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Other Name
OFFICE DESK
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OAK, NEWSPAPER, MOTHER-OF-PEARL
Catalogue Number
P20110027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OFFICE DESK
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1997
Materials
OAK, NEWSPAPER, MOTHER-OF-PEARL
No. Pieces
1
Height
76.4
Length
167.8
Width
86.4
Description
DESK, OAK WITH MOTHER-OF-PEARL CALL BUTTONS ON TOP FRONT RIGHT CORNER. TOP SURFACE HAS: WORN FINISH, AREA OF DARK BLACK STAINING NEAR FRONT CENTER, AND WATER DAMAGE CAUSING WOOD TO SPLIT AT THREE PLACES ON RIGHT SIDE. SEVEN DRAWERS, WITH THREE ON LEFT, THREE ON RIGHT AND ONE AT CENTER. DRAWER FACES HAVE BEVELED EDGES AND WOODEN HANDLES. BOTTOM TWO DRAWERS ON RIGHT, BOTTOM DRAWER ON LEFT AND CENTER DRAWER HANDLES HAVE CHUNKS OF WOOD MISSING. LEFT SIDE OF CENTER DRAWER HAS WHITE PAINT. LOCKING MECHANISMS AT TOP RIGHT, CENTER AND LEFT DRAWERS. ABOVE DRAWERS AT LEFT AND RIGHT ARE PULL OUT BOARDS. SIDES AND REVERSE OF DESK HAVE PANELED WOOD. RIGHT SIDE HAS FRAGMENT OF CORD EXTENDING FROM THE EDGE OF CALL BUTTONS. TOP DRAWER ON RIGHT HAS THREE LOOSE WOODEN SEPARATORS, ONE IN RIGHT MIDDLE AND ONE IN LEFT MIDDLE. SPILLED INK HAS STAINED THE BOTTOM OF TOP LEFT DRAWER INSIDE. FRAGMENT OF NEWSPAPER ON THE UNDERSIDE OF TOP CENTER DRAWER HAS, “FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1913.”
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
DESK BELONGED TO DONOR’S FATHER JERRY YAMAMOTO WHO PASSED AWAY ON OCTOBER 11, 1997. IN MAY 2012, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR TERRY YAMAMOTO. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE INTERVIEW’S TRANSCRIPTION. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS FIRST MEMORY OF THE DESK, YAMAMOTO RESPONDED BY SAYING, “WELL… IT GOES BACK TO WHEN I WAS ABOUT ELEVEN YEARS OLD. MY DAD BUILT THE HOUSE, HE BUILT IT ON HIS OWN AND THE FIRST YEAR WE MOVED IN THERE I WAS ELEVEN LIKE WE LIVED IN THE BASEMENT WHILE HE BUILT THE UPSTAIRS. AS FAR AS I CAN REMEMBER THAT DESK HAS BEEN THERE SINCE THE TIME WE MOVED IN SO I WAS ELEVEN SO THAT WOULD BE 1963. IT WAS IN WHAT WE CALLED HIS RADIO ROOM. HE WAS A RADIO TECHNICIAN FOR THE RCMP AND HE JUST HAD IT SET IN THERE FOR HIS MUSIC AS A DESK. YEAH, HE DID YOU KNOW WELL HE FIXED RADIOS HE WAS A RADIO TECH FOR THE RCMP SO HE WOULD TINKER AROUND FIXING RADIOS AND THINGS LIKE THAT. HE WAS ALSO A HAM OPERATOR. [FOR] AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER HE WAS WITH THE RCMP. I WAS BORN IN ‘52, 1952 SO IT HAD TO BE AROUND THAT TIME OR AFTER THAT HE JOINED THE RCMP BECAUSE AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER HE ALWAYS WORKED WITH THEM. HE STARTED OUT AS OPERATING RADIOS THEN JUST WENT ON COURSES AND WHATEVER WITH THE RCMP AND THEN HE BECAME THE RADIO TECHNICIAN FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. [WHEN HE STARTED, HE WAS DOING] THE RADIO TRANSMISSION WITH EVERY COP IN THE CARS. AND BASICALLY THE RCMP SENT HIM BACK AND PUT HIM ON TRAINING FOR RADIO TECHNICIAN AND HE WAS WITH THEM UNTIL HE RETIRED. HE LIKED IT BECAUSE HE SERVICED NOT ONLY THE CAR RADIOS BUT ALL THE RADIO TOWERS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. THE ONE THING HE REALLY ENJOYED WAS HE HAD RETIRED AND THEN WHEN THE OLYMPICS CAME, THE SKIING, THE WORLD CUP IN 1980, SECURITY OR WHATEVER. THE RCMP SENT HIM OUT TO OTTAWA ON A SPECIAL, BROUGHT HIM OUT OF RETIREMENT, SENT HIM TO OTTAWA FOR A SPECIAL COURSE AND THEN HE HAD TO HE WAS UP AT LAKE LOUISE AND BANFF AND THEY WERE DOING ALL THE SECURITY ON THE TOWERS AND EVERYTHING.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED ANY OF THE HISTORY OF THE DESK BEFORE HIS FATHER’S USE, YAMAMOTO SAID, “ALL I REMEMBER IS HIM SAYING IS THAT IT CAME FROM THE FORT MACLEOD RCMP BARRACKS AND HIM AND JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN HAD COLLECTED WEIRD THINGS. BUT ANYWAYS IT HAD SOMETHING TO DO WITH JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN SO I DON’T IF HE ACTUALLY HAD IT IN THE BEGINNING AND GAVE IT MY DAD TOOK IT BUT IT DID ACTUALLY COME FROM THE FORT MACLEOD RCMP BARRACKS. [MY FATHER] AND JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN WERE FRIENDS OF A DIFFERENT KIND AND LIKE I SAY THEY COLLECTED WEIRD THINGS.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE DAMAGE ON THE TOP SURFACE OF THE DESK, YAMAMOTO EXPLAINED, “YEAH, THAT WAS PROBABLY MY FAULT, I WAS USING IT FOR MY BEDDING PLANTS AND IT GOT SPRAYED WITH WATER. YOU KNOW I HAD THEM SITTING THERE I HAD A BOARD OVER TOP FOR A WHILE THERE.” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED BY KIM GUNN AND FORWARDED BY TOM EDGAR IN AN E-MAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION, “THE DESK IS AN OLD RCMP DESK THAT WAS STANDARD ISSUE TO RCMP OFFICES ACROSS CANADA. WHEN THE RCMP GOT NEW DESKS IT WAS GIVEN TO DR. GORE-HICKMAN’S DAD FOR USE IN HIS OFFICE AT THE OLD POLICE STATION ON 5TH STREET. GORDIE REMEMBERS JERRY Y. AND THE DESK BEING IN HIS DAD’S OFFICE. HE SAYS HIS DAD AND JERRY WERE GOOD FRIENDS. GORDIE SAYS THAT HIS DAD STARTED OUT AS A POLICE MAGISTRATE AND THAT IS WHY HIS OFFICE WAS AT THE POLICE STATION.” *UPDATE* AT THE TIME OF CATALOGUING IN AUGUST, 2013, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT DAVID SMITH DISCOVERED SOME ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS IN THE TOP CENTER DRAWER. UPON CONSULTATION WITH DONOR, THESE DOCUMENTS WERE TRANSFERRED TO GALT ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20110027000
Acquisition Date
2011-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE POLICE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RUBBER, PLEXIGLASS, STEEL.
Catalogue Number
P19960112055
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE POLICE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
RUBBER, PLEXIGLASS, STEEL.
No. Pieces
1
Height
14
Length
37.5
Width
22.5
Description
GREEN RUBBER GAS MASK WITH A PLEXIGLASS MASK AND A DETACHABLE OXYGEN CAN ATTACHED BELOW THE VENT ON MASK MARKED "CHIN TYPE CANNISTER", "FOR USE WITH SMITH & WESSON CHEMICAL CO.", AND MORE. "MSA" ON PLATE ABOVE MASK. STRAPS ON BACK MARKED "MINE SAFETY APPLIANCES CO.". PAINT ON CANISTER IS CHIPPING, BUT OTHERWISE MASK IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
POSSIBLY USED BY CITY POLICE SWAT TEAM OR THE RIOT SQUAD WHEN TEAR GAS WAS USED. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112055
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
C/W CASE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P19641365000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
C/W CASE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, RUBBER
No. Pieces
2
Height
14.0
Length
31.8
Width
23.5
Description
.1 CASE. ABOVE DIMENSIONS. LEATHER, BRASS, STEEL, MASONITE. LEATHER CARRYING HANDLE. MASONITE CASE. STEEL-BOUND EDGES. STAMPMARK ON EACH CLASP "CORBIN MADE IN U.S.A." UNDERNEATH BLACK PAINT ON FRONT. "MCNABB" AND "FULTON". "4" PAINTED WHITE ON TOP. .2 GAS MASK (SET). 15.2 CM HT. X 6.3 CM WTH. X 63.5 CM X 2.5 CM DIA. RUBBER, STEEL, GLASS, TIN. "SCOTT LANCASTER, NEW YORK, U.S.A.: CIRCLE WITH C IN MIDDLE" ON BACK OF MASK. PAPER LABEL ON FRONT OF CANISTER, GIVING DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS OF THE CANISTER "MINE SAFETY APPLIANCE COMPANY PITTSBURGH, PENNA MADE IN U.S.A. U.S.A. PATENTS 1,586,327 - 1,787,875". PAPER LABEL ON BACK. DIRECTIONS ON SHELF LIFE AND STORAGE... "JAN. 17, 56" SCRATCHED ON LID.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
USED BY LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT IN FIRE FIGHTING OPERATIONS
Catalogue Number
P19641365000
Acquisition Date
1964-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE [THEY] HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1985
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
No. Pieces
1
Length
416.0
Width
38.3
Diameter
17.5
Description
SHORT HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE, ALSO KNOW AS PONY LENGTH OR PUMP LENGTH FIRE HOSE. SHORT, WIDE, RED FIRE HOSE. COUPLINGS ON EACH END OF HOSE. ON THE LARGER END (17.5CM DIAMETER) THE CHROME PLATED COUPLING HAS 10.4CM LONG HANDLES AND A STRIPE OF GREEN PAINT NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE HOSE. THE HOSE HAS BEEN TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON THE OTHER END OF THE HOSE, THE DIAMETER IS 14.0CM, AND THE COUPLING HAS HANDLES THAT ARE 4.7CM LONG. THIS END OF THE HOSE IS ALSO TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON EACH END OF THE HOSE, TWO OF THE CLAMPS ARE SMALLER AND ARE STAMPED WITH A REPEATING "* DENVER * COLORADO * USA * BAND * IT *" THE LARGEST CLAMPS, EACH FURTHEST FROM ITS RESPECTIVE COUPLING, STAMPED: "DIXON V. & C. CO. USA 525" ON EITHER SIDE OF THE TWO LARGE BOLT SETS. VERY GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY ON EDGES. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND GOUGES IN THE METAL HANDLES OF THE COUPLINGS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS HOSE WAS USED “WHEN A FIRE ENGINE NEEDED TO CONNECT TO A FIRE HYDRANT AND WAS PARKED RIGHT BESIDE THE HYDRANT. THIS WAS BEFORE WE CARRIED LARGER BUT LIGHTER HOSES ON THE TRUCKS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT “THIS WAS ONE OF YOUR MAIN PIECES OF EQUIPMENT WHEN YOU WENT TO A FIRE … WE’D HOOK THIS [THE HOSE] TO THE HYDRANT, AND THEN THIS INTO OUR PUMP, SO WE’D BE GETTING 8 INCHES OF WATER INTO OUR PUMP, AND THEN THE PUMP WOULD BOOST THAT LINE, AND WE COULD PUT UP 5 OR 6 LINES … THIS WAS ONLY USED AT LARGE FIRES … WHEN WE HAD TO USE THIS, THERE WAS BIG TROUBLE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “IF THIS