Skip header and navigation

14 records – page 1 of 1.

Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.4
Length
3.5
Width
4.6
Description
GLASS BOTTLE CONTAINING AMBER OIL, WITH CRACKED AND TORN CORK IN TOP OPENING. BOTTLE HAS ROUND NECK, DOMED TOP AND SQUARE BODY; BOTTLE HAS BLUE AND WHITE LABEL ON FRONT. FRONT LABEL BLUE BACKGROUND WITH WHITE CROWN ABOVE WHITE SHIELD WITH RED AND BLUE TEXT; LABEL IS TORN ACROSS SHIELD MAKING RED TEXT INDECIPHERABLE, BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “PURE VANILLA”; SHIELD HAS WHITE DOTS AROUND BASE AND WHITE TEXT BELOW “FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CAMPBELL BROS & WILSON LIMITED, WINNIPEG – CANADA, EST. 1882”. BACK OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “2 FL. OZ”. BASE OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “1, 4818, FDJ” WITH “D” IN A DIAMOND. CORK IS TORN OFF AT THE TOP OF THE BOTTLE NECK; LABEL IS WORN AND DISCOLORED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE GUN OIL, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.N.W.M.P. SUSPENDERS
Date Range From
1908
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, COTTON, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P19672564005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.N.W.M.P. SUSPENDERS
Date Range From
1908
Date Range To
1920
Date
1908
Materials
LEATHER, COTTON, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Length
82
Width
3.8
Description
LEATHER & ELASTISIZED COTTON CANVAS, ADJUSTABLE SIZING. 1 LEATHER BUTTON LOOP TORN. "Y" SHAPED. SEE CONSERVATION REPORT. GREY WITH WHITE BACKING.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
STAMPED "CURRIE" ON METAL ADJUSTING BUCKLE. WORN OVER SHIRT & UNDER JACKET. NOT KNOWN IF ROYAL NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE OR LATER ISSUE. SEE P19672564001-GA FOR HISTORY REFERENCES.
Catalogue Number
P19672564005
Acquisition Date
1967-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.N.W.M.P. SAM BROWNE BELT
Date Range From
1908
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19672564003
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.N.W.M.P. SAM BROWNE BELT
Date Range From
1908
Date Range To
1920
Date
1908
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
114.0
Width
9
Description
LEATHER & BRASS FITTINGS. LEATHER TORN AT 4 HOLE FOR BUCKLE. SEE CONSV REPORT. PENNED IN INK, NAME, POSSIBLY D.A. MCKILLOP? AT 1 END.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELT APPEARS TO BE OTHER RANKS' PATTERN & IS CONSISTENT WITH ROYAL NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE ISSUE OF 1904 OR LATER. SEE P19672564001-GA FOR HISTORY & REFERENCES.
Catalogue Number
P19672564003
Acquisition Date
1967-03
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19970094020
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.7
Length
4
Width
1.6
Description
BRASS TIE CLIP WITH POLICE CREST FASTENED TO CENTRE. CREST ENAMELED BLUE AT CENTRE AND IN TWO BANNERS ACROSS WIDTH, READING "POLICE LETHBRIDGE". TENSION CLIP AT BACK WITH THUMB TAB AND SERRATED ARM FOR SECURING TO TIE. ENGRAVED "CMC".
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO FRANK BATHGATE, A MEMBER OF THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE FROM 1953 UNTIL HE RETIRED IN 1988. DECEASED 1996. FOR HISTORY PLEASE SEE P19960107001-GA. DONOR IS FRANK'S WIFE.
Catalogue Number
P19970094020
Acquisition Date
1998-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, CHROME, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19960112008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER, CHROME, BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
0.5
Length
121
Width
7.26
Description
BLACK LEATHER BELT WITH CROSS-STRAP. BELT IS DOUBLE-THICKNESS AT ONE END; PERFORATED WITH 7 HOLES ALONG CENTRE AND 7 SETS OF DOUBLE HOLES, AT OTHER END. CHROME-PLATE BUCKLE INSERTED INTO BELT BY TWO PRONGS; FASTENS INTO TWO BRASS CLIPS AT OTHER END. CHROME KNOB FITS INTO HOLES IN BELT TO SECURE. TWO BANDS ACROSS WIDTH, WITH SEMI-CIRCULAR RINGS LOOPED THROUGH. BACK OF BELT CRACKED AND WORN. STAMPED "38" IN LEATHER NEAR BRASS DEVICE. CROSS-STRAP IS ALSO BLACK. REMOVABLE END PIECE ATTACHES BY CHROME BUCKLE AND KNOB, THROUGH HOLE PERFORATED IN BELT. OPPOSITE END HAS LOOP, STITCHED TO REVERSE OF STRAP AND FASTENED BY SNAP AT FRONT. CROSS-STRAP APPEARS NEWER THAN BELT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112008
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RCMP UNIFORM
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ELASTIC/COTTON, LEATHER, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19970073003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RCMP UNIFORM
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
ELASTIC/COTTON, LEATHER, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
100.5
Width
21
Description
NAVY SUSPENDERS WITH ELASTIC WEBBING AND A THIN YELLOW STRIPE UP THE CENTRE. FRONT BANDS HAVE TWO BLUE LEATHER ENDS WITH BUTTON LOOPS, WITH BRASS ADJUSTMENT SLIDES AND OTHER END HAS 2 BANDS THAT ATTACH TO BACK OF PANTS. NO DAMAGE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
DONATED TO LEGION BY E.D. WHITE, REG.# 21698; FEB. 21, 1941. USE UNKNOWN. SEE P19970073001-8-GA FOR RELATED PIECES AND P19970073001-GA FOR MORE INFO. *UPDATE* IN 2017 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING ITEMS, INCLUDING SEVERAL ITEMS DONATED BY THE LEGION. EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE RCMP HISTORY SECTION GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: THE SERIAL NUMBER 21698 DOES NOT BELONG TO E.D. WHITE. IT BELONGED TO AN RCMP OFFICER WHO SERVED BETWEEN 1961-1997. NO RCMP MEMBER WITH THE LAST NAME "WHITE" AND INITIALS "E.D." WERE FOUