWEEN GALT GARDENS AND THE COULEES. IN A JANUARY 7, 2002 ARTICLE ALBERT LEONG EXPLAINS THAT NO ONE REALLY WANTED CHINESE PEOPLE AROUND AND THAT “’ THEY WERE TOLD THAT THE ONLY PLACE THEY COULD START BUSINESSES WAS BETWEEN THE COULEES AT THE PARK, BECAUSE THE CITY DIDN’T WANT ANY COMPETITION FOR THE WHITE BUSINESSMEN … BUT ‘GHETTO-IZED’ OR NOT, THE CHINESE WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE FORMED AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE BACKBONE OF THIS CITY, [AND MADE] NOTEWORTHY [CONTRIBUTIONS] TO THE HISTORY OF THIS PLACE.’” BUSINESSES SUCH AS LAUNDRIES, MARKET GARDENS, AND RESTAURANTS WERE OPENED IN CHINATOWN, WITH THE RESIDENTS LIVING IN ROOMS ABOVE THE BUSINESSES. IN 1912 THERE WERE ABOUT 100 PEOPLE LIVING IN CHINATOWN AND BY THE 1930S, IT WAS A BUSTLING COMMUNITY. THE POPULATION OF CHINATOWN DWINDLED FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. JANICE WONG, PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY IN 2015, GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE SOCIETY IN AN INTERVIEW: AS OF 2015, THE SOCIETY EXISTS MORE AS A SOCIAL CLUB AND THE SOCIETY HOLDS THREE CELEBRATORY DINNERS EACH YEAR, USUALLY HELD AT THE NEW DYNASTY RESTAURANT. THE SOCIETY ALSO VISITS THE CEMETERY ON A YEARLY BASIS “TO HONOUR THE ANCESTORS, CLEAN THE TOMBS, BRING FOOD, DO THE USUAL THINGS THAT WE USED TO DO – EAT ON GRAVES, BURN THE INCENSE. WE DO THAT EVERY YEAR STILL TO HONOUR OUR ANCESTORS. IT IS USUALLY IN THE SPRING … IN APRIL.” JANICE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY, INDICATING THAT THERE IS SOME TALK ABOUT RE-BUILDING “BUT THAT INVOLVES A LOT OF PLANNING, AND MONEY, AND FUNDRAISING” AND SHE QUESTIONS WHETHER OR NOT THERE IS ENOUGH OF A MEMBERSHIP BASE TO GO FORWARD WITH RE-BUILDING. SHE ALSO EXPLAINED THAT PREVIOUS CHINESE IMMIGRANTS HAD TENDED TO COME FROM THE SAME GEOGRAPHIC REGION, BUT THAT PRESENTLY IMMIGRANTS ARE COMING FROM ALL OVER CHINA: “THERE’S A LOT OF INFLUX OF PEOPLE FROM CHINA THAT AREN’T FROM THE SAME AREA, BECAUSE TRADITIONALLY, THE PEOPLE WERE ALL FROM THE SAME AREA AND SPOKE THE SAME DIALECT AND HAD THAT SORT OF THING KEEPING THEM TOGETHER AS A COMMUNITY OVERSEAS FROM CHINA.” PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE BELOW: MAY LEE: MAY WAS ACTUALLY BORN IN CANADA AND IS KNOWN AS A GOLD MOUNTAIN GIRL, BECAUSE SHE IS A CANADIAN-BORN CHINESE WOMAN. MAY EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN IN CANADA. I WAS BORN IN NANOOSE BAY. WHEN I WAS 4 YEARS OLD, WE MOVED TO VICTORIA. WHEN I WAS 9 YEARS OLD AND THE WHOLE FAMILY, IN 1930, GO BACK TO CHINA.” DURING THE WAR, THE JAPANESE BOMBED THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN TOCSIN CITY AND MAY’S MOTHER DECIDED TO SEND MAY AND HER BROTHER TO HONG KONG TO START THE PROCESS OF COMING TO CANADA. MAY STARTED ENGLISH SCHOOL IN HONG KONG, BUT OFTEN MISSED CLASSES BECAUSE SHE WAS SICK FROM THE HEAT. SHE SAYS THAT SHE’S LEARNED MOST OF HER ENGLISH FROM HER HUSBAND, HER CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND EVEN GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN. SHE WAS MARRIED TO HOM MEN LEE, AKA JIMMY LEE, ON NOVEMBER 16, 1938 IN VICTORIA, BC. JIMMY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE AT THE GALT HOSPITAL, BUT WAS SENT BACK TO CHINA AS A CHILD FOR HIS EDUCATION. JIMMY’S FAMILY HAD COME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1914 AND OWNED LEE-DUC CLEANERS. THE LEE FAMILY LIVED ABOVE THE SHOP, WHICH WAS ON 13TH STREET NORTH, NEAR HIGA’S JEWELERS. MAY’S MAIN MEMORY OF CHINATOWN: “ALL I REMEMBER IN CHINATOWN, IN SUMMERTIME, LOTS OF OLD GUYS SITTING IN FRONT OF GUOMINDANG. AUNTIE HELEN GREW UP IN CHINATOWN. I THINK SHE KNOWS MORE ABOUT CHINATOWN. IN THE OLDEN DAYS, I HARDLY GO OUT, JUST TO BUY GROCERIES.” JUDY ADDED THAT MAY HAD 8 CHILDREN AND WAS KEPT BUSY AT HOME RAISING THEM. RICHARD LOO: RICHARD ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953, HAVING LEFT THE MAINLAND OF CHINA IN 1949. RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD MOVED TO CANADA IN EITHER LATE 1800S OR THE EARLY 1900S AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE HEAD TAX. HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED AS A COOK IN RESTAURANTS, EITHER IN LETHBRIDGE OR IN TABER (ACCORDING TO RICHARD, HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED THROUGH THE WAR YEARS IN TABER). RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD PLANNED ON MOVING BACK TO CHINA WHEN HE RETIRED, BUT THEN THE COMMUNISTS TOOK OVER, AND HE ELECTED TO STAY. AT THAT TIME, HE INVITED RICHARD TO MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL. RICHARD LEFT HONG KONG, AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 8 MONTHS, ON A FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 2PM LOCAL TIME. HE FINALLY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE SUNDAY AFTERNOON. HE WAS LUCKY IN THAT HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS FLIGHTS ON SALE. NORMALLY A TICKET FROM HONG KONG TO VANCOUVER WOULD HAVE COST $700, BUT RICHARD WAS ABLE TO SECURE A FLIGHT FOR ONLY $500. HE ALSO INDICATED THAT HIS FLIGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WAS ONLY $39.95. ON RECALLING HIS FIRST TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, RICHARD RECOUNTED THE FOLLOWING STORY: “SO, BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE AIRPORT, I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO SAY NOTHING. DIDN’T KNOW – MAYBE COULD SAY ‘GOOD MORNING’ – THAT’S ALL YOU COULD SAY, JUST ANYWAYS HOW TO SAY ‘HELLO’ – SO, ANYWAY, SO IN THE MEANTIME, THE FELLOW AT THE AIRPORT MUST HAVE KNOWN ZEKE, YOU KNOW ZEKE QUAN [OWNER OF] THE LOTUS INN [RESTAURANT], AND HE PHONED HIM UP. HE SAYS, ‘ZEKE.’ I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT – NOTHING. AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘HEY, THIS IS A CHINA BOY HERE. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH HIM?’ SO, ZEKE SAYS, ‘OH, JUST TAKE HIM TO CHINATOWN AND DUMP HIM.’ NOW, I DIDN’T KNOW THOSE, NOT UNTIL LATER ON. ZEKE’S SON GO TO SAME SCHOOL I DID – CENTRAL SCHOOL.” RICHARD INITIALLY LIVED IN THE SOCIETY BUILDING FOR SEVERAL YEARS, OCCUPYING A ROOM THAT HAD BEEN RECENTLY VACATED BY ANOTHER MAN NAMED LOO WHO HAD GONE TO WORK IN PICTURE BUTTE. RICHARD RECALLED THAT THE SOCIETY WAS A GOOD PLACE TO FEEL A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND THAT IT WAS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS, A PLACE WHERE THEY WEREN’T DISCRIMINATED AGAINST. HONG WONG: HONG ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AND WAS INVITED TO THE CITY BY HIS UNCLE SHUEY WONG, WHO WAS ALREADY LIVING HERE. UNCLE SHUEY HAD COME TO CANADA SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE $500 HEAD TAX. HONG TRAVELED WITH HIS BROTHER FROM MAINLAND CHINA TO HONG KONG, IN ORDER TO GO TO THE CANADIAN EMBASSY. ON HIS FERRY RIDE TO HONG KONG, HE WAS SHOT BY BANDITS AND WAS REQUIRED TO STAY IN THE HOSPITAL FOR QUITE SOME TIME TO RECOVER. HIS BROTHER ELECTED TO REMAIN IN HONG KONG, AS HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW LIVED IN THE CITY AND GOT HONG’S BROTHER WORK IN A THEATRE. TO GET TO CANADA, HONG FLEW FROM JAPAN TO GUAM, TO VANCOUVER, AND THEN FINALLY TO LETHBRIDGE. HIS FIRST IMPRESSION OF LETHBRIDGE: COLD. HONG SAID: “’WELL, IN HONG KONG IT WAS AROUND MAYBE 20 SOME 30 ABOVE. AND HERE, AT THAT TIME, MAYBE 20 BELOW, OR 20 SOME BELOW. I DIDN’T HAVE THE EAR MUFFS. I SAID, ‘GEE, I’M NOT SO HAPPY HERE, IT SEEMS SO COLD.’” UNCLE SHUEY TOLD HONG THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE COLDEST WINTERS HE COULD REMEMBER. HONG WORKED FOR HIS UNCLE IN HIS SHOP ON 9TH AVENUE, DOING CHORES AROUND THE STORE, UNTIL HIS ENGLISH HAD IMPROVED ENOUGH SO THAT HE COULD SERVE CUSTOMERS. HE JOINED THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE SOCIETY ALMOST AS SOON AS HE ARRIVED: “WHEN I CAME HERE, I JOINED IN THE SAME YEAR BECAUSE MY UNCLE WAS A MEMBER. SO THAT’S WHY HE GOT ME IN TO BE A MEMBER. OH, AT THAT TIME, I BET, 95% OF THE CHINESE PEOPLE THEY BELONG TO THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, I BELIEVE.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT YOU COULDN’T BE A MEMBER OF BOTH THE SOCIETY AND THE MASONS, AND HE BELIEVES ABOUT 5% OF THE CITY’S CHINESE POPULATION WOULD HAVE BELONGED TO THE MASONS. HE ADDED: “BUT WE ARE STILL FRIENDS, STILL FRIENDS. WE’RE NOT ENEMY OR ANYTHING BUT, IT’S JUST THAT THE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DIFFERENT. THAT’S ALL.” HONG ENJOYED THE CAMARADERIE OF THE SOCIETY. HE SAID: “I REMEMBER, I LIKE IT BECAUSE THEY HAVE THE PARTY AND SO MANY PEOPLE. AND THEN YOU MEET ALL THE CHINESE PEOPLE THERE IN THE ONE GROUP. WELL, ANYWAY, WHEN YOU SEE SO MANY PEOPLE IN ONE PARTY, AND THEN WHEN THEY COME OUT MOSTLY THE PEOPLE THAT PARTY AND IT FEELS LIKE A LOTS OF FRIENDS OR EVEN LIKE THE FAMILY. SO YOU FEEL GOOD, YOU FEEL BETTER, AND THEN, WELL, MY UNCLE BELONGS THERE TOO AND THEN THE OTHERS BELONG THERE TOO, YEAH, EVERYBODY LIKE IN THE BIG FAMILY. YES, NICE, OTHERWISE YOU DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS, YOU DON’T MEET ANYBODY, IF YOU NOT BELONG THERE, I THINK NOT SO FRIENDLY TO YOU.” HONG INDICATED THAT WHEN A SPECIAL MEAL WAS HELD AT THE SOCIETY, IT WAS THE MEN WHO DID THE COOKING: “AT THAT TIME JUST ABOUT EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW TO COOK BECAUSE MOSTLY WE WORK IN THE KITCHEN WHEN THEY CAME HERE.” HE SAID THAT DINERS WOULD PAY A SMALL FEE TO EAT AT THE LEAGUE WHEN SPECIAL MEALS WERE PUT ON. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND FOR INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20110031014
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MINIATURE, “BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER”
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1910
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20140012002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MINIATURE, “BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER”
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1910
Materials
PAPER, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Length
6.25
Width
4
Description
MINIATURE BOOK BOUND IN GREEN LEATHER. TEXT AND DIAMOND SHAPE EMBOSSED IN GOLD ON COVER AND SPINE READS “COMMON PRAYER”. INNER FRONT PAGE HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT READING “ETTA HENDERSON, APRIL 7/” WITH THE YEAR WORN AWAY. TITLE PAGE READS “THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE SACRAMENTS AND OTHER RITES AND CEREMONIES OF THE CHURCH ACCORDING TO THE USE OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND TOGETHER WITH THE PSALTER OR PSALMS OF DAVID POINTED AS THEY ARE TO BE SUNG OR SAID IN CHURCHES… OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS WAREHOUSE”. WEAR AND STAINING ON COVER; GENERAL WEAR AND DOG-EARING ON PAGES. GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE HENDERSON FAMILY AND ETTA HENDERSON IVES, THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THIS BOOK, WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE BOOK ‘PIONEER PEMMICAN CLUB ROUND-UP, 1885 – 1985’ BY A.P. BAINES, AND THE GALT ARCHIVES. WILLIAM HENDERSON CAME TO CANADA FROM EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND IN 1879, WHEN HE WAS 22. A CARPENTER BY TRADE, HENDERSON MADE HIS WAY WESTWARD, BUILDING THE FIRST HOUSE IN MEDICINE HAT IN 1881, THE BARRACKS OF THE NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE AND THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY STORE IN FORT MACLEOD, AND SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1885 WHERE HE WORKED FOR THE NORTH WEST COAL & NAVIGATION COMPANY. HE WORKED ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST SCHOOL, THE COMPANY HOSPITAL AND COTTAGES, AND LETHBRIDGE HOUSE (LATER KNOWN AS THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL), WHERE HE REMAINED AS PROPRIETOR. IN 1887 HE MARRIED MARGARET THOMPSON LUNDY, A SCOTTISH WOMAN WHO HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN WIDOWED IN DUNMORE, NWT. THE CEREMONY TOOK PLACE AT THE HOME OF WILLIAM STAFFORD AND WAS PERFORMED BY REVEREND CHARLES MCKILLOP. HENDERSON WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE GROWING COMMUNITY OF LETHBRIDGE – HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE FIRST TOWN COUNCIL, THE MASONS AND ODDFELLOWS, A FOUNDER OF THE PEMMICAN CLUB, AND MEMBER OF KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. IN 1897 HE BUILT A BRICK DUPLEX AT THE CORNER OF 7 AVE AND 5 ST SOUTH AND THOUGH THE STRUCTURE HAS UNDERGONE RENOVATIONS, IT STILL STANDS IN 2014. WILLIAM AND MARGARET HAD SIX CHILDREN – HAROLD, ETTA, EDNA, WILLIAM, ADELINE AND FRED. ALL SIX RECEIVED THEIR EARLY EDUCATION IN LETHBRIDGE, BUT WERE LATER SENT TO BOARDING SCHOOLS – THE BOYS TO UPPER CANADA COLLEGE IN TORONTO, THE GIRLS TO HAVERGAL COLLEGE IN WINNIPEG. IN 1908 HENDERSON SR. WAS ELECTED MAYOR OF LETHBRIDGE, BUT DIED OF PNEUMONIA IN DECEMBER 1909 WHILE STILL IN OFFICE. HIS THREE SONS ALL SERVED IN WORLD WAR I, AND HAROLD WAS KILLED IN ACTION IN 1917. THE REMAINING SONS AND DAUGHTERS WERE ALL MARRIED AND RAISED FAMILIES. ETTA MARRIED LOCAL FARMER ALBERT ELI IVES, AND HAD THREE CHILDREN, MARGARET, KATHARINE, AND THADDEUS. ADELINE MARRIED JACK KANE AND LIVED IN BARONS. EDNA OBTAINED HER NURSING DEGREE AT QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY, MARRIED DR. ATKINSON, AND SETTLED IN MASSACHUSETTS. MARGARET HENDERSON SR. LIVED IN THE FAMILY HOME BUILT BY HER HUSBAND FOR NEARLY 30 YEARS AFTER HIS DEATH, AND WAS ACTIVE IN THE PEMMICAN CLUB AND I.O.D.E. UNTIL HER DEATH IN 1933. GIVEN THAT THIS MINIATURE BOOK IS SIGNED “ETTA HENDERSON” ON THE FIRST PAGE, IT WAS LIKELY USED BY ETTA PRIOR TO HER MARRIAGE, DURING HER CHILDHOOD. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE POPULARITY OF MINIATURE BOOKS WAS EXTRACTED FROM AN ARTICLE ON ABEBOOKS.COM (SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPY): “MINIATURE BOOKS, USUALLY PRAYER BOOKS, APPEARED IN EUROPE DURING THE MIDDLE AGES. THEY WERE TINY IN ORDER TO BE EASILY CARRIED AND ALSO SO THEY COULD BE CONCEALED FROM PRYING EYES… BY THE 19TH CENTURY, BOOKS IN GENERAL HAD BECOME MORE AFFORDABLE AND MINIATURE BOOKS REALLY CAME INTO VOGUE. AS WITH EARLIER ERAS, THEY WERE PRIZED BECAUSE THEY WERE PORTABLE… DURING THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES, BOOKS FROM ALMOST EVERY GENRE WERE AVAILABLE AS MINIATURES, INCLUDING CLASSIC FICTION, DICTIONARIES, BIBLES, PRAYER BOOKS, AND OTHER NON-FICTION WORKS LIKE FISHING GUIDES WHERE THE USER WAS OUT AND ABOUT. PUBLISHERS ALSO BEGAN PRODUCING MINIATURE LIBRARIES FOR CHILDREN, SPECIALLY DESIGNING THE BOOKS TO BE MORE COMFORTABLY HELD IN SMALL HANDS… AS PRINTING AND BINDING TECHNIQUES IMPROVED, BOOK MAKERS DISPLAYED THEIR SKILLS BY CREATING EVEN SMALLER BOOKS WITH INCREASINGLY INTRICATE AND BEAUTIFUL BINDINGS.” ETTA HENDERSON IVES PASSED AWAY IN 1979, AND THE PRAYER BOOK WAS INHERITED BY HER GRANDSON BRUCE IVES, THE DONOR. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR THE OBITUARIES OF WILLIAM AND MARGARET HENDERSON, AND HENDERSON FAMILY HISTORY EXCERPT FROM BAINES’ BOOK.
