Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions64881
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
19991016033
Physical Description
2 items
Scope and Content
The Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society's 1993 Program Plan Scedule B. Information incudes the mission statement, services, visitors, program leadership, fee and charges schedule, program safety practices, budget, and agreement compliance.
Material Type
Manuscript
Physical Description
2 items
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
The Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society's 1993 Program Plan Scedule B. Information incudes the mission statement, services, visitors, program leadership, fee and charges schedule, program safety practices, budget, and agreement compliance.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19991016033
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Town Of Magrath Fonds: Administrative Correspondence, 1958-1970

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions1321
Date Range
1958-1970
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
19941031256
Physical Description
Approximately 102 cm. 124 files.
Scope and Content
19941031256 - Accounts Receivable. 1965. 19941031257 - Advertising: Store News. 1959-1969. 19941031258 - Agriculture Department. 1963-1968. 19941031259 - Alberta Canning Company. 1963-1969. 19941031260 - Alberta Government Telephones. 1961-1968. 19941031261 - Alberta Housing And Urban Renewal Co…
Material Type
Manuscript
Date Range
1958-1970
Physical Description
Approximately 102 cm. 124 files.
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
19941031256 - Accounts Receivable. 1965. 19941031257 - Advertising: Store News. 1959-1969. 19941031258 - Agriculture Department. 1963-1968. 19941031259 - Alberta Canning Company. 1963-1969. 19941031260 - Alberta Government Telephones. 1961-1968. 19941031261 - Alberta Housing And Urban Renewal Corporation. 19674-1967. 19941031262 - Alberta Municipal Financing Corporation. 1964-1968. 19941031263 - Alberta Urban Municipalities Association. 1967-1968. 19941031264 - Alberta Wheat Pool. 1962. 19941031265 - 266 - Applications for employment. 1960-1968. 19941031267 - Assessment appeals. 1960-1967. 19941031268 - Assessments Equalization Board 1962-1968 19941031269 - Assessments. 1960-1968. 19941031270 - Assessments: Calgary Power and Canadian Western Natural Gas. 1961-1968. 19941031271 - Attorney General correspondence re: Liquor Control Act, Policing the Town of Magrath, Juvenile Deliquesnts Act notices. 1962-1967. 19941031272 - Blood Indian Agency (Cardston) Guard Duty invoices. 1961-1964. 19941031273 - Board of Industrial Relations. 1959-1966. 19941031274 - Board of Public Utilities commissioners. 1960-1962. 19941031275 - 281 - Building Permits. 1961-1968. 19941031282 - Bylaw 733: dog impoundment. 1962. 19941031283 - Bylaw 734: Business licensing.1962. 19941031284 - Calgary Power. 1959-1968. 19941031285 - Canadian Pacific Railway. 1965. 19941031286 - Canadian western natural gas. 1961-1968. 19941031287 - Cardston School Division. No. 2 1961-1967 19941031288 - Pioneer Day Celebrations, July 24, 1962. 19941031289 - Centennial Celebration 1967. 1964-1968. 19941031290 - Chamber of Commerce. 1961-1966. 19941031291 - Chinook Foundation Senior Citizen Home, Cardston. 1960-1968. 19941031292 - 293 - civil Defense. 1959-1968. 19941031294 - Complaints, 1967. 19941031295 - County System of government, includes a municipal affairs publiction containing historical and current information about the county system as well as commonly asked questions and answers about the system. 1961-1969. 19941031296 - Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1961-1966. 19941031297 - Donations to non-profit organizations. 1960-1966. 19941031298 - department of education/ 1961-1966. 19941031299 - Ellison Milling. 1963-1965. 19941031300 - Employees. 1964. 19941031301 - Canada Department of Finance, Municipal Grants Division. 1961-1967. 19941031302 - Financial Statements. 1966-1968. 19941031303 - Fire Department. 1961-1967. 19941031304 - Fire reports. 1965-1966. 19941031305 - Health Unit. 1961-1968. 19941031306 - Highways Department. 1961-1967. 19941031307 - Homeowner's Tax Discount. 1966. 19941031308 - hospital Requisitions: Department of Municipal Affairs, Hospitals Act. 1961-1965. 19941031309 - Alberta Department of Industry and Development. 1964-1965. 19941031310 - Insurance. 1960-1966. 19941031311 - Irrigation. 1959-1966. 19941031312 - Irrigation: ARDA. 1963-1964. 19941031313 - Irrigation: Magrath Headgate Monument. 1962-1967. 19941031314 - 317 - Land Titles Office. 19941031318 - Land Transfers. 1959-1965. 19941031319 - Land Rentals. 1968. 19941031320 - Lethbridge Herald printing. 1960-1968. 19941031321 - Lethbridge Safety Council. 1961-1964. 19941031322 - Letters to ratepayers. 1965-1967. 19941031323 - Library. 1964-1966. 19941031324 - List of Electors. 1966-1968. 19941031325 - Local Authorities Board. 1963-1968. 19941031326 - Magistrates Office: Receipts for courtroom rental, statements of fines and police costs payable to the municipality. 1963-1967. 19941031327 - Materials tests: Sidewalks and curbs. 1962. 19941031328 - Medical Services Incorporated. 1963-1967. 19941031329 - Mines and Minerals Department. 1962-1966. 19941031330 - 336 - Miscellaneous correspondence. 1961-1968. 19941031337 - 338 - Alberta Department of Municipal Affairs. 1959-1968. 19941031339 - Alberta Department of Municipal Affairs: Inspector's reports. 1960-1967. 19941031340 - Alberta Department of Municipal Affairs: Tax Assessment. 1963-1967. 19941031341 - Municipal District of Cardston. 1964-1966. 19941031342 - Natural Gas Service. 1963-1967. 19941031343 - Bylaw 769: Construction of new town hall and library. 1966-1968. 19941031344 - Park Theatre. 1967. 19941031345 - Plumbing Inspector. 1964. 19941031346 - Police. 1961-1966. 19941031347 - Provincial Planning Advisory Board.1960-1966. 19941031348 - Provincial Secretary Department: Office of Fire Commissioner. 1963-1967. 19941031349 - Provincial Treasurer. 1960-1962. 19941031350 - Alberta Department of Provincial Health: includes restaurant inspections. 1963-1968. 19941031351 - Public notices. 1963-1970. 19941031352 - public trustee: Estates of Theador Klem, William Henry Gibb, Lee Carter, Lillian M. Naylor. 1959-1967. 19941031353 - 354 - Public Welfare Department.1960-1968. 19941031355 - Public Welfare Department: Applications for aid. 1959-1966. 19941031356 - Purchase orders. 1963-1970. 19941031357 - Recreation and Cultural Development Branch. 1962-1964. 19941031358 - Resignations. 1958 -1966. 19941031359 - Road Maintenance. 1959-1967. 19941031360 - safety programs. 1967-1968. 19941031361 - Southern Alberta Tourist Council. 1966. 19941031362 - Spencer, J. A. correspondence with town council. 19941031363 - Stringham, Steele and Denecky (barristers, solicitors and notaries) legal correspondence with Town of Magrath.1960-1968. 19941031364 - Swimming Pool, including sketch of renovations. 1960-1968. 19941031365 - Tax Arrears. 1962-1966. 19941031366 - Tax Collections. 1960-1968. 19941031367 - Tax Sales. 1961-1966. 19941031368 - Taxpayer inquiries. 1967-1968. 19941031369 - Texaco Canada Limited. 1966. 19941031370 - Town boundaries. 1962. 19941031371 - Unemployment Insurance Commission. 1961-1968. 19941031372 - Union of Alberta Municipalities. 1965-1966. 19941031373 - University of Lethbridge: Three Alberta Universities Fund - 3 AU Capital Fund. Includes a paper on the project. 1968. 19941031374 - 376 - Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program. 1961-1968. 19941031377 - Winter Works Program: Payroll sheets. 1960-1964. 19941031378 - Winter Works Program: record books. 1960-1961. 19941031379 - Workman's Compensation Board. 1961-1968.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19941031256
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society Fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions11340
Date Range
1966 to 1994
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
19981070000
Physical Description
114 cm of textual records (Note: Contains three architectural drawings of the Fort Whoop-Up replica)
Scope and Content
The fonds is composed of two series. The first series consists of the records of the Kinsmen Club of Lethbridge, and pertain to the construction, expansion and maintenance of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Centre. The second series consists of the records of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society, …
Material Type
Manuscript
Date Range
1966 to 1994
Physical Description
114 cm of textual records (Note: Contains three architectural drawings of the Fort Whoop-Up replica)
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society 1973- The organization was founded on 19 November 1973 as the Whoop Up Historical Society, to take over operation of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Centre from the Kinsmen Club of Lethbridge. The Kinsmen constructed the replica of Fort Whoop-Up as a project for Canada's centennial . The project began in 1965 and was completed in 1966. The replica is located in the river valley at Lethbridge, just north of the Whoop Up Drive traffic bridge. In 1978 the society changed its name to the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretative Society. The name has been shortened slightly to Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society in general use. The objectives of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society include the "Interpretation of Trade Era 1865-1895, encompassing activities of Fort Whoop-Up including interaction of American and Blackfoot peoples and the occupation of the Fort by the North West Mounted Police." (source: Lethbridge Community Information Directory, June 1997) A major reconstruction and upgrading of the replica Fort Whoop-Up took place in the years 1984-1987. Archaeologist B.O.K. (Barney) Reeves did ectensice work at the sire of the original fort, and discovered that the North West Mounted Police (NWMP) plan of it was inaccurate.The fort was in fact rectangular, and the interior layout was different than shown in the NWMP plan. Renovations were undertaken to make the replica match the appearance of the original Fort Whoop-Up, and expand the visitor services available at the facility. At present the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society operates the Interpretive Centre year-round, with a variety of public programs and services.
Scope and Content
The fonds is composed of two series. The first series consists of the records of the Kinsmen Club of Lethbridge, and pertain to the construction, expansion and maintenance of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Centre. The second series consists of the records of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society, and pertain to the operation and maintenance of the Interpretive Centre as well as the operation of the Society. 19981070001 - Minutes Kinsmen Centennial Committee 1965-1967* 19981070002 - Minutes Whoop-Up Country Committee Januare 1968 - June 1968 19981070003 - Minutes Fort Expansion - Whoop-Up Country Committee December 1968 - June 1969* 19981070004 - Minutes Kinsdmen Country Committee February 1970 - June 1971 19981070005 - Minutes Fort Whoop-Up Committee March 1972 - June 1973 19981070006 - Brochures ca 1968* 19981070007 - Construction 1966* 19981070008 - Financial Accounts 1966-1968 19981070009 - Financial Statements and Estimates 1966-1970 19981070010 - Fort Whoop-Up Reconstruction1961-1984* 19981070011 - Fort Whoop-Up Concept 1965-1966* 19981070012 - Fort Whoop-Up Plans, Photographs and Information Glenbow Foundation 1962* 19981070013 - Fort Whoop-Up Through Contempary Eyes - Manscript Gerald L. Berry* 19981070014 - Half Way House 1967 19981070015 - Jerry Potts Plainsman Booklet by Hugh A.Dempsey 1965 19981070016 - Maps and Plans for Railway track and tunnel; Grades Top Rail Elevations and a portion of a map of Lethbridge showing loction of the Fort Replica* 19981070017 - Miscellaneous Coorespondence 1965-1966 19981070018 - Miscellaneous Coorespondence 1967 19981070019 - Miscellaneous Coorespondence 1968-1973 19981070020 - MontanaHistorical Society 1967-1968 19981070021 - News clippings 1968 -1972* 19981070022 - A Proposal for a Dynamic Visitor Attraction for southern Alberta - Frank Smith October 6, 1971* 19981070023 - Recent History of Fort Whoop-Up by Tom Atkinson - April 1967* 19981070024 - River Valley Corridor Recreation Development by Neil J. Andrew November 1970* 19981070025 - The Whiskey Traders The NWMP Part 1 by Phyliss A. Arnold 1969* 19981070026 - Whoop Up Historical Society November 1973- October 1975* 19981070027 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society February 1980-March 1981 19981070028 - By-laws Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society August 1983 19981070029 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society 1986 19981070030 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society 1987 19981070031 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society 1988 19981070032 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society 1989 19981070033 - Minutes Fort Whoop Up Interperative Society 1990-1991 19981070034 - Adminstration 1990-1991 19981070035 - Advertising Committee 1987-1988 19981070036 - Bats 19981070037 - Board Members 1985-1990 19981070038 - Brochures* 19981070039 - Budget Proposals 1984-1989 19981070040 - Budget Proposals 1990-1991 19981070041 - Chinook Country Tourist Association 1989 19981070042 - Chinook Country Tourist Association Marketing Plan 1992/1993 Edition 19981070043 - City of Lethbridge Correspondence 1978-1991 19981070044 - City of Lethbridge Theme Selction Study August 1978 19981070045 - Coalhurst Miner's Days August 19-21, 1988 19981070046 - Community Recreation/ Curtural Grant Allication 1990 19981070047 - Consultation Meeting with Alberta Museums July 1982 19981070048 - Convention and Special Events Caldendar City of Lethbridge 1992 19981070049 - Display Units Fort Whoop Up Interperative Center 1984* 19981070050 - Donations 1987 19981070051 - Expansion Feasibility Study 1990* 19981070052 - Feasibility Study Fort Whoop Up Interpertaive Center* 19981070053 - Financial Statements Whoop Up Country Historical Society 1973-1977 19981070054 - Financial Statements Whoop Up Interpreative Society 1978,1980-1984 19981070055 - Financial Statements Whoop Up Interpreative Society 1985 - 1987 19981070056 - Financial Statements Whoop Up Interpreative Society 1988-1989 19981070057 - Financial Statements Whoop Up Interpreative Society 1990-1991 19981070058 - Fire Alarms 1988 - 1990 19981070059 - Fort Floor Plan April 1986* 19981070060 - Fort Whoop-Up Concepts General Overview* 19981070061 - Fort Whoop-Up Interpretation Center Marketing Research Results 19981070062 - Fort Whoop-Up Interpretative Society Strategic lan Octoberr 31, 1988 19981070063 - Fort Whoop-Up Period Rooms Schematic Designs* 19981070064 - For Whoop-up Society 1986* 19981070065 - Glenbox Museum 198901992 19981070066 - Grant Applications 1987-1988 19981070067 - Grant Applications Alberta Culture 1977-1986 19981070068 - Grant Applications Alberta Culture 1987-1990 19981070069 - Grant Applications Alberta Museums Associaiton 1986-1991 19981070070 - Historical Interpretive Display Design for City of Lethbrige Mqarch 1984* 19981070071 - Historical Interpretive Display Design Workshop 1984* 19981070072 - Historical Interpretive Master Plan* 19981070073 - Historical Site Management Manual 1986* 19981070074 - Hospitality Training Program 1987* 19981070075 - Insurance 1971-1989 19981070076 - Intern Program 1986-1987 19981070077 - Interpreative program 1987-1988* 19981070078 - Interpreative program 1989-1992 19981070079 - Interpretation Strategy 19981070080 - Interpretive Center Display Concepts* 19981070081 - Interviewing and Resuems: Job Application 1990 19981070082 - Inventory 1983-1986* 19981070083 - Invitations for Proposals for For Whoop -Up Period Rooms & Compound Furnishing and Features 1986* 19981070084 - Lease Agreement 1974 19981070085 - Lease Agreement 1985 19981070086 - Lease Agreement 1989 19981070087 - Lethbridge: A Whole Lot of Heritage 1987 19981070088 - Lethbridge Major Toursit Attraction Feasability Proposal Jan. 1989 19981070089 - Lethbidge: The Western Heritage Center October 1989 19981070090 - Lethbridge Tourism Action Plan 1987 19981070091 - Lethbridge Tourism Marketing Plan 1988 19981070092 - Lombard North Group Designers 1984* 19981070093 - Management Committee 1987-1988 19981070094 - Market Analysis university of Lethbridge 1988 19981070095 - Marshall, Aklin, Monaghan Western Consulting Engineers 1984-1986* 19981070096 - Miscellaneous Correspondence 1973-1977 19981070097 - Miscellaneous Correspondence 1979-1986 19981070098 - Miscellaneous Correspondence 1987-1991 19981070099 - Museum Assistant Program Application 1992 19981070100 - Newspaper Clippings 1987-1992* 19981070101 - Payroll Accounts 1982 19981070102 - Payroll Accounts 1987 19981070103 - Payroll Timesheets 1986-1988 19981070104 - Payroll Timesheets 1989-1990 19981070105 - Plans and Drawings fo Fort Whoop-Up 19981070106 - P.M.L. Exhibit Services Limited Furishings 1986-1987* 19981070107 - Priority Employment Program 1986-1988 19981070108 - Program Committee 19981070109 - Program Resources Inventory 19981070110 - Proposed Feasibility Study for the Fior Whoop-Up Interpretive Center - Advisory Group October 1990 19981070111 - Purchase Orders 1982-1986 19981070112 - Purchase Orders 1986-1988 19981070113 - River Valley Area Development Plan 1986* 19981070114 - River Valley Development 1974 19981070115 - Robins, Watson, Brunton Architects 1984* 19981070116 - Safety and Security 1976 - 1985* 19981070117 - Safety and Security Fort Steele 1979 - 1986 19981070118 - Schools 1987-1988 19981070119 - Service Accounts 1989-1991 19981070120 - Special Events 1987-1990 19981070121 - Staff Manual Alberta Culture Southwest Region 1988* 19981070122 - Staff Memos 1991 19981070123 - Summer Employment/Experience Development program 1987* 19981070124 - Summer Employment/Experience Development program 1988* 19981070125 - Summer Employment/Experience Development program 1989* 19981070126 - Summer Employment/Experience Development program 1990* 19981070127 - Summer Temporary Employment Program 1983 - 1987 19981070128 - Summer Temporary Employment Program 1988 19981070129 - Summer Temporary Employment Program 1989 19981070130 - Tour Bookings 1990 19981070131 - Tour Bookings Correspondence 1990 19981070132 - Tour Highlights Notes 1982* 19981070133 - Tourism Action Committee 1989-1990 19981070134 - Touristg Statistics 1988-1989 19981070135 - Train/People Mover 1984-1989* 19981070136 - Travel and Convention Association of wouthern Alberta Annual Report1976* 19981070137 - Urban Parks Correspondence 1984-1987 19981070138 - Urban Parks Project Draft Master Plan February 1989 19981070139 - Urban Parks Project 1980-1986 Final Report 1987 19981070140 - Urban Parks Project Historical Interpretive Master Plan Part I 19981070141- Urban Parks Project Historical Interpretive Master Plan Part II 19981070142 - Urban Parks Project Master Plan no date 19981070143 - Urban Parks Proposal Alberta Recreation and Parks 1979 19981070144- Urban Parks Proposal Maps 19981070145 - Volunteer Board Develpment Workshop 1987 - 1992
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19981070000
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society Fonds: Society Series

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions11342
Date Range
1973 to 1994
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
19981070026
Physical Description
95 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
26 Minutes of the Whoop Up Historical Society. 19 November 1973 to 19 October 1975 27 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 25 September 1980 to 2 March 1981 28 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. July 1983 29 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 17 May…
Material Type
Manuscript
Date Range
1973 to 1994
Creator
Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society
Physical Description
95 cm of textual records
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society 1973- The organization was founded on 19 November 1973 as the Whoop Up Historical Society, to take over operation of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Centre from the Kinsmen Club of Lethbridge. The Kinsmen constructed the replica of Fort Whoop-Up as a project for Canada's centennial . The project began in 1965 and was completed in 1966. The replica is located in the river valley at Lethbridge, just north of the Whoop Up Drive traffic bridge. In 1978 the society changed its name to the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretative Society. The name has been shortened slightly to Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society in general use. The objectives of the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society include the "Interpretation of Trade Era 1865-1895, encompassing activities of Fort Whoop-Up including interaction of American and Blackfoot peoples and the occupation of the Fort by the North West Mounted Police." (source: Lethbridge Community Information Directory, June 1997) A major reconstruction and upgrading of the replica Fort Whoop-Up took place in the years 1984-1987. Archaeologist B.O.K. (Barney) Reeves did ectensice work at the sire of the original fort, and discovered that the North West Mounted Police (NWMP) plan of it was inaccurate.The fort was in fact rectangular, and the interior layout was different than shown in the NWMP plan. Renovations were undertaken to make the replica match the appearance of the original Fort Whoop-Up, and expand the visitor services available at the facility. At present the Fort Whoop-Up Interpretive Society operates the Interpretive Centre year-round, with a variety of public programs and services.