WAS IN SERVICE WITH OUR DEPARTMENT, THIS WAS IN SERVICE BEFORE I GOT ON, SO I DON’T KNOW THAT I’VE EVEN EVER ACTUALLY SEEN ONE OF THESE, TO BE HONEST WITH YOU.” DZUREN ELABORATED: “THAT’S WHAT WE WOULD HOOK UP ONTO FROM OUR HYDRANT TO THE PUMP. THE HYDRANT MAN, HE WOULD CONNECT THAT TO THE HYDRANT GATE, TO THE HYDRANT, AND THIS WOULD GO TO THE INPUT SIDE OF THE PUMPER. AND THEN THEY WOULD TURN ON THE WATER WITH THAT NOZZLE AND THEY WOULD SUPPLY WATER TO THE FIRE TRUCK AND HE COULD PUMP IT TO A MULTITUDE OF LINES THAT COME OFF OF THERE.” WHEN ASKED WHY FIREFIGHTERS WOULD WANT TO RUN THE WATER THROUGH THE PUMPER TRUCK, RATHER THAN JUST OFF THE HYDRANT, DZUREN EXPLAINED: “WELL, IF THE HYDRANT PRESSURE IS NOT HIGH ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE FIREFIGHTING, LIKE SAY IF OUR HOSE, IF A NOZZLE LIKE THAT, YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE UP TO A HUNDRED POUNDS IN THERE, A HYDRANT NORMALLY DOESN’T HAVE THAT KIND OF HIGH PRESSURE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PICK-HEADED AXE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PICK-HEADED AXE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.0
Length
89.1
Width
25.5
Description
FIRE AXE OR PICK-HEADED AXE. WOODEN HANDLE WITH METAL HEAD. HANDLE IS UNFINISHED WOOD, WITH A BRIGHT 6.5CM ORANGE STRIPE APPROXIMATELY 1/3 OF THE WAY DOWN THE HANDLE FROM THE HEAD. THE KNOB AND GRIP OF THE AXE CURVES SLIGHTLY AND IS SLIGHTLY WIDER THAN THE REST OF THE HANDLE, UNTIL THE JUNCTION WITH THE METAL HEAD (THE SHOULDER), WHERE THE HANDLE IS THE WIDEST. METAL HEAD HAS A BLADE AND PICK. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. SEVERAL SCRATCHES IN THE WOODEN HANDLE, ESPECIALLY NEAR THE HEAD. THE GRIP AND KNOB IS WELL WORN AND SCUFFED. A LARGE SLIVER OF WOOD IS MISSING FROM THIS AREA, BUT GIVEN THE WEAR PATTERN, THE SLIVER WAS LOST EARLY IN THE AXE'S USE. METAL HEAD IS VERY WORN. IT APPEARS TO HAVE HAD A RED FINISH AT ONE POINT, WHICH IS ALMOST ENTIRELY GONE. REMNANTS OF RED REMAIN ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THE HEAD, WHERE THE HEAD AND HANDLE MEET. BLADE AND PICK OF HEAD ARE BOTH WELL USED AND HAVE LOST THEIR SHARPNESS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE AXE (PICK-HEADED AXE) WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS AXE WOULD BE “USED IN FORCIBLE ENTRY, OVER HAUL, VENTILATION [AND] IS STILL USED TODAY, BUT [NOW WE] HAVE FIBERGLASS HANDLES OR COMPOSITE HANDLES.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN ADDED “PROBABLY THAT’S WHAT FIREFIGHTERS ARE NOTED FOR, IS AN AXE, BECAUSE AN AXE WAS USED SO MANY TIMES. … WHAT THE HYDRANT KEY COULDN’T DO, THE AXE DID … THIS OLD AXE WAS GOOD. IT WAS A GOOD OLD PRY-BACK, PRY AXE … SOMETIMES WE HAD TO GO TO A FARM FIRE. THEY HAD A POND THERE. WE HAD TO GET THE WATER, SO WE’D CUT A HOLE IN THE ICE WITH OUR AXE.” LAZENBY AGREED: “THIS IS ONE OF THE CLASSIC FIRE SERVICE TOOLS … THIS WAS PROBABLY THE PRIMARY TOOL THAT WE WOULD GRAB OFF THE TRUCK YEARS AND YEARS AGO IF WE HAD TO VENTILATE THE ROOF OF A STRUCTURE. BACK IN THE DAY WE DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE A CHAINSAW OR A K-12 SAW TO CUT THROUGH THE SHINGLES AND THE SHEETING AND THE SHIPLAP BOARDS AND SO IT WAS HARD WORK … THESE GET TAKEN OFF THE TRUCK ALL THE TIME BECAUSE WE’RE NOW IN THE HABIT OF TAKING TOOLS WITH US ON MOST CALLS … THESE [AXES] HAVE CHANGED. THE HANDLES ARE NO LONGER WOODEN; THEY’VE GONE TO FIBERGLASS. THEY’RE A BIT LIGHTER. THEY’RE MORE IMPACT-RESISTANT. YOU DON’T GET SLIVERS AND SPLINTERS WITH FIBERGLASS LIKE YOU DO WITH THE OLD. WE USE TO SAND THESE DOWN WITH SANDPAPER. WE WOULD OIL THEM UP A LITTLE BIT TO KEEP THE FINISH NICE AND THE HEADS WOULD RUST LIKE CRAZY, SO AGAIN, LIKE OUR HYDRANT KEY WE WOULD GET THE STEEL WOOL OUT OR SANDPAPER AND SAND IT AND OIL IT TO KEEP IT FROM RUSTING UP. AS OFTEN AS OUR TRUCKS GET WASHED, THESE USED TO BE MOUNTED ON THE EXTERIOR TAILBOARD OF THE TRUCK, SO EVERY