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13317 records – page 1 of 1332.

Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P19970041325
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.3
Length
38.5
Width
6.7
Description
RECTANGULAR WOOD FRAME WITH 28 ROWS OF 6 WOOD BEADS, FIVE ON ONE SIDE OF WHITE DIVIDER THAT RUNS DOWN LENGTH AND HAS BLACK DOTS AT REGULAR INTERVALS. SHAFTS WHICH HOLD BEADS ARE WOOD. WOOD HAS DARK FINISH.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ABACUS WAS USED OCCASIONALLY BY DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA WHO WAS AN ANGLICAN PRIEST SERVING IN COALDALE. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE RELOCATED TO SLOCAN CITY(1942) BY THE CANADIAN GOV'T. DONOR'S FATHER, REV. G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041325
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P19739498000
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1914
Materials
WOOD, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
140.0
Width
66.0
Description
12 ROWS OF 12 WOOD BEADS EACH.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
History
USED IN LOCAL SCHOOLS AS ARITHMATIC TEACHING DEVICE.
Catalogue Number
P19739498000
Acquisition Date
1973-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1925
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19694693000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1925
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
17.7
Length
36.5
Width
2.5
Description
BRASS REINFORCED CORNERS. WOODEN BEADS.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
Catalogue Number
P19694693000
Acquisition Date
1969-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
P19683475000-GA
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MAHOGANY, BAMBOO, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19780225000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
P19683475000-GA
Date
1900
Materials
MAHOGANY, BAMBOO, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.5
Length
33.0
Width
16.8
Description
STRAPPED ON CORNERS WITH BRASS STRIPS & NAILS, FOR REINFORCEMENT. THE BRASS STRIP IS MISSING FROM THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER. ALSO THE DOVETAIL JOINT IS LOOSE IN THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER. NAILS MISSING FROM LEFT SIDE BRASS STRAPS. ABACUS IS COMPLETE WITH ALL WOODEN COUNTERS. BACK OF RIGHT SIDE IS CUT IN, E.G. THE RIGHT SIDE PIECE IS HALF THE THICKNESS (1.6 CM) OF THE OTHER SIDE PIECES. THE BACK INSIDE EDGE OF THE OTHER THREE SIDE PIECES ARE GROOVED, PRESUMABLY THIS WAS TO ALLOW FOR A SLIDING PIECE TO BE INSERTED FROM THE RIGHT AS A BACKPIECE. THIS BACK PIECE IS MISSING. BACK EDGE OF CENTRE BRACE PIECE SPLIT.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
LEONG WAY BORN IN CHINA IN 1879 & IMMIGRATED IN 1892. AROUND 1900 HE OPENED THE "BOW ON TONG CO." STORE (GOOD HEALTH MEDICINE STORE) IN VANCOUVER, B.C. AT 13 PENDER STREET WEST. LEONG WAY WAS A TRADITIONALLY TRAINED HERBALIST. THE STORE OPERATED AS A GROCERY-HERBALIST PREMISE. IN 1928 HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE & OPENED A HERBALIST SHOP UNDER THE SAME NAME. THIS SOON BECAME THE LARGEST CHINESE HERBALIST SHOP IN CANADA WITH ITEMS IMPORTED FROM CHINA. HE OPERATED THE SHOP UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1967. HIS SON, ALBERT NOW OPERATES THE SHOP. THE ABACUS WAS USED IN THE SHOP.
Catalogue Number
P19780225000
Acquisition Date
1978-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19790252000
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1921
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.5
Length
10.8
Width
28.8
Description
13 ROWS OF WOODEN BEADS ON BRASS DOWLING. ONE BEAD ABOVE WOODEN DIVIDER & 5 BEADS BELOW. JAPANESE SYMBOLS ENGRAVED INTO WOOD DIVIDER, MARK EACH ROW OF BEADS. WRITTEN OF SIDE "Y. JOE MIYANAGA 1921". "MADE IN JAPAN" STAMPED ON BOTTOM. NATURAL WOOD GRAIN WHICH HAS BEEN OILED.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
History
REPRESENTS AN OLDER STYLE OF ABACUS. SEE P19790250000-GA FOR HISTORY
Catalogue Number
P19790252000
Acquisition Date
1979-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19800006000
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1940
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.5
Length
10.8
Width
28.9
Description
13 ROWS OF 5 BEADS EACH. 13 ROWS OF 1 BEAD EACH. THE CASE OF ABACUS IS MADE OF WOOD. IT APPEARS TO BE HANDMADE & IS PARTLY HELD TOGETHER BY MORTISE AND TENON JOINTS. A STRIP OF WOOD SEPARATES THE ROWS OF 5 BEADS FROM THE ROWS OF 1 BEAD. EACH ROW EXCEPT THE MIDDLE, OR 7TH ROW HAS A JAPANESE CHARACTER CARVED INTO THE WOOD & COLOURED RED. ON BACK OF CASE IN BLUE INK "G. FUKUNAGA", ALSO TWO JAPANESE CHARACTERS. CONSERVATION REPORT ON FILE.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
BUSINESS
History
USED AS A CALCULATOR.
Catalogue Number
P19800006000
Acquisition Date
1978-09
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, CANVAS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20030056000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOD, CANVAS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
4
Height
21.1
Length
46.5
Width
39.5
Description
1. CASE. ABOVE DIMENSIONS. MADE OF WOOD. CASE IS CURVED NEAR FRONT TO MOLD TO ACCORDION. EXTERIOR IS COVERED IN SNAKESKIN PATTERNED PAPER. FRONT HAS WOOD HANDLE AND STEEL LOCKING MECHANISM. LID OPENS ON TWO HINGES AT BACK. INSIDE IS LINED WITH LIGHT GREEN PAPER. TWO STAMPS INSIDE LID READ "CANADA CENSORED INT. OP. 47", ALONG WITH THE IMAGE OF A CROWN. OUTER COVERING AND INNER LINING ARE WORN AND MISSING IN MANY AREAS, AS WELL AS EXHIBITING TEARS AND WATER DAMAGE. SIDES OF CASE ARE SEPARATING FROM BOTTOM. 2. ACCORDION. MADE FROM WOOD WITH GLOSSY, BLACK ENAMEL FINISH. BELLOWS ARE MADE FROM STEEL WIRE FRAME WITH CANVAS STRETCHED BETWEEN THEM AND BLUE PAPER COVERING EDGES. ON TOP OF ACCORDION, AT BACK, ARE 4 ROWS OF 8 ROUND, BLACK KEYS. ALSO ON TOP OF ACCORDION, NEAR FRONT, IN IVORY COLOR, IS "MAGISTE". KEYBOARD CONSISTS OF 15 IVORY COLOURED KEYS AND 10 BLACK (ALSO MADE FROM WOOD). THERE IS A LONG BROWN LEATHER STRAP ATTACHED TO SIDES NEAR KEYBOARD. ALSO A TIGHTER BROWN LEATHER STRAP ACROSS BACK OF ACCORDION, AS WELL AS TWO SHORT STRAPS ATTACHED AT SIDES NEAR BACK. BACK OF ACCORDION IS MADE OF NATURAL COLOURED WOOD. A WEAVE OF THIN FIBERS IS VISIBLE THROUGH SLOTS AT FRONT AND BACK OF ACCORDION (MANY FIBERS BROKEN). THERE IS SOME WEAR OF BLUE PAPER EDGING ON BELLOWS AND LEATHER STRAPS. THERE IS A LARGE PIECE OF ENAMEL MISSING DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF KEYBOARD; REST OF ENAMEL IS CRACKING IN SAME AREA. *UPDATE* AS OF 2011 INVENTORY, NUMBER OF PIECES WAS INCREASED FROM 2 TO 4. TWO BROWN LEATHER SHOULDER STRAPS ARE DETACHED FROM THE ACCORDION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
History
ACQUIRED BY LAWRENCE COOK, HUSBAND OF EDITH EVANS, THE DONOR, WHEN COOK WAS A CHILD. ACCORDING TO EVANS, THE ACCORDION WAS ACQUIRED BY WALTER A. COOK, LAWRENCE'S FATHER, AND WAS SAID TO HAVE COME FROM THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. LAWRENCE COOK WAS BORN IN 1934 AND IS BELIEVED TO HAVE GROWN UP FOR A TIME ON LETHBRIDGE'S NORTH SIDE, PRIOR TO MOVING TO 523 27TH STREET SOUTH. EVANS BELIEVES THAT HER HUSBAND TOOK ACCORDION LESSONS AS A CHILD. WALTER AND LAWRENCE WERE BOTH LOCAL POSTMASTERS. LAWRENCE PASSED AWAY IN JUNE 1975 AND WALTER IN 1967. EVANS CLAIMS THAT THE STORY SURROUNDING THE ACCORDION INCLUDES THE ASSERTION THAT IT WAS MADE BY A POW INTERNEE. IN OCTOBER 2007, FRANK HOSEK, THE ORIGINAL CONDUCTOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE A.C.T. JUNIOR BAND, WAS CONTACTED TO CLARIFY QUESTIONS REGARDING TWO OTHER INSTRUMENTS IN THE GALT COLLECTIONS THAT WERE SAID TO HAVE USED BEEN BY THE A.C.T. BAND AND INMATES IN POW CAMP 133 BY THEIR DONOR, BOB FINDLAY (P19900049001 AND P19900049002). HOSEK STATED THAT THE INSTRUMENTS WERE GIVEN TO THE ASSOCIATION OF CANADIAN TRAVELERS (A.C.T.) BY FEDERAL AUTHORITIES PRIOR TO CAMP 133'S DISMANTLEMENT AND DEMOLITION. HOSEK RECALLED THAT THE INSTRUMENTS WERE LEFT BEHIND AT THE CAMP WHEN ITS INTERNEES WERE