Scope and Content
26 Minutes of the Whoop Up Historical Society. 19 November 1973 to 19 October 1975 27 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 25 September 1980 to 2 March 1981 28 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. July 1983 29 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 17 May 1983 to 6 December 1986 30 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 20 January to 10 December 1987 31 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 20 January to 8 December 1988 32 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 15 January to 15 November 1989 33 Minutes of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society, including revised mission statement. January 1990 to 21 November 1991 34 Administration, including pest control, promotional material and correspondence. 1990 to 1991 35 Advertising Committee minutes, promotional material and correspondence. 7 January 1987 to September 1988 36 Bat control, including reports of examinations for rabies, and a pest control report by Grace Holmes. 21 August 1990 to 21 January 1991 37 List of officers and directors of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 1985 to 1990 38 Brochures promoting Fort Whoop Up. 1989 39 Budget proposals. 1984 to 1989 40 Budget proposals. 41 Tourist Associates re a major tourist attraction for Lethbridge. Descriptions of staff duties at Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre. October 1989 42 Draft of the “Chinook Country Tourist Association Marketing Plan 1992/1993 Edition”. October 1991 43 Correspondence with the City of Lethbridge about a variety of topics, including facility repair and security, funding, operating agreement and the Urban Parks Project. 8 May 1978 to 25 January 1991 44 “City of Lethbridge Theme Selection Study” prepared by Pannell Kerr Forster of Edmonton in association with Great Plains Research Consultants Limited. of Calgary. 10 August 1988 45 Coalhurst Miners’ Days promotional material. 1988 46 Community Recreation / Cultural Grant application. 21 February 1990 47 “Proceedings of the Consultation Meeting with Alberta Museums”. The meeting was held at the request of the Minister of Culture to explore options for increasing provincial help to museums. 17 July 1982 48 Conventions and special events calendar published by the City of Lethbridge. 15 June 1992 49 Fort Whoop Up storyline concepts, display unit designs and exhibition area elevations, prepared by Jean-Jacques Andre. 1984 50 Lists of donors of goods and services to Fort Whoop Up. [ca. 1987] 51 Expansion feasibility study grant application to the Community Tourism Action Program. 23 April to 14 August 1990 52 “Feasibility Study for [the expansion of] the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre” prepared by the Advisory Group of Calgary. 19 March 1991 53 Financial statements. 1973 to 1979 54 Financial statements. 1978, 1980 to 1984 55 Financial statements. 1985 to 1987 56 Financial statements. 1988 to 1989 57 Financial statements. 1990 to 1991 58 Fire Department inspection reports and fire alarm inspection reports. 2 April 1988 to 29 June 1990 59 Architectural drawing of the Fort’s floor plan, with annotations for electrical service. 1986 60 Display concepts for the Fort’s display and exhibit areas. 61 “Fort Whoop Up Interpretation Centre Marketing Research Results”. 28 November 1988 62 “Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre Strategic Plan”. 31 October 1988 63 “City of Lethbridge Fort Whoop Up Period Rooms Schematic Design” by Marshall Macklin Monaghan Western Limited. 64 Overview of the operating philosophy and activities of the Fort. [ca. 1986] 65 Correspondence and promotional material from the Glenbow Museum. 1989 to 1992 66 Grant applications. 1987 to 1988 67 Grant applications to the Museum Assistance Program of Alberta Culture. 1977 to 1986 68 Grant applications to the Museum Assistance Program of Alberta Culture. 1987 to 1990 69 Grant applications to several funding programs of the Alberta Museums Association. 1986 to 1991 70 “Historical Interpretive Display Design for City of Lethbridge: Progress Submission No. 1” by Marshall Macklin Monaghan Western Limited. 27 March 1984 71 Historical Interpretive Display Design workshop agenda. 2 May 1984 72 “City of Lethbridge Historical Interpretive Master Plan Summary” by Marshall Macklin Monaghan Western Limited. [ca. 1986] 73 Outline of workshop for historic site management. [ca. 1986] 74 Lethbridge Community College Hospitality Training Program correspondence and information. 6 October 1987 75 Insurance policies, correspondence and receipts for payment. 1971 to 1989 76 Information about Job Development Program of Canada Employment and Immigration, as well as the Internship Program of the Alberta Museums Association. 1986 to 1987 77 Interpretive program information including correspondence, planning documents and promotional material. 1987 to 1988 78 Interpretive program information including planning documents, policy and procedure statements and promotional material. 1989 to 1992 79 Interpretation strategy planning information. 1984 80 Interpretive display concepts for the Fort. 81 Resource information about job applications, resumes and interviewing techniques. [ca. 1990] 82 Equipment and supplies inventories. 1983 to 1986 83 “Invitation for proposals for Fore Whoop-Up Period Rooms and Compound Furnishings and Features”. The call for proposals is for fabrication work. 1986 84 Draft agreement between the City of Lethbridge and Fort Whoop Historical Society for the joint operation of the Fort. December 1974 85 Joint management agreement between the City of Lethbridge and Fort Whoop Interpretive Society for the operation of the Fort. October 1985 86 Joint management agreement between the City of Lethbridge and Fort Whoop Interpretive Society for the operation of the Fort. 14 April 1989 87 Draft of promotional publication titled “Lethbridge: A Whole Lot of Heritage”. 1987 88 Terms of reference and IBI Group proposal: “Lethbridge Major Tourist Attraction Feasibility Study”. 1988 to 1989 89 Submission to Lethbridge City Council titled “ Lethbridge: The Western Heritage Centre” by Tourist Associates. October 1989 90 Final version of “Lethbridge Tourism Action Plan” prepared by the Lethbridge Committee for Attractions for the City of Lethbridge. May 1987 91 Draft of the “Lethbridge Tourism Marketing Plan” prepared by the Lethbridge Tourism Marketing Plan Committee. 31 March 1988 92 Copies of correspondence between William M. Brown, Urban Parks Project director, and Lombard North Group to confirm approval for the latter to provide a concept plan for the Fort Whoop Up area. March to August 1984 93 Minutes and other information of the Management Committee of the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Society. 1987 to 1988 94 Transparencies of charts and lists, part of a market analysis of Fort Whoop Up prepared by the University of Lethbridge. 1988 95 Correspondence and other information pertaining to the “Historical Interpretive Master Plan” prepared by Marshall Macklin Monaghan Western Limited.. 1984 to 1986 96 Miscellaneous correspondence. 1973 to 1977 97 Miscellaneous correspondence. 1979 to 1986 98 Miscellaneous correspondence. 1987 to 1991 99 Museum Assistance Program application, annotated. 15 July 1992 100 Newspaper clippings. 1987 to 1992 101 Payroll accounts. 1982 102 Payroll accounts. 1987 103 Payroll time sheets. 1986 to 1988 104 Payroll time sheets. 1989 to 1990 105 Plans for the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre: floor plans, display and signage plans, architects’ drawings and site plan of the original fort by archaeologist B.O.K. (Barney) Reeves. 106 Correspondence and lists passed between the City of Lethbridge and P.M.L. Exhibit Services Limited., pertaining to reproductions of period furniture for the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre. 1986 to 1987 107 Priority Employment Program applications and correspondence. 1986 to 1988 108 Program Committee planning documents. 1986 to 1987 109 Program services inventory. 110 Correspondence, budget information and the final version of the “Feasibility Study for the Fort Whoop Up Interpretive Centre” prepared by The Advisory Group. The study was to determine the feasibility of expansion of the Interpretive Centre. 29 October 1990 111 Purchase orders. May 1984 to May 1986 112 Purchase orders. July 1986 to February 1988 113 “River Valley Area Redevelopment Plan” prepared for the City of Lethbridge by Lombard North Group Limited. 25 August 1986 114 River valley development bylaw 3255 and background information, presented to Lethbridge City Council. 13 November 1974 115 Robins Watson Baunton Architects and Engineers: correspondence and plans pertaining to renovation of the Interpretive Centre. 116 Safety and security notes and general information. 1976 to 1985 117 Safety and Security for Fort Steele. 1979 to 1986 118 Schools – promotional material from Fort Whoop Up. 1987to 1988 119 Service agreements with various service providers. 1989 to 1991 120 Special events promotional material. 1987 to 1990 121 Staff manual for employees of Alberta Culture and Multiculturalism- Historic Sites Service – Southwest Region. 1988 122 Staff memos. 1991 123 Summer Employment / Experience Development (SEED) grant application. 1987 124 SEED grant application. 1988 125 SEED grant application. 1989 126 SEED grant application. 1990 127 Summer Temporary Employment Program (STEP) applications. 1983 to 1987 128 STEP applications. 1988 129 STEP applications. 1989 130 Tour bookings. 1990 131 Tour bookings – correspondence. 1990 132 Tour highlights notes written by Barry Weintraub. 30 May 1982 133 Minutes and objectives of the Municipal Tourism Action Committee. 1989 to 1990 134 Monthly and year-end tourism statistics for Lethbridge and southern Alberta, compiled by the Chinook Country Tourist Association. gaps. 1988 135 Correspondence, schedules, insurance and other information for the tour train in Indian Battle Park. 1984 to 1989 136 Travel and Convention Association of Southern Alberta Annual Report. 1976 137 Urban Parks Project correspondence. 1984 to 1987 138 Urban Parks Project Draft Master Plan 139 Urban Parks Project Final Report, together with brochures from the park’s facilities. July 1987 140 Urban Parks Project – “Historical Interpretive Master Plan” part 1. 141 Urban Parks Project – “Historical Interpretive Master Plan” part 2. 142 Urban Parks Project Master Plan. 143 “Urban Parks Proposal”, a program guide published by Alberta Parks and Recreation. [ca. 1979] 144 Set of four maps of the Lethbridge urban parks system. 145 Volunteer board development workshop presented by Lethbridge Community College. 1987 to 1992
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19981070026
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Radish Factory Artists Society: Alphabetical Subject Files