Catalogue Number
P20140012002
Acquisition Date
2014-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

CERTIFICATE, MEMBERSHIP

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact4137
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P19880003000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1923
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
2
Length
56.4
Width
45.8
Description
OAK WOOD FRAME WITH MASONIC SYMBOLS MADE WITH PLASTER, CHIPPED. BLACK FRAME, FADED GILDING PAINT. PAPER STAINED AND SOILED. SCRIPT IN ENGLISH AND LATIN FORM. *NOTE* IN 2015 PRINT WAS FOUND UNFRAMED AND STORED SEPARATELY FROM FRAME.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
INSTALLATION OF WILLIAM PATERSON TO 3RD DEGREE OF MASONS. DATED MARCH 1923. DONOR FOUND IN ATTIC OF FORMER "ELLIOT" HOUSE IN COALDALE.
Catalogue Number
P19880003000
Acquisition Date
1988-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, CARD, PAPER, PLASTER, FELT
Catalogue Number
P19738897000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, CARD, PAPER, PLASTER, FELT
No. Pieces
4
Height
68.6
Length
46.4
Width
16.5
Description
WOOD CASE, GLASS FRONT. SCENE DEPICTS 2 SMALL PLASTER BEARS (1 BLACK, 1 WHITE) WRESTLING, CHILD HOLDING AXE, BACKGROUND IS RED/WHITE STRIPE. CARD IN FRONT READS "JAPANESE BOY'S DAY CELEBRATION MAY 5. THIS DOLL WISHES "GREAT STRENGTH" TO THE BOY IN THE FAMILY". MOUNTED ON TOP OF CASE IS A WHITE HORSE WITH ORANGE SILK TRAPPINGS, RIDER IS ELABORATELY DRESSED WITH GOLD HEADPIECE,CARRYING A WOODEN SWORD. "A DOLL OF A FAMOUS 'SAMURAI', WISHING THE BOY OF THE FAMILY 'POWER' AS THIS MAN HAD". HORSEMAN'S FACE IS CHIPPED.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
Catalogue Number
P19738897000
Acquisition Date
1973-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
N.W.M.P. CENTENNIAL
Date Range From
1973
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P19890020015
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.W.M.P. CENTENNIAL
Date Range From
1973
Date Range To
1975
Materials
PLASTIC, NYLON
No. Pieces
2
Height
40.4
Diameter
6.3
Description
PLASTIC & NYLON SOUVENIR FLAG DEPICTING A MAN ON HORSEBACK WITHIN A TRIANGLE DESIGN. COLORS RED, WHITE, BLUE, YELLOW & BLACK. FLAGPOLE HAS SMALL STAND, AND POINTED TOP, PAINTED GOLD.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
History
COMMEMORATES THE CENTENNIAL OF THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) & THE TREK WEST IN 1873-74. FROM THE JOHNSTON ESTATE. SEE P19890020001-GA FOR JOHNSTON HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19890020015
Acquisition Date
1989-05
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT
Catalogue Number
P19950073029
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1961
Materials
FELT
No. Pieces
1
Length
45.4
Width
16.3
Description
BURGUNDY FELT BANNER HAS GREY FELT TRIM AND WRITING. IS TRIANGLE WITH PINKED EDGES. ON WIDEST PART HAS GREY STRIP, AND TWO SECTIONS OF TASSELS. ARE 2 RECTANGULAR PIECES WITH ENDS CLIPPED TO "V". HAS ONE GREY AND ONE BURGUNDY STRIP ON EACH SECTION. IN GREY ACROSS FRONT IS "GEN. STEWART '61". LETTERS WERE SEWN INTO PLACE, ON STITCHING ON BACK THERE ARE REMNANTS OF PAPER STUCK UNDERNEATH STITCHES. FELT SHOWS MINOR WEAR.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
EDUCATION
COMMEMORATIVE
History
SEE FILE P20000034002-GA FOR INFORMATION RELEVANT TO THE GENERAL PRODUCTION AND ISSUE OF THE "GEN. STEWART" PENNANT. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073029
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19739473000
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1956
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.5
Length
71.1
Width
50.2
Description
"GALT REHABILITATION CENTRE JULY 6, 1956 BOARD OF MANAGEMENT....".
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
Catalogue Number
P19739473000
Acquisition Date
1973-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
“DISTINGUISED DONOR, GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI”
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140006023
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“DISTINGUISED DONOR, GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI”
Date
1988
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
21.5
Width
17
Description
PLASTIC PLAQUE WITH FAUX WOODGRAIN VENEER AND RAISED GOLD-COLOURED LETTERING. TEXT READS “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL – DISTINGUISHED DONOR – GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI – AWARDED WITH GRATITUDE FOR GENEROUS SUPPORT – 1988”. SYMBOL IN LOWER LEFT CORNER FEATURES REPEATING HEART SHAPES IN CIRCULAR PATTERN. PLASTIC BACKING HAS FOLDING EASEL STAND AND FOUR PLASTIC RIVETS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS PLAQUE WAS PRESENTED TO THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION BY THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL IN 1988, TO COMMEMORATE THE ASSOCIATION’S CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE HOSPITAL. IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF THE COLLECTED ARTIFACTS. HIGA, THE EARLIEST GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST, SAID: “I TRAINED MOSTLY AT THE GALT. THE STUDENTS, WE ALL KNEW EACH OTHER, HELPED EACH OTHER BECAUSE THERE WERE MOSTLY STUDENTS THERE: ONE REGISTERED NURSE FROM 7AM TO 7PM. THE REST WERE ALL US STUDENTS THAT RAN THE HOSPITAL SO, BUT WE WERE REALLY GOOD FRIENDS AND WE HELPED EACH OTHER… WE HAD SUCH GOOD RAPPORT BETWEEN THE STUDENTS IN MY CLASS… I JOINED [THE ALUMNAE] WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1955… I WAS INTERESTED IN HOW EVERYBODY TURNED OUT, AND THE ALUMNAE SORT OF KEPT IN CONTACT WITH THEM, AND IT WAS QUITE IMPORTANT TO ME. I FELT QUITE HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT ALL THE OTHER [NURSES]… IT’S NICE WHEN THEY CAME FOR THE REUNIONS. YOU SEE ALL THESE GIRLS YOU WORKED WITH, MAYBE ONLY FOR A LITTLE WHILE, BUT YOU REMEMBER THEM… I REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO BE THE ARCHIVIST, BUT WE DON’T HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE THAT OFFER TO DO THINGS… I WAS INTERESTED IN ALL THE HISTORY AND ALL THE THINGS THAT THE GIRLS THOUGHT ABOUT IT… [THE ARCHIVIST WAS TO] KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE HISTORY AND THE PEOPLE THAT WERE INVOLVED, AND KEEP TRACK OF THE STUFF WE COLLECT[ED]… [THE COLLECTION IS IMPORTANT TO ME BECAUSE] I LIKE EVERYBODY TO KNOW ABOUT THE GALT AND HOW WE TRAINED AND HOW IT PROGRESSED… AS YOU GET OLDER YOU KIND OF HAVE MEMORIES THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP, AND YOU KNOW YOU THINK ABOUT THOSE THINGS… [WHEN] YOU LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] YOU REMEMBER.” ELAINE HAMILTON BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN THE LATE 1980S AFTER SHIRLEY HIGA STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, HAMILTON SAID: “I THINK THE RETIRED NURSES DECIDED THAT THEY SHOULD FORM A GROUP TO HELP THE STUDENTS… I WASN’T THERE BUT IT WAS ’45 WHEN THEY FORMED, AND THEY DID THINGS FOR THE NURSES STUDENTS LIKE, THEY BOUGHT FURNITURE [FOR STUDENT RESIDENCES]… THEY DID A WHOLE BUNCH OF BAKE SALES AND CRAFT SALES; THEY WORKED AT THE BULL SALE OUT AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS. THEY DID A LOT OF THINGS LIKE THAT TO RAISE MONEY FOR LITTLE THINGS THAT COULDN’T BE BOUGHT OTHERWISE, LIKE THE PATIENT COMFORT, LIKE PATIENTS WOULD COME IN WITHOUT TOOTHBRUSHES AND COMBS… THEY HAD A BANQUET [FOR NURSING STUDENTS], AND THEY HAD A TEA WITH OUR PARENTS TOO, FOR US IN THE RESIDENCE… FOR ME, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WAS THE BANQUETS, AND HAVING MY CLASSMATES COME EVERY FIVE YEARS, BECAUSE THEY ARE LIKE SISTERS TO ME… OF COURSE I LIKE HISTORY AND ARCHIVES TOO SO [THE COLLECTION] IS KIND OF IMPORTANT TO ME TOO… WE LIVED TOGETHER, AND ATE TOGETHER, AND CRIED TOGETHER AND DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER FOR THREE YEARS, BECAUSE WE LIVED RIGHT IN A RESIDENCE. SO, WE BECAME VERY CLOSE… AND IF YOU WORK IN THE ALUMNI, YOU BECOME KIND OF LIKE A LITTLE FAMILY TOO BECAUSE THERE’S NOT THAT MANY OF US THAT GO TO OUR MEETINGS, SO WHEN WE GET TOGETHER, IT’S KIND OF NICE TO SHARE WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON… IT’S A FELLOWSHIP.