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Other Name
PICK-HEADED AXE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PICK-HEADED AXE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.0
Length
89.1
Width
25.5
Description
FIRE AXE OR PICK-HEADED AXE. WOODEN HANDLE WITH METAL HEAD. HANDLE IS UNFINISHED WOOD, WITH A BRIGHT 6.5CM ORANGE STRIPE APPROXIMATELY 1/3 OF THE WAY DOWN THE HANDLE FROM THE HEAD. THE KNOB AND GRIP OF THE AXE CURVES SLIGHTLY AND IS SLIGHTLY WIDER THAN THE REST OF THE HANDLE, UNTIL THE JUNCTION WITH THE METAL HEAD (THE SHOULDER), WHERE THE HANDLE IS THE WIDEST. METAL HEAD HAS A BLADE AND PICK. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. SEVERAL SCRATCHES IN THE WOODEN HANDLE, ESPECIALLY NEAR THE HEAD. THE GRIP AND KNOB IS WELL WORN AND SCUFFED. A LARGE SLIVER OF WOOD IS MISSING FROM THIS AREA, BUT GIVEN THE WEAR PATTERN, THE SLIVER WAS LOST EARLY IN THE AXE'S USE. METAL HEAD IS VERY WORN. IT APPEARS TO HAVE HAD A RED FINISH AT ONE POINT, WHICH IS ALMOST ENTIRELY GONE. REMNANTS OF RED REMAIN ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THE HEAD, WHERE THE HEAD AND HANDLE MEET. BLADE AND PICK OF HEAD ARE BOTH WELL USED AND HAVE LOST THEIR SHARPNESS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE AXE (PICK-HEADED AXE) WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS AXE WOULD BE “USED IN FORCIBLE ENTRY, OVER HAUL, VENTILATION [AND] IS STILL USED TODAY, BUT [NOW WE] HAVE FIBERGLASS HANDLES OR COMPOSITE HANDLES.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN ADDED “PROBABLY THAT’S WHAT FIREFIGHTERS ARE NOTED FOR, IS AN AXE, BECAUSE AN AXE WAS USED SO MANY TIMES. … WHAT THE HYDRANT KEY COULDN’T DO, THE AXE DID … THIS OLD AXE WAS GOOD. IT WAS A GOOD OLD PRY-BACK, PRY AXE … SOMETIMES WE HAD TO GO TO A FARM FIRE. THEY HAD A POND THERE. WE HAD TO GET THE WATER, SO WE’D CUT A HOLE IN THE ICE WITH OUR AXE.” LAZENBY AGREED: “THIS IS ONE OF THE CLASSIC FIRE SERVICE TOOLS … THIS WAS PROBABLY THE PRIMARY TOOL THAT WE WOULD GRAB OFF THE TRUCK YEARS AND YEARS AGO IF WE HAD TO VENTILATE THE ROOF OF A STRUCTURE. BACK IN THE DAY WE DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE A CHAINSAW OR A K-12 SAW TO CUT THROUGH THE SHINGLES AND THE SHEETING AND THE SHIPLAP BOARDS AND SO IT WAS HARD WORK … THESE GET TAKEN OFF THE TRUCK ALL THE TIME BECAUSE WE’RE NOW IN THE HABIT OF TAKING TOOLS WITH US ON MOST CALLS … THESE [AXES] HAVE CHANGED. THE HANDLES ARE NO LONGER WOODEN; THEY’VE GONE TO FIBERGLASS. THEY’RE A BIT LIGHTER. THEY’RE MORE IMPACT-RESISTANT. YOU DON’T GET SLIVERS AND SPLINTERS WITH FIBERGLASS LIKE YOU DO WITH THE OLD. WE USE TO SAND THESE DOWN WITH SANDPAPER. WE WOULD OIL THEM UP A LITTLE BIT TO KEEP THE FINISH NICE AND THE HEADS WOULD RUST LIKE CRAZY, SO AGAIN, LIKE OUR HYDRANT KEY WE WOULD GET THE STEEL WOOL OUT OR SANDPAPER AND SAND IT AND OIL IT TO KEEP IT FROM RUSTING UP. AS OFTEN AS OUR TRUCKS GET WASHED, THESE USED TO BE MOUNTED ON THE EXTERIOR TAILBOARD OF THE TRUCK, SO EVERY TIME WE DROVE THROUGH INCLEMENT WEATHER OR WASHED THE VEHICLE, IT WAS EXPOSED TO ROAD GRIME AND WET.” PETIT ELABORATED: “WE USED THEM QUITE A BIT IF THERE WAS A VENT ON THE BUILDING, TO TEAR THE VENT. SAY THERE WAS A FIRE IN THE ATTIC AND YOU WANTED TO TEAR THE VENTS, WE’D USUALLY USE AN AXE LIKE THIS BECAUSE OF THE PICK SO YOU COULD GET UNDERNEATH THE METAL AND RIP IT … I DEFINITELY USED THEM … MOSTLY HOUSE FIRES, LIKE FIRES IN THE ATTIC AND THERE’S A VENT AND YOU TEAR THE VENT OFF AND SOMETIMES YOU’D TRY TO MAKE THE HOLE BIGGER SO THAT SMOKE AND STUFF CAN GET OUT. BUT LIKE I SAY, EVENTUALLY, WE DIDN’T USE AN AXE TO MAKE A HOLE, WE USED A POWER SAW.” DZUREN AGREED: “IT’S FOR CHOPPING OR FOR GETTING, AGAIN, THROUGH ANY TYPE OF WALL WHERE YOU HAVE TO PUNCTURE A HOLE THROUGH THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010003
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
Catalogue Number
P19960112074
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
No. Pieces
1
Length
85.8
Width
4.8
Description
ORANGE PLASTIC BELT WITH CROSS-STRAP. REVERSE IS DARKER ORANGE/RED. CROSS-STRAP IS SEWN TO BELT; TWO METAL RINGS FOR ADJUSTING SIZE. "ALBERTA MOTOR ASSOCIATION" IN BLACK ON EXTERIOR OF STRAP. BELT HAS STAMP INSIDE READING "REGULAR AAA STOCK NO.3164 MFG. USA." METAL CLASP ON EITHER END.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112074
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PERSUADER OR COME-ALONG
Date Range From
1800
Date Range To
1900
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, NICKEL PLATING
Catalogue Number
P19662209000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PERSUADER OR COME-ALONG
Date Range From
1800
Date Range To
1900
Materials
STEEL, NICKEL PLATING
No. Pieces
1
Height
29.5
Width
8.3
Description
CHAIN WITH "T" SHAPED SOLID PIECE AT EACH END. SHAPED WITH GROOVE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