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions1966
Date Range
1981-1990
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
19901082012
Physical Description
115 Files.
Scope and Content
19901082012 - Advertising copy and notices. 1987-1989. 19901082013-14 - Alberta Art Foundation correspondence and Special Project Grants.1986-1989. 19901082015-16 - Alberta Manpower Step and Pep Employment Programs. 1986-1989. 19901082017 - Alberta Consumer and Corporate Affairs Corporation 1990108…
Material Type
Manuscript
Date Range
1981-1990
Physical Description
115 Files.
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
19901082012 - Advertising copy and notices. 1987-1989. 19901082013-14 - Alberta Art Foundation correspondence and Special Project Grants.1986-1989. 19901082015-16 - Alberta Manpower Step and Pep Employment Programs. 1986-1989. 19901082017 - Alberta Consumer and Corporate Affairs Corporation 19901082018 - 20 - Alberta Culture Art Gallery operating grants. 1987-1989. 19901082021 - Alberta Culture general correspdondence. 1986-1989. 19901082022 - Allied Arts council of Lethbridge correspdondence, meeting minutes, membership information and other material 1986-1989. 19901082023 - Alternate Galleries - research information about their space allocations, staffing, policies, and procedures of organizations similar to the Radish Factory. 1986-1987. 19901082024 - Applications for employment. 1986-1988. 19901082025 - Artalk, the Radish Factory Newsletter. 1986-1989. 19901082026 - Articles published in publications other than the Lethbridge Herald. 1986-1989. 19901082027 - Art rentals and purchase program. 1988. 19901082028 - 34 - Association of National Non-Profit Artist Centres: Annual meetings, general information, management committee, regional meetings. 1986-1989. 19901082035 - Board and staff development information. 1987-1988. 19901082036 -Braemore Management Limited: Lease Agreement and corresepondence for upstairs, 425- 5th Street South. 19901082037 - "Bridge" Exhibition correspondence. 1989. 19901082038 - "Brush With Business" Educational videotape for new artisits: pamplhet and correponcence. 1987 -1988. 19901082039 - Budget information for scheduled events and activities. 1989. 19901082040 - Bylaws of the Radish Factory Artisits' Society. 1986-1987. 19901082041 - Calls for submissions for wearable art and performance art exhibitions, 1988-1989. 19901082042 - 46 - Canada Council: Applications for financial assistance to operate, exhibition assistance, correspondence, "Exploration" program 1981-1989. 19901082047 - Canadian Artists Representation" General information and newsletters. 1987-1988. 19901082048 - Charitable organization status for Revenue Canada. 1986-19189. 19901082049 - City of Lethbridge: Correspondence re financial assistance under the "Community recreation/Cultural grants' program. 1986-1989. 19901082050 - 51 - comments from visitors to the "Warehouyse" and other exhibits. 1986-1987. 19901082052 - "Community Recreation/Cultural Grants Program applications and correspondence. 1988-1989. 19901082053 - Community Volunteer Centre: Service agreement, news and information releases. 1988-1989. 19901082054 - contracts for exhibitions. 1986. 19901082055 - Copyright law information. 1986-1987. 19901082056 - 58 - Correspondence: Miscellaneous, outgoing, incoming. 1985. 19901082059 - Council For Business and the Arts In Canada: Survey statistics. 1988. 19901082060 - Donations: Letters soliciting funds and services. 1987. 19901082061 - Downtown LA. Bylaws, correspondence, news releases. 1989. 19901082062 - Employment and Immigration Canada: Seed and Section 38 UIC job programs applications. 1987-1988. 19901082063 - Exhibition proposals. 1988-1989. 19901082064 - Facilites at 327 and 427 - 5th Street South. no date. 19901082065 - Figure drawing program and advertising, report, correspondence, legal releases. 1988-1989. 19901082066 - Financial statements: 1987-1988, 1989-1990, 19901082067 - Galleries: Information about other art gallelries.collections 1986-1987. 19901082068 - Globe and Mail newsppaper clippings. 1989. 19901082069 - Grants: General inforamtion. 1984-1989. 19901082070 - Graphics Gallery agreement to rent space to Radish Factory. 1889. 19901082071 - 72 - Guest Books: 1987 and 1989. 19901082073 - Incorporation under the Provincial Societies Act. 1986-1989. 19901082074 - Insurances Policies: 1986-1989. 19901082075 - Inventory of equipment. 1989. 19901082076 - Job descriptions. 1987-1988. 19901082077 - Job Strageties Job Program. 1986-1988. 19901082078 - Job training for staff. 1987. 19901082079 - Legal correpondecne re: missing optical grinder from rented exhibition space. 1986-1988. 19901082080 - Lethbridge Foundation: correspondence and grant application. 1986-1989. 19901082081 -82 - Lethbridge Herald newspaper clippings. 1986-1989. 19901082083 - Literary Artists: Advertising and correspondence. 1986-1989. 19901082084 - Letts of resignation from staff and society members. 1986-1989. 19901082085 - Lobbying for continued funding at Provincial and Municipal levels. 1987-1989. 19901082086 - 87 - Mailing lists for media and non members. 1987-1989. 19901082088 - Mandates and bylaws of other art organizations. 19901082089 - 92 - Membership application, mailing lists, general lists, Needs Survey. 1986-1989. 19901082093 - Motions summary. 1986-1987. 19901082094 - 95 - News releases: General: and distribution strategy. 1986-1989. 19901082096 - Occupational Health and Safety information. 1988. 19901082097 - Opus Farming Limited prlduct information and newsletters. 1989 19901082098 - "Parallelogramme", Canadian Art Magaine: Deadline notices and 2 issues. 1988-1989. 19901082099 - Performaing artisit' proposals for performances. 1986-1988. 19901082100 - Permits to serve alcohol at special functions. 1987-1989. 19901082101 - Polish Exhibit proposal. 1988. 19901082102 - Presidents's reports. 1987-1989. 19901082103 - Printer's estimates and invoices. 1986-1987. 19901082104 - Prposals for exhibitions. 1986. 19901082105 - Publicity materials. 1987. 19901082106 - Quotations for maintenance services and supplies. 1987-1988. 19901082107 - Raffle application to Provicial Gaming Commission. 1986-1989. 19901082108 - 109 - Receipts and requistions: General and St. Patrick's Credit Union. 19901082110 - Records of employment for staff members. 1986-1989. 19901082111 - Request for a Lethbirdge herald photographer to cover various events. 1987-1989. 19901082112 - Royal Bank statements. 1988. 19901082113 - Schedules for work for individual days. 1986. 19901082114 - "Southern Life" News Magazine. 1986. 19901082115 - 116 - St. Patrick's Credit Union: Correspondence and statements. 1988-1990 19901082117 - Termination of the Radish Factory Artist's Society, 1989. 19901082118 - Time Sheets and schedules for staff. 1988. 19901082119 - Traffic (visitor attendance) sheets. 1988. 19901082120 - TV Art Auction. 1986-1989. 19901082121 - University of Lethbridge Art Gallery: pamphlets, correspondence. 1988-1989. 19901082122 - Video Pool production and distribution group. 1988. 19901082123 - Visual Arts newsletter: Submissions, meeting minutes. 1986-1988. 19901082124 - Volunteers' time sheets. 1987. 19901082125 - Wild Rose Foundation: Correspondence, guidelines, grant applications. 1985-1988. 19901082126 - Young Men's christian assocation (YMCA) Generation Program.1988.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19901082012
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Raymond Buddhist Church Fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions65940
Date Range
1970-2005
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
20091064000
Physical Description
approximately 5 cm
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of a series of the church newsletter 'Rolling Wheel' from 1970 to 2005 [gaps] and programs for Obon services from 1984 to 1999 [gaps] and Hanamatsuri services from 1983 to 1999 [gaps].
Material Type
Manuscript
Date Range
1970-2005
Physical Description
approximately 5 cm
Physical Condition
Very Good
History / Biographical
The first Japanese settlers began arriving in Raymond and district as early as 1903. Some had lived on the west coast of British Columbia, while others were recruited as farm workers directly from Japan. These men formed a Japanese Society, and one of their priorities was religious education. Leaders of the Buddhist movement in the Raymond area at that time included Henry Kojun Iwaasa, Harry Yoichi Hironaka, Shiyozo Kosaka, E. Sonomura, Takajiro Koyata, Buhachi ‘Charlie’ Nishimura, Y. Hatanaka and Kisaburo Sugimoto. In November 1929 Harry Yoichi Hironaka became the first elected president of the Japanese Society. In 1929 the Japanese Society bought the former Mormon Church in Raymond for $5,000. The building was originally constructed as Raymond’s first school. A 100-year plan was written for the church, and Japanese families living in Hardieville and Coalhurst pledged their financial assistance as well. The new Raymond Buddhist Church was renovated under the direction of S. Motoyama and in 1929 Reverend Shinjo Nagatomi arrived with his family to become the church’s first minister. During the Great Depression, Reverend Nagatomi’s monthly honorarium could not be paid regularly, and the members of the congregation supported him and his family by providing them with flour, meat and vegetables as well as coal for heating and cooking. Reverend Nagatomi eventually returned to Japan and was replaced by Reverend Yutetsu Kawamura, who arrived in Raymond with his family in 1934. Reverend Kawamura taught Sunday School, as well as the Japanese language and dances to the children of the district. A cooperative store was organized to sell Japanese food to the families of the district. Called the Kobai Kumiai Association, the store was still in operation in 1993. In 1940 Reverend Kawamura left Raymond, and the Buddhist Church was without a minister for two years. What made the situation even more challenging was the influx of Japanese Canadians from the west coast beginning in 1942. Forcibly relocated to southern Alberta after Canada’s declaration of war on Japan on 7 December 1941, the Japanese evacuees swelled the membership of the Raymond Buddhist Church. Among the evacuees were the Reverend Shinjo Ikuta and his family. Reverend Ikuta became the Buddhist minister at Raymond. Mrs. Ikuta lead the organization of the Sunday School. She recruited teachers from the Young Women’s Buddhist Association (YWBA) and Young Men’s Buddhist Association (YMBA) as teachers. They went to other communities in the district each Sunday morning to teach, returning in the afternoon to teach those children who could come to the church in Raymond. Mrs. Ikuta also helped organize the ladies’ organization known as the Fujinkai, with Mrs. Chiaki Karaki as its first president. On 4 November 1945 the YWBA and YMBA amalgamated to form the Young Men's and Women's Buddhist Association (YMWBA). The YMWBA membership numbered more than 40, and was active in organizing fundraising and social events. Among the events sponsored by the YMWBA were the Miss Sunny Alberta dance, an annual New Year’s Eve dance and the Kei Ro Kai (a party to honour elders). Sports were also an important part of the activities of the Raymond Buddhist Church. A baseball team called the Yamato (afterwards the YMBA, and later still the Busseis). The Church also organized the Budo Koen Kai, which in turn organized judo and kendo clubs in Raymond and district. A basketball team was formed to compete in a league organized by the Buddhist churches in southern Alberta. On 23 January 1948 a fire was discovered under the floor where the shrine stood. The wooden statue of the Buddha was brought to safety by Isamu Koyata, who crawled through dense smoke to get to it. In the late 1940s and the 1950s, renovations were made to the Raymond Buddhist Church. The alter area was redesigned to accommodate a larger shrine donated by the Royston Buddhist Church in British Columbia in 1946. A special dedication service (Kei San Hoyo) was held to mark the donation, and it was then that Buddhist ministers and Church executives decided to form a Canadian Buddhist Society with Kichizo Takaguchi as its first president. The Raymond Buddhist Church continued to grow after World War 2, and in 1950 the bilingual minister Reverend Ensei Nekoda arrived with his family to assist Reverend Ikuta. Reverend Ikuta was transferred to Kelowna in 1951 while Reverend Nekoda continued at Raymond until 1960, when he left for San Francisco. In 1964 Reverend Leslie Kawamura became the minister at the Raymond Buddhist Church. Son of Reverend Yutetsu Kawamura, who served at Raymond from 1934 to 1940, Reverend Leslie Kawamura oversaw the continued growth of the Raymond Buddhist Church. In 1963 Girl Guide and Brownie troops were formed, and later an Ranger troop for older girls. In 1984 the Alberta government declared the Raymond Buddhist Church building a Provincial Historic site, and in 1989 the Church celebrated its 60th anniversary with over 400 people in attendance. In the 1990s, the Raymond Buddhist Church began to falter. Membership declined as young people moved away, and the average age of the membership increased. The crisis deepened until in 2005, Raymond Buddhist Church closed. Other Buddhist churches in the region were undergoing similar crises. After discussion, it was decided that amalgamation was the solution to the problems facing the regional Buddhist community. On 18 December 2006 The Buddhist Temple of Southern Alberta (BTSA) was established. Its membership is comprised of former members of the Lethbridge Buddhist Temple, Lethbridge Honpa Buddhist Temple, Raymond Buddhist Temple and Taber Buddhist Temple. Construction of the Buddhist Temple of Southern Alberta at 470 40 Street South in Lethbridge was completed in 2009, and the Temple was dedicated on 25-26 April 2009. [Source: Turner, Lawrence ed. Settlers, Sugar and Stampedes: Raymond Remembered. Town of Raymond, 1993. pages 9-101 to 9-104]
Language
English
Japanese
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of a series of the church newsletter 'Rolling Wheel' from 1970 to 2005 [gaps] and programs for Obon services from 1984 to 1999 [gaps] and Hanamatsuri services from 1983 to 1999 [gaps].
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20091064000
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Oral History interview - Elizabeth Hall

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions3009
Date Range
15 March 1985
Material Type
Recording
Accession No.
19921043000
Physical Description
Dynarec audio cassette tape
Scope and Content
Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Hall. Interviewer: Joyce Wilkinson. Liz was born in England and educated in a private day school and then went to boarding school. in 1939 world war 11 had started and many children were being sent out of England for safety. j.n 1940, uiz, under private sponsorship …
Material Type
Recording
Date Range
15 March 1985
Physical Description
Dynarec audio cassette tape
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Elizabeth (Liz) Carol Hall was born on 10 October 1924, in Alderly Edge, Cheshire, England. Elizabeth had a brother David and two sisters, Daphne and Diana, all in England. She attended a private day school and later a boarding school. In 1940 she was evacuated from England to Canada as part of a program to take British children out of the range of German bombing during World War 2. Elizabeth remained in Canada, first in Coaticook, Quebec and later in Winnipeg, Manitoba until 1942, when she returned to England. Joining the army, Elizabeth served as an ambulance driver, then a driving instructor and finally an automotive mechanic. At the end of World War 2 Elizabeth married Dr. Robert (Bob) Hall. A lack of employment for physicians in England brought the Halls and their three children - Michael, Alison (Mrs. Earle) and Jackie (Mrs. Buckland) - to Canada in 1958, where Dr. Hall joined the Campbell Clinic in Lethbridge. In 1962 Elizabeth Hall joined the choir of St. Augustine's Anglican Church, and also served on the Vestry for four years. She was also involved in the Home and School Association.In 1963, she became active in the Girl Guide movement, rising to the position of Provincial Training Commissioner by 1985. In 1968 Mrs. Hall bagan to advocate for the creation of a park in the river valley at Lethbridge, and from there began to develop outdoor education programs for school children in cooperation with Helen Schuler. From 1969 to 1972 Mrs. Hall, with eight other women, founded and maintained the Meals on Wheels program in Lethbridge. She also served on the newly created Community Services Adivsory Committee, where she continued to advocate for parks and other recreation facilities in the city. In 1977 Elizabeth Hall was elected to Lethbridge City Council. Re-elected in 1980 and 1983, Mrs. Hall stepped down from City Council due to ill health prior to the 1986 election. While an Alderman, Mrs. Hall was in the forefront of the Urban Parks Project and the CentreSite Project. In 1976 the Young Women's Christian Association chose Elizabeth Hall as one of their Women of the Year. In 1977 she and Helen Schuler were given the Alberta Teachers Association Award of Merit for their work in environmental education. In 1987 the City named the Elizabeth Hall Wetlands, part of the Urban Parks Project, in her honour. Eliabeth Hall died of cancer on 14 October 1987.