REPATRIATED BACK TO GERMANY. HOSEK STATED THAT THE CAMP INSTRUMENTS WERE ORIGINALLY PROVIDED FOR THE PRISONERS BY THE INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS KNOWLEDGE OF CAMP 133 ACCORDIONS, HOSEK WAS NOT ABLE TO CONFIRM THAT HE REMEMBERED THIS PARTICULAR ACCORDION AS HAVING BEEN PART OF THE INSTRUMENTS RECOVERED FROM THE CAMP, SAYING ONLY: "I HAD FOR A TIME A LARGE CLASS OF ACCORDION STUDENTS. THIS PARTICULAR INSTRUMENT YOU REFER TO MAY HAVE BEEN MIXED UP WITH ALL THE INSTRUMENTS.” SEE RECORD P19900049001 FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE A.C.T. BAND AND ITS USE OF CAMP INTERNEE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF LAWRENCE COOK'S OBITUARY AND MEMORIAM OF WALTER COOK. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE.
Catalogue Number
P20030056000
Acquisition Date
2004-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAY. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1924
Date Range To
1934
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PEARL, NICKEL PLATE, HEATED CLOTH, WOOD, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19738742000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1924
Date Range To
1934
Materials
PEARL, NICKEL PLATE, HEATED CLOTH, WOOD, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Height
26.0
Length
31.1
Width
15.0
Description
SINGLE BELLOWS. STRAPS BROKEN OFF. MENDED WITH ADHESIVE TAPE. CORNERS AND CLASP NICKEL PLATE. PEARL BUTTONS. BOTH KEYBOARDS AND BUTTON KEYBOARDS. "AD" STAMPED ON TOP OF KEYBOARD (MELODY). "M. HOHNER MADE IN GERMANY" BRASS NAME PLATE ON BASE. "STEEL REEDS" ON BASE.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
PURCHASED THROUGH EATON'S CATALOGUE. *UPDATE* IN 2015 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. NO SPECIFIC INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ACCORDION'S HISTORY WAS FOUND, BUT THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE DONOR, JOHN FRASER HODGSON, WAS FOUND IN A PROFILE ARTICLE IN THE AUGUST 1, 1970 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND HODGSON'S OBITUARY. HODGSON WAS BORN IN FOREST, ONTARIO, AND MOVED TO CENTRAL ALBERTA IN 1909. HE ATTENDED CALGARY TECH WITH THE FIRST CLASS OF MECHANICS IN 1922, AND WORKED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY. IN 1935 HODGSON AND FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, SETTLING IN COALDALE BY 1942. HODGSON WAS DIAGNOSED WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, AND WAS FORCED TO RETIRE IN 1956. UPON RETIREMENT, HE BEGAN WRITING BOOKS OF STORIES ABOUT HIS LIFE, PUBLISHING 'ONCE UPON A LIFETIME' IN 1966 AND 'WANDERINGS OF AN EXPERT' IN 1971. HE WAS ALSO A REGULAR COLUMN CONTRIBUTOR TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. HODGSON WAS AWARDED THE M.S. AWARD FOR ACHIEVEMENT, AND WAS MADE AUTHOR OF THE YEAR FOR ALBERTA MULTIPLE TIMES. J. FRASER HODGSON DIED ON APRIL 8, 1978. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P19738742000
Acquisition Date
1973-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
C/W CASE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19980056000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
C/W CASE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, LEATHER
No. Pieces
4
Height
40.4
Length
39.1