CHAIN IS WRAPPED AROUND WRIST, "T" PIECES FIT IN EACH OTHER & ARE TWISTED TO "PERSUADE" AN INDIVIDUAL TO FOLLOW A POLICE OFFICER. RETIRED POLICE CHIEF JIM CARPENTER SAYS THIS TYPE OF HANDCUFF WAS USED BY LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE BEFORE MORE FAMILIAR MODERN HANDCUFF ADOPTED. ***** UPDATE: COPY BELOW WAS RESEARCHED AND WRITTEN FOR SUBMISSION TO LETHBRIDGE LIVING MAGAZINE ON 15 APRIL 2013, RELATED TO THE MUSEUM’S WHAT’S IT FEATURE. REFERENCES TO THE ARTIFACT’S REPRESENTATIONAL USE BY THE LATE, RETIRED CHIEF OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE JIM CARPENTER CAN BE FOUND ON PAGES 83 AND 104 OF HIS BOOK THE BADGE AND THE BLOTTER. RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED BY MUSEUM VOLUNTEER KIRSTEN CHRISTOPHERSON. “COME-ALONGS” (ALSO KNOWN AS “CHAIN GRIPS” OR “CHAIN NIPPERS”) ARE AN EARLY FORM OF POLICE RESTRAINT USED FROM THE LATE 19TH TO MID 20TH CENTURY. THE LATE POLICE CHIEF JIM CARPENTER WROTE IN HIS BOOK THE BADGE AND THE BLOTTER THAT, WHEN HE BEGAN HIS CAREER WITH LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE IN 1940, HE WAS ISSUED “COME-ALONG CHAINS” AMONGST OTHER THINGS. COME-ALONGS HAVE TWO “T” SHAPED HANDLES, THE LARGER OF WHICH IS INSET, ALLOWING FOR ONE “T” HANDLE TO BE INSERTED INTO THE OTHER. TO USE A COME-ALONG, AN OFFICER WRAPPED THE CHAIN COMPONENT OF THE HANDCUFF AROUND ONE OF THE DETAINEE’S WRISTS, COMBINING AND TWISTING THE NOW INTERLOCKED HANDLE, THEREBY SHORTENING THE CHAIN. THIS SHORTENING ACTION CAUSED DISCOMFORT AND PAIN FOR THE DETAINEE, PERSUADING HIM OR HER TO “COME-ALONG” BY FORCE. ONE CAN IMAGINE THE ISSUES OFFICERS FACED USING COME-ALONGS, AS IT ONLY CONTROLLED ONE OF THE DETAINEE’S TWO HANDS. THE RESTRAINT “TOOL” WAS EVENTUALLY DISCARDED BY POLICE AS THE TRADITIONAL HANDCUFF ROSE IN PROMINENCE. THIS CHANGE PROVIDED INCREASED SAFETY AND PEACE OF MIND FOR BOTH OFFICERS AND THEIR DETAINEES.
Catalogue Number
P19662209000
Acquisition Date
1966-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
DISPOSABLE CUFFS
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19960112046
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DISPOSABLE CUFFS
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
86.6
Width
2
Description
OFF-WHITE PLASTIC "MONADNOCK DOUBLE CUFF" WITH 2 LONG STRAPS THAT WHEN USED ARE INSERTED INTO THE SLOTS IN THE CENTRE OF THE CUFF TO SECURE. ALSO EMBOSSED ON THE SURFACE "FITZWILLIAM. NH. U.S.A.", AND "LICENSED UNDER US PAT. NO. 4910831". NEW.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
USED WHEN LARGE NUMBER OF CUFFS NEEDED. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112046
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
20.0
Length
32.9
Width
15.3
Description
RED METAL FIRE HOSE JACKET. EMBOSSED ON BOTH SIDES WITH “AKRON 77”. EACH END OF THE HOSE JACKET IS OPEN, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO GO THROUGH THE JACKET. HOSE JACKET IS HINGED ON THE TOP, HAS A HANDLE ON THE BOTTOM, AND ALSO OPENS FROM THE BOTTOM. A HINGED RECTANGULAR PIECE LIFTS UP TO ALLOW THE JACKET TO BE OPENED AND REVEALS THREE SQUARE OPENINGS. THERE ARE THREE SETS OF TWO RECTANGLES THAT FORM THREE SQUARES. WHEN CLOSED, THIS LARGE RECTANGLE WITH THREE SQUARE OPENINGS FITS OVER THE THREE RECTANGLE PAIRS. WHEN OPEN, THE JACKET REVEALS A BLACK RUBBER LINING. EMBOSSED ONTO THE RUBBER: “AKRON STYLE 77 HOSE JACKET LINER. - TO REPLACE LINER - 1. LIFT DOVETAILS FROM DOVETAIL SLOTS. 2. SQUEEZE SIDES OF LINER TOGETHER. 3. PULL LINER FROM HOUSING. 4. INSERT ONE END OF NEW LINER OVER PINS IN BOTTOM END OF HOUSING. 5. INSERT OTHER END OF LINER OVER PINS AT OPPOSITE END OF HOUSING. 6. INSERT DOVETAILS INTO DOVETAIL SLOTS. 7-29-011” ONE SIDE HAS A “Q1” STICKER ABOVE THE “N” IN “AKRON” STRUCTURALLY IN GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE FINISH IS VERY WORN AND HAS FLAKED OFF IN MANY PLACES. THE FINISH IS LOOSE AND CONTINUES TO FLAKE OFF.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE HOSE JACKET WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS JACKET IS A “HINGED TWO PART DEVICE TO BE PLACED OVER OR ON A 65MM HOSE LINE THAT HAS A LEAK IN IT. IT HAS RUBBER SEALS ON THE ENDS TO KEEP THE WATER IN. IT WAS KEPT ON EVERY FIRE ENGINE. WE STOPPED USING THEM WHEN WE REGULARLY STARTED TESTING HOSES AND FOUND LEAKY HOSES BEFORE A FIRE. SO [WE] NO LONGER HAD USE FOR THEM.