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Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P19960112135
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
96.2
Length
66.2
Width
51.5
Description
OAK ARMCHAIR. DARK BROWN SIMULATED LEATHER (CLOTH) UPHOLSTERY ON CHAIR BACK; SLIGHTLY CUSHIONED SEAT UPHOLSTERED WITH SAME. STRAIGHT LEGS WITH SPINDLES BETWEEN THEM. STEEL BRACKET FIXING BOTH ARMS TO SUPPORTS AT FRONT. STEEL RODS ALONG WIDTHS OF CHAIR, JUST BELOW SEAT. FINISH ON CHAIR IS QUITE WORN AND SCRATCHED, ESPECIALLY ON ARMS. FINISH ON UPHOLSTERY ALSO WORN.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112135
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OAK, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19960112134
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
OAK, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Height
81.8
Length
57.7
Width
57.7
Description
OAK ROUND-BACK CHAIR WITH SOLID BACK PANEL. ARM RESTS; LEFT ONE HAS WHITE SPOT OF PAINT. BACKING OF CHAIR HAS BLACK LEATHER PANEL (BOTH FRONT AND REVERSE) TACKED TO IT; TRAPEZOID IN SHAPE. THREE SLATS CONNECTING LEGS: TWO RUN FRONT TO BACK; THIRD CONNECTS THESE TWO ACROSS CENTRE. LEFT PROPER SLAT IS BROKEN AT BACK JOINT. CHAIR IS SCRATCHED THROUGHOUT. LABELLED AT LOWER BACK OF SEAT.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BETWEEN 2008 AND 2009, RET. LETHBRIDGE POLICE CHIEF TERRY WAUTERS STATED THAT THE CHAIR WAS “FROM THE COURTROOM (LOCATED AT THE 5TH AVENUE POLICE STATION) AND THAT IT WAS USED BY DEFENCE LAWYERS, PROSECUTORS AND POLICE OFFICERS”. CONCURRENTLY, POLICE INSPECTOR BILL KAYE ADDED THAT AFTER ITS USE IN THE COURTROOM, IT WAS “USED IN THE LOBBY OF THE OLD POLICE STATION”. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112134
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
FOLDING DESK
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OAK
Catalogue Number
P19960112133
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FOLDING DESK
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1970
Materials
OAK
No. Pieces
3
Height
68.8
Length
81.2
Width
45.3
Description
SMALL OAK DESK CONSISTING OF DESKTOP, AND TWO HINGED LEG PANELS. TWO SLATS ACROSS BACK HOLD LEGS IN PLACE; ONE AT BOTTOM IS REPLACEMENT. DRAWER IN FRONT RIGHT PROPER, WITH BRASS LOCK MECHANISM AT CENTRE; NO PULL. WRITTEN IN PENCIL INSIDE DRAWER IS "DEX 90S-C". BOTTOM OF DRAWER HAS WRITTEN IN BLACK INK "WIN M1200 S. NO. 255888 PUR"; "BRNG 12ETTE. S. NO. 3A4452 PUR. DEC '66 $194.95."; "WIN M100 S. NO. 128002 PUR. 11 FEB '67". PULL-OUT WRITING BOARD AT LEFT SIDE OF DESK FRONT. TWO BENT NAILS JUST BELOW DESKTOP AT RIGHT SIDE. DESK IS SCRATCHED THROUGHOUT, WITH SEVERAL INSECT BORE HOLES AT TOP. COLLAPSES BY REMOVING BACK SLATS AND FOLDING LEGS UNDER DESKTOP.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BETWEEN 2008 AND 2009, RET. LETHBRIDGE POLICE CHIEF TERRY WAUTERS STATED THAT THE “SMALL DESK WAS USED FOR COMPLAINT BOOK ENTRIES” IN THE POLICE STATION. ADDITIONALLY, HE RECALLED USING THE DESK PERSONALLY. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112133
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.4
Length
3.5
Width
4.6
Description
GLASS BOTTLE CONTAINING AMBER OIL, WITH CRACKED AND TORN CORK IN TOP OPENING. BOTTLE HAS ROUND NECK, DOMED TOP AND SQUARE BODY; BOTTLE HAS BLUE AND WHITE LABEL ON FRONT. FRONT LABEL BLUE BACKGROUND WITH WHITE CROWN ABOVE WHITE SHIELD WITH RED AND BLUE TEXT; LABEL IS TORN ACROSS SHIELD MAKING RED TEXT INDECIPHERABLE, BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “PURE VANILLA”; SHIELD HAS WHITE DOTS AROUND BASE AND WHITE TEXT BELOW “FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CAMPBELL BROS & WILSON LIMITED, WINNIPEG – CANADA, EST. 1882”. BACK OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “2 FL. OZ”. BASE OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “1, 4818, FDJ” WITH “D” IN A DIAMOND. CORK IS TORN OFF AT THE TOP OF THE BOTTLE NECK; LABEL IS WORN AND DISCOLORED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE GUN OIL, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT. HOWEVER, HE’S VERY, VERY CONCERNED ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD CITIZENS TO HAVE FIREARMS, BUT THE MAIN THING [WAS] TO PROTECT US FROM A FASCIST GOVERNMENT.” “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKEL
Catalogue Number
P19970094010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1945
Materials
NICKEL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1
Length
4.5
Width
4.7
Description
NICKEL CAP BADGE WITH PIN. BADGE IS SHAPED AS MAPLE LEAF; CROWN EMBOSSED AT CENTRE OF FACE, WITH "CANADA" IN BANNER BELOW. BRASS COTTER PIN THROUGH TABS AT BACK.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO FRANK BATHGATE, A MEMBER OF THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE FROM 1953 UNTIL HE RETIRED IN 1988. DECEASED 1996. FOR HISTORY PLEASE SEE P19960107001-GA. DONOR IS FRANK'S WIFE.
Catalogue Number
P19970094010
Acquisition Date
1998-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MODEL 929 .22 CAL
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P19960087002
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MODEL 929 .22 CAL
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Materials
STEEL, BAKELITE
No. Pieces
7
Height
10
Length
16.5
Width
9
Description
.22 CALIBRE REVOLVER KNOWN AS A "SIDEKICK". REVLOVER HAS 9 CHAMBERED CYLINDER AND BLACK BAKELITE GRIPS. STAMPED INTO LEFT SIDE OF BARREL IS "MODEL 929 22LR" AND "MADE IN U.S.A.". RAISED AT TOP OF GRIPS ARE MANUFACTURER LOGO "H&R". S/N "AP137117" IS STAMPED INTO BUTT.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-FIREARM
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
REVOLVER WAS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM BY THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE WHO CONFISCATED THE GUN FROM AN UNKNOWN PERSON.
Catalogue Number
P19960087002
Acquisition Date
1996-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
CAP (UNIFORM) (3)
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKEL / NICKEL-PLATE
Catalogue Number
P19780058000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CAP (UNIFORM) (3)
Date Range From
1900
Date Range To
1977
Materials
NICKEL / NICKEL-PLATE
No. Pieces
6
Length
5.1
Width
5.1
Description
.1 "LETHBRIDGE" AND "F.D." IN ENGRAVED LETTERS. "1" IN CENTRE, FIRE HYDRANT AND LADDER. SCREW WELDED ON BACK, WITH A BRASS "NUT". SMALL POINT ON BACK. .2 "LETHBRIDGE" AND "FIRE DEPT." ENGRAVED IN BLACK LETTERS. "64" IN CENTRE, FIRE HYDRANT AND LADDER. SCREW WELDED ON BACK, SMALL POINT ON BACK. HAS A SILVER NUT. .3 "CITY OF LETHBRIDGE" AND "FIRE DEPARTMENT" LETTERING ON RED BACKGROUND. A SCREW WELDED ON BACK. PIN AND A BRASS NUT ON BACK. ALL BADGES ARE HIGHLY POLISHED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
.1 CAP BADGE USED IN EARLY 1900'S (ORIGINAL FIRE DEPARTMENT BADGE)..2 A LATER MODEL OF ABOVE BADGE. USED UNTIL 1976..3 BADGE FIRST ISSUED IN 1977.