Width
25.5
Description
1. ACCORDION: IMITATION IVORY/MOTHER-OF-PEARL PANELED BODY WITH FRENCH IVORY AND BAKELITE KEYBOARD. PANEL BELOW KEYBOARD HAS CUT-OUT GEOMETRIC PATTERN, WITH FINE BROWN SCREENING BENEATH. "HOHNER" NAMEPLATE AT CENTRE. CENTRAL PORTION OF BODY HAS EXPANDABLE BELLOWS, BELOW WHICH IS A SET OF BLACK CHORD BUTTONS. "VERDI II" NAMEPLATE ABOVE. TWO WORN LEATHER STRAPS ATTACHED ACROSS BACK; EACH HAS SILVER BUCKLE. BOTH ENDS OF TOP STRAP BROKEN. BACK OF ACCORDION HAS GOLD VINYL(?) PANEL RIVETED BELOW KEYBOARD SECTION. BOTTOM OF INSTRUMENT PERFORATED, WITH LEATHER STRAP RUNNING ACROSS LENGTH. ACCORDION FUNCTIONAL. 2. CASE: 22.7CM (H) X 52.5CM (L) X 44.5CM (W). WOODEN BOX WITH HINGED LID, SHAPED WITH PEAK NEAR CENTRE TO FIT OVER INSTRUMENT. PAINTED BLACK THROUGHOUT INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR; PAINT IS BADLY CHIPPING AND WORN IN SEVERAL PLACES. LENGTH OF BUTCHER'S TAPE AND PACKING TAPE ON EACH SIDE OF LID. TWO HINGED AND SPRING-LOADED METAL CLASPS AT FRONT OF CASE; ONE BROKEN AND MISSING. BLACK LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO METAL RINGS ON FRONT BASE OF CASE. LEATHER WORN INTERIOR OF BASE LINED WITH RED WOOL/FELT FABRIC, TACKED TO WALLS OF CASE. LINING IS WRINKLED, DISCOLORED, AND WORN. CASE APPEARS HANDMADE. *UPDATE* AS OF 2011 INVENTORY THIS ITEM WAS DEEMED TO HAVE 4 PIECES (RATHER THAN 2), AS BOTH LEATHER STRAPS CAN BE DETACHED FROM THE ACCORDION BODY. THE STRAPS ATTACH TO THE ARTIFACT WITH A BELT AND BUCKLE SYSTEM.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE DONOR, HARRY ELDON, WAS NAMED HENDRIK ELZINGA WHEN HE ARRIVED IN CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN JULY OF 1948, AT AGE THIRTEEN. THE ELZINGA FAMILY WENT TO A FARM IN COALDALE FOR ONE YEAR, THEN SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE. HENDRIK'S FATHER PURCHASED THE ACCORDION SECOND HAND IN 1943-44 AT THE RECOMMENDATION OF HENDRIK'S MUSIC TEACHER, AS HENDRIK HAD OUTGROWN HIS PREVIOUS INSTRUMENT. AS THIS WAS DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR INSTRUMENTS WERE VERY DIFFICULT TO OBTAIN SO MUCH TRADING OCCURRED TO OBTAIN THIS ACCORDION. THE PIECE CAME TO CANADA WITH THE FAMILY IN 1948. HENDRIK LEARNED TO PLAY THE ACCORDION IN HOLLAND, AND PLAYED IT IN CANADA AT FAMILY AND CHURCH FUNCTIONS THROUGHOUT HIS TEENS. THE ACCORDION HAS REMAINED IN THE FAMILY SINCE, UNTIL BEING DONATED TO MUSEUM. *UPDATE* IN 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK CONDUCTED AN AUDIT OF ACCESSORIES, INCLUDING A BOX DONATED BY BERNICE ELDON. ON 2 MARCH 2018, PUNDYK INTERVIEWED MRS. ELDON’S HUSBAND, HARRY ELDON, ABOUT THE DONATION MADE BY HIS LATE WIFE. IN THAT INTERVIEW, ELDON RECALLED HIS FAMILY’S SETTLEMENT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, “[WE WENT] TO COALDALE FIRST [IN 1948]… [FOR] FOUR TO FIVE MONTHS… AND THAT WAS A MISTAKE. AND THEN WE WENT TO LETHBRIDGE. AND THEY STAYED HERE, AND DIDN’T GO BACK TO HOLLAND BECAUSE MOM DIDN’T HAVE… THE PROBLEMS THAT SHE HAD IN HOLLAND...” “IN HOLLAND, MY FATHER NEVER WORKED FOR A MAN,” ELDON EXPLAINED, “HE WAS A SALESMAN… [HE] HAD HIS OWN STORE... BUT IN 1940, WE MOVED BECAUSE THE WAR WAS STARTING, AND HE WOULDN’T STAY IN THE PLACE THAT HE WAS… I DON’T KNOW WHY WE MOVED, BUT [WE] MOVED TO FRIESLAND… [WHICH IS] A