TIME WE DROVE THROUGH INCLEMENT WEATHER OR WASHED THE VEHICLE, IT WAS EXPOSED TO ROAD GRIME AND WET.” PETIT ELABORATED: “WE USED THEM QUITE A BIT IF THERE WAS A VENT ON THE BUILDING, TO TEAR THE VENT. SAY THERE WAS A FIRE IN THE ATTIC AND YOU WANTED TO TEAR THE VENTS, WE’D USUALLY USE AN AXE LIKE THIS BECAUSE OF THE PICK SO YOU COULD GET UNDERNEATH THE METAL AND RIP IT … I DEFINITELY USED THEM … MOSTLY HOUSE FIRES, LIKE FIRES IN THE ATTIC AND THERE’S A VENT AND YOU TEAR THE VENT OFF AND SOMETIMES YOU’D TRY TO MAKE THE HOLE BIGGER SO THAT SMOKE AND STUFF CAN GET OUT. BUT LIKE I SAY, EVENTUALLY, WE DIDN’T USE AN AXE TO MAKE A HOLE, WE USED A POWER SAW.” DZUREN AGREED: “IT’S FOR CHOPPING OR FOR GETTING, AGAIN, THROUGH ANY TYPE OF WALL WHERE YOU HAVE TO PUNCTURE A HOLE THROUGH THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010003
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.5
Width
14.7
Description
METAL HYDRANT WRENCH, NOT ADJUSTABLE. WRENCH IS ROUGHLY AN 'L' SHAPE. ONE END OF THE WRENCH HAS A SINGLE CLAW, USED FOR PRYING. THE OPPOSITE END (THE SHORT END OF THE 'L') HAS A REULEAUX TRIANGLE, A SLIGHT HOOK, AND A SMALL (2.5CM) CIRCLE. IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HANDLE, ON ONE SIDE ONLY, IS A RECTANGULAR PATCH OF LIGHT GREY PAINT. THERE ARE REMNANTS OF LIGHT GREY FINISH ON THE REST OF THE WRENCH. OVERALL IN FAIR CONDITION. VERY RUSTED. GREY FINISH HAS ALMOST ENTIRELY FLAKED OFF. THE RECTANGULAR AREA OF GREY FINISH IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE PLUG WRENCH, OR HYDRANT WRENCH, WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ACCORDING TO BROWN THIS IS A “GOOD OLD HYDRANT KEY. WE ALL CARRIED ONE ON OUR BELT … IT WAS MADE OF PRETTY DURABLE STEEL. YOU COULD PRY ON THAT THING ALL YOU WANTED. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER ONE BREAKING. YOU COULD USE IT AS A HAMMER, AS A CLUB. WE ALWAYS JOKED – WE’D USE IT AS A WEAPON IF WE EVER GOT INTO TROUBLE WITH OTHER PEOPLE. IT NEVER HAPPENED – JUST A JOKE. IT WAS PROBABLY YOUR MAIN LINE TOOL, BREAK WINDOWS, BREAK DOORS IN. YOU KNOW, WE DIDN’T HAVE A WHOLE LOT OF REAL FANCY TOOLS IN THOSE DAYS BUT THAT HYDRANT KEY WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO US. WE CARRIED THEM ON OUR HYDRANT BELTS.” LAZENBY EXPANDED: “WHEN I WAS HIRED EVERY MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT WAS ISSUED ONE OF THESE WHEN YOU GOT YOUR BUNKER GEAR OR YOUR TURNOUTS AND YOUR HELMET. YOU WERE ISSUED A HYDRANT KEY WITH A LEATHER HOLSTER BELT THAT YOU WORE OVER TOP OF YOUR JACKET … NOW THERE WAS A FEW ROLES OR A FEW USES FOR THIS TOOL. NUMBER ONE, FIRST AND FOREMOST, IT IS A HYDRANT KEY WHICH MEANS THAT THIS WAS THE KEY THAT YOU USED TO ESSENTIALLY OPEN THE HYDRANT. THE OPENING AT THE END AWAY FROM THE BEVELED EDGE IS CUT IN THE SAME SIZE AND SHAPE AS THE STEM ON TOP OF THE HYDRANT AND IT WAS SIMPLY LEFTY-LOOSE, RIGHTY-TIGHTY. BUT THIS COULD ALSO BE USED AS A FORCIBLE ENTRY TOOL, PERHAPS AS A TOOL TO FIND A MEANS OF EGRESS IF YOU HAPPEN TO BE TRAPPED, YOU COULD BREAK WINDOWS WITH THIS. YOU COULD USE THE PRYING END TO PRY IF YOU HAD TO. I DON’T RECALL WHAT THE PURPOSE OF THE ROUND OPENING ON THAT KIND OF FLANGE END WAS - I DON’T REMEMBER THAT. BUT I DO REMEMBER THAT THERE WAS A SORT OF A MINDSET AMONG SOME OF THE SENIOR MEMBERS THAT IF YOU LET YOUR HYDRANT KEY BECOME ALL RUSTED AND LOOK A LITTLE BIT DISHEVELED THAT THAT WAS SORT OF LIKE THE MARK OF A POOR FIREFIGHTER, SOMEONE THAT DIDN’T LOOK AFTER THEIR GEAR PROPERLY, AND SO WE USED TO – AT TIMES WE WOULD BREAK OUT SOME STEEL WOOL OR THE PNEUMATIC POLISHER AND ACTUALLY POLISH THESE TO A NICE BRIGHT, SILVERY - LIKE A CHROME SHEEN, ALMOST. SO WHEN THEY ISSUED THEM THEY LOOKED TERRIBLE - THEY WERE UNFINISHED AND IT WAS YOUR JOB TO SORT OF GET IT POLISHED UP AND GET IT INTO SERVICE, SO TO SPEAK.