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN ADDED THAT HOSES GET “RAGGED AND TATTERED, DRAGGED ALONG THE PAVEMENT AND DRAGGED ALONG THE CURBS, [WHICH] WEARS IT OUT. IF THE HOSE EVER BURSTS, RATHER THAN CHANGING THE HOSE, BECAUSE SOMETIMES TO CHANGE A HOSE YOU’VE GOT TO PUT TWO HOSES ON AND SHUT THE WATER OFF, AND IF THE GUYS AREN’T THERE, OR THEY’RE IN THE BUILDING, YOU CAN’T SHUT THE WATER OFF, SO THAT JUST GOES OVER LIKE A SLEEVE AND CLAMPS DOWN.” LAZENBY ELABORATED, SAYING: “THE USE WAS THAT ANY TIME YOU’RE FLOWING WATER UNDER PRESSURE, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT SOMETHING IS GOING TO BURST … SO YOU WOULD HAVE A BURST HOSE LENGTH. AND IF IT WASN’T IRREPARABLY DAMAGED OR IF THERE WAS A LEAK FROM A CERTAIN AREA OF THE HOSE, THIS HAD A RUBBER LINER THAT WAS BUILT IN EXACTLY LIKE A PERFECT CIRCLE THAT YOU WOULD BASICALLY ENCAPSULATE THE LEAK INSIDE OF THIS HOSE JACKET … NOWADAYS IF WE HAVE A BURST LENGTH, WE JUST REPLACE THE LENGTH. WE’LL SHUT THAT HOSE LINE DOWN; WE’LL TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE BECAUSE SOMETIMES AS HOSES ARE DAMAGED, THEY’LL CUT 8 FEET OFF … SO YOU HAVE A 42 FOOT HOSE INSTEAD OF 50 FEET … [WHICH LEAVES YOU] SHORT, SO THAT’S WHY YOU ALWAYS TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE … I THINK ONE OF THE REASONS WE WENT AWAY FROM THESE IS THAT WE HAVE A VERY STRINGENT HOSE TESTING PROCESS IN PLACE NOW. OUR HOSES GET TESTED EVERY YEAR TO THEIR MAXIMUM OPERATING PRESSURE AND BEYOND TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY CAN WITHSTAND PRESSURES THAT WE PUT THROUGH THEM … I WANT TO SAY THAT THOSE WERE ON THE TRUCKS ALMOST UP TO 10 YEARS AFTER I STARTED, SO UP TO A DOZEN YEARS AGO WE STILL SAW THESE [IN SERVICE].” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE [THEY] HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.0
Length
24.8
Width
16.6
Diameter
9.0
Description
ADJUSTABLE SILVER COLOURED METAL WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE. CENTRAL CYLINDRICAL PORTION HAS A COUPLING ON ONE END, THROUGH WHICH BLACK RUBBER IS VISIBLE. THE OPPOSITE END HAS A CAP ON THE END OF THE CYLINDER. THIS CAP HAS A SMALL KNOB, WHICH HAS A VERY SHORT PIECE OF THIN CHAIN ATTACHED. COMING OUT FROM THE TOP OF THE CLYINDER IS THE DUAL-ADJUSTABLE NOZZLE: A 90 DEGREE FITTING ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO ROTATE HORIZONTALLY AND HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE TIGHTENED TO PREVENT FURTHER ROTATION; THE SECOND COMPONENT ROTATES VERTICALLY AND IS ROUGHLY SHAPED LIKE A THUMBLESS MITTEN AND AN 11CM LONG SLIT THAT ALLOWS THE WATER TO SPRAY OUT. BELOW THE NOZZLE, COMING OUT FROM THE SIDES OF THE CYLINDER, IS A ROUGHLY TRIANGULAR SHAPED PORTION, WHICH GOES UNDER THE CYLINDER AND HAS TWO SMALL BOLTS ON THE VERY BOTTOM. EACH OF THE ARMS OF THIS TRIANGULAR SHAPE HAVE A RED STRIPE, WITH ONE HAVING A STICKER OF "Q1" IN THE RED STRIPE. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. THE SILVER FINISH ON THE METAL HAS FLAKED OFF, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES/CORNERS, AROUND THE COVER WITH THE SMALL PIECE OF CHAIN AND AROUND THE COUPLING. THE RED STRIPES HAVE PARTIALLY SCRATCHED OFF. THE "Q1" STICKER IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED IN 1959, RETIRED 1992), AND RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998). BROWN RECALLED “THAT’S JUST A KIND OF SPRAY CURTAIN BETWEEN BUILDINGS. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER USING IT. THAT’S WHAT IT IS. IF ONE BUILDING IS ON FIRE, AND YOU WANT TO TRY AND SAVE THE OTHER BUILDING, YOU PUT IT ON THERE, JUST KIND OF A BIG WALL OF SPRAY, AND THAT WOULD KEEP THE OTHER BUILDING SAFE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS CALLED A CURTAIN NOZZLE AND THE IDEA BEHIND THIS NOZZLE WAS … FOR EXPOSURE PROTECTION. AND, WHAT I MEAN BY THAT IS, IF YOU HAVE A HOUSE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREET THAT’S ON FIRE AND THE FIRE IS VENTING OUT THE WINDOWS ON ONE SIDE, THE HOUSE THAT IS IMMEDIATELY EXPOSED TO THAT HOUSE THAT’S ON FIRE, WE CONSIDER THAT AN EXPOSURE HAZARD … THE BEST WAY TO STOP HEAT FROM TRANSFERRING RADIANTLY FROM HOUSE A TO HOUSE B WAS TO PUT UP A STREAM OF WATER IN BETWEEN THE HOUSES … IT DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL WHEN IT WAS WINDY AND UNFORTUNATELY WITH THE WINDS THAT WE GET AROUND HERE IT BECAME INEFFECTIVE AT TIMES, AND IT ALSO WASN’T VERY STABLE. IF YOU PUMPED THIS THING TO MORE THAN ABOUT 60 POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH AT THIS NOZZLE, IT BECAME UNSTABLE AND IT WOULD FLIP OVER … THE IDEA AND THE CONCEPT WAS EXCELLENT … BUT I THINK [IN THE END] IT DIDN’T WORK AS WELL AS WHAT WAS HOPED.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, STATING THAT THE NOZZLES WERE “DEFINITELY ON THE TRUCKS WHEN I STARTED … [AND THAT] SOMEWHERE AROUND 2005” THEY WERE REMOVED FROM THE TRUCKS AND REPLACED WITH A “BLITZ FIRE NOZZLE”. HE RECALLED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USEFUL: “I SAW IT DEPLOYED. WE DID USE IT. AND AS FAR AS EFFICACY, IT’S HARD TO KNOW REALLY WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF IT HADN’T BEEN THERE, SO, DID IT DO ITS JOB? YES, IT DID. THEY WERE JUST A LITTLE BIT TOO FINICKY AND JUST MAYBE DIDN’T WORK QUITE AS WELL AS THE NEWER TECHNOLOGY THAT WAS COMING ON THE MARKET.” PETIT ADDED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS “JUST LIKE A SPRINKLER SYSTEM … YOU COULD PUT THAT BETWEEN THE TWO [CLOSE TOGETHER] BUILDINGS SO YOU COULD PROTECT THE OTHER ONE … I’VE SEEN IT USED, NOT IN A FIRE, BUT IN DRILLS … IT PROBABLY CAME IN AFTER [I STARTED IN THE 1960S] BUT LIKE I SAY, THE ONLY TIME I’VE EVER USED IT WAS WHEN WE HAD SOME DRILLS.” DZUREN RECALLED AN EARLIER VERSION: "I DON’T RECALL EVER USING THAT. NOW, THERE’S ANOTHER ONE THAT’S … GOT THESE LEGS SITTING HERE LIKE THAT [AND] YOU WOULD SET THAT ON THE GROUND. NOW IF THAT WAS TO HOOK UP A HOSE, THIS COULD BE SOMETHING WHERE YOU COULD HAVE A CONSTANT SPRAY GOING OUT. SAY IF THERE’S A FIRE THERE, AND YOU WANT TO PROTECT AN EXPOSURE CLOSE BY, AND THE FACT THAT THIS TRIPOD THERE, TO HAVE IT SITTING STEADY ON THE GROUND, AND THE SPRAY WOULD COME OUT OF THERE, THAT’S ALL THAT COMES TO MIND." "WE HAD A FIRE DOWN TOWN HERE, IT WAS THE OLD SAAN STORES ON THIS STREET, AND THERE WAS A FIRE IN THE UPPER STORY, AND WE, THERE WERE POWER LINES AND TRANSFORMERS RIGHT IN THE ALLEY, AND WE SET UP WHAT WE CALL A CURTAIN NOZZLE, AND IT WAS BASICALLY, BUT IT DIDN’T LOOK LIKE THAT, IT WAS BASICALLY THAT, BUT IT WAS A FLAT PIECE OF BRASS ABOUT THAT LONG WITH HOLES IN IT, AND WE PUT THAT ON SO IT WOULD BE A SPRAY GOING UP FAIRLY HIGH, I THINK IT WENT PROBABLY TWENTY-FIVE, THIRTY FEET HIGH. ONCE YOU PUT THE TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE ON THERE WITH THE HIGH PRESSURE TO PROTECT THE TRANSFORMERS FROM HEAT, FROM THE BUILDING THAT WAS BURNING. NOW, THAT’S THE ONLY THING I CAN THINK OF, OF WHAT THAT MIGHT BE, BUT I DON’T, I DON’T REMEMBER THAT…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
2 1/2 INCH FOG NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
2 1/2 INCH FOG NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1995
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.0
Length
50.3
Width
27.6
Description
FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE. SILVER COLOURED METAL, BLACK RUBBER AND PLASTIC. TWO LARGE BLACK RUBBER HANDLES COME OUT FROM THE CYLINDRICAL PORTION OF THE NOZZLE, MAKING A ROUNDED-CORNER SQUARE, WITH THE BODY OF THE NOZZLE GOING DOWN THE MIDDLE. "L" SHAPED METAL HANDLE WHERE BLACK RUBBER HANDLE MEETS BODY OF NOZZLE. DARK GREY COUPLING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NOZZLE ALLOWS THE LOWER HANDLE PORTION TO BE REMOVED. STAMPED INTO THE DARK GREY METAL: "AKRON NPSH". SILVER METAL ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE OPENED OR CLOSED AND IS EMBOSSED WITH "CLOSED" AND "OPEN" ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE HANDLE. STAMPED INTO THE METAL NEAR THIS OPEN/CLOSE LEVER IS "AKRON" AND THERE IS ALSO A BLACK STICKER OF "A1". ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THIS LEVER IS A SQUARE PATCH OF MEDIUM BLUE PAINT AND SCRATCHED INTO THE METAL IS "16 B". ABOVE THIS IS AN ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH THE FOLLOWING MEASUREMENTS: "120 3/4; 150 7/8; 200 1; 250 1 1/8" (THESE MEASUREMENTS INDICATE HOW MANY GALLONS OF WATER PER MINUTE THE NOZZLE WILL EXPEL). IT IS ALSO STAMPED WITH: "FLUSH" AND "AKRON TURBOJET". THIS RING HAS 24 RAISED SQUARES FOR GRIPPING. BEYOND THIS IS ANOTHER ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH "I V V", WHERE THE FIRST 'V' IS EXAGERATED AND EXTRA WIDE. (ADJUSTING THIS RING ADJUSTS THE FLOW OF WATER FROM A STRAIGHT STREAM TO A MIST OR FOG). THE BACKGROUND OF THESE STAMPS IS RED. BLACK RUBBER ABUTS THE ADJUSTABLE RING. THE RUBBER SECTION IS 7.7CM LONG AND IS TEXTURED, FIRST WITH A WIDE SET OF LINES, THEN ON THE VERY EDGE OF THE NOZZLE WITH A VERY CLOSE SET SECTION OF LINES. EMBOSSED ON THIS RUBBER SECTION IS: "US PAT. 3,387,791 - CAN PATENTED 1969". THE VERY END OF THE NOZZLE, WHERE THE WATER COMES OUT, HAS 24 BLACK PLASTIC TEETH. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGNS OF WEAR ON THE SILVER FINISH, ESPECIALLY ON ADJUSTABLE OPEN/CLOSED HANDLE AND THE "L" SHAPED HANDLE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS WEAPONS WE’VE GOT ON THAT DEPARTMENT. YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS HOLDING THAT THING … IT WAS FOR LARGER FIRES. YOU DIDN’T TAKE THAT INTO FIRES, BECAUSE YOU COULDN’T CONTROL IT. YOU’D TAKE IT MAYBE TO A DOOR OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. THIS HERE NOZZLE – YOU’D TURN – IT WOULD BE A SPRAY OR A STRAIGHT STREAM. IF YOU PUT IT ON NON-STRAIGHT STREAM, IT WOULD DRAG YOU ALL OVER THE GROUND. I CAN REMEMBER SEEING GUYS ON THIS NOZZLE, SNAKING BACK AND FORTH LIKE THAT, AND THEM HANGING ONTO THE NOZZLE BEFORE THEY COULD GET THEIR BALANCE TO SHUT IT OFF … YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS ON IT, AND IF BY CHANCE, THEY FELL OFF IT, AND THEY LET IT LOOSE, WELL, YOU CAN IMAGINE. THAT THING PROBABLY WEIGHED … I’M GUESSING 40 POUNDS; IT WAS A VERY HEAVY NOZZLE. IF IT HIT ANYBODY … IT WOULD BE PRETTY HARD. SO, IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE TWO GUYS ON THAT NOZZLE, YOU’D TAKE IT AND YOU’D MAKE A CIRCLE ON IT, AND YOU’D SIT ON THE CIRCLE WITH THE NOZZLE LIKE THAT, AND JUST THAT LITTLE CIRCLE WOULD SORT OF KNOCK THE PRESSURE, SO IT DIDN’T ALL COME OUT OF THE NOZZLE. IT WOULD BE BACK IN THAT LITTLE CIRCLE SO ONE GUY COULD HOLD IT. BUT YOU’D PRETTY WELL HAVE TO SIT ON THAT NOZZLE. AND, AFTER YOU WERE ON THAT NOZZLE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES, YOU WERE JUST WIPED. IT WAS LIKE FIGHTING A TOUGH LITTLE CALF. BUT THAT WAS JUST MORE OR LESS FOR THE BIG FIRES, AND FOR THE FIRES YOU COULDN’T GET INTO.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “IT’S A TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE AND THIS WAS NEARING THE END OF ITS LIFE SPAN WHEN I WAS HIRED. THIS IS A FOG NOZZLE, WHICH MEANS THAT YOU CAN CHANGE THE PATTERN OF THE WATER FROM A RELATIVELY SMOOTH OR STRAIGHT STREAM INTO A 75 DEGREE FOG FOR YOUR PROTECTION. BEING A TWO AND HALF INCH NOZZLE, THIS CAN FLOW AN AWFUL LOT OF WATER … I BELIEVE THE ERGONOMIC PLASTIC HANDLES WERE JUST FOR ERGONOMICS AND EASE OF HOLDING ON TO THAT. THIS HOSE WAS BIG ENOUGH THAT TYPICALLY ONE PERSON WOULDN’T WANT TO OPERATE THAT BY THEMSELVES, UNLESS YOU’RE A REALLY BIG, STRONG GUY. EVEN EMPLOYING WHAT WAS CALLED THE KEENAN HOSE LOOP AND ACTUALLY ROTATE THE NOZZLE UNDERNEATH, AROUND AND UNDERNEATH ITSELF, UNDER THE HOSE AND YOU WOULD SIT ON THE CROSS OF THE HOSE SO THAT WOULD BEAR ALL THE NOZZLE REACTION AND ALL YOU WOULD HAVE TO DO IS DIRECT THE STREAM … GOOD NOZZLE, BUT QUITE HEAVY AND WE WERE GOING AWAY FROM THESE IN FAVOUR OF A NEWER, PISTOL-GRIP STYLE OF NOZZLE WHERE IT WAS ACTUALLY LIKE A PISTOL HANDLE WITH THE BALE FIXED ON TOP THAT IT JUST GAVE YOU A LITTLE BIT EASIER USE, LESS CUMBERSOME … I NEVER ACTUALLY USED ONE OF THESE EXCEPT FOR IN TRAINING, BUT THEY WERE ON OUR BACKUP ENGINES – THEY WEREN’T FRONT LINE, BUT THEY WERE ON THE BACKUP ENGINES WHEN I STARTED.” DZUREN ADDED: “THERE’S USUALLY EITHER TWO OR THREE GUYS, DEPENDING ON WHERE YOU WERE USING IT. BECAUSE THE PRESSURE ON THAT, YOU HAD TO HAVE FAIRLY HIGH PRESSURE TO HAVE THAT EVEN FUNCTION PROPERLY. SO YOU WOULD NEED TO HAVE ONE GUY THAT WOULD OPERATE THIS TRIGGER VALVE HERE, OR THE SPRAY VALVE, AND SOMEBODY WOULD BE BEHIND YOU MAKING SURE THAT IT DIDN’T GET AWAY ON YOU, BECAUSE IF A HOSE GOT AWAY ON YOU WITH IT RUNNING, IT WOULD … IT COULD BREAK A PERSON’S LEG OR KILL A PERSON … IF IT GOT AWAY FROM THEM.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Length
151.1
Width
10.2
Diameter
6.3
Description
PIERCING NOZZLE. BRASS, WITH CHROME PLATE, STEEL, AND BLACK RUBBER. CYLINDRICAL END OF NOZZLE HEAD IS THREADED, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO BE CONNECTED. TEXTURED EDGE NEAR THREADING. THROUGH THIS OPENING A BLACK RUBBER RING AND METAL MESH ARE VISIBLE. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE EMBOSSED ON ONE SIDE WITH “AKRON BRASS” AND “1 1/2 4 WAP” ON THE OTHER. (NOTE: WAP IS A BEST GUESS, LETTERS HAVE LOST THEIR DEFINITION.) BELOW HANDLE, STAMPED INTO THE METAL BODY OF THE NOZZLE IS “SHUT FOG OPEN”. HANDLE MARKS CHANGE IN SHAPE FROM CYLINDRICAL TO TRIANGULAR. TRIANGULAR PORTION HAS A BLACK STICKER “Q2” AND A STRIPE OF YELLOW PAINT, NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE PIPE. A SMALL RECTANGULAR PUSH BUTTON ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE DISCONNECTED FROM THE PIPE. SMALL HOLE THROUGH THE NOZZLE HEAD VISIBLE AT THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD, WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES WITH THE OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE HANDLE. NEAR THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD STAMPED INTO THE METAL OF THE PIPE “LFD 62”, WITH THE STAMP BEING PARTIALLY FILLED IN WITH WHITE PAINT. TWO SECTIONS OF STEEL PIPING HAVE BEEN PERMANENTLY THREADED TOGETHER. END OF PIPE HAS THREE SETS OF TWELVE HOLES EACH AROUND THE PIPE, 13.5CM FROM THE END. TIP OF PIPE IS ANGLED, TO CREATE A SHARP END TO PENETRATE THROUGH WALLS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. WELL-WORN. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES OF THE HANDLE. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER. VARIOUS BLACK STAINS ON THE PIPE SECTION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIERCING NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “USED TO PUT WATER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF A WALL, FLOOR, OR CEILING. ALSO USED TO PUT WATER INSIDE OF A HAYSTACK.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED SAYING: “IT HAS A METAL PROBE ON ONE END OF IT WITH LITTLE HOLES DRILLED INTO IT. MOSTLY WE USED IT FOR BALE FIRES, JAMMING IT INTO THE HAYSTACK OR BALE … ONCE IN A WHILE, WE’D USE IT FOR INSIDE A WALL, BUT VERY SELDOM.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT … HAS A NUMBER OF NAMES … IT’S BEEN CALLED ANYTHING FROM A CELLAR NOZZLE … TO AN ATTIC NOZZLE, TO A PIERCING NOZZLE … THE POINT ON THE END OF THIS WAS ACTUALLY QUITE SHARP, AND IF YOU WANTED TO, IF YOU HAD AN ATTIC FIRE, YOU COULD EASILY POKE THIS FROM BELOW UP THROUGH YOUR DRYWALL AND YOUR INSULATION … AND THERE WERE A BUNCH OF SMALL HOLES DRILLED INTO THE VERY END SO THAT WHEN YOU DID OPEN IT, THE WATER WOULD COME OUT IN A FOG PATTERN.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING: “THE ADVANTAGE OF THAT IS THAT YOU DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO PULL THE CEILING DOWN … YOU COULD DO SOME SUPPRESSION UP THERE BEFORE YOU DECIDED TO PULL THAT CEILING DOWN AND SORT OF MAKE CONDITIONS BETTER BEFORE YOU EXPOSED YOURSELF TO THEM. SO FOR THE ATTIC USE, IT WORKED REALLY, REALLY WELL FROM WHAT I HEARD. I’VE NEVER DEPLOYED ONE OF THESE IN THAT SITUATION.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED FURTHER: “THE OTHER USE … IF YOU GOT TO A STRUCTURE AND THE BASEMENT WAS ON FIRE, SAME IDEA, JUST DIFFERENT DIRECTION … IF YOU SHOVED THE NOZZLE DOWN AND OPENED IT UP, YOU’RE GETTING AUTOMATIC SUPPRESSION BEFORE YOU SENT A TEAM DOWN THERE INTO THAT ATMOSPHERE. I WAS EVEN TOLD THAT YOU COULD USE THESE ON AN ENGINE FIRE … SOME OF THESE WERE BUILT WITH A STRIKING SECTION ON THEM SO THAT IF YOU HAD A HAMMER YOU COULD HIT THE TOP OF IT – THIS WOULD ACTUALLY PIERCE THE HOOD OF THE VEHICLE, ENTER THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, YOU COULD TURN THE NOZZLE ON, AND IT WOULD SUPPRESS THE FIRE WITHOUT EVER HAVING TO LIFE THE HOOD. … I DON’T THINK THAT WE EVER USED THIS TOOL MAYBE AS OFTEN AS WE SHOULD HAVE. I THINK THAT WE, AT TIMES, COULD HAVE MADE BETTER USE AND ACTUALLY MADE CONDITIONS A LITTLE BIT BETTER FOR OURSELVES BEFORE WE PUT OURSELVES INTO THAT SPACE OR ATMOSPHERE.” WHEN ASKED IF THIS TYPE OF NOZZLE IS STILL IN USE, LAZENBY REPLIED: “WE HAVE ONE OF THESE ON OUR ENGINE DOWNTOWN … OURS BREAKS DOWN INTO A COUPLE OF PIECES SO IT STORES EASIER … BUT FUNDAMENTALLY IT’S THE SAME TOOL, SLIGHT MODIFICATIONS FOR EASE OF USE, BUT YEAH, THEY’RE STILL AROUND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
METAL, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
323
Width
11.5
Diameter
4.2
Description
PIKE POLE. LONG, CYLINDRICAL WOODEN HANDLE, WITH A METAL HEAD. THE HEAD IS IN THE SHAPE OF A LOWER CASE 'R', WITH A STRAIGHT AND HOOKED POKER. TWO METAL RIVETS HOLD THE METAL HEAD ON THE WOODEN POLE. NO MARKINGS. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. METAL HAS RUSTED. WOOD IS WELL USED AND HAS SEVERAL GOUGES/SLIVERS MISSING. WOOD IS VERY DARK FROM USE. WOOD ESPECIALLY DARK AT JUNCTION WITH METAL HEAD.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIKE POLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT IT WAS “USED TO PULL CEILINGS FROM BELOW DURING OVERHAUL. ALSO USED TO FORCE CEILINGS DOWN DURING VENTILATION. THE SAME TYPE OF TOOL IS IN USE TODAY.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED “THAT WAS PRETTY IMPORTANT … WHEN YOU HAD A FIRE, AND THE FIRE WAS STILL GOING, BUT MOST OF IT WAS OUT, THE CEILINGS – IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW IF THE FIRE WAS OUT IN THE CEILING, YOU’D TAKE THE PIKE POLE, AND YOU CAN SEE HOW YOU WOULD POKE IT IN … THAT WAS A VERY DESTRUCTIVE TOOL, YOU COULD DO A LOT OF DAMAGE WITH THAT. BUT IF THERE WAS SOMETHING THAT YOU HAD TO GET INTO THE CEILING TO CHECK, AND WE’D OPEN A HOLE IN THE CEILING TO GET UP ON THE LADDER TO LOOK … POKING AROUND TO MAKE SURE THE FIRE WAS OUT.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS PROBABLY AS CLASSIC A TOOL, A HAND TOOL, AS MAYBE THE PICK HEADED AXE … AS FAR AS FIREFIGHTING GOES. THIS IS A GREAT SALVAGE AND OVERHAUL TOOL … IF YOU HAD A FIRE GO UP INSIDE THE WALLS AND YOU THOUGHT MAYBE THERE WAS FIRE IN THE ATTIC, YOU WOULD NEED TO PULL DOWN THE PLASTER BOARD OR THE LATH OR THE DRYWALL TO … DO A VISUAL INSPECTION OF THAT SPACE.” HE CONTINUED, EXPLAINING ITS USE: “THE POINTY END WAS PERFECT FOR BREAKING THROUGH THE DRYWALL AND ONCE YOU MADE THAT INCISION, FOR LACK OF A BETTER TERM, IF YOU TURNED IT NINETY DEGREES, NOW ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE HOOK IS POINTING TOWARDS A FRESH PORTION OF THE DRYWALL AND AS YOU PULLED, IT WOULD COME DOWN IN RELATIVELY LARGE CHUNKS. AND YOU CAN OPEN UP A FAIR AMOUNT OF CEILING IN A SHORT TIME WITH THIS.” LAZENBY DESCRIBED THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THIS PIKE POLE AND MORE MODERN VERSIONS: “THE CONNECTION POINT BETWEEN THE METAL HEAD AND WOODEN HANDLE WOULD WEAKEN AND SOMETIMES THE HEADS WOULD ROCK A LITTLE BIT; THEY WERE TOUGH TO KEEP TIGHT, THEY WOULD RUST A LITTLE BIT. THEY’RE BEING MADE OUT OF DIFFERENT MATERIALS NOW, MOST NOTABLY, THE HANDLES HAVE GONE TO FIBERGLASS. THEY DON’T CONDUCT ELECTRICITY WELL, WHICH IS GOOD. NEITHER DID THE WOOD, BUT AGAIN, NO SPLINTERS, NO SLIVERS, THAT KIND OF THING.” HE REITERATED THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS TOOL: “IT’S ANOTHER GO-TO TOOL FOR US: AXE, HALLIGAN, AND I WOULD SAY PIKE POLE ARE PROBABLY THE THREE MOST COMMONLY USED HAND TOOLS … AND ACTUALLY, IF YOU LOOK, MOST FIRE SERVICE BADGES THAT PEOPLE WEAR – YOU’VE GOT A PIKE POLE AND LADDER – THEY’RE SYNONYMOUS WITH THE FIRE SERVICE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
GATE VALVE / SLUICE VALVE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, CAST IRON, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20150010014