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, HAMILTON SAID: “IT’S AN ACCUMULATION OF ARTIFACTS FROM THE HOSPITALS AND FROM OUR TRAINING DAYS. AND, IT’S PART OF THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE IN A WAY, BECAUSE THE SCHOOL WAS HERE FOR QUITE A WHILE… I’M A CARE GIVER AND I LIKE TO LOOK AFTER STUFF. SO, IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME THAT IT GOT CARED FOR… I THINK WITH THE CLOSING [OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, IN 1979] WE GOT ALL THE CHARTS, AND WE ALREADY HAD THINGS FROM THE GALT HOSPITAL IN OUR STUFF THAT PROBABLY SOMEBODY [BEFORE HIGA] ACCEPTED… WHEN WE WENT INTO THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL [IN 1955] IT WAS ALL BRAND NEW, STAINLESS STEEL, SO THERE WAS NONE OF THE ENAMEL STUFF, AND THEN WHEN THE MUNICIPAL CLOSED [IN 1988], THE OPERATING ROOM GAVE US A LOT OF THINGS. THERE WERE A LOT OF DONATIONS THEN FROM DIFFERENT SPOTS BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T WANT TO MOVE STUFF SINCE IT WAS OLD… WE GOT A PLACE [FOR STORING THE COLLECTION IN THE REGIONAL HOSPITAL], ACTUALLY ABOVE THE WASHERS IN THE LAUNDRY FIRST. BUT IT WAS PRETTY MOIST UP THERE. AND THEN THEY GAVE US A ROOM IN THE SEWING ROOM, WHICH WAS VERY NICE, OUR OWN SEPARATE LITTLE ROOM THERE FOR OUR STORAGE… WE HAD THINGS UP ON A SHELF AND WE HAD A TRUNK IN THERE, AND… WE HAD ALL THE LETTERS FROM THE RESIDENCE… WE HAD A DISPLAY CASE THAT THEY BUILT AT THE REGIONAL [IN THE HOSPITAL ATRIUM] AND WE HAD STUFF IN THERE, AND WE’D MOVE IT AROUND… HAVING THE DISPLAY CASE WAS IMPORTANT TO ME, AND CHANGING THE UNIFORM ON [THE DISPLAY MANNEQUIN] EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, AND HAVING HER IN DIFFERENT OUTFITS… I ALWAYS HAD IT ALL TIDY FOR A REUNION… I WOULD CHANGE THE UNIFORM FOR THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT CLASS WAS HAVING THEIR REUNION.” SUE KYLLO BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN 2010 AFTER ELAINE HAMILTON STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, KYLLO SAID: “[I ATTENDED THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING] FROM ’66 TO ’69, AND I JOINED IN 1976 AFTER I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE. I HAD TWO LITTLE KIDS AND I WANTED TO GET OUT AND MEET PEOPLE AND THE ALUMNI GAVE ME THAT… I WANTED TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH MY NURSING FRIENDS AND SEE IF I CAN HELP OUT IN SOME WAY… THE ALUMNI IS THE WAY TO GO TO KEEP OUR NURSING MEMORIES ALIVE AND I WANT TO DO THAT. SO NOW IT’S IMPORTANT TO ME WAY MORE THAN WHEN I WAS A YOUNG MOTHER THAT WANTED TO GET OUT… IT MEANS COMPANIONSHIP [AND] TO HELP EACH OTHER.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, KYLLO SAID: “I DON’T KNOW HOW IT GOT STARTED. I WOULD THINK THAT MRS. BOYCHUCK WOULD HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH IT BECAUSE [SHE] WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE ALUMNI AT THE BEGINNING, AND I WOULD THINK THAT IF ANYBODY, IT WOULD BE HER THAT STARTED COLLECTING THE ODD LITTLE THING, AND THEN IT WENT TO SHIRLEY. I DON’T KNOW THAT THERE WAS ANYBODY BEFORE SHIRLEY… OUR ALUMNI ONLY STARTED IN [1945], SO THERE WERE THOSE PERIODS WHERE I DON’T THINK ANYBODY CARED ABOUT ANY OF THIS STUFF… TO ME, IT MEANS AN AWFUL LOT. IT MEANS THAT WE EXISTED REALLY… IF WE DIDN’T HAVE ALL THIS STUFF, WELL WHAT WERE WE? A NURSE, WHAT DOES A NURSE DO? WITH THIS WE CAN SHOW THEM THAT WE DIDN’T JUST GIVE BEDPANS. WE DID A LOT OF THINGS, AND I’M REALLY PROUD THAT WE HAVE WHAT WE’VE GOT.” OF THE SITUATION LEADING UP TO THE DONATION OF THE GSN COLLECTION TO THE GALT MUSEUM, KYLLO SAID: “WE HAD A DISPLAY AT THE NORTH END OF THE HOSPITAL [THAT] WAS GOING TO STAY THERE [AND ADDITIONAL COLLECTION STORAGE] AND WE DIDN’T HAVE A PROBLEM... WE WERE ALWAYS UNDER THE IMPRESSION OF ALL THE PAST ADMINISTRATIONS THAT WE ALWAYS HAD A PLACE IN THAT HOSPITAL… NOW THAT ALL THE OLD GUYS HAVE GONE, THEY JUST UP AND MOVED [THE COLLECTION, IN FALL 2012] AND DIDN’T CARE. THEY WERE BUILDING A NEW WING AND ‘TO HECK WITH YOUR GUYS’ STUFF’… NOBODY WANTED TO EVEN TALK TO US ABOUT IT. I FINALLY GOT AHOLD OF THE GUY IN CHARGE OF MAINTENANCE, [HE] SAID, “WELL IT’S UPSTAIRS IN THE PENTHOUSE.” WELL, WE KNEW WHAT THE PENTHOUSE WAS LIKE, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY HOT AND YOU DON’T WANT [THESE ARTIFACTS] IN SOMEPLACE REALLY HOT, SO I WANTED IT OUT OF THERE… SO THAT’S WHEN IT WENT OUT INTO A STORAGE LOCKER. AND IN THE STORAGE LOCKER… IT WAS JUST NOT CLEAN ENOUGH TO BE IN THERE… WE WERE VERY DISAPPOINTED.” HAMILTON ADDED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE ANYWHERE FOR [THE COLLECTION], AND IT’S IN PEOPLE’S GARAGES AND BASEMENTS AND LIVING ROOMS… [THE MUSEUM IS HOUSED IN] THE GALT HOSPITAL. AND A LOT OF OUR MEMBERS TRAINED HERE. SO IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL TO THEM, AND THEY WOULD LIKE TO LEAVE SOMETHING HERE TO BE REMEMBERED BY… IT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO US TO LEAVE SOMETHING BEHIND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20140006023
Acquisition Date
2014-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
NAMEPLATE COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE
Date Range From
1971
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19900020082
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
NAMEPLATE COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE
Date Range From
1971
Date Range To
1975
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
60.8
Width
46
Description
BRASS PLAQUE: ""BREW KETTLE DOME" THIS BREWERY WAS FOUNDED IN 1901 AND THIS COPPER DOME WAS PART OF THE 9,000 GALLON CAPACITY SOLID COPPER BREW KETTLE THAT WAS TAKEN OUT OF SERVICE IN 1971. APPROXIMATELY 200,000,000 GALLONS OF BEER WERE PROCESSED THROUGH THIS VESSEL."