Catalogue Number
P19780058000
Acquisition Date
1978-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
JERSEY
Catalogue Number
P19990088002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Materials
JERSEY
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.0
Length
53.0
Width
49.5
Description
WHITE JERSEY. SHIRT IS WAIST LENGTH, WITH HALF LENGTH SLEEVES. THERE IS A BLUE LOGO ON LEFT CHEST. LOGO CONSISTS OF A BUFFALO HEAD IN THE CENTER OF AN OVAL SHAPE; WITHIN BORDER OF OVAL READS "MAINTIENS LE DROIT". ATOP OVAL IS A CROWN; ON THE SIDES OF THE OVAL ARE MAPLE LEAVES; AND BELOW OVAL IS A BANNER SHAPE, WITHIN WHICH READS "ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE". THERE IS A TAG ON INSIDE BACK OF NECK; TAG IS WHITE WITH RED PRINT THAT READS "UNIQUE UNIQUE PRODUCTS CO TORONTO".
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD BUCHANAN. DONOR THINKS SHIRT WAS USED BY FATHER DURING SPORTS ACTIVITIES. EDWARD WAS A MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE FROM 1919 UNTIL 1932 WHEN HE TRANSFERRED TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. HE WAS A SENIOR STAFF SARGEANT, ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE AT LETHBRIDGE FROM MAY 1944 TO NOV. 1950. HE RETIRED IN 1950, THEN BECAME DIRECTOR OF CORRECTIONS FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, EDWARD BECAME A MEMBER OF THE RCMP VETERAN'S ASSOCIATION IN 1950/51 IN EDMONTON AND REMAINED A MEMBER UNTIL HIS PASSING; HE ALSO SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THIS ASSOCIATION. SEE P20020090001-GA FOR COMPLETE BIOGRAPHY OF EDWARD BUCHANAN.
Catalogue Number
P19990088002
Acquisition Date
2000-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON MODEL 1871 "SPORTSMAN"
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P19970088003
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON MODEL 1871 "SPORTSMAN"
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
STEEL, BAKELITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
12.8
Length
27
Width
3.9
Description
.22 CALIBRE REVOLVER WITH BROWN WOOD GRIPS. 9 CHAMBER CYLINDER. STAMPED INTO LEFT SIDE OF BARREL IS "H&R 'SPORTSMAN' DOUBLE ACTION". STAMPED INTO RIGHT SIDE OF BARREL IS "22 LONG RIFLE CTC." SERIAL NUMBER "R55157" IS STAMPED INTO BUTT FRAME. GRIPS HAVE PEWTER MEDALLION LOGOS WITH STYLIZED "H&R".
Subjects
ARMAMENT-FIREARM
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
DONOR WAS BORN IN SASKATCHEWAN AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AT AGE 8. JOINED THECANADIAN MILITARY AND THEN ATTENDED SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY. WORKED FOR 25 YEARS AS A PROBATION OFFICER AND SOCIAL WORKER IN FAMILY COURT. DONOR PURCHASED REVOLVER IN VANCOUVER IN 1970 OUT OF PERSONAL INTEREST. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY ALEXANDER MCQUARRIE. SHE LEARNED THESE DETAILS ABOUT THE DONOR FROM HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY: "ALEXANDER ROBERT 'MAC' MCQUARRIE, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. JULIE L. MCQUARRIE OF LETHBRIDGE, PASSED AWAY AT THE ST. MICHAEL'S HEALTH CARE CENTRE ON FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 AT THE AGE OF 59 YEARS... MAC WAS BORN IN PRINCE ALBERTA, SK AND GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. HE RECEIVED HIS PILOT'S WINGS IN THE CANADIAN AIR FORCE AND SPENT THREE YEARS IN THE LORD STRATHCONA'S HORSE REGIMENT. HE ATTENDED SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY AND RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE HE WORKED FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA AS A SOCIAL WORKER FOR 25 YEARS."
Catalogue Number
P19970088003
Acquisition Date
1997-09
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19990088005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.0
Length
93.0
Width
46.5
Description
OLIVE DRAB, LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT. FRONT OPENING CLOSES WITH 5 OLIVE, PLASTIC BUTTONS; THERE IS ALSO A BUTTON FOR EACH CUFF. ON EACH SIDE OF CHEST IS A FLAPPED PATCH POCKET THAT ALSO CLOSES WITH A BUTTON (AS ABOVE). SHIRT HAS A TURNED DOWN COLLAR, AND A PLAIN OLIVE GREEN EPAULETTE ON EACH SHOULDER THAT IS HELD IN PLACE WITH A BUTTON (AS ABOVE). A WHITE TAG, ON INSIDE BACK, WITH BLACK PRINT READS "ALLAN SHIRT FINELY TAILORED". STAMPED ABOVE TAG IS "16", AND STAMPED BELOW TAG IS "7 5 45". STAMPED ON UNDERSIDE OF COLLAR, ON OUTSIDE BACK OF SHIRT, IS "ALLAN QUALITY 7 5 45 R.C.M.P.". THERE IS ALSO A BUTTON HOLE ON BACK OF COLLAR.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD BUCHANAN. EDWARD WAS A MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE FROM 1919 TO 1932, WHEN HE TRANSFERRED TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. HE WAS A SENIOR STAFF SARGEANT, ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE AT LETHBRIDGE FROM MAY 1944 TO NOV. 1950. HE RETIRED IN 1950, THEN BECAME DIRECTOR OF CORRECTIONS FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, EDWARD BECAME A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE VETERAN'S ASSOCIATION IN EDMONTON IN 1950/51, AND REMAINED A MEMBER UNTIL HIS PASSING; HE ALSO SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THIS ASSOCIATION. SEE P20020090001-GA FOR COMPLETE BIOGRAPHY OF EDWARD BUCHANAN.
Catalogue Number
P19990088005
Acquisition Date
2000-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON?
Catalogue Number
P19990088006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON?
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.1
Length
45.4
Width
10.9
Description
OLIVE DRAB COLLAR. TOP PART OF COLLAR IS PRESSED DOWN. THERE ARE THREE BUTTONHOLES ON BOTTOM OF COLLAR. STAMPED ON INSIDE OF COLLAR IS "ALLAN QUALITY" "16 31 48" "16" "R.C.M.P.".
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD BUCHANAN. EDWARD WAS A MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE FROM 1919 UNTIL 1932, WHEN HE TRANSFERRED TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. HE WAS A SENIOR STAFF SARGEANT, ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE AT LETHBRIDGE FROM MAY 1944 TO NOV. 1950. HE RETIRED IN 1950, THEN BECAME DIRECTOR OF CORRECTIONS FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, EDWARD BECAME A MEMBER OF THE RCMP VETERAN'S ASSOCATION IN EDMONTON IN 1950/51, AND REMAINED A MEMBER UNTIL HIS PASSING; HE ALSO SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THIS ASSOCIATION. SEE P20020090001-GA FOR COMPLETE BIOGRAPHY OF EDWARD BUCHANAN. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING A COLLAR DONATED BY TED BUCHANAN. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND FINDAGRAVE.COM STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD E. BUCHANAN PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 98 ON DECEMBER 15, 1998. HIS OBITUARY CREDITS HIM WITH 31 YEARS SERVICE WITH THE RCMP FOLLOWED BY 15 YEARS AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. AT THE TIME OF HIS DEATH, HE HAD BEEN MARRIED TO HIS WIFE, CHRISTENE BUCHANAN (MAIDEN NAME UNKNOWN) FOR 76 YEARS. CHRISTENE PASSED AWAY ON AUGUST 29, 1999, JUST SHY OF HER 100TH BIRTHDAY. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD.
Catalogue Number
P19990088006
Acquisition Date
2000-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P19930077001
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
98
Length
55
Width
52
Description
DARK STAINED WOODEN SWIVEL CHAIR ON ROLLERS. CHAIR HAS WOODEN SEAT, BACK AND ARMS ALONG WITH CAST IRON SWIVEL MECHANISM AND WOODEN LEGS WITH STEEL COASTERS PAINTED GOLD. TOP OF CHAIR BACK IS SINGLE PIECE WITH TOP EDGE CARVED IN ROLL STYLE. TWO WIDER WOODEN SLATS SLOT INTO BACK OF TOP PIECE TO FORM SIDES OF BACK. AT CENTER THERE ARE FIVE PLAIN SUPPORT SLATS. ARMS OF CHAIR ARE MADE UP OF TWO FINISHED PIECES JOINED AT A RIGHT ANGLE. THE BACK END IS SLOTTED INTO SIDE PIECES OF CHAIR BACK. SUPPORT STRUT FOR ARM IS FASTENED TO SIDES OF SEAT. RIGHT ARM HAS ROUNDED BOTTOM PIECE MISSING FROM END. SEAT IS 51CM SQUARE WITH ROUNDED CORNERS. FRONT EDGE AND TOP OF SEAT HAVE BEEN HEWN FOR USER COMFORT. BOTTOM EDGES OF SEAT ARE REINFORCED WITH WOODEN FRAMES WHICH SKIRT THE CIRCUMFRENCE OF SEAT. AT CENTER OF UNDERSIDE OF SEAT ARE TWO IRON CROSS PIECES SCREWED TO SEAT. CROSS PIECES FORM SUPPORT FOR SWIVEL MECHANISM. SWIVEL IS CAST IRON WITH SOME SCROLL WORK, PAINTED BLACK. HAS TWO LARGE SPRINGS AND KNOB TO ADJUST TENSION. LARGE THREADED SHAFT SCREWS INTO IRON FRAME WITH WOODEN LEGS ATTACHED TO IT. FOUR SLOPED WOOD LEGS ARE BOLTED TO IRON FRAME TO FORM "X" SHAPE. AT END OF EACH LEG IS BRASS COLORED STEEL COASTER. EACH COASTER IS ENGRAVED WITH "PATENTED" AND "STARLET BY SHEPHERD". CHAIR HAS VERY DARK FINISH WHICH IS WEARING ON EDGES OF CHAIR BACK AND SEAT, AS WELL AS ON ENDS OF ARMS AND LEGS. BLACK PAINT ON IRON SWIVEL IS CHIPPING.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
SAFETY SERVICES
History
CHAIR WAS USED IN WARDEN'S OFFICE OF LETHBRIDGE PROVINCIAL GAOL DURING THE 1930'S TO 1950'S. POSSIBLY PASSED ON TO L.C.C. BEFORE BEING DONATED TO MUSEUM.
Catalogue Number
P19930077001
Acquisition Date
1993-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.M.P. LEATHER GLOVES (GAUNTLETS)
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19860112004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.M.P. LEATHER GLOVES (GAUNTLETS)
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Length
45.7
Width
20
Description
MADE IN 2 PIECES, WITH STIFF LEATHER CUFF & MALLEABLE LEATHER GLOVE, UNLINED. LEATHER IS WORN & ABRADED ESP. AT FINGER TIPS. PAINT SPATTERED & STAINED. SEE CONSERVATION REPORT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
LEATHER GAUNTLETS WERE ABOLISHED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE UNIFORM IN 1932, AND USED THEREAFTER ONLY BY MEMBERS OF THE MUSICAL RIDE, MOTORCYCLISTS, AND THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE BAND. SEE P19860112001-GA FOR ISTORY & REFERENCES. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING THE GAUNTLETS DONATED BY BERY ALLAN. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. BERESFORD ‘BERY’ ALLAN WAS BORN NOVEMBER 7, 1907 IN WINNIPEG. RAISED BY HIS GRANDPARENTS, HE SPENT MOST OF HIS YOUTH IN VANCOUVER. HE JOINED THE R.C.M.P. IN 1932 AND WAS POSTED THROUGHOUT CANADA, INCLUDING BRITISH COLUMBIA, ALBERTA, MANITOBA, ONTARIO, AND THE NORTH WEST TERRITORIES. IN NOVEMBER 1937, BERY WAS PART OF THE MUSICAL RIDE AND PERFORMED IN MADISON SQUARE GARDENS IN NYC. HE ALSO SERVED ON THE ESCORT DETAIL FOR KING GEORGE VI AND QUEEN ELIZABETH WHEN THEY VISITED BANFF. BERY MARRIED HIS TRUE LOVE, GRACE HELENA, BEFORE MOVING TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1944. IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING HIS RETIREMENT IN 1959, AT THE RANK OF STAFF SERGEANT, BERY TOOK OVER AS THE CIVIL DEFENCE TRAINING OFFICER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE ALSO SPENT APPROXIMATELY 15 YEARS WITH THE FAMILY COURT DIVISION OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT. BERY PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 93 ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARD COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. *UPDATE* IN 2018, COLLECTIONS INTERN KIRSTAN SCHAMUHN CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF PERSONAL ARTIFACTS. ON 19 NOVEMBER 2018, SCHAMUHN INTERVIEWED ROSEMARY ALLAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S, BERESFORD “BERY” ALLAN’S, DONATION. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BOOTS AND GAUNTLETS BEING PART OF HER FATHER’S SPECIAL OCCASIONS UNIFORM, ROSEMARY ALLAN RECALLED, “YES, THEY WERE.” “THE RED SERGE WOULD COME OUT FROM TIME TO TIME FOR THINGS LIKE PARADES, OR PEOPLE VISITING FOR CERTAIN REASONS. BUT IT DID COME OUT FROM TIME TO TIME.” “I CAN REMEMBER HIM WEARING THEM FROM TIME TO TIME BECAUSE HE WOULD HAVE TO PREPARE TO WEAR THEM.” ON HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE R.C.M.P., ROSEMARY ALLAN REMEMBERED “HIS TRAINING HE RECEIVED IN SASKATCHEWAN. I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS, HE GOT TO LETHBRIDGE AFTER HIS TOUR OF DUTY IN THE YUKON. HE WAS THE ONLY CROWN REPRESENTATIVE IN THE NORTH.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN THE ALASKA HIGHWAY WAS [BUILT], BUT AFTER IT OPENED HE WAS THERE, MAYBE FOR ANOTHER YEAR, A YEAR AND A HALF OR SO, AND [THEN] HE WAS MOVED AND RELOCATED BY THE R.C.M.P TO LETHBRIDGE.” “HE WAS NEVER MOVED AFTER BECOMING THE STAFF SERGEANT OF THE R.C.M.P. DETACHMENT IN LETHBRIDGE, HE WAS ALWAYS THERE.” “[AFTER LEAVING THE R.C.M.P.] HE WORKED FOR CIVIL DEFENSE FOR A YEAR, AND AFTER CIVIL DEFENSE HE WAS HIRED TO BECOME A PROBATION OFFICER TO WORK WITH THE YOUNG, THE YOUTH OFFENDERS.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P19860112001 FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF ARTICLES REGARDING THE FAMILY HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19860112004
Acquisition Date
1986-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1917
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20020090002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1917
Date Range To
1932
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
0.9
Length
6.0
Width
2.6
Description
SILVER SHOULDER TITLE. HAS THE LETTERS "A.P." CENTERED ABOVE THE WORD "POLICE". BACK OF TITLE HAS 2 BRASS LOOPS FOR HOLDING BRASS SPLIT PIN. ABOVE DIMENSIONS DO NOT INCLUDE SPLIT PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BADGES P20020090001 & P20020090002 CAME TO MUSEUM MOUNTED ON A PIECE OF GREEN FELT (REMOVED BY CATALOGUER). ITEMS BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE HE BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY, 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920. IN 1922 HE MET AND MARRIED HIS WIFE, CHRISTENE - THE DAUGHTER OF A SWEDISH FARMER. THEY BEGAN THEIR MARRIED LIFE IN THE LOG CABIN DETACHMENT NEAR BEAVERLODGE, ALBERTA, AND HAD 2 SONS, 2 DAUGHTERS, THEN ANOTHER SON DURING AN 18 YEAR PERIOD. WITH THE EXPANSION OF THE R.C.M.P. THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT ENTERED INTO A CONTRACT WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND THE MOST SUITABLE MEMBERS WERE ACCEPTED AND CONTINUED THEIR SERVICE WITH THE R.C.M.P. ON APRIL 1, 1932, WHEN THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS DISSOLVED. FURTHER POLICE TRAINING WAS THEN TAKEN. ED BUCHANAN WAS THE FIRST R.C.M.P. OFFICER TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WEMBLEY DETACHMENT NEAR GRANDE PRAIRIE; ON CALL 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK. MUCH OF HIS WORK WAS DONE ON HORSEBACK WHEN A VEHICLE COULD NOT BE USED. IN 1935 HE WAS PROMOTED TO CORPORAL (AND THEN SARGEANT) IN CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH COVERED A HUGE AREA INCLUDING BARRHEAD THROUGH TO FORT ASSINIBOINE AND NORTH OF WESTLOCK TO SMITH. THEIR HOME INCLUDED THE COURT ROOM, OFFICE AND A JAIL CELL. THE PRISONERS ATE THE SAME FOOD AS ED AND HIS FAMILY (WHICH EARNED CHRISTENE 25 CENTS PER DAY WHENEVER OCCUPIED). HE USUALLY HAD 2 CONSTABLES TRAINING UNDER HIM. ED WAS INVOLVED WITH SEVERAL TRAGIC MURDER CASES AND ALWAYS ASSISTED THE CORONER WITH AUTOPSIES PLUS SENDING BODY PARTS INTO EDMONTON FOR EXAMINATION. IN 1944 ED WAS PROMOTED TO STAFF SARGEANT WITH A WARTIME MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE COVERING ALL OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH SPECIAL DUTIES APPOINTED TO HIM; ONE BEING THE INSPECTOR OF FOREIGN EXCHANGE & CONTROL BOARD; ALSO INSPECTOR OF P.O.W. CAMPS. WITH REGARD TO SECURITY, HE ALSO REPRESENTED THE DEPARTMENT OF SECURITY CONTROL AND WAS OBLIGED TO INSPECT THE R.C.A.F. UNITS IN THAT AREA. HE SERVED AS THE SUB-DIVISION SENIOR NCO UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1950 WHICH COMPLETED 30 YEARS OF DISTINGUISHED SERVICE. HOWEVER, HE DID NOT REMAIN INACTIVE. THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA APPOINTED HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF GAOLS WHICH TOOK HIM TO ALL THE INSTITUTIONS THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE RANGING FROM PEACE RIVER TO LETHBRIDGE. HE MOVED HIS FAMILY TO EDMONTON AS HIS OFFICE WAS IN THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. HE WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN DEVELOPING NUMEROUS, PROGRESSIVE CHANGES BY HAVING INMATES GROW THEIR OWN FOOD SUPPLIES, SPECIAL WORK CAMPS IN FORESTRY AREAS, ETCETERA. CONCERNED ABOUT THE WELFARE OF RELEASED INMATES AND ESPECIALLY JUVENILE AND FIRST OFFENDERS, MR. BUCHANAN LOOKED AT THE OLD R.C.A.F. TRAINING DEPOT NEAR BOWDEN AND COULD SEE THE BENEFIT OF CONVERTING THE DORMITORY AND OTHER BUILDINGS INTO A SEPARTE PRISON FOR THE YOUNG AND FIRST-OFFENDERS AND IMPLEMENTING SCHOOLING AND TRAINING COVERING MANY PROFESSIONS THAT COULD EARN THEM DIPLOMAS FOR A BARBER, CARPENTER, WELDER, BAKER, HIGH SCHOOL, ETCETERA. UPON THEIR RELEASE, MANY WERE ABLE TO OBTAIN A GOOD JOB OR EVEN START THEIR OWN BUSINESS. ED ALSO RAISED UP THE BELMONT INSTITUTION WHICH HOUSED INMATES WHO HAD GOTTEN INTO TROUBLE DUE TO ALCOHOL PROBLEMS. HIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENAL INSTITUTION CHANGES WERE RECOGNIZED BOTH NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY. FOLLOWING A 2ND RETIREMENT IN 1965, HE CONTINUED AN ACTIVE ROLE THROUGHOUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT IN CREATING A SPECIAL TRAINING SCHOOL IN EDMONTON FOR SMALL MUNICIPAL AND RURAL POLICE FORCES THAT LACKED PROPER FACILITIES. AT THE SAME TIME HE BEGAN DONATING HIS TIME TO SCHOOL CHILDREN BY SHARING SOME OF HIS EXPERIENCES, SOUVENIRS AND HISTORY OF THE R.C.M.P. THE STUDENTS WERE SO THRILLED WITH HIS PRESENTATION THAT HIS APPOINTMENT BOOK BECAME JAMMED. BY THE TIME HE TURNED 95, THEIR REQUESTS WERE RARELY ACCEPTED. ED WAS ALSO AN ACTIVE MEMBER AND PAST PRESIDENT OF THE R.C.M.P. VET'S ASSOCIATION; ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL POLICE ASSOCIATION; RECEIVED SPECIAL RECOGNITION AND HIS PHOTO DISPLAYED BY THE EDMONTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY; ACTIVE CHURCH MEMBER, IN WHICH HE SERVED TERMS AS ELDER AND STEWARD; LOVER OF THE BIBLE, HE ALWAYS HAD WITH HIM FROM THE TIME HE POLICED ON HORSEBACK AT THE AGE OF 20. ED PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 15, 1998. SEE HARD COPY FOR BIOGRAPHY. THE HISTORY OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BEGINS IN NOVEMBER 1916 WHEN A.B. PERRY, COMMISSIONER OF THE R.N.W.M.P., ANNOUNCED THE MOUNTIES COULD NO LONGER POLICE THE PRAIRIE PROVINCES. CONTRACTS WOULD BE CANCELLED AND SERVICES WITHDRAWN AT THE END OF THE YEAR. THE FIRST WORLD WAR (WHICH TOOK MANY MOUNTIES OVERSEAS TO SERVE IN THE MILITARY; AS WELL AS ADDING ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE MOUNTIES) AND THE MOUNTIE'S UNWILLINGNESS TO ENFORCE ALBERTA'S LIQUOR LAWS (PROHIBITION BEGAN IN 1915) WERE TO BLAME FOR THE WITHDRAWAL OF THE MOUNTIES FROM THE PRAIRIES. ON MARCH 1, 1917 THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WERE OFFICIALLY IN CHARGE. THE NEW POLICE FORCE WAS UNDERSTAFFED, UNDERPAID, UNDERTRAINED AND OVERWORKED; AS WELL, ALBERTANS OBJECTED TO THE FORMATION OF THE A.P.P. HOWEVER, AFTER A ROCKY START AND SOME REORGANIZATION OF ITS ADMINISTRATION, THE A.P.P. SETTLED IN TO THE TASK OF POLICING ALBERTA. IT STARTED WITH FEWER THAN 100 OFFICERS, 50 HORSES, A FEW CARS, AND THE OBSOLETE 45-75 WINCHESTER CARBINES THE R.N.W.M.P. HAD BOUGHT IN 1873. THE FIRST A.P.P. UNIFORMS WERE SURPLUS METROPOLITAN POLICE UNIFORMS USED BY CLAGARY AND EDMONTON FORCES, TOTALLY UNSUITED TO THE RIGOURS OF RURAL POLICING. THE A.P.P. LATER ADOPTED A UNIFORM CLOSER TO WHAT THE MOUNTIES WORE, WITH BLUE FOR DRESS UNIFORMS AND KHAKI FOR THE WORKING UNIFORMS. AFTER ALBERTA REPEALED PROHIBITION IN 1924, THE R.C.M.P. REOPENED NEGOTIATIONS WITH ALBERTA; BUT BY THEN THE A.P.P. HAD GROWN AND HAD ACQUIRED A GOOD REPUTATION FOR ITS EFFECTIVENESS. SO, ALBERTA RESISTED THE R.C.M.P.'S ADVANCES, BUT AS THE GREAT DEPRESSION DEEPENED, ALBERTA COULD NO LONGER AFFORD ITS OWN POLICE FORCE. PREMIER JOHN BROWNLEE RELUCTANTLY APPROACHED THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT LATE IN 1931, AND ON MARCH 1, 1932 THE MOUNTIES WERE BACK AND THE A.P.P. WAS NO MORE. (TAKEN FROM CALGARY HERALD ARTICLE, JUNE 15, 2003). AN INTERVIEW ABOUT SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S POLICING CAREER WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH HIS DAUGHTER JEAN I. BUCHANAN REGARDING A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE MADE TO THE MUSEUM IN 2018. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20180014001 FOR THE ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20020090002