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GATE VALVE / SLUICE VALVE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, CAST IRON, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.0
Length
22.5
Width
11.7
Diameter
9.0
Description
CAST IRON, BRASS, AND SILVER COLOURED METAL GATE VALVE. SILVER COLOURED METAL HAND WHEEL IN THE SHAPE OF A SIDEWAYS 'L' ON TOP OF THE GATE VALVE ALLOWS THE INNER GATE TO BE OPENED OR CLOSED. BELOW THIS IS A BRASS NUT, WHICH IS ON TOP OF THE MAIN CAST IRON PORTION OF THE VALVE. MAIN PORTION OF THE VALVE IS RECTANGULAR, WITH A ROUNDED TOP NEAR THE BRASS NUT. EMBOSSED ON THE RECTANGULAR FRONT PORTION OF THE VALVE IS "HASBRA", WITH "HQ" BELOW THAT IN YELLOW PAINT. SIDE OF THE VALVE HAS "FD" ALSO IN YELLOW PAINT. ON THE BACK OF THE VALVE IS A COUPLING, WHICH ALLOWS THE VALVE TO BE AFFIXED TO A FIRE HYDRANT. OPPOSITE THIS COUPLING IS A SLIGHTLY CURVED SPOUT, WHICH IS THREADED ON THE END. ON THE BOTTOM OF THE GATE VALVE IS A 1.9CM KNOB.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS GATE VALVE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE VALVE WAS “USED TO [CONTROL THE] FLOW OF WATER FROM THE SMALL OUTLET ON A HYDRANT AND BE ABLE TO SHUT THE WATER OFF WITHOUT TURNING THE HYDRANT OFF. WE USED THESE MOSTLY WHEN TESTING THE HYDRANTS FOR PRESSURE AND FLOW. THE FIRE DEPARTMENT STOPPED TESTING HYDRANTS WHEN WATER WORKS TOOK IT OVER.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THE GATE VALVE “WAS JUST A VALVE TO SHUT OFF…[AND THAT] YOU’D FILL YOUR TRUCKS OFF A HYDRANT.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “YOU CAN HOOK THESE ONTO THE SIDE OF A TRUCK BECAUSE THE THREAD OF THE ADAPTER HERE HOOKS ON TO THE TWO AND HALF INCH COUPLE THAT COMES OFF THE MALE END THAT COMES OFF THE BACK OF THE TRUCK. YOU CAN ALSO ATTACH THIS TO THE HYDRANT AND LEAVE THE GATE TURNED OFF, OPEN THE HYDRANT SO THAT YOU GET FLOW AS FAR AS WHERE THE GATE IS–SO YOU COULD ISOLATE THIS LINE FROM THE REST OF THE HYDRANT IF YOU WANTED TO…SO IT’S JUST A WAY OF HAVING ACCESS TO WATER WHEN YOU WANT IT BUT NOT HAVING TO OPEN AND CLOSE THE FULL HYDRANT SYSTEM EVERY SINGLE TIME…WE HAVE USED THESE AN AWFUL LOT; WE’VE USED THESE IN A RURAL SETTING, WE’VE USED THEM FOR FILLING TRUCKS UP … I’VE USED THESE AN AWFUL LOT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010014
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010012
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2015
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.9
Length
64.2
Width
11.4
Description
ADJUSTABLE FIRE PLUG WRENCH, ALSO KNOWN AS A HYDRANT WRENCH. SILVER COLOURED METAL HANDLE WITH BLACK PAINTED METAL HEAD. HANDLE HAS A 10.2CM SECTION OF ENGRAVED CROSSHATCHING AT THE BOTTOM, KNOWN AS A KNURLED GRIP. ON THE LOWER PORTION OF THE BLACK HEAD, WHERE THE HEAD AND HANDLE MEET, THE FOLLOWING IS EMBOSSED: “RED HEAD – S W 3”. THE OTHER SIDE IS EMBOSSED WITH SIMPLY “RED HEAD”. JUST ABOVE THE EMBOSSED “RED HEAD” IS AN ADJUSTABLE WEDGE NUT, TO ALLOW THE USER TO REMOVE THE TOP BOLT (OPERATING NUT) OF A HYDRANT. WRENCH HEAD HAS THREE HOOKS: THE FIRST, CLOSEST TO THE ADJUSTABLE WEDGE NUT IS FOR USE ON HYDRANT ADAPTERS (THE SMALLER ARMS OF A HYDRANT); THE OTHER TWO ARE FOR USE ON THE NOZZLE CAP (THE LARGE, REMOVABLE COVER ON THE FRONT OF A HYDRANT). OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. THE FINISH ON THE BLACK HEAD HAS FLAKED OFF IN SEVERAL AREAS, ESPECIALLY ON THE THREE HOOKS AND ON THE INSIDE OF THE ADJUSTABLE WEDGE NUT HOUSING. SURFACE RUST HAS DEVELOPED WHERE THE METAL IS EXPOSED. SILVER METAL HANDLE IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, WITH ONLY A FEW SURFACE STAINS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ADJUSTABLE FIRE PLUG WRENCH (HYDRANT WRENCH) WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT, PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), SAID IT “WAS NOT ISSUED TO ALL FIRE FIGHTERS, NOR [WAS IT] CARRIED ON THEIR PERSON … [IT] IS A COMBINATION TOOL THAT IS ADJUSTABLE. IT [WAS] ALSO USED ON HIGH VOLUME (I.E. 5” OR 125MM HOSE COUPLINGS). IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998). BROWN ELABORATED, SAYING: “I DON’T EVER REMEMBER USING IT, EVER. IT WAS THAT WE USED THE HYDRANT KEY [INSTEAD]. BASICALLY, IT WAS THE SAME THING; IT WAS FOR A HYDRANT THAT WAS STUCK MORE. I KNOW THAT SOMETIMES I COULDN’T OPEN A HYDRANT. [BUT] ALL I HAD TO [DO WAS] LOOK AROUND FOR ONE OF THE BIG GORILLAS AT WORK AND SAY ‘I CAN’T OPEN THIS HYDRANT.’ HE’D COME AND HE’D TWIST IT AND THE HYDRANT WAS COMING OFF ITS STAND. THERE WERE SO MANY GUYS SO MUCH MORE POWERFUL THAN I WAS.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THAT WAS SORT OF THE FIRST GENERATION OF HYDRANT OPENING TOOLS [REFERENCING P20150010011]. THIS [P20150010012] I WOULD SAY, IS MAYBE GENERATION NUMBER TWO. YOU CAN SEE BY THE LONG STEM THAT’S THREADED HERE, THAT THIS IS ADJUSTABLE IN NATURE AND THIS WAS CONSIDERED LIKE A MORE OF A MULTI-TOOL … NOW WE’VE MOVED ONTO RATCHETING [WRENCHES] SO THAT YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE TO GO ALL THE WAY AROUND … I BELIEVE WE STILL HAVE SOME OF THESE ON THE DEPARTMENT AND I THINK WE DON’T MOUNT THESE TO THE BACK OF THE TRUCKS ANYMORE, BUT YOU STILL MIGHT FIND A COUPLE OF THESE UP ON THE HIGHBALL HOSES ON THE HOSE BEDS.” PETIT AGREED WITH KURTZ, SAYING: “I’M SURE IT WAS CARRIED ON THE PUMP, IT WASN’T CARRIED BY THE FIRE FIGHTERS.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010012
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.5
Width
14.7
Description
METAL HYDRANT WRENCH, NOT ADJUSTABLE. WRENCH IS ROUGHLY AN 'L' SHAPE. ONE END OF THE WRENCH HAS A SINGLE CLAW, USED FOR PRYING. THE OPPOSITE END (THE SHORT END OF THE 'L') HAS A REULEAUX TRIANGLE, A SLIGHT HOOK, AND A SMALL (2.5CM) CIRCLE. IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HANDLE, ON ONE SIDE ONLY, IS A RECTANGULAR PATCH OF LIGHT GREY PAINT. THERE ARE REMNANTS OF LIGHT GREY FINISH ON THE REST OF THE WRENCH. OVERALL IN FAIR CONDITION. VERY RUSTED. GREY FINISH HAS ALMOST ENTIRELY FLAKED OFF. THE RECTANGULAR AREA OF GREY FINISH IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE PLUG WRENCH, OR HYDRANT WRENCH, WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ACCORDING TO BROWN THIS IS A “GOOD OLD HYDRANT KEY. WE ALL CARRIED ONE ON OUR BELT … IT WAS MADE OF PRETTY DURABLE STEEL. YOU COULD PRY ON THAT THING ALL YOU WANTED. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER ONE BREAKING. YOU COULD USE IT AS A HAMMER, AS A CLUB. WE ALWAYS JOKED – WE’D USE IT AS A WEAPON IF WE EVER GOT INTO TROUBLE WITH OTHER PEOPLE. IT NEVER HAPPENED – JUST A JOKE. IT WAS PROBABLY YOUR MAIN LINE TOOL, BREAK WINDOWS, BREAK DOORS IN. YOU KNOW, WE DIDN’T HAVE A WHOLE LOT OF REAL FANCY TOOLS IN THOSE DAYS BUT THAT HYDRANT KEY WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO US. WE CARRIED THEM ON OUR HYDRANT BELTS.” LAZENBY EXPANDED: “WHEN I WAS HIRED EVERY MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT WAS ISSUED ONE OF THESE WHEN YOU GOT YOUR BUNKER GEAR OR YOUR TURNOUTS AND YOUR HELMET. YOU WERE ISSUED A HYDRANT KEY WITH A LEATHER HOLSTER BELT THAT YOU WORE OVER TOP OF YOUR JACKET … NOW THERE WAS A FEW ROLES OR A FEW USES FOR THIS TOOL. NUMBER ONE, FIRST AND FOREMOST, IT IS A HYDRANT KEY WHICH MEANS THAT THIS WAS THE KEY THAT YOU USED TO ESSENTIALLY OPEN THE HYDRANT. THE OPENING AT THE END AWAY FROM THE BEVELED EDGE IS CUT IN THE SAME SIZE AND SHAPE AS THE STEM ON TOP OF THE HYDRANT AND IT WAS SIMPLY LEFTY-LOOSE, RIGHTY-TIGHTY. BUT THIS COULD ALSO BE USED AS A FORCIBLE ENTRY TOOL, PERHAPS AS A TOOL TO FIND A MEANS OF EGRESS IF YOU HAPPEN TO BE TRAPPED, YOU COULD BREAK WINDOWS WITH THIS. YOU COULD USE THE PRYING END TO PRY IF YOU HAD TO. I DON’T RECALL WHAT THE PURPOSE OF THE ROUND OPENING ON THAT KIND OF FLANGE END WAS - I DON’T REMEMBER THAT. BUT I DO REMEMBER THAT THERE WAS A SORT OF A MINDSET AMONG SOME OF THE SENIOR MEMBERS THAT IF YOU LET YOUR HYDRANT KEY BECOME ALL RUSTED AND LOOK A LITTLE BIT DISHEVELED THAT THAT WAS SORT OF LIKE THE MARK OF A POOR FIREFIGHTER, SOMEONE THAT DIDN’T LOOK AFTER THEIR GEAR PROPERLY, AND SO WE USED TO – AT TIMES WE WOULD BREAK OUT SOME STEEL WOOL OR THE PNEUMATIC POLISHER AND ACTUALLY POLISH THESE TO A NICE BRIGHT, SILVERY - LIKE A CHROME SHEEN, ALMOST. SO WHEN THEY ISSUED THEM THEY LOOKED TERRIBLE - THEY WERE UNFINISHED AND IT WAS YOUR JOB TO SORT OF GET IT POLISHED UP AND GET IT INTO SERVICE, SO TO SPEAK.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, SAYING THAT BY 2000 “THESE ARE NO LONGER ISSUED TO INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS … WE’VE EVOLVED IN SOME WAYS IN THAT THE HYDRANT KEY NOW TYPICALLY IS … MOUNTED ON THE BACK OF THE TRUCK … THE WHOLE INDUSTRY IS STARTING TO CHANGE IN THAT WE’RE BECOMING MUCH MORE SAFETY-ORIENTED WHEN IT COMES TO THESE TYPES OF THINGS … THIS BECAME REDUNDANT, AND YOU KNOW, IT WAS A LITTLE BIT SMALL FOR THE JOB THAT IT WAS ASKED TO DO AS WELL. OBVIOUSLY, THE BIGGER YOUR TOOL, THE BETTER PRYING AND STRENGTH AND WEIGHT YOU GET. THIS, YOU RELIED A LOT ON THE PERSONAL STRENGTH OF THE PERSON TO BE ABLE TO USE THIS EFFECTIVELY … WHEREAS WITH THE BIGGER ONES NOW, THEY’RE HEAVIER, THEY’RE A LITTLE BIT LONGER, YOU CAN JUST GET BETTER LEVERAGE NATURALLY.” PETIT AGREED, ADDING THAT HE BELIEVED THE WRENCH “WAS MADE IN LETHBRIDGE. MAYBE LETHBRIDGE IRON WORKS.” DZUREN EXPLAINED THAT THE WRENCH “WAS CARRIED IN A LEATHER HOLSTER TYPE OF THING THAT HUNG AT YOUR SIDE AND IT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS YOU PUT ON RIGHT AWAY, AS SOON AS YOU PUT ON YOUR TURN OUT GEAR … THAT WOULD BE THERE BECAUSE YOU WOULD NEED THAT TO TURN ON YOUR FIRE HYDRANT IF YOU NEEDED THE HYDRANT FOR WATER … AND IT ALSO HAD, THERE WAS A LITTLE, TINY, THE TOP OF THE KEY THERE WAS A LITTLE ROUND THING THAT WAS THERE TO TIGHTEN THE CUP LINKS ON HOSES, IF YOU HAD TO TIGHTEN A HOSE THAT WAS LEAKING.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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