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
KETTLE WAS USED BY THE BREWERY FROM 1908 TO 1971. SEE P19900020001-GA FOR LETHBRIDGE BREWERY HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19900020082
Acquisition Date
1990-05
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
SCISSORS & KEY, “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL OFFICIAL OPENING”, CASED
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHERETTE, CHROME, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20140006013
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SCISSORS & KEY, “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL OFFICIAL OPENING”, CASED
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1963
Materials
LEATHERETTE, CHROME, BRASS
No. Pieces
4
Height
3
Length
33
Width
11
Description
.A – BLACK LEATHERETTE RECTANGULAR BOX, WITH HINGED LID AND TWO METAL LOCKING CLOSURES. INSIDE OF LID IS LINED WITH WHITE SATIN. BOX CAVITY IS FITTED WITH BLOCKS TO SUPPORT .B AND LINED WITH PURPLE VELVET. TWO ENGRAVED GOLD-COLOURED METAL PLATES ARE GLUED TO THE VELVET. THE PLATE IN THE UPPER LEFT CORNER READS “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL – GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING – BUILDING – OFFICIAL OPENING – MAY 10 1963”. THE PLATE AT CENTRE BOTTOM READS “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL – NURSES HOME – OFFICIAL OPENING – WEDNESDAY JAN. 11, 1956”. STAINING ON SATIN LINING FROM METAL OF .B, MINOR WEAR ON LEATHERETTE ON BOX’S OUTER EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 3 X 33 X 11 .B – METAL SCISSORS WITH STRAIGHT, TAPERED BLADES AND GOLD-PLATED HANDLES. HANDLES HAVE DECORATIVE MOULDING ON ENDS AND BELOW FINGER GRIPS. ENGRAVED TEXT ON BLADE READS “GRIFFON”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 0.75 X 29.5 X 6.5 .C – GOLD-COLOURED METAL KEY. ROUND HOLE AT CENTER TOP. ENGRAVED TEXT ON BOTH SIDES, READING “DAN’S LETHBRIDGE – MADE IN CANADA” ON THE FRONT AND “DL – DOMINION LOCK CO. – MONTREAL CANADA” ON THE BACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 0.1 X 6 X 3.5 .D – GOLD-COLOURED METAL PLATE, ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL – OFFICIAL OPENING – WEDNESDAY MAY 25, 1955”. ROUND HOLES IN EACH CORNER OF PLATE. GLUE RESIDUE ALONG TOP BACK. SLIGHT OXIDATION THROUGHOUT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 0.1 X 7.5 X 2
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
History
AT THE TIME OF DONATION, GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION PAST ARCHIVIST ELAINE HAMILTON IDENTIFIED THE SCISSORS IN THIS CASE AS BEING “USED TO CUT THE RIBBON ON [THE] OPENING OF THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL”. THE TEXTS ENGRAVED ON THE BRASS PLATES ALSO COMMEMORATE THE OPENING OF THE MUNICIPAL NURSES HOME ON JANUARY 11, 1956 AND THE OPENING OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BUILDING AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL ON MAY 10, 1963. IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF THE COLLECTED ARTIFACTS. HIGA, THE EARLIEST GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST, SAID: “I TRAINED MOSTLY AT THE GALT. THE STUDENTS, WE ALL KNEW EACH OTHER, HELPED EACH OTHER BECAUSE THERE WERE MOSTLY STUDENTS THERE: ONE REGISTERED NURSE FROM 7AM TO 7PM. THE REST WERE ALL US STUDENTS THAT RAN THE HOSPITAL SO, BUT WE WERE REALLY GOOD FRIENDS AND WE HELPED EACH OTHER… WE HAD SUCH GOOD RAPPORT BETWEEN THE STUDENTS IN MY CLASS… I JOINED [THE ALUMNAE] WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1955… I WAS INTERESTED IN HOW EVERYBODY TURNED OUT, AND THE ALUMNAE SORT OF KEPT IN CONTACT WITH THEM, AND IT WAS QUITE IMPORTANT TO ME. I FELT QUITE HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT ALL THE OTHER [NURSES]… IT’S NICE WHEN THEY CAME FOR THE REUNIONS. YOU SEE ALL THESE GIRLS YOU WORKED WITH, MAYBE ONLY FOR A LITTLE WHILE, BUT YOU REMEMBER THEM… I REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO BE THE ARCHIVIST, BUT WE DON’T HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE THAT OFFER TO DO THINGS… I WAS INTERESTED IN ALL THE HISTORY AND ALL THE THINGS THAT THE GIRLS THOUGHT ABOUT IT… [THE ARCHIVIST WAS TO] KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE HISTORY AND THE PEOPLE THAT WERE INVOLVED, AND KEEP TRACK OF THE STUFF WE COLLECT[ED]… [THE COLLECTION IS IMPORTANT TO ME BECAUSE] I LIKE EVERYBODY TO KNOW ABOUT THE GALT AND HOW WE TRAINED AND HOW IT PROGRESSED… AS YOU GET OLDER YOU KIND OF HAVE MEMORIES THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP, AND YOU KNOW YOU THINK ABOUT THOSE THINGS… [WHEN] YOU LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] YOU REMEMBER.” ELAINE HAMILTON BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN THE LATE 1980S AFTER SHIRLEY HIGA STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, HAMILTON SAID: “I THINK THE RETIRED NURSES DECIDED THAT THEY SHOULD FORM A GROUP TO HELP THE STUDENTS… I WASN’T THERE BUT IT WAS ’45 WHEN THEY FORMED, AND THEY DID THINGS FOR THE NURSES STUDENTS LIKE, THEY BOUGHT FURNITURE [FOR STUDENT RESIDENCES]… THEY DID A WHOLE BUNCH OF BAKE SALES AND CRAFT SALES; THEY WORKED AT THE BULL SALE OUT AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS. THEY DID A LOT OF THINGS LIKE THAT TO RAISE MONEY FOR LITTLE THINGS THAT COULDN’T BE BOUGHT OTHERWISE, LIKE THE PATIENT COMFORT, LIKE PATIENTS WOULD COME IN WITHOUT TOOTHBRUSHES AND COMBS… THEY HAD A BANQUET [FOR NURSING STUDENTS], AND THEY HAD A TEA WITH OUR PARENTS TOO, FOR US IN THE RESIDENCE… FOR ME, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WAS THE BANQUETS, AND HAVING MY CLASSMATES COME EVERY FIVE YEARS, BECAUSE THEY ARE LIKE SISTERS TO ME… OF COURSE I LIKE HISTORY AND ARCHIVES TOO SO [THE COLLECTION] IS KIND OF IMPORTANT TO ME TOO… WE LIVED TOGETHER, AND ATE TOGETHER, AND CRIED TOGETHER AND DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER FOR THREE YEARS, BECAUSE WE LIVED RIGHT IN A RESIDENCE. SO, WE BECAME VERY CLOSE… AND IF YOU WORK IN THE ALUMNI, YOU BECOME KIND OF LIKE A LITTLE FAMILY TOO BECAUSE THERE’S NOT THAT MANY OF US THAT GO TO OUR MEETINGS, SO WHEN WE GET TOGETHER, IT’S KIND OF NICE TO SHARE WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON… IT’S A FELLOWSHIP.