Scope and Content
Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Hall. Interviewer: Joyce Wilkinson. Liz was born in England and educated in a private day school and then went to boarding school. in 1939 world war 11 had started and many children were being sent out of England for safety. j.n 1940, uiz, under private sponsorship was one of twelve girls to leave her school for evacuation to Canada. The journey was on board a very unstable ship which rolled with every wave and to add to the adventure a ship in the vicinity which had been carrying merman and Italian f.u.ws had been torpedoed so the convoy was put into a smoke screen, by the escort. Upon arrival in Montreal the young people were taken to a house on the banks of the at. Lawrence which belonged to Lady Athelstan, she had given permission for the house to be used until the students could go to the various houses where they would be living. After a week, Liz went with her friends to a school in Coaticook, S. Quebec. This school had been empty for some time and was very dirty with broken windows. in the grounds were two ponies and numerous skunks, the latter made their presence felt and at night the girls used to soak their pillows with cologne to get rid of the skunk smell. For the next two and one half years Liz went to school in Winnipeg which was called Riverbend1 but is now known as Balmoral house. Her holidays were spent in New Brunswick with two elderly cousins, natriculation examination papers were sent out from England and at age 16 Liz had completed her high school education and wanted to go on to university, but her cousins did not think this was suitable, i-his was now 1942 and many young people were going back to the UK and Liz was able to get a berth on a small ship. This ship had been built prior to 1914 and had been used on the Baltic so was not really capable of withstanding Atlantic storms. Liz boarded in Halifax and after three days they arrived in St. John's and there they stayed for three weeks. Convoys coming from New York were being blown apart due to "U" Boat activity, one corvette looked as though she had been cut in half by a knife. At last part of a convoy got through and the journey was started with an escort of four destroyers and 5 covettes. The Atlantic was so rough the "U" Boats were unable to raise their periscopes above the waves. During the last forty eight hours the only food available on the ship were beans and rice. Six weeks had elapsed since leaving Halifax so everyone was glad to leave the ship which had been infested with bedbugs and cockroaches, some of which had invaded Liz's trunk and eaten some nylon stockings she was bringing back for her sisters. In later years Liz found that one of her neighbours in Lethbridge had served as an officer aboard one of the escorting corvettes. Upon arrival in the UK Liz still had thoughts of going to university, but she changed her mind when she saw how people were going 'all out' for the war effort. She joined the army and became an ambulance driver, then a driving instructor, the latter she found rather nerve racking so she became a mechanic which she has found very useful on occasion. At the end of the war Liz was married to Dr. Bob Hall who had been serving in Burma. At this time the British Government was encouraging general practitioners to specialize, but unfortunately had not taken into account the specialists who were now leaving the armed forces to take up their private practises. The result was a surplus of young specialists, but no jobs. Many of the doctors were attracted to Western Canada and Dr. Hall was one of those who came in 1958 and joined the Campbell Clinic, with three children the Hall family settled in Lethbridge and like so many young families after the war had to start to establish a new home. In 1962 Liz was invited to join the church choir at St. Augustine's and served on the church Vestry for four years. The Home and School Association was another of her interests. In 1963 she started taking a leading part in the Girl Guide movement and today is Provincial Training Commissioner for Alberta. In 1968 Liz wrote a letter to the local newspaper and to City Council begging them to set aside the River Valley as a park, through this she became a member of the Parks and Recreation Committee and in 1969 a student from U of A, Mel Andrews, did a study of the valley and made recommendations as to the future of the Kivey valley and many of thesem have been incoporated into the Urban Parks plan.At this time a new City Manager developed the Community services Advisory Committee and Liz was invited to become a member, wlso in 1969 together with eight other women she was instrumental in organising meals on wheels in the City of Lethbridge and this came to fruition in 1970. In 1972 A woman teaching Environmental education at LCC wanted her students to become involved,as part of their curriculum, with the school children, Helen Schuler and Liz from the Lethbridge Naturalist society were asked to help with this scheme and permission was given for the students from George McKillop school to become part of the interpretive programme, only two of the students from LCC kept up their interest, but Helen and Liz carried on. The children were given classroom orientation and then taken to the outdoors to observe nature. The scheme was very successful and the reaction from the teachers was very positive and the two ladies were asked to continue and expand the programme, but they needed more volunteers as the project was becoming too big and time consuming for only two people, so a training programme was developed. Mary Sailey is in charge of the programme and has at least 16 volunteers to call on. In 1973 Liz was once more a member of the Community Advisory Committee and served for four more years two of which she was chairman, une of her proudest achievements was the Ten Year Plan for major recreation facilities for the city. The Senior Citizens' Centre was one of the developments through this programme. Up until three months before the civic election in 1977, Liz had given no thought to running for council, at this time. Vera rerguson was the token woman alderman. Liz decided to 'run' and was elected. Vera was a great help during the first term as she was able to inform Liz on many points of council business. In 1980, she was the only woman on council and at the election tried to interest many women 'to run' but was not successful. In 1977, she and Helen Schuler were given the Alberta Teachers Association Award of Merit for their work with the school children in the Environmental Programme. As neither of them were teachers this was a distinct honour. Liz is still a member of the Lethbridge Naturalist Society and for many years has been President of the Church Choir.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19921043000
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Oral History Interview - Dr. Hugh Arnold (interview 4)

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions82110
Date Range
1994
Description Level
Fonds
Material Type
Recording
Accession No.
19931081171
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (digital file)
Scope and Content
The following transcript was prepared by Donna Kampen. A: You know, I want to get you that information I have, that interview I had up in Calgary. That covers a lot of this stuff. Q Well, if we haven't covered some things adequately, its because I haven't asked the right questions, I…
Material Type
Recording
Date Range
1994
Fonds
Dr. Hugh Arnold fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
1 audio cassette (digital file)
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Dr. Arnold donated his papers to the Galt Museum and Archives in September 1993, with the provision that they be available for an independent study project done by University of Lethbridge student Donna Kampen, under the supervision of Professor Bill Baker of the Department of History. Donna Kampen organized Dr. Arnold's papers conducted a series of oral history interviews (8 audio cassettes) with Dr. Arnold.
Scope and Content
The following transcript was prepared by Donna Kampen. A: You know, I want to get you that information I have, that interview I had up in Calgary. That covers a lot of this stuff. Q Well, if we haven't covered some things adequately, its because I haven't asked the right questions, I guess. A: Well, I do think that the material from Calgary will come. They've been very cooperative, and I think we'll get that within the next few days. I offered to go up and get it, and they said they'd send it down, so it should be fine. I'll have to see the material to know just what it was., just what the librarian and I covered. I don't remember the details of it. I think there will be quite a bit relevant to my work with the medical profession. Q Uh huh... A: The doctor who followed me as the president of the Alberta Medical Association-¬he was a Calgarian—the librarian who taped me also taped hem, separately. The material, I think was essentially having to do with medical politics. The other fellow wrote a book, based on this information. Q: Really? A: Yes. And I think that probably a lot of the Medical Association work, along with the Health Plan, the M.S.I., the Alberta Health Plan, and what was subsequently Medicare, (they all evolved, one after the other), I think that that will be covered pretty thoroughly in this material. Q That's good, because that's something that we haven't really touched on yet. A: I think that will be in the transcriptions that will come. Q: That's good. We were just getting to what I've been calling in my mind the "community years". When you were involved with the Kinsmen, the Rotary, the Navy League. You were very involved in a lot of community organizations. A: Yes, I was. Q: Did you find the time that you spent in these community organizations was time taken away from your practice? A: No, I can't say that I did. Where the time was taken away from was probably from my own family—my wife and the children. We were very, very busy during the war years. I returned from Montreal, from my post graduate work (an internship really)--! returned just at the beginning of the war. The war had started at that time, and—I think I've mentioned to you—the work that we did in civilian practice was, in part, the responsibility of assessing young men and (mostly men)-assessing their health with regard to going into the services. This was at the direction of the federal government. They were responsible. They were calling up young men according to age groups, and according to whether or not they were married of course. I felt that I had a responsibility to stay in practice here, to continue some of the things I was mixed up with, including, of course, the Sea Cadet Organization. Q. Yes. A: I became the commanding officer. We eventually had, I think it was 10 officers with a corps of around 120 boys. We continued our activities throughout the war, with parades twice a week. Q: That would have taken up quite a lot of your time. A: Yes, yes, quite a lot of time. It was time that I enjoyed, however. Anytime you're working with young people, its fun. And these young boys, they were from about 14 to 18 years of age. You know, many of them went on to do Naval service. Q Really? A: Yes. There were people, the officer corps included people such as Mr. A. C. Anderson who went on to become our mayor. Leslie Grant, who was the Anglican priest in Lethbridge—St. Augustine's priest. The work we did was very worthwhile, I felt, and interesting. Q: That was during the 40fs A: Yes, that was during the 40's Q: And the early 50's? A: Ah, let me see—that would have been about 1947 that I left the corps. Q. I see. A: Yes, I retired as commanding officer, and Mr. Anderson took over. Q. Yes. A: The corps continued as the Sea Cadet Corps, but they also had a younger group also, and this group includes boys in their younger teens—the Navy League Cadets, as distinct from the Sea Cadets. Q: That's a distinction that I wasn't too clear about, and I'm glad to have that cleared up. Its Navy League, and then Sea Cadets. A: Well, the Navy League is in charge. They sponsor the Cadet organization. They are the umbrella. Q I see. A: To continue with the time factor, I think I told you. When we worked in our practice, we would make our hospital rounds in the morning, rather early—when I say early I mean from 8:00 o'clock until about 10 o'clock. Q: What would you say...I know this will be difficult to come up with an average, but how many patients would you say you had at one time in the hospital. Really, just a rough average. A: I would say 10 to 15. Q. So, you would see 10 or 15 patients every day in the hospital? A: That would be an average. It varied of course. And that would be in two hospitals. We had St. Michael's of course, and this hospital. Q Yes. And then the Municipal and the Regional. A: Yes, well, when the Gait closed, of course it became the Municipal. Then, it was rebuilt as the Regional. St. Michael's Hospital had originally started in Lethbridge in the early 30's or maybe the late 20's. The sisters of St. Martha, who have their mother house in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, they took over the Van Harlem hospital, which was located on 7th Avenue and about 12th street. Then, in the early 30's they built St. Michael's Hospital. The Van Harlem, then continued as a nurses residence. St. Michael's was originally three floors, but had one central core. This was added to, first