PROVINCE IN HOLLAND THAT IS ON THE NORTHERN EDGE, MAYBE 40-50 MILES FROM GERMANY. AND HE MOVED THERE TO BE CLOSER TO HIS PARENTS AND SIBLINGS. SO, THEN WE LIVED THERE FOR SEVEN TO EIGHT YEARS, UNTIL THE WAR WAS FINISHED, AND THEN WE DECIDED TO MOVE TO CANADA. BUT THAT WAS A BIT OF A MISTAKE AS WELL, BECAUSE [SOME OF] THE NEIGHBORS WERE MOVING, AND THEY SAID, ‘TONY’ – THAT’S MY DAD. HE WAS TINUS… IN HOLLAND, BUT THEY CALLED HIM TONY HERE – SO THEY SAID, ‘TINUS, WHY DON’T YOU MOVE AS WELL?’ AND [HE SAID], ‘HUH, I’LL TRY IT.’ AND, HE DID. WELL, IT WAS A DIFFERENT LIFE OUT HERE THAN IT WAS THERE FOR THEM… BECAUSE IT WAS EASY FOR THEM TO MAKE A LIVING [IN HOLLAND], AND IT WAS DIFFICULT FOR [THEM] HERE… BUT THEY ADJUSTED TO IT.” “AND, IN LETHBRIDGE, A JOB WAS PROVIDED FOR [MY DAD] AT THE ADVANCE LUMBER COMPANY… [THEY] LIVED AT 1318 6TH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THAT’S WHERE WE GREW UP. I WENT TO THE HIGH SCHOOL THAT IS NOT FAR [THERE]… WE COULD WALK IN 6-7 MINUTES. AND, THAT WAS IT… I HAVE ONE BROTHER, [AUKE], WHO IS 5 YEARS YOUNGER THAN ME; AND A SISTER, [MARY], WHO IS A YEAR OLDER THAN ME.” ALL OF THE ELZINGA CHILDREN WERE BORN IN HOLLAND BEFORE THE FAMILY’S IMMIGRATION. ELDON SAYS, “I WAS BORN IN ’35… [WHEN WE WERE MOVING] IT SOUNDED EXCITING TO SEE WHAT IT WAS GOING TO BE LIKE... AND [WHEN] WE MOVED… AS FAR AS WE WERE CONCERNED AS KIDS, IT WAS FINE…” “I WAS 12 WHEN I LEFT HOLLAND,” ELDON SAYS, “I HAD MY 13TH BIRTHDAY IN COALDALE. BUT, I’VE BEEN BACK TO HOLLAND QUITE A FEW TIMES BECAUSE OF MY BUSINESS, AND I HAVE GONE BACK AS WELL TO VISIT SOME COUSINS, AND WHAT-HAVE-YOU, THAT I KNOW THERE…” WHEN THE FAMILY FIRST MOVED TO CANADA, ELDON SAID, “WE BROUGHT ALL SORTS OF FURNITURE… A LOT OF STUFF THAT WE DIDN’T NEED BUT, ANYHOW, WE BROUGHT IT, AND USED IT… WE HAD THREE BIG CASES… [WHICH ARRIVED] A COUPLE OF WEEKS LATER, AND THEY WERE DELIVERED TO OUR HOUSE, AND WE HAD TO UNPACK IT, AND SHOVE IT WHERE IT HAD TO GO.” ELDON EXPLAINED, “MY MOTHER’S NAME AND MY FATHER’S NAME WAS ‘ELZINGA’, AND I CHANGED MINE, WHEN I WAS CLOSE TO GETTING MY DEGREE, AS CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, TO ‘ELDON’, BECAUSE I DIDN’T THINK I WOULD GO THROUGH THE – WELL, THEY USED TO CALL US NAMES – AND SO I THOUGHT I WAS STARTING UP MY OWN ACCOUNTANCY, AND I DIDN’T THINK THE NAME ‘ELZINGA’ SOUNDED ALL THAT FAMILIAR. THAT’S A LONG TIME AGO.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE STATES THEUNIS AND DIRJKE GAVE THEIR APPLICATIONS FOR CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP TO THE LETHBRIDGE DISTRICT COURT ON 2 FEBRUARY 1954. ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, THEUNIS (TONY) ELZINGA PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE AT THE AGE OF 73 YEARS ON 12 OCTOBER 1983. THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED A THANK YOU FROM THE FAMILY FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF DOROTHY ELZINGA ON 10 OCTOBER 2000. THE DONOR, BERNICE ELDON (NEE LANCASTER), PASSED AWAY ON 6 NOVEMBER 2006. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR THE FULL INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P19980056000
Acquisition Date
1999-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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