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, HAMILTON SAID: “IT’S AN ACCUMULATION OF ARTIFACTS FROM THE HOSPITALS AND FROM OUR TRAINING DAYS. AND, IT’S PART OF THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE IN A WAY, BECAUSE THE SCHOOL WAS HERE FOR QUITE A WHILE… I’M A CARE GIVER AND I LIKE TO LOOK AFTER STUFF. SO, IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME THAT IT GOT CARED FOR… I THINK WITH THE CLOSING [OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, IN 1979] WE GOT ALL THE CHARTS, AND WE ALREADY HAD THINGS FROM THE GALT HOSPITAL IN OUR STUFF THAT PROBABLY SOMEBODY [BEFORE HIGA] ACCEPTED… WHEN WE WENT INTO THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL [IN 1955] IT WAS ALL BRAND NEW, STAINLESS STEEL, SO THERE WAS NONE OF THE ENAMEL STUFF, AND THEN WHEN THE MUNICIPAL CLOSED [IN 1988], THE OPERATING ROOM GAVE US A LOT OF THINGS. THERE WERE A LOT OF DONATIONS THEN FROM DIFFERENT SPOTS BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T WANT TO MOVE STUFF SINCE IT WAS OLD… WE GOT A PLACE [FOR STORING THE COLLECTION IN THE REGIONAL HOSPITAL], ACTUALLY ABOVE THE WASHERS IN THE LAUNDRY FIRST. BUT IT WAS PRETTY MOIST UP THERE. AND THEN THEY GAVE US A ROOM IN THE SEWING ROOM, WHICH WAS VERY NICE, OUR OWN SEPARATE LITTLE ROOM THERE FOR OUR STORAGE… WE HAD THINGS UP ON A SHELF AND WE HAD A TRUNK IN THERE, AND… WE HAD ALL THE LETTERS FROM THE RESIDENCE… WE HAD A DISPLAY CASE THAT THEY BUILT AT THE REGIONAL [IN THE HOSPITAL ATRIUM] AND WE HAD STUFF IN THERE, AND WE’D MOVE IT AROUND… HAVING THE DISPLAY CASE WAS IMPORTANT TO ME, AND CHANGING THE UNIFORM ON [THE DISPLAY MANNEQUIN] EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, AND HAVING HER IN DIFFERENT OUTFITS… I ALWAYS HAD IT ALL TIDY FOR A REUNION… I WOULD CHANGE THE UNIFORM FOR THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT CLASS WAS HAVING THEIR REUNION.” SUE KYLLO BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN 2010 AFTER ELAINE HAMILTON STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, KYLLO SAID: “[I ATTENDED THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING] FROM ’66 TO ’69, AND I JOINED IN 1976 AFTER I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE. I HAD TWO LITTLE KIDS AND I WANTED TO GET OUT AND MEET PEOPLE AND THE ALUMNI GAVE ME THAT… I WANTED TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH MY NURSING FRIENDS AND SEE IF I CAN HELP OUT IN SOME WAY… THE ALUMNI IS THE WAY TO GO TO KEEP OUR NURSING MEMORIES ALIVE AND I WANT TO DO THAT. SO NOW IT’S IMPORTANT TO ME WAY MORE THAN WHEN I WAS A YOUNG MOTHER THAT WANTED TO GET OUT… IT MEANS COMPANIONSHIP [AND] TO HELP EACH OTHER.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, KYLLO SAID: “I DON’T KNOW HOW IT GOT STARTED. I WOULD THINK THAT MRS. BOYCHUCK WOULD HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH IT BECAUSE [SHE] WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE ALUMNI AT THE BEGINNING, AND I WOULD THINK THAT IF ANYBODY, IT WOULD BE HER THAT STARTED COLLECTING THE ODD LITTLE THING, AND THEN IT WENT TO SHIRLEY. I DON’T KNOW THAT THERE WAS ANYBODY BEFORE SHIRLEY… OUR ALUMNI ONLY STARTED IN [1945], SO THERE WERE THOSE PERIODS WHERE I DON’T THINK ANYBODY CARED ABOUT ANY OF THIS STUFF… TO ME, IT MEANS AN AWFUL LOT. IT MEANS THAT WE EXISTED REALLY… IF WE DIDN’T HAVE ALL THIS STUFF, WELL WHAT WERE WE? A NURSE, WHAT DOES A NURSE DO? WITH THIS WE CAN SHOW THEM THAT WE DIDN’T JUST GIVE BEDPANS. WE DID A LOT OF THINGS, AND I’M REALLY PROUD THAT WE HAVE WHAT WE’VE GOT.” OF THE SITUATION LEADING UP TO THE DONATION OF THE GSN COLLECTION TO THE GALT MUSEUM, KYLLO SAID: “WE HAD A DISPLAY AT THE NORTH END OF THE HOSPITAL [THAT] WAS GOING TO STAY THERE [AND ADDITIONAL COLLECTION STORAGE] AND WE DIDN’T HAVE A PROBLEM... WE WERE ALWAYS UNDER THE IMPRESSION OF ALL THE PAST ADMINISTRATIONS THAT WE ALWAYS HAD A PLACE IN THAT HOSPITAL… NOW THAT ALL THE OLD GUYS HAVE GONE, THEY JUST UP AND MOVED [THE COLLECTION, IN FALL 2012] AND DIDN’T CARE. THEY WERE BUILDING A NEW WING AND ‘TO HECK WITH YOUR GUYS’ STUFF’… NOBODY WANTED TO EVEN TALK TO US ABOUT IT. I FINALLY GOT AHOLD OF THE GUY IN CHARGE OF MAINTENANCE, [HE] SAID, “WELL IT’S UPSTAIRS IN THE PENTHOUSE.” WELL, WE KNEW WHAT THE PENTHOUSE WAS LIKE, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY HOT AND YOU DON’T WANT [THESE ARTIFACTS] IN SOMEPLACE REALLY HOT, SO I WANTED IT OUT OF THERE… SO THAT’S WHEN IT WENT OUT INTO A STORAGE LOCKER. AND IN THE STORAGE LOCKER… IT WAS JUST NOT CLEAN ENOUGH TO BE IN THERE… WE WERE VERY DISAPPOINTED.” HAMILTON ADDED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE ANYWHERE FOR [THE COLLECTION], AND IT’S IN PEOPLE’S GARAGES AND BASEMENTS AND LIVING ROOMS… [THE MUSEUM IS HOUSED IN] THE GALT HOSPITAL. AND A LOT OF OUR MEMBERS TRAINED HERE. SO IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL TO THEM, AND THEY WOULD LIKE TO LEAVE SOMETHING HERE TO BE REMEMBERED BY… IT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO US TO LEAVE SOMETHING BEHIND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20140006013
Acquisition Date
2014-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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