the west wing, and then the east wing. And then they established a nurses residence when they established a nursing school. The Gait School of Nursing was established here back at the turn of the century. And it continued of course until... Q I think it was sometime in the early 80's when it became college based wasn't it. A: Yes, I think that would be about right, the eighties. At that time, the students at the community college would do their theoretical work out there, and their practical work in St. Michael's. ^ Q: Yes, I think they still do a practicum at the Regional. I'm not sure if they do a practicum at St. Michael's anymore. They may. A: I don't know. But when this hospital...Do you want me to start on this hospital? Q: Sure. A: When this hospital closed (I can get dates for you-they're on the wall downstairs). Q: Yes. A: When this hospital closed, I think I had mentioned to you, I had done some work in Boston just about the time that this hospital closed. I'd have to check my dates... Q I think it was in January of 1953 or 1951. I know that you left in February. A: That's when I went to Boston? Q Yes. A: Well anyway, this hospital (the Gait) was just in the process of being closed. The Municipal hospital was in the process of building at that time, and the question was what to do about this building. The question as to what to do with the building was uncertain, because of the fact that there was some information which was available to the effect that the building was built over some of the mine shafts of the old coal mining which went on down along the side of the hill here. Q Really? A: Yes. And there was some question as to the ultimate safety of the building. They actually went so far as to build a new powerhouse just to the north of this building. Q: Yes. A: Do you remember that? Q No. A: The upshot of this all is that when I was in Boston, at this time, when all this was going on, I attended a lecture in rehabilitation by a specialist in rehabilitation medicine which was a new category of medical care. He was interested in the whole subject of rehabilitation. When I came back from Boston, I was enthusiastic too, about this field. So this building was in state of flux as to what they were going to do with it. I brought the matter up at one of the medical staff meetings, that we could use this building as a rehabilitation centre. The staff was at that time in agreement that this was a concept they could appreciate, so Dr. Ernie Poulson... I was the president of the medical staff at about that time, here, and I thought that there was an opportunity for us to at least explore the possibility of establishing a rehabilitation hospital here. Dr. Poulson was the vice president, as I recall, and the two of us decided that we would go and talk to the mayor about this. Which we did. We went and talked to Mr. Shackleford. He was the mayor at that time. Our first approach was rather coldly received. He didn't see that there was any possibility, nor that that was the proper use for this building at that time. Q Did he mention to you that he had some ultimate plans for it? Did he have any idea of what he thought it should be used for? A: No, I think it was all in a state of flux. Nobody really knew what they were going to do with the building. Anywise, he got thinking about it, and he phoned me up one morning, and said: "Arnold, I want you to come over." I wondered what this could be about. I went over and he said: "I think I've changed my mind on this, I think you've got an idea." And we had him on side. Right there. That opened the door for the concept of the convalescent hospital. Q This building was owned by the City of Lethbridge. A: Yes. The city of Lethbridge. To make a long story short, the concept caught fire. He was responsible for getting people like the reeves of the districts around us—one of them was Steve Hoi ton—and other responsible people in the community and rural areas on side. And a board was formed. The members of the board are on the plaque downstairs on the wall. Q Really? A: Yeah. And they got a director, they hired a director to come it. They altered the hospital in some respects, physically and brought it up to date in some regards. The upshot of that whole thing was that we had a rehabilitation hospital. And that was a good thing. Q Yes. A: Yes. When the Gait moved over to what was the new municipal hospital. Q Did this then eventually become the auxiliary hospital? A: No, This was the Gait rehabilitation hospital. At about that same time, the provincial government was—they had as the minister of health, a doctor. He was sympathetic and cooperative in the whole concept of rehabilitation medicine. We were beginning to appreciate the fact, as practitioners, that there was a need for longer term care for rehabilitation, and at the same time recognizing that there was a continuing need for facilities for long term care patients. The upshot of all this was that this was going on at the provincial level at the same time as it was going on here, the spark was...we were not responsible, as far as I know, but we might have been—the concept of rehabilitation started here as early as it did anywhere. Our hospital opened here as the Gait Rehabilitation Hospital. Q Tell me about the typical patient of the Rehabilitation centre. Would it be rehabilitation from trauma caused by, for example accidents, like learning how to walk again after a badly broken leg, or would it be more things like rehabilitation after strokes. A: By and large, let's say right off the bat, that the latter type of case, the stroke patient, the patient with the long term illness, was being cared for in homes, by mothers and fathers and relatives. When we opened this hospital as the rehabilitation hospital, we had so many patients, who needed care in long term facilities, that most of our beds were almost immediately taken up by them. So the rehabilitation concept had to be almost shelved while we were used or operated quite wisely, for patients who needed long term care. Of course, this was the care that had been given at home. We weren't aware of the actual numbers of these patients, because they had been a forgotten population. Cared for in upstairs or downstairs bedrooms in homes. It immediately became apparent that this hospital was filling a need, but the need wasn't for rehabilitation, but for long term care. At this approximate date, the doctor in charge of health for the provincial government was becoming interested and aware of the needs for the rehabilitation throughout the province, including Lethbridge. They decided on a program then, of building rehabilitation hospitals. And Lethbridge got one—the Lethbridge Auxiliary hospital. You see, this was the Auxiliary program. The Auxiliary was for both rehabilitation and other types of care including long term care. It appeared at that time, that when we got our auxiliary hospital, that this one, the Gait Rehabilitation Centre, would be replaced by that hospital. This was over the period of months, maybe even a month or two, as it developed. What happened then, was that the auxiliary hospital was completed, and we were ready to move into it, what was going to happen to this building. We didn't need, we didn't think we needed two auxiliary or rehabilitation hospitals, so this was turned back to the city and districts from which we had taken it over, and they ultimately felt that this was a good place for a museum. Q Yes. A: And they altered it, and changed it, and knocked down parts of it, and rebuilt parts, the extension out to the west, and we now have a museum on the site of the original old Gait Hospital. And that was wonderful. Q Yes. A: The Auxiliary Hospital was ready to open now, and they wanted a name. And I remember them phoning me one day, Mr. Holton was the chairman of the board, he phoned up one day and asked me if I would allow my name to be used as the name of the new auxiliary hospital. I was flattered of course, and very keen about it, but in any case, I spoke to the registrar of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Edmonton, and he~I spoke to him and I asked him about it because he was responsible for ethics and this sort of thing at that time, and he said that he would speak to the past president—a member of the profession who was a past president of the C.M.A. and past president of the Alberta Medical Association who lives at Lamont, Alberta, and who was also the chairman of the ethics committee of the Canadian Medical Association. He asked him what he thought about the idea. He phoned me—I remember that I was at the convention in Waterton, I think. He phoned and told me that he had talked this over with this gentleman, and the two of them felt that it would be better if I didn't allow may name to be used in this way. That it was something that may be advertising. Q Yes. A: Maybe if I'd been older... Q: Closer to retirement... A: Yes. In any case, I didn't accept the honor. Q: Well, it was nice to be considered anyway. A: Yes. Q: I think they were stickier about what could be construed as advertising back then. A: Yes, there's been tremendous changes in that. But, to stay with this story, we got the Auxiliary Hospital started, and it too became a hospital that filled a real need in the community for long term care. Out of that need, we in Lethbridge eventually built the Southland nursing home, and what is now Extendicare and the Edith Cavell on 5th avenue. They came along very quickly. Q Because it was so evident that a need existed? A: Yes. It was a result of many, many ill people. People ill with chronic diseases, who needed long term care. So that's the story. But the Auxiliary hospital continued to be a locus, not the only locus, but an important one, of rehabilitation in the city and district. We brought in the first physiotherapist, trained in Australia, for the rehabilitation hospital. Anyways, that's the story of this hospital and its evolution from the Gait Hospital to Rehabilitation Hospital to Museum. TAPE 4 SIDE 2 Q: I knew that you had been instrumental in the establishment of the Gait rehabilitation centre just from some of the correspondence in your papers...while it gives one the idea that yes, you were definitely involved, but it doesn't really give you a clear picture of how much you were involved...to what extent you were involved. A: I'm going to tell you that now. Q. Good! How often did you visit your patients in the centre...you wouldn't visit them on a daily basis would you? A: It would depend upon their condition. For the most part, we would try to visit them once a week. Some of them, if they merited more frequent visits, they had them. Q: There have been some really miraculous strides in rehabilitative medicine from the forties to the nineties. A: Oh, yes. I can remember patients with coronaries, coronary thrombosis. In my early years of practice we would keep the patient in bed for three weeks, four weeks? Now they're up the same day! A: Surgery, say an appendix, would be in bed for a week or ten days, or hernias-same thing. Now they're home the next day! Q (Laughs) Or outpatients. My some had a hernia repair just before Christmas—it was day surgery. A: Is that right? (both laugh) Well, there's been tremendous change in the management of medical (which is the heart patient, for example) and surgical patients. Q: Even obstetrical. A: Exactly. They used to be in bed for a week to ten days. Q: Now they go home the next day. A: The next day. Yes its true. And its a good thing. We don't see the complications in surgical patients. We don't see the complications we used to see, you know, when we kept them in bed for a week to ten days. The first time they'd get up they'd have an embolism, from the legs. The whole gamut of medical care, certainly the drug programs, are changing so very fast that one finds it difficult to keep up. Q: Umhum... A: You know, to know how many drugs there are for, and what they're for, and so on. Its just incredible. Q: Yes, I had an uncle who died of pneumonia at the age of 22, in the thirties. That was a disease that you died from back then. A: Yes. You see we had nothing to give them. I told you about that young teenager with the rheumatic fever and the cortisone. That was a miracle, you know? Q Uh huh. It would be unthinkable now for a healthy 22 year old man to die of pneumonia in a city in this country. A: That's correct Except that the problem is becoming—its becoming more of a problem—the control of bacteria and other infectious organisms. The problem of the antibiotics losing their strength because of the resistance of the bacteria. This is becoming more and more a big problem. Q: Yes, I've read that, particularly in the U.S., Tuberculosis is becoming a problem in the large cities, because it is becoming resistant to the medicines... A: That's right. Q: I'd like to get back to the rehabilitation centre. Can you think of a patient that you could say the rehabilitation centre, or the establishment of the rehabilitation program here, made a difference for? Can you think of a patient who perhaps returned to a normal life who might not have done so, had it not been for the fact that there was a rehabilitation hospital and physiotherapists here? I guess that's a pretty difficult question. I suppose—I'm sure that there were such patients. I guess its difficult for you to remember a particular one. A: Definitely, definitely on both counts. We all had rehabilitation in our minds as part of our treatment program all the time. Like a patient with coronary thrombosis. I remember a nurses at St. Michael's Hospital. She was one of the first, in my eyes, who recognized that you don't let a patient just lying in the hospital after a heart attack—you don't let them cross their feet. That slows venous return down there in the leg you see? and may prevent a blood clot. That's maybe not rehabilitation so to speak, but that's sure preventative medicine. Q: Sure. A: Early on, it became apparent to me, and to other physicians, that you don't let your patient lie still in bed. Even back in those days, you had your patient doing exercises in bed. Isometric exercises, where you don't necessarily move a lot, but you tighten up your muscles in your arms...and you do the dame thing with the hips, the thighs, the calves and so on. That's good medicine. Good preventative medicine. Q Yes. A: You're sitting in an airplane? Don't just sit there, get up and walk. Go to the bathroom, go someplace. Don't just sit Q I'm sure though, that having a rehabilitation centre in Lethbridge, having trained physiotherapists, probably made a remarkable difference in some people's lives. A: I'm sure it did. Q People who had strokes, or terrible accidents, where they had to learn to do things all over again. A: Yes. And the same thing with regard to diabetes, or patients with lung trouble, breathing exercises. The use of exercises in breathing, medication would help the cough and so on....there's lots of rehabilitative medicine going on that you don't even think of as rehabilitation necessarily. The physiotherapist has a great place in medicine. Q: Can you talk a little bit about..this is going off on a completely different tangent here, but I don't want to forget about this...You were very involved with the Kinsmen in the early 50's A: Yes. Q Can you tell me a little bit about...I know you were on the executive, but were you the president one year? A: Yes. The Kinsmen is a young men's service organization. At the age of 40, well...you have to get out! From there, very often Kinsmen would move onto Kiwanis, or Rotary of Gyro or one of the senior service clubs. It was an enthusiastic service club. We were young, and we had young families. Everybody was the same...nobody was very rich, we all had about the same amount of money. They were good years. We had lots of fun. But we also worked hard. Q Yes. In the papers, there was reference to the "food for Britain"? A: Well, I'll finish this first. Q Okay. A: Yes, I was president of the Kinsmen club in Lethbridge. I was made a life member of the Kinsmen, and I'm still a member of what they call the "K-40 Club", that is Kinsmen after the age of 40. They're out of the Kinsmen club, but they still continue their association with Kinsmen. We get together once a year or so. Q: I think it was in the Kinsmen papers that a program called "Food for Britain" was mentioned, in 1946 or 19471 think? Tell me about that. A: Yes. Well, it was during the war. Q Oh, was it? Okay. A: Yes, and the National Association of the Kinsmen Club, they started a program of sending milk to Britain. I forget now, but I know it was thousands of pounds that we sent, of dried milk, you know. Yes. It was a national program that was very useful, very appreciated, and successful. Yes. All the Kinsmen, all across the country. Q: That's interesting, because I wasn't even aware of its existence. A: Yes, a very worthwhile endeavor or project. Q. There is kind of a women's auxiliary of the Kinsmen... A: Yes, the Kinettes. Q. Was Islay involved with the Kinettes? A: Yes, she was responsible for starting...she was responsible along with the wife of a banker in Lethbridge, for starting Kinettes in Lethbridge. Q: Really? A: Yes. Islay was the President. I guess the founding president, or the first president of the Kinettes. They had, they took care of social programs, to raise money, they used to have Saturday night dances sometimes at the old Marquis Hotel. Q: Really? A: Yes, where the Royal Bank is now. Q Oh, I remember the Marquis Hotel. It wasn't that long ago. How old were your children then? What years were your children born? A: I'll have to consult with my wife on that one. (both laugh) Q I know that Carolyn was born in the early 40's. Wasn't she? A: Yes, Carolyn was born in, was it 1943? No. Elizabeth Ann was bora in 1939, Carolyn in 1942, Judith in 1946 and Hugh James in 1949. Q: I know that it was after you came back from Montreal wasn't it? A: Yes. Our oldest girl was Ann. She was bom in 39 and died in 1942 when she was about three years old. Q Really. A: And Caroline was bom after that, I think in about 1942. And Then it was about five years or so. I'll get those figures for you. Q: Okay. What did Ann die of? A: She was never well. She was born impaired and she was never, never well. She developed a pneumonia and died. She was never able to function normally. Yes. Q Its very, very difficult to lose a child. A: Oh, its shocking, shocking. Q: You never really get over it, I think. A: No, no. Q Your children, in the 50's would have been, Caroline would have been...I'm thinking, I'm moving into... A: Do you know Caroline? Q No, but I think I've met your youngest daughter. She's a teacher? A: Yes. Grade one. Q: During the years that your children were in school, doing all the things that children do at that age, music lessons, dance lessons, Cubs and girl Guides and all the rest of it... A: You're right. Q Your wife must have been very busy. A: Yes, yes she was. Very busy. Q: You spent long, long hours at the clinic, and at the hospital and with your practice, and she would have been the chauffeur and the... A: Yes. She would be...I would be called out after supper to see a patient or down at this hospital. She, after supper would bundle the three kids into the car, and we would drive down here. They would sit outside there, where we're parked now. I'd come in and see the patient, and to keep themselves warm...we didn't have the heaters that we have now in the car. I mean, we had heaters, but they weren't like the ones we have now. To keep warm, they would sing, she'd lead them in songs. They would carry on, in rounds. Often they've remarked upon it. Q: Well, it was a good way for them to spend some time with their dad. I suppose that on your busiest days, when they were very small, they might not see you at all. A: Yes, but you know, I always made an effort to come home for lunch. Q: Ah, yes. A: And supper, yes. Looking back, I don't feel that I was put upon, or affected adversely by my profession. I don't think so. sure, I was away from the home, but I never felt—I knew what I was getting into when I went into it. There was a group of us. We always had at least 5, and as it grew there were more. But we, I think we gained by having our associates help us, and by helping them. I always thought that the way we practiced was a good "social" maneuver. It worked out very well, I thought. For all of us. Q: Well. I know from our talks and from your papers that your profession was what you felt you were meant to do. I suppose, in many ways, it was all good times. Even what we might call the "bad times", the challenges, the disappointments, were still experiences that you learned from. You could always find something positive in them. A: That's right. Islay had been a teacher before we were married. She had gone to the University of Saskatchewan, took her teaching training... Q Yeah, I think we had talked about that before. That she had been a teacher before you were married, and that she had then decided that she wanted to be a nurse, and that's when you met. A: Yes. And when we got settled in Lethbridge, and when the children were coming along, at an age when they were all in school, Islay went back to teaching, at Alan Watson School. Q Yes. Now we were back in the fifties here. What would you say was the most common reason for an office visit? And did that change over the course of your career in medicine? A: There are several. One is a checkup. You go in to see the doctor because you want a check up. That was one reason. More often than not, there were specific complaints. I didn't do much in the way of maternity work at all. So that wasn't a factor in my practice. I suppose stomach? Gastrointestinal, pulmonary, cardiac, circulatory, metabolic (diabetes and so on)...these were the reasons for people coming to me, or being referred to me. Q: Would you say that most of your patients were referrals? A: No. A lot of them were just my patients. The day of the...the practice of the specialist has changed. To the point where the specialist is confined in his work, by his own decision, to a rather narrow area of medicine. The cardiologist...well there is the cardiologist who is an internist, the cardiologist who is a surgeon, and gastrointestinal specialist who is just concerned with the bowel or the stomach, and another who is just concerned with the pulmonary, the lungs, or metabolic-with diabetes or thyroid disease or adrenal disease... Yes. This is more today than what it used to be. Then there would be a specialist, but he would be a specialist in general surgery, which would be stomach, appendix, gall bladder, thyroid... Q: Pretty well everything but the brain and the heart? A: Yes. The brain and the heart were separate specialties. You had neurosurgeons and cardiac surgeons. These specialist areas have become quite narrow in their scope. The internist is the person who is responsible for a whole range of illnesses including heart, lungs, gastrointestinal, metabolic, rheumatic fever and so on. Now, there are internists who do nothing but cardiology. Q When did you first begin to see that change toward fairly narrow specialization? A: Well, its been a gradual evolution. I don't really know if I can give an answer to that, but I would say that my impression is that it began about, say 15 years ago? And its been gradually moving that way ever since...narrowing. Q: I know that its been a positive thing, in many ways, simply because of the explosion of knowledge...it would be impossible for someone to be as well versed in every area as someone who concentrated on a narrow area of specialization. I know its been positive in that way. But do you think there's been a trade off? A negative effect in any way? A: I don't think so... Q: I just wondered. A: I don't think so. I took sick some years ago with arthritis. I think I was glad to go to Calgary to see an arthritis specialist. I think that's true. Yes, I think fiat's true. As long as there's somebody who's going to lead the orchestra. Somebody who's going to be in charge of me. Send me to whoever you want, but let me come back to you. Q: That's it. I think you'll see family physicians in this role...and I think you see internists in this role as well now. A: I agree. I think that this is how I felt, being an internist. Q Being the coordinator of care, the person who coordinates the whole management of that patient. A: That's true. Somebody has to lead the orchestra. Q I think that, when I mentioned the negative things, I think I had in mind...from some reading in this field. Sometimes there are patients who just get lost They get sent from specialist to specialist and there i s no one leading the band. A: Yes. It happens, and its very unfortunate. They are lost. That's a good way of putting it. Q Yes. And there doesn't really seem to be any mechanism within the system to prevent that. I suppose it is really the responsibility of the patients themselves to have a family practitioner or an internist, to coordinate their care. But if they don't have that, and they get lost, there's...there doesn't seem to be a mechanism in place to see that they get "found" again. A: Yes. That's true. But I think generally speaking, most doctors would recognize the need for this type of advisor, and if they are not able to fulfill that responsibility they would generally see to it that the patient gets somebody. The problem is to get somebody who matches. Some people don't like somebody else because...well for whatever reason. Q: Yes. Different personalities matter. I think that some patients feel comfortable with the doctor in a more or less paternal role..."I know what's best for you...do as I say, and everything will be fine", and other, probably many younger people now, are much more likely to want to be very involved themselves in the decision making process, and would resent a paternalistic type of situation. A: Yes. That's very true. I think that this is a very, very important area of medical care. Q: Yes, I'm very interested in it. It fascinates me to read about it. One can see where there are problems...problems do come up...situations that are not ideal for optimal healing. A: Yes. I think if I had one word to express this area of difficulty for patients, the word is communication. Proper communication, and an understanding by the physician, is one of the greatest needs of the patient. Q: Do you think that communication is one of the most difficult areas for patients? I know that its not like it was 40 years ago. I think that 40 or 50 years ago there was a tendency to see the "Doctor" as omnipotent. Even now, I think that one feels, in some ways, almost like a child when one walks into a doctor's office. Because he or she "knows things that I don't know". And because of that, its become difficult to communicate because it is not a communication between equals. A: That's right. That's true. Its a difficult area.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19931081171
Collection
Archive
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.