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, SAYING THAT BY 2000 “THESE ARE NO LONGER ISSUED TO INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS … WE’VE EVOLVED IN SOME WAYS IN THAT THE HYDRANT KEY NOW TYPICALLY IS … MOUNTED ON THE BACK OF THE TRUCK … THE WHOLE INDUSTRY IS STARTING TO CHANGE IN THAT WE’RE BECOMING MUCH MORE SAFETY-ORIENTED WHEN IT COMES TO THESE TYPES OF THINGS … THIS BECAME REDUNDANT, AND YOU KNOW, IT WAS A LITTLE BIT SMALL FOR THE JOB THAT IT WAS ASKED TO DO AS WELL. OBVIOUSLY, THE BIGGER YOUR TOOL, THE BETTER PRYING AND STRENGTH AND WEIGHT YOU GET. THIS, YOU RELIED A LOT ON THE PERSONAL STRENGTH OF THE PERSON TO BE ABLE TO USE THIS EFFECTIVELY … WHEREAS WITH THE BIGGER ONES NOW, THEY’RE HEAVIER, THEY’RE A LITTLE BIT LONGER, YOU CAN JUST GET BETTER LEVERAGE NATURALLY.” PETIT AGREED, ADDING THAT HE BELIEVED THE WRENCH “WAS MADE IN LETHBRIDGE. MAYBE LETHBRIDGE IRON WORKS.” DZUREN EXPLAINED THAT THE WRENCH “WAS CARRIED IN A LEATHER HOLSTER TYPE OF THING THAT HUNG AT YOUR SIDE AND IT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS YOU PUT ON RIGHT AWAY, AS SOON AS YOU PUT ON YOUR TURN OUT GEAR … THAT WOULD BE THERE BECAUSE YOU WOULD NEED THAT TO TURN ON YOUR FIRE HYDRANT IF YOU NEEDED THE HYDRANT FOR WATER … AND IT ALSO HAD, THERE WAS A LITTLE, TINY, THE TOP OF THE KEY THERE WAS A LITTLE ROUND THING THAT WAS THERE TO TIGHTEN THE CUP LINKS ON HOSES, IF YOU HAD TO TIGHTEN A HOSE THAT WAS LEAKING.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.0
Length
24.8
Width
16.6
Diameter
9.0
Description
ADJUSTABLE SILVER COLOURED METAL WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE. CENTRAL CYLINDRICAL PORTION HAS A COUPLING ON ONE END, THROUGH WHICH BLACK RUBBER IS VISIBLE. THE OPPOSITE END HAS A CAP ON THE END OF THE CYLINDER. THIS CAP HAS A SMALL KNOB, WHICH HAS A VERY SHORT PIECE OF THIN CHAIN ATTACHED. COMING OUT FROM THE TOP OF THE CLYINDER IS THE DUAL-ADJUSTABLE NOZZLE: A 90 DEGREE FITTING ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO ROTATE HORIZONTALLY AND HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE TIGHTENED TO PREVENT FURTHER ROTATION; THE SECOND COMPONENT ROTATES VERTICALLY AND IS ROUGHLY SHAPED LIKE A THUMBLESS MITTEN AND AN 11CM LONG SLIT THAT ALLOWS THE WATER TO SPRAY OUT. BELOW THE NOZZLE, COMING OUT FROM THE SIDES OF THE CYLINDER, IS A ROUGHLY TRIANGULAR SHAPED PORTION, WHICH GOES UNDER THE CYLINDER AND HAS TWO SMALL BOLTS ON THE VERY BOTTOM. EACH OF THE ARMS OF THIS TRIANGULAR SHAPE HAVE A RED STRIPE, WITH ONE HAVING A STICKER OF "Q1" IN THE RED STRIPE. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. THE SILVER FINISH ON THE METAL HAS FLAKED OFF, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES/CORNERS, AROUND THE COVER WITH THE SMALL PIECE OF CHAIN AND AROUND THE COUPLING. THE RED STRIPES HAVE PARTIALLY SCRATCHED OFF. THE "Q1" STICKER IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED IN 1959, RETIRED 1992), AND RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998). BROWN RECALLED “THAT’S JUST A KIND OF SPRAY CURTAIN BETWEEN BUILDINGS. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER USING IT. THAT’S WHAT IT IS. IF ONE BUILDING IS ON FIRE, AND YOU WANT TO TRY AND SAVE THE OTHER BUILDING, YOU PUT IT ON THERE, JUST KIND OF A BIG WALL OF SPRAY, AND THAT WOULD KEEP THE OTHER BUILDING SAFE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS CALLED A CURTAIN NOZZLE AND THE IDEA BEHIND THIS NOZZLE WAS … FOR EXPOSURE PROTECTION. AND, WHAT I MEAN BY THAT IS, IF YOU HAVE A HOUSE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREET THAT’S ON FIRE AND THE FIRE IS VENTING OUT THE WINDOWS ON ONE SIDE, THE HOUSE THAT IS IMMEDIATELY EXPOSED TO THAT HOUSE THAT’S ON FIRE, WE CONSIDER THAT AN EXPOSURE HAZARD … THE BEST WAY TO STOP HEAT FROM TRANSFERRING RADIANTLY FROM HOUSE A TO HOUSE B WAS TO PUT UP A STREAM OF WATER IN BETWEEN THE HOUSES … IT DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL WHEN IT WAS WINDY AND UNFORTUNATELY WITH THE WINDS THAT WE GET AROUND HERE IT BECAME INEFFECTIVE AT TIMES, AND IT ALSO WASN’T VERY STABLE. IF YOU PUMPED THIS THING TO MORE THAN ABOUT 60 POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH AT THIS NOZZLE, IT BECAME UNSTABLE AND IT WOULD FLIP OVER … THE IDEA AND THE CONCEPT WAS EXCELLENT … BUT I THINK [IN THE END] IT DIDN’T WORK AS WELL AS WHAT WAS HOPED.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, STATING THAT THE NOZZLES WERE “DEFINITELY ON THE TRUCKS WHEN I STARTED … [AND THAT] SOMEWHERE AROUND 2005” THEY WERE REMOVED FROM THE TRUCKS AND REPLACED WITH A “BLITZ FIRE NOZZLE”. HE RECALLED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USEFUL: “I SAW IT DEPLOYED. WE DID USE IT. AND AS FAR AS EFFICACY, IT’S HARD TO KNOW REALLY WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF IT HADN’T BEEN THERE, SO, DID IT DO ITS JOB? YES, IT DID. THEY WERE JUST A LITTLE BIT TOO FINICKY AND JUST MAYBE DIDN’T WORK QUITE AS WELL AS THE NEWER TECHNOLOGY THAT WAS COMING ON THE MARKET.” PETIT ADDED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS “JUST LIKE A SPRINKLER SYSTEM … YOU COULD PUT THAT BETWEEN THE TWO [CLOSE TOGETHER] BUILDINGS SO YOU COULD PROTECT THE OTHER ONE … I’VE SEEN IT USED, NOT IN A FIRE, BUT IN DRILLS … IT PROBABLY CAME IN AFTER [I STARTED IN THE 1960S] BUT LIKE I SAY, THE ONLY TIME I’VE EVER USED IT WAS WHEN WE HAD SOME DRILLS.” DZUREN RECALLED AN EARLIER VERSION: "I DON’T RECALL EVER USING THAT. NOW, THERE’S ANOTHER ONE THAT’S … GOT THESE LEGS SITTING HERE LIKE THAT [AND] YOU WOULD SET THAT ON THE GROUND. NOW IF THAT WAS TO HOOK UP A HOSE, THIS COULD BE SOMETHING WHERE YOU COULD HAVE A CONSTANT SPRAY GOING OUT. SAY IF THERE’S A FIRE THERE, AND YOU WANT TO PROTECT AN EXPOSURE CLOSE BY, AND THE FACT THAT THIS TRIPOD THERE, TO HAVE IT SITTING STEADY ON THE GROUND, AND THE SPRAY WOULD COME OUT OF THERE, THAT’S ALL THAT COMES TO MIND." "WE HAD A FIRE DOWN TOWN HERE, IT WAS THE OLD SAAN STORES ON THIS STREET, AND THERE WAS A FIRE IN THE UPPER STORY, AND WE, THERE WERE POWER LINES AND TRANSFORMERS RIGHT IN THE ALLEY, AND WE SET UP WHAT WE CALL A CURTAIN NOZZLE, AND IT WAS BASICALLY, BUT IT DIDN’T LOOK LIKE THAT, IT WAS BASICALLY THAT, BUT IT WAS A FLAT PIECE OF BRASS ABOUT THAT LONG WITH HOLES IN IT, AND WE PUT THAT ON SO IT WOULD BE A SPRAY GOING UP FAIRLY HIGH, I THINK IT WENT PROBABLY TWENTY-FIVE, THIRTY FEET HIGH. ONCE YOU PUT THE TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE ON THERE WITH THE HIGH PRESSURE TO PROTECT THE TRANSFORMERS FROM HEAT, FROM THE BUILDING THAT WAS BURNING. NOW, THAT’S THE ONLY THING I CAN THINK OF, OF WHAT THAT MIGHT BE, BUT I DON’T, I DON’T REMEMBER THAT…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
POLES AND CANVAS
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20140019001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
POLES AND CANVAS
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Materials
CANVAS, NYLON
No. Pieces
1
Length
212
Width
67
Description
RECTANGULAR PIECE OF OFF-WHITE CANVAS, WITH TWO RED NYLON STRAPS SEWN AT EACH VERTICAL EDGE. CANVAS IS FOLDED OVER AND SEWN ALONG BOTH HORIZONTAL EDGES, CREATING TWO LENGTHWISE CHANNELS. ALL SEAMS ARE REINFORCED WITH DOUBLE-STITCHING. FRONT OF CANVAS HAS REPEATING CIRCULAR WATER STAINS ALONG THE CENTRE AND VARIOUS SPOTS OF DISCOLOURATION THROUGHOUT. TEXT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER READS “L F D” IN BLACK MARKER. BACK OF CANVAS HAS SIMILAR WATER STAINING, AND TEXT ACROSS THE CENTRE READING “DISCARD” IN BLACK MARKER. A STAMP AT THE RIGHT SIDE DEPICTS A CIRCULAR CREST AND READS “CITY OF LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPT” IN BLUE INK. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-HUMAN-POWERED