Acquisition Date
2003-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20020090001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
ALUMINUM, COPPER
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
5.2
Width
4.1
Description
SILVER BADGE. IN CENTER IS A CREST FEATURING A PRAIRIE LANDSCAPE IN THE FOREGROUND, WITH FOOTHILLS AND MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. FLANKING CREST ARE 2 STEMS OF MAPLE LEAVES. ABOVE CREST IS A BANNER THAT READS "FIAT JUSTITIA", AND IS TOPPED BY A KING'S CROWN. BELOW CREST ARE THREE BANNERS THAT READ "ALBERTA" "PROVINCIAL" "POLICE" AND THERE IS A BOW BELOW THESE. ON BACK ARE 2 COPPER LOOPS THAT HOLD A COPPER SPLIT PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BADGES P20020090001 & P20020090002 CAME TO MUSEUM MOUNTED ON A PIECE OF GREEN FELT (REMOVED BY CATALOGUER). ITEMS BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE HE BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY, 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920. IN 1922 HE MET AND MARRIED HIS WIFE, CHRISTENE - THE DAUGHTER OF A SWEDISH FARMER. THEY BEGAN THEIR MARRIED LIFE IN THE LOG CABIN DETACHMENT NEAR BEAVERLODGE, ALBERTA, AND HAD 2 SONS, 2 DAUGHTERS, THEN ANOTHER SON DURING AN 18 YEAR PERIOD. WHEN THE A.P.P. WAS DISSOLVED IN 1932 ED BUCHANAN CONTINUED HIS CAREER WITH THE R.C.M.P. AND WAS THE FIRST R.C.M.P. OFFICER TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WEMBLEY DETACHMENT NEAR GRANDE PRAIRIE; ON CALL 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK. MUCH OF HIS WORK WAS DONE ON HORSEBACK WHEN A VEHICLE COULD NOT BE USED. IN 1935 HE WAS PROMOTED TO CORPORAL (AND THEN SARGEANT) IN CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH COVERED A HUGE AREA INCLUDING BARRHEAD THROUGH TO FORT ASSINIBOINE AND NORTH OF WESTLOCK TO SMITH. THEIR HOME INCLUDED THE COURT ROOM, OFFICE AND A JAIL CELL. THE PRISONERS ATE THE SAME FOOD AS ED AND HIS FAMILY (WHICH EARNED CHRISTENE 25 CENTS PER DAY WHENEVER OCCUPIED). HE USUALLY HAD 2 CONSTABLES TRAINING UNDER HIM. ED WAS INVOLVED WITH SEVERAL TRAGIC MURDER CASES AND ALWAYS ASSISTED THE CORONER WITH AUTOPSIES PLUS SENDING BODY PARTS INTO EDMONTON FOR EXAMINATION. IN 1944 ED WAS PROMOTED TO STAFF SARGEANT WITH A WARTIME MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE COVERING ALL OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH SPECIAL DUTIES APPOINTED TO HIM; ONE BEING THE INSPECTOR OF FOREIGN EXCHANGE & CONTROL BOARD; ALSO INSPECTOR OF P.O.W. CAMPS. WITH REGARD TO SECURITY, HE ALSO REPRESENTED THE DEPARTMENT OF SECURITY CONTROL AND WAS OBLIGED TO INSPECT THE R.C.A.F. UNITS IN THAT AREA. HE SERVED AS THE SUB-DIVISION SENIOR NCO UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1950 WHICH COMPLETED 30 YEARS OF DISTINGUISHED SERVICE. HOWEVER, HE DID NOT REMAIN INACTIVE. THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA APPOINTED HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF GAOLS WHICH TOOK HIM TO ALL THE INSTITUTIONS THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE RANGING FROM PEACE RIVER TO LETHBRIDGE. HE MOVED HIS FAMILY TO EDMONTON AS HIS OFFICE WAS IN THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. HE WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN DEVELOPING NUMEROUS, PROGRESSIVE CHANGES BY HAVING INMATES GROW THEIR OWN FOOD SUPPLIES, SPECIAL WORK CAMPS IN FORESTRY AREAS, ETCETERA. CONCERNED ABOUT THE WELFARE OF RELEASED INMATES AND ESPECIALLY JUVENILE AND FIRST OFFENDERS, MR. BUCHANAN LOOKED AT THE OLD R.C.A.F. TRAINING DEPOT NEAR BOWDEN AND COULD SEE THE BENEFIT OF CONVERTING THE DORMITORY AND OTHER BUILDINGS INTO A SEPARTE PRISON FOR THE YOUNG AND FIRST-OFFENDERS AND IMPLEMENTING SCHOOLING AND TRAINING COVERING MANY PROFESSIONS THAT COULD EARN THEM DIPLOMAS FOR A BARBER, CARPENTER, WELDER, BAKER, HIGH SCHOOL, ETCETERA. UPON THEIR RELEASE, MANY WERE ABLE TO OBTAIN A GOOD JOB OR EVEN START THEIR OWN BUSINESS. ED ALSO RAISED UP THE BELMONT INSTITUTION WHICH HOUSED INMATES WHO HAD GOTTEN INTO TROUBLE DUE TO ALCOHOL PROBLEMS. HIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENAL INSTITUTION CHANGES WERE RECOGNIZED BOTH NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY. FOLLOWING A 2ND RETIREMENT IN 1965, HE CONTINUED AN ACTIVE ROLE THROUGHOUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT IN CREATING A SPECIAL TRAINING SCHOOL IN EDMONTON FOR SMALL MUNICIPAL AND RURAL POLICE FORCES THAT LACKED PROPER FACILITIES. AT THE SAME TIME HE BEGAN DONATING HIS TIME TO SCHOOL CHILDREN BY SHARING SOME OF HIS EXPERIENCES, SOUVENIRS AND HISTORY OF THE R.C.M.P. THE STUDENTS WERE SO THRILLED WITH HIS PRESENTATION THAT HIS APPOINTMENT BOOK BECAME JAMMED. BY THE TIME HE TURNED 95, THEIR REQUESTS WERE RARELY ACCEPTED. ED WAS ALSO AN ACTIVE MEMBER AND PAST PRESIDENT OF THE R.C.M.P. VET'S ASSOCIATION; ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL POLICE ASSOCIATION; RECEIVED SPECIAL RECOGNITION AND HIS PHOTO DISPLAYED BY THE EDMONTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY; ACTIVE CHURCH MEMBER, IN WHICH HE SERVED TERMS AS ELDER AND STEWARD; LOVER OF THE BIBLE, HE ALWAYS HAD WITH HIM FROM THE TIME HE POLICED ON HORSEBACK AT THE AGE OF 20. ED PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 15, 1998. SEE HARD COPY FOR BIOGRAPHY. THE HISTORY OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BEGINS IN NOVEMBER 1916 WHEN A.B. PERRY, COMMISSIONER OF THE R.N.W.M.P., ANNOUNCED THE MOUNTIES COULD NO LONGER POLICE THE PRAIRIE PROVINCES. CONTRACTS WOULD BE CANCELLED AND SERVICES WITHDRAWN AT THE END OF THE YEAR. THE FIRST WORLD WAR (WHICH TOOK MANY MOUNTIES OVERSEAS TO SERVE IN THE MILITARY; AS WELL AS ADDING ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE MOUNTIES) AND THE MOUNTIE'S UNWILLINGNESS TO ENFORCE ALBERTA'S LIQUOR LAWS (PROHIBITION BEGAN IN 1915) WERE TO BLAME FOR THE WITHDRAWAL OF THE MOUNTIES FROM THE PRAIRIES. ON MARCH 1, 1917 THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WERE OFFICIALLY IN CHARGE. THE NEW POLICE FORCE WAS UNDERSTAFFED, UNDERPAID, UNDERTRAINED AND OVERWORKED; AS WELL, ALBERTANS OBJECTED TO THE FORMATION OF THE A.P.P. HOWEVER, AFTER A ROCKY START AND SOME REORGANIZATION OF ITS ADMINISTRATION, THE A.P.P. SETTLED IN TO THE TASK OF POLICING ALBERTA. IT STARTED WITH FEWER THAN 100 OFFICERS, 50 HORSES, A FEW CARS, AND THE OBSOLETE 45-75 WINCHESTER CARBINES THE R.N.W.M.P. HAD BOUGHT IN 1873. THE FIRST A.P.P. UNIFORMS WERE SURPLUS METROPOLITAN POLICE UNIFORMS USED BY CLAGARY AND EDMONTON FORCES, TOTALLY UNSUITED TO THE RIGOURS OF RURAL POLICING. THE A.P.P. LATER ADOPTED A UNIFORM CLOSER TO WHAT THE MOUNTIES WORE, WITH BLUE FOR DRESS UNIFORMS AND KHAKI FOR THE WORKING UNIFORMS. AFTER ALBERTA REPEALED PROHIBITION IN 1924, THE R.C.M.P. REOPENED NEGOTIATIONS WITH ALBERTA; BUT BY THEN THE A.P.P. HAD GROWN AND HAD ACQUIRED A GOOD REPUTATION FOR ITS EFFECTIVENESS. SO, ALBERTA RESISTED THE R.C.M.P.'S ADVANCES, BUT AS THE GREAT DEPRESSION DEEPENED, ALBERTA COULD NO LONGER AFFORD ITS OWN POLICE FORCE. PREMIER JOHN BROWNLEE RELUCTANTLY APPROACHED THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT LATE IN 1931, AND ON MARCH 1, 1932 THE MOUNTIES WERE BACK AND THE A.P.P. WAS NO MORE. (TAKEN FROM CALGARY HERALD ARTICLE, JUNE 15, 2003). AN INTERVIEW ABOUT SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S POLICING CAREER WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH HIS DAUGHTER JEAN I. BUCHANAN REGARDING A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE MADE TO THE MUSEUM IN 2018. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20180014001 FOR THE ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20020090001
Acquisition Date
2003-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FIREMAN'S CREST
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19950037017
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIREMAN'S CREST
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.6
Length
9.2
Width
7.9
Description
CIRCULAR BRASS CREST WITH DOVETAILED STREAMER ON TOP. RAISED FROM STREAMER IS "FIRE". CIRCULAR CREST HAS RAISED BORDER WITH ROUGH PITTED BACKGROUND. AT CENTER OF CREST ARE FIVE RAISED HORNS CROSSED OVER EACH OTHER. BACK OF CREST IS PLAIN WITH TWO SOLDER BLOBS. BRASS HAS MODERATE AMOUNT OF CORROSION IN BACKGROUND OF CREST.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
SEE P19950037001-GA. BELONGED TO WILLIAM H. SHORT, LAST FIRE CHIEF OF THE OL DNO. 1 FIRE HALL IN LETHBRIDGE. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING A BELT DONATED BY SHARON DEREK. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. THE DONOR, SHARON DERRICK, IS THE NIECE OF AGNES SHORT. AGNES CHRISTINA SHORT WAS BORN ON APRIL 20, 1916 TO WILLIAM H. AND BERTHA SHORT (MAIDEN NAME UNKNOWN). SHE GRADUATED FROM LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE AND THEN ATTDNED THE CALGARY GENERAL HOSPITAL FOR NURSING TRAINING, WHICH SHE GRADUATED FROM IN 1939. AGNES WAS THE SUPERVISOR AT THE GALT HOSPITAL FROM 1939-1945. SHE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE NURSING STAFF OF LETHBRIDGE SCHOOL DISTRICT #51 FROM 1947 UNTIL 1958. SHE WAS ALSO THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING AT THE LETHBRIDGE HEALTH UNIT FROM 1964 UNTIL HER RETIREMENT. SHE RETIRED IN 1980 AFTER 42 YEARS OF NURSING. AGNES PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 78 ON OCTOBER 20, 1994. WILLIAM HENRY SHORT WAS AGNES’S FATHER. HE WAS BORN IN LONDON, ENGLAND IN 1889 AND MOVED TO CANADA IN 1909. HE INITIALLY WORKED FOR THE CITY WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT IN LETHBRIDGE FOR TWO YEARS, BEFORE SPENDING 51 YEARS IN SERVICE OF THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. HE OVERSAW THE INTRODUCTION OF MOTORIZED FIRE ENGINES, SWITCHING FROM HORSE POWERED WAGONS, IN 1913. HE ALSO SAW THE DEPARTMENT GROW IN SIZE FROM ONLY 13 TO 49 MEN. HE PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 84 ON NOVEMBER 18, 1974. WILLIAM’S WIFE BERTHA L. SHORT PASSED AWAY ON JULY 28, 1989. ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE ABOUT AGNES’S LIFE, THE SHORT FAMILY LIVED IN NUMBER 1 FIRE HALL, WHERE WILLIAM WAS FIRE CHIEF. WILLIAM H. AND BERTHA ALSO HAD ANOTHER CHILD, WILLIAM D. SHORT. HE WAS BORN ON AUGUST 16, 1916 AND PASSED AWAY ON AUGUST 5, 1990. HE WAS MARRIED TO MYRTLE (NEE NELSON) SHORT AND THEIR CHILDREN INCLUDE THE DONOR, SHARON DERRICK. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. *UPDATE* IN 2018 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF BOXED TEXTILES AND ACCESSORIES INCLUDING A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED BY SHARON DERRICK. ON 1 MARCH 2018, PUNDYK INTERVIEWED DERRICK REGARDING HER DONATION. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED WERE CONNECTED TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM H. SHORT AND HIS CAREER AS FIRE CHIEF IN THE NUMBER 1 FIRE HALL IN LETHBRIDGE. “YOU SEE, DURING THE YEARS THAT HE WAS THE FIRE CHIEF,” DERRICK BEGAN, “THEIR QUARTERS ACTUALLY WERE IN THE BACK OF THE FIRE HALL. SO STUFF KIND OF GOT ACCUMULATED THERE. THE WHOLE FAMILY [LIVED IN THE FIRE HALL]. WHEN I WAS LITTLE, I WAS THERE ALL THE TIME. MY FATHER [WILLIAM D. SHORT] WAS A CAPTAIN IN THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, BUT MY GRANDFATHER WAS THE FIRE CHIEF.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE HAD ANY MEMORY OF SEEING HER GRANDFATHER WEARING ANY OF THE ARTIFACTS, SUCH AS THE HELMET (P19950037014) OR THE FIRE PANTS (P19950037008), DERRICK RECALLED, “YES, BECAUSE LETHBRIDGE WAS SMALL AT THE TIME AND WHEN WE LIVED IN THE FIRE HALL AND THE BELLS WENT OFF, WE WOULD OFTEN WALK OVER TO HAVE A LOOK AT THE FIRE. I WOULD SEE MY GRANDFATHER OUT THERE, AND I’D SEE MY FATHER WHEN HE WAS ON SHIFT. THERE WERE SOME HUGE FIRES RIGHT DOWNTOWN. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHAT DATES – PROBABLY BACK IN THE LATE ‘40’S, EARLY ‘50’S. [IN ONE INSTANCE], MY DAD WAS ALSO ON THE BACK OF A FIRE TRUCK, SPEEDING TO A FIRE, AND ANOTHER TRUCK CAME ALONG AND HIT HIM IN THE BACK. HE SUFFERED VERY SEVERE INJURIES FROM THAT. AND I SAW THAT TOO. I WAS JUST ON MY WAY BACK TO SCHOOL.” “WHEN I WAS YOUNG, I WAS ALWAYS IN AND OUT [OF THE FIRE HALL],” DERRICK WENT ON, “THERE WAS A BELL TOWER THERE, WHERE THEY HUNG THE WET HOSES UP TO DRY. THERE WERE RICKETY OLD WOODEN STAIRS GOING ROUND AND ROUND ALL THE WAY UP TO THE TOP OF THE FIRE HALL TO WHERE THE BELL USED TO BE. I USED TO GO UP AND DOWN THOSE STAIRS, AND HOP AND PLAY. AND IN THE BASEMENT THERE WAS PRISON CELLS, BECAUSE IT USED [TO BE] THE POLICE STATION MANY, MANY YEARS BEFORE. IT WAS A COMBINATION OF FIRE AND POLICE. AND, THERE WAS A BIG FURNACE DOWN THERE. I USED TO GO DOWN AND WATCH THE FIREMEN PUSH COAL INTO THE FURNACE TO KEEP IT GOING. IT WAS AN INTERESTING PLACE TO BE AROUND.