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS CANVAS STRETCHER, ALONG WITH TWO WOODEN POLES, WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT DURING MEDICAL EMERGENCIES, PRIOR TO THE INCORPORATION OF PARAMEDIC STAFF IN THE DEPARTMENT IN THE MID 1980S. AMONG DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL, IT IS REFERRED TO AS “POLES AND CANVAS”. ON SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LAWRENCE DZUREN, RETIRED FIRE CHIEF, WHO SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT FROM 1959 TO 1992. OF THE POLES AND CANVAS, DZUREN SAID: “[THIS] WOULD BE IN THE AMBULANCE AND THERE’S TWO BIG WOODEN POLES, NICELY SANDED DOWN. WHEN YOU GOT THE PATIENT YOU WOULD ROLL HIM TO THE SIDE, TUCK THAT UNDER, ROLL HIM BACK ONTO [THE CANVAS], PUT THE POLES IN, AND PICK HIM UP, ONE [FIREMAN] ON EACH END… THAT’S THE WAY WE CARRIED PATIENTS OUT OF WHEREVER WE HAD TO CARRY THEM… I RECALL GOING TO ONE, THERE WAS A BLIZZARD GOING ON, WE GOT THIS BIG FELLA… HE WAS ABOUT 6’5”, AND WE HAD TO GET HIM OUT OF THE BASEMENT … WITH POLES LIKE THIS… YOU THINK YOU CAN MANIPULATE, AND WE USUALLY DID SUCCEED IN GETTING THEM OUT OF THERE, BUT IT WAS WITH A LOT OF BACK BREAKING STUFF TO GET HIM UP THE STAIRS… BECAUSE ONE GUY IS UP THERE TO LIFT THIS WAY, AND THE OTHER GUY IS BENDING DOWN… [POLES AND CANVAS] CAME OUT OF SERVICE WHEN WE STARTED GETTING PARAMEDICS [IN THE MID TO LATE 1980S]. THEY DID AWAY WITH IT, WHICH I WAS KIND OF SURPRISED, BECAUSE WE FOUND IT SUCH AN EASY WAY OF DOING IT. BECAUSE NOW… THE PARAMEDICS AND NURSES PICK THEM UP AND MANUALLY SET THEM ONTO THE BED, WHERE WITH THIS… WE COULD JUST PICK THEM UP, PUT THEM ON [THE BED] AND AWAY WE WENT. BUT THEY FOUND [A METHOD] THAT’S MAYBE MORE EFFICIENT, OR EASIER ON THE PATIENT.” ON SEPTEMBER 15, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLIFF ‘CHARLIE’ BROWN, RETIRED PLATOON CHIEF, WHO SERVED WITH FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES FROM 1966 TO 2004. OF THE POLES AND CANVAS, BROWN SAID: “THAT’S WHAT I WAS TRAINED ON… THAT WAS OUR ‘SCOOP AND RUN’. WHEN WE WENT TO ANY KIND OF EMERGENCY, WE TOOK THE CANVAS WITH US… VERY LITTLE FIRST AID AT THE SCENE, LIKE NEXT TO NONE, UNLESS THERE WAS BLEEDING… IT WAS MOSTLY SCOOP AND RUN… GET THEM TO THE HOSPITAL AS QUICK AS WE COULD… RATHER THAN CARRY [A STRETCHER WITH A METAL FRAME] UP THE STAIRS, WE’D GO UPSTAIRS AND PUT THE PATIENT ON THE POLES… THE [FIREMAN] ON THE BOTTOM, IF [THE PATIENT] WAS STARTING TO SLIDE OFF, THEY’D END UP WITH THEIR LEGS AROUND THE [FIREMAN’S] NECK, AND THERE WAS NOTHING YOU COULD DO… YOU HAD TO GET DOWN, AND IT WASN’T THE PERSON’S FAULT BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE THE STRENGTH ON THE SLIPPERY CANVAS TO HANG ON.” ON SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED TREVOR LAZENBY, LIEUTENANT WITH LETHBRIDGE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES, WHO TRAINED AS A PARAMEDIC AND STARTED HIS CAREER IN LETHBRIDGE WORKING AS A DISPATCHER IN 1994. OF THE POLES AND CANVAS, LAZENBY SAID: “I NEVER USED THESE, BUT I HAVE HEARD A THOUSAND STORIES ABOUT POLES AND CANVAS – SOME GOOD, WHERE THEY WORKED INCREDIBLY WELL, AND SOME NOT SO GOOD, WHERE IT WAS ALMOST COMICAL THE WAY THINGS UNFOLD. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU GO UP A TWO-STOREY OR THREE-STOREY WALKUP WITH NO ELEVATOR, AND IF YOU’VE GOT [FIREMEN] WHO ARE HEIGHT MISMATCHED… WHEN YOU STARTED GOING DOWN STAIRS, THERE WERE REALLY NO STRAPS ON THESE THINGS TO HOLD PEOPLE – THEY WERE LIKE A MILITARY LITTER. SO AS THE ONE [FIREMAN] IS GOING DOWN THE STAIRS, THE PATIENT STARTS TO SLIDE. THERE WERE STORIES WHERE GUYS WERE TRYING TO HOLD THE POLES UP AS HIGH AS THEY POSSIBLY COULD SO THE [PATIENT] WOULDN’T SLIDE DOWN… PRETTY SOON HIS LEGS ARE HANGING OVER YOUR SHOULDERS!... BUT WHEN I WAS NEW [IN THE MID-1990S], I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TIMES I GOT TOLD ‘OH THE POLES AND CANVAS ARE WAY BETTER THAN THOSE STRETCHERS YOU GUYS ARE USING TODAY BECAUSE OF THIS AND THIS’ [AND] I AM SURE THAT IN SOME WAYS THEY WERE; I NEVER DISCOUNTED IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE P20150010001-GA FOR FULL TRANSCRIPTS OF REFERENCED INTERVIEWS ALONG WITH OTHERS WITH FIRE/EMS MEMBERS AND ADDITIONAL RELATED RESEARCH.