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS ON THE INTERNATIONAL BOARD OF FIRE CHIEFS,” DERRICK CONTINUED, “HE WAS VICE-PRESIDENT IN NEW YORK. THEY HAD ASKED HIM TO COME UP AND TAKE THE PRESIDENCY, BUT AFTER MUCH CONSIDERATION, HE DECIDED HE DIDN’T WANT TO LEAVE THE FAMILY FOR THE TWO YEAR TERM IN NEW YORK, SO HE TURNED THAT ONE DOWN. THOUGH HE DID REMAIN ON THE BOARD FOR MANY YEARS.” AN ARTICLE IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2000 READS, “WILLIAM SHORT RETIRED AS LETHBRIDGE FIRE CHIEF IN 1962, ENDING A CAREER AS CHIEF WHICH BEGAN IN JANUARY 1945.” A HERALD ARTICLE FROM 1974 ADDITIONALLY STATES THAT SHORT “JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT IN 1911. HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT IN 1919 AND CAPTAIN IN 1922.” AN ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE WELL PROTECTED BY MODERN FIRE DEPARTMENT,” PUBLISHED IN 1967 IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD READS, “[IN 1910] THE FIRST FIREHALL THAT [WAS] LOCATED AT 4TH STREET AND 2ND AVENUE SOUTH WAS TORN DOWN. IT WAS A TWO-STOREY BUILDING. A THREE-STOREY FIREHALL WAS BUILT IN ITS PLACE ON THE SAME SITE. THAT EARLY BUILDING HOUSED THE FIRE DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT, SERVED AS CITY HALL AND THE POLICE STATION…” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE REASON FOR THE DONATION OF HER FAMILY’S ARTIFACTS DURING THE 2018 INTERVIEW, DERRICK EXPLAINED, “I WAS THE EXECUTOR FOR MY AUNT’S WILL AND WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY SHE [WAS LIVING IN] MY GRANDMOTHER AND GRANDFATHER’S HOME. ALL THIS STUFF HAD BEEN LEFT IN THE HOUSE, SO WHEN WE WERE CLEANING IT OUT FOLLOWING HER DEATH, WE CAME ACROSS ALL THESE THINGS. WHILE I KEPT SOME AS MEMENTOS, MY SISTER AND I [DECIDED TO DONATE OTHER ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM].” PLEASE PERMANENT FILE P19950037001, FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF ARTICLES REGARDING THE FAMILY HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19950037017
Acquisition Date
1995-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKEL, GOLD, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19950038014
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Materials
NICKEL, GOLD, LEATHER
No. Pieces
4
Description
1. "EX" BADGE: 4.1CM (D). ROUND BADGE HAS COPPER BODY AND GOLD PLATING. HAS RIDGED SURFACE AND DIAGONALLY GROOVED LIP. STAMPED ABOVE SURFACE ARE FIVE HORNS ALL INTERSECTING IN THE MIDDLE. IN THE CENTRE IS A BLUE PAINTED CIRCLE WHICH READS "EX" IN GOLD. REVERSE IS HOLLOW AND SHOWS THE REVERSE VERSION OF THE FRONT. HAS A THREADED SCREW IN THE MIDDLE WITH A WASHER ON IT. AT TOP IS A SHORT SOLDERED OFF PIN THAT REACHES TOWARDS THE MIDDLE AT ABOUT 60 DEGREES. STAMPED ON BACK OVER ONE HORN IS "SHREESE NEW YORK" WITH A PICTURE OF CRESCENT MOON AND STAR IN THE MIDDLE. ON ANOTHER HORN IS STAMPED "...-10K GOLD FILLED". HAS PATINA ON FRONT, PLATING IS WEARING OFF. HAS SOME CORROSION ON BACK AROUND TOP PIN AND SCREW. 2. BADGE: 3.8CM (L) X 3.1CM (W). NICKEL BODY BADGE HAS GOLD FINISH. IS A ROUNDED RECTANGLE WITH A RIDGE SURFACE AND DIAGONAL GROOVE PERIMETER. RIDGES MEET IN THE CENTRE. ON EITHER SIDE OF CENTRE ARE TWO UPRIGHT HORNS. BACK IS HOLLOW AND SHOWS THE STAMPED DESIGNS OF THE FRONT. HAS A THREADED SCREW IN MIDDLE ON BACK WITH A ROUNDED WASHER, AND RED LEATHER SPACER UNDERNEATH. HAS BLACK STAIN ON BACK, AND SOME CORROSION. ON FRONT PLATING IS WEARING OFF AND WHITE RESIDUE OF CORROSION IS PRESENT. SPACER IS DRY.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
DONATED IN MEMORY OF MRS. AGNES SHORT, WHO WAS A NURSE IN LETHBRIDGE UNTIL C. 1970. HELPED WITH FIRST POLIO VACCINATION HERE, AND WAS PART OF THE HEALTH CLINIC FOR ABOUT 20 YEARS. FATHER WAS WILLIAM H. SHORT, WHO WAS THE LAST FIRE CHIEF OF THE OLD NO.1 FIREHALL IN LETHBRIDGE. APPEARS THESE ARE SYMBOLS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FIRE CHIEFS. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING A BELT DONATED BY SHARON DEREK. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. THE DONOR, SHARON DERRICK, IS THE NIECE OF AGNES SHORT. AGNES CHRISTINA SHORT WAS BORN ON APRIL 20, 1916 TO WILLIAM H. AND BERTHA SHORT (MAIDEN NAME UNKNOWN). SHE GRADUATED FROM LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE AND THEN ATTDNED THE CALGARY GENERAL HOSPITAL FOR NURSING TRAINING, WHICH SHE GRADUATED FROM IN 1939. AGNES WAS THE SUPERVISOR AT THE GALT HOSPITAL FROM 1939-1945. SHE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE NURSING STAFF OF LETHBRIDGE SCHOOL DISTRICT #51 FROM 1947 UNTIL 1958. SHE WAS ALSO THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING AT THE LETHBRIDGE HEALTH UNIT FROM 1964 UNTIL HER RETIREMENT. SHE RETIRED IN 1980 AFTER 42 YEARS OF NURSING. AGNES PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 78 ON OCTOBER 20, 1994. WILLIAM HENRY SHORT WAS AGNES’S FATHER. HE WAS BORN IN LONDON, ENGLAND IN 1889 AND MOVED TO CANADA IN 1909. HE INITIALLY WORKED FOR THE CITY WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT IN LETHBRIDGE FOR TWO YEARS, BEFORE SPENDING 51 YEARS IN SERVICE OF THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. HE OVERSAW THE INTRODUCTION OF MOTORIZED FIRE ENGINES, SWITCHING FROM HORSE POWERED WAGONS, IN 1913. HE ALSO SAW THE DEPARTMENT GROW IN SIZE FROM ONLY 13 TO 49 MEN. HE PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 84 ON NOVEMBER 18, 1974. WILLIAM’S WIFE BERTHA L. SHORT PASSED AWAY ON JULY 28, 1989. ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE ABOUT AGNES’S LIFE, THE SHORT FAMILY LIVED IN NUMBER 1 FIRE HALL, WHERE WILLIAM WAS FIRE CHIEF. WILLIAM H. AND BERTHA ALSO HAD ANOTHER CHILD, WILLIAM D. SHORT. HE WAS BORN ON AUGUST 16, 1916 AND PASSED AWAY ON AUGUST 5, 1990. HE WAS MARRIED TO MYRTLE (NEE NELSON) SHORT AND THEIR CHILDREN INCLUDE THE DONOR, SHARON DERRICK. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. *UPDATE* IN 2018 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF BOXED TEXTILES AND ACCESSORIES INCLUDING A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED BY SHARON DERRICK. ON 1 MARCH 2018, PUNDYK INTERVIEWED DERRICK REGARDING HER DONATION. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED WERE CONNECTED TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM H. SHORT AND HIS CAREER AS FIRE CHIEF IN THE NUMBER 1 FIRE HALL IN LETHBRIDGE. “YOU SEE, DURING THE YEARS THAT HE WAS THE FIRE CHIEF,” DERRICK BEGAN, “THEIR QUARTERS ACTUALLY WERE IN THE BACK OF THE FIRE HALL. SO STUFF KIND OF GOT ACCUMULATED THERE. THE WHOLE FAMILY [LIVED IN THE FIRE HALL]. WHEN I WAS LITTLE, I WAS THERE ALL THE TIME. MY FATHER [WILLIAM D. SHORT] WAS A CAPTAIN IN THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, BUT MY GRANDFATHER WAS THE FIRE CHIEF.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE HAD ANY MEMORY OF SEEING HER GRANDFATHER WEARING ANY OF THE ARTIFACTS, SUCH AS THE HELMET (P19950037014) OR THE FIRE PANTS (P19950037008), DERRICK RECALLED, “YES, BECAUSE LETHBRIDGE WAS SMALL AT THE TIME AND WHEN WE LIVED IN THE FIRE HALL AND THE BELLS WENT OFF, WE WOULD OFTEN WALK OVER TO HAVE A LOOK AT THE FIRE. I WOULD SEE MY GRANDFATHER OUT THERE, AND I’D SEE MY FATHER WHEN HE WAS ON SHIFT. THERE WERE SOME HUGE FIRES RIGHT DOWNTOWN. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHAT DATES – PROBABLY BACK IN THE LATE ‘40’S, EARLY ‘50’S. [IN ONE INSTANCE], MY DAD WAS ALSO ON THE BACK OF A FIRE TRUCK, SPEEDING TO A FIRE, AND ANOTHER TRUCK CAME ALONG AND HIT HIM IN THE BACK. HE SUFFERED VERY SEVERE INJURIES FROM THAT. AND I SAW THAT TOO. I WAS JUST ON MY WAY BACK TO SCHOOL.” “WHEN I WAS YOUNG, I WAS ALWAYS IN AND OUT [OF THE FIRE HALL],” DERRICK WENT ON, “THERE WAS A BELL TOWER THERE, WHERE THEY HUNG THE WET HOSES UP TO DRY. THERE WERE RICKETY OLD WOODEN STAIRS GOING ROUND AND ROUND ALL THE WAY UP TO THE TOP OF THE FIRE HALL TO WHERE THE BELL USED TO BE. I USED TO GO UP AND DOWN THOSE STAIRS, AND HOP AND PLAY. AND IN THE BASEMENT THERE WAS PRISON CELLS, BECAUSE IT USED [TO BE] THE POLICE STATION MANY, MANY YEARS BEFORE. IT WAS A COMBINATION OF FIRE AND POLICE. AND, THERE WAS A BIG FURNACE DOWN THERE. I USED TO GO DOWN AND WATCH THE FIREMEN PUSH COAL INTO THE FURNACE TO KEEP IT GOING. IT WAS AN INTERESTING PLACE TO BE AROUND.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS ON THE INTERNATIONAL BOARD OF FIRE CHIEFS,” DERRICK CONTINUED, “HE WAS VICE-PRESIDENT IN NEW YORK. THEY HAD ASKED HIM TO COME UP AND TAKE THE PRESIDENCY, BUT AFTER MUCH CONSIDERATION, HE DECIDED HE DIDN’T WANT TO LEAVE THE FAMILY FOR THE TWO YEAR TERM IN NEW YORK, SO HE TURNED THAT ONE DOWN. THOUGH HE DID REMAIN ON THE BOARD FOR MANY YEARS.” AN ARTICLE IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2000 READS, “WILLIAM SHORT RETIRED AS LETHBRIDGE FIRE CHIEF IN 1962, ENDING A CAREER AS CHIEF WHICH BEGAN IN JANUARY 1945.” A HERALD ARTICLE FROM 1974 ADDITIONALLY STATES THAT SHORT “JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT IN 1911. HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT IN 1919 AND CAPTAIN IN 1922.” AN ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE WELL PROTECTED BY MODERN FIRE DEPARTMENT,” PUBLISHED IN 1967 IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD READS, “[IN 1910] THE FIRST FIREHALL THAT [WAS] LOCATED AT 4TH STREET AND 2ND AVENUE SOUTH WAS TORN DOWN. IT WAS A TWO-STOREY BUILDING. A THREE-STOREY FIREHALL WAS BUILT IN ITS PLACE ON THE SAME SITE. THAT EARLY BUILDING HOUSED THE FIRE DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT, SERVED AS CITY HALL AND THE POLICE STATION…” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE REASON FOR THE DONATION OF HER FAMILY’S ARTIFACTS DURING THE 2018 INTERVIEW, DERRICK EXPLAINED, “I WAS THE EXECUTOR FOR MY AUNT’S WILL AND WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY SHE [WAS LIVING IN] MY GRANDMOTHER AND GRANDFATHER’S HOME. ALL THIS STUFF HAD BEEN LEFT IN THE HOUSE, SO WHEN WE WERE CLEANING IT OUT FOLLOWING HER DEATH, WE CAME ACROSS ALL THESE THINGS. WHILE I KEPT SOME AS MEMENTOS, MY SISTER AND I [DECIDED TO DONATE OTHER ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM].” PLEASE PERMANENT FILE P19950037001, FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF ARTICLES REGARDING THE FAMILY HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19950038014
Acquisition Date
1995-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.9
Length
6.0
Width
2.6
Description
SILVER SHOULDER TITLE. HAS THE LETTERS "A.P." CENTERED ABOVE THE WORD "POLICE". BACK OF TITLE HAS 2 BRASS LOOPS FOR HOLDING BRASS SPLIT PIN. THERE IS NO PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BADGE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." THESE BADGES WERE A PART OF HIS UNIFORM IN THIS ROLE. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
2.7
Description
A: SILVER-COLOURED METAL BUTTON. SHIELD OF ALBERTA EMBOSSED ON THE CENTER OF THE BUTTON. “ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE” EMBOSSED AROUND THE CREST. SHINY FINISH. THE BACK OF THE BUTTON IS BRASS IN COLOUR. AROUND THE CENTRE OF THE BACK “W. SCULLY MONTREAL” IS MACHINE ENGRAVED. THERE IS A LOOP FOR A PIN FASTENER LOOSELY ATTACHED TO THE BACK B: TWO-PRONGED BRASS PIN WITH A CIRCULAR LOOP ON ONE END AND THE TWO ENDS ON THE PIN EXTENDING OUT INTO A V-SHAPE ON THE OTHER. PIN IS 3.2 CM IN LENGTH AND AT THE WIDEST POINT THE PRONGS ARE 1.1 CM APART. CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE FRONT AND BACK SURFACES OF THE BUTTON. BRASS BACK IS SLIGHTLY TARNISHED. METAL OF PIN IN SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BUTTON BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190002006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
71.5
Width
34
Description
TAN CANVAS SHOULDER BAG WITH BROWN LEATHER TRIM. FRONT OF BAG HAS COVER FLAP WITH BROWN LEATHER TRIM ALONG EDGE OF FLAP, WITH BROWN LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP ATTACHED TO FRONT OF FLAP. FRONT OF BAG HAS TWO POUCHES WITH COVER FLAPS, WITH BROWN LEATHER TRIM ALONG EDGES OF COVER FLAPS, AND BROWN LEATHER BUCKLE STRAPS AND SILVER BUCKLES. FRONT OF BAG HAS SILVER AND BROWN LEATHER BUCKLE BETWEEN POUCHES. SHOULDER STRAP HAS SILVER BUCKLE ON RIGHT-WEARING STRAP; STRAP IS SEWN TO BAG ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE AND IS FIXED TO BAG WITH SILVER BUCKLE ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE. BAG HAS BLACK MACHINE-STITCHING ON BASE AND AROUND BASES OF POUCHES. INSIDE BAG HAS WHITE TAG WITH RED TEXT SEWN ONTO INSIDE FRONT, “MADE BY WOODS, MFG CO LTD, OTTAWA, CANADA”. INSIDE BACK OF BAG HAS BLACK TEXT HANDWRITTEN IN INK, “E. BUCHANAN. R.C.M. POLICE” WITH “R.C.M.POLICE” UNDERLINED. BASE OF BAG IS STAINED BLACK AND BROWN; BAG IS STAINED ON OUTSIDE AND INSIDE, AND STAINED ON SHOULDER STRAP. BAG HAS RIP IN RIGHT-WEARING CORNER WHERE COVER FLAP IS SEWN TO BAG. BAG HAS FRAYING THREADS ON FRONT AND BACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE BAG, NOTING, “THIS OLD BAG IS REALLY INTERESTING TO ME BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” “[THE GUNS] WERE A TOOL OF HIS JOB, BUT HE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE THAT WANTED TO EVER USE IT, BUT IF HE HAD IT, HE HAD TO, OR TO JUST MAINTAIN THE PEACE.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT. HOWEVER, HE’S VERY, VERY CONCERNED ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD CITIZENS TO HAVE FIREARMS, BUT THE MAIN THING [WAS] TO PROTECT US FROM A FASCIST GOVERNMENT.” “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002006
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
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