Catalogue Number
P20140019001
Acquisition Date
2014-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

DEVICE, BLOOD PRESSURE

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact13220
Other Name
OSCILLONTONOMETER
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OSCILLONTONOMETER
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CARDBOARD, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
11
Height
24
Length
31.8
Width
9
Description
1: AN ORANGE-BROWN CASE WITH BRONZE COLOURED HINGES, CLASPS, AND FEET. THERE IS A SINGLE HANDLE AT THE TOP MADE OF THE SAME FAUX LEATHER MATERIAL AS THE CASE ON TWO METAL HINGES. IT SITS ABOVE A GOLD PUSH CLASP. THERE ARE TWO BRONZE COLOURED HINGES THAT THE CASE SWINGS OPEN ON. THE CASE HAS EIGHT BRONZE-COLOURED DOMED FEET, FOUR OF WHICH SIT AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE HINGES AND FOUR OF WHICH ARE ON THE SIDE OF THE CASE. ON THE SAME SIDE SIX SILVER STUDS SIT IRREGULARLY IN THE BODY OF THE CASE. THE INSIDE OF THE CASE HAS A BUILT IN POUCH, ON WHICH A STICKER STATES “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 3402041” AND A PIECE OF PAPER READING “OSCOLLOTONOMETER USE FOR BLOOD PRESSURE” IS TAPED ON. AT THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE, BOLTED TO THE CASE WITH SILVER STUDS SITS THE MEASURING MECHANISM OF THE OSCILLONOMETER. THE SILVER CASED MECHANISM HAS A BLACK RUBBER HAND PUMP ATTACHED, ALONG WITH MULTIPLE ATTACHMENT POINTS FOR THE TUBES OF THE PRESSURE CUFFS. TWO DIALS SIT ON ITS FACE, ONE RANGING FROM 7-0-18 AND READING “COMPARATIF”, THE SECOND RANGING FROM 0-300MMHG AND READING “MANOMETER”. NEXT TO IT IS A SILVER COLOURED PLATE HOLDING FOUR SILVER SCREW-IN KNOBS. 2: A CIRCULAR PAPER TAG RIMMED IN A METAL FRAME AND HELD WITH A SAFETY PIN TO THE HANDLE OF THE CASE. ON ONE SIDE THE TAG READS “C.S.R OSCILLOTONOMETER “CAMPARAT”” . THE TAG IS CRUMPLED AND SOME OF THE TEXT IS WORN OFF. H: 0.1 CM, D: 4.7 CM 3: A PIECE OF THE INSIDE LINING OF THE CASE THAT HAS PEELED OFF FROM THE SIDE. ONE SIDE IF THE FAUX LEATHER, THE OTHER A CARDBOARD PAPER COATED IN HARDENED GLUE. H: 0.1 CM, L: 23 CM, W: 5 CM 4: A GREY PRESSURE CUFF ATTACHED TO TWO TUBES, RED, AND BLACK. THE INFLATABLE PART OF THE CUFF MEASURES 46 CM BY 14 CM, WITH THE WRAP AROUND STRAP MEASURING 76 CM BY 4 CM. THE TWO RED AND BLACK TUBES MEASURE 63 CM LONG AND 0.5 CM AROUND. H: 76.5 CM, L: 122.5 CM, W: 14 CM 5: RED TUBING BROKEN OFF FROM ONE OF THE PRESSURE CUFFS. THE TUBING IS CRIMPED AND SNAPPED OFF INTERNALLY NEAR THE BROKEN EDGE OF THE TUBING. L: 47 CM, D: 0.5 CM 6: A GREY PRESSURE CUFF ATTACHED TO TWO TUBES, RED, AND BLACK. THE INFLATABLE PART OF THE CUFF MEASURES 46 CM BY 14 CM, WITH THE WRAP AROUND STRAP MEASURING 76 CM BY 4 CM. THE BLACK TUBE MEASURES 63 CM LONG AND 0.5 CM AROUND. THE RED TUBE MEASURES 18 CM, BROKEN IN HALF. H: 76.5 CM, L: 122.5 CM, W: 14 CM 7: A TYPED NOTE READING “RE OSCILLOMETER. IF ANYONE WISHES TO USE THIS AND IS NOT FAMILIAR WITH THIS MODEL, DR. KING-BROWN HAS SAID THAT HE WOULD HELP. THANK YOU. MIB.” THERE IS ALSO AN “MIB” SIGNED IN BLUE PEN. L: 15.4 CM, W: 10.1 CM 8: A SINGLE PAGE BOOKLET TITLED “SERVICE INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE OSCILLOMETER COMPARATIF”. THE PAPER IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED WITH A TORN CORNER AND A SLIGHT TEAR IN THE MIDDLE EDGE OF THE PAGES. L: 30 CM, W: 11.7 CM 9: A SINGLE PAGE BOOKLET TITLED “OSCILLOTONOMETERS “COMPARAT” AND “COMPARATIF”” FRONT COVER ALSO HAS AN IMAGE OF A DOCTOR USING THE MACHINE TO MEASURE BLOOD PRESSURE FROM A PATIENT'S ANKLES. THE BACK COVER SHOWCASES AN IMAGE OF THE COMPARATIF AND A DIAGRAM OF BLOOD PRESSURE TUBE CONNECTORS. THE PAGES ARE SLIGHTLY DIMPLED AROUND THE EDGES. L: 30 CM, W: 12.2 CM 10: AN EXAMPLE OF THE FILL-IN FORMS PRINTED WITH FILL-IN EXAMPLES AND GRAPHS IN BLACK INK. WRITTEN IN GERMAN. L: 15 CM, W: 24.7 CM 11: A PAD OF ORANGE INKED FILL-IN FORMS COMPLETE WITH GRAPHING GRIDS. THE FORMS ARE WRITTEN IN GERMAN. THE PAD IS MISSING ONLY A FEW PAGES, WITH SLIGHTLY DIMPLED EDGES AND CURVING CORNERS. H: 0.7 CM, L: 15 CM, W: 24.7 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS ARTIFACT IS CALLED AN OSCILLOTONOMETER AND IT WAS USED TO MEASURE THE BLOOD PRESSURE OF THE LEGS. THE OSCILLOTONOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM (OR), WHERE IT WAS USED BY THE OR STAFF. IT CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE IN 1988 AFTER ITS USE IN THE OR. THE ALUMNI BELIEVE THAT THIS ARTIFACT IS OF IMPORTANCE BECAME IT IS “SOMETHING NOT SEEN OFTEN BY FLOOR STAFF.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. ON 12 JULY 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK MET WITH THREE MEMBERS OF GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – SHARON DEJONG, DONNA KARL, AND SUE KYLLO – TO ESTABLISH FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT VARIOUS ARTIFACTS IN THIS WAVE OF GSN ACQUISITIONS. ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT, THE ALUMNI STATED THAT THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN USED FROM 1958 TO 1988 (BASED ON THEIR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES DURING THEIR CAREER AND THE CLOSING YEAR OF THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL). THEY ALSO ADDED THAT THIS INSTRUMENT WAS NOT OFTEN SEEN BY THE FLOOR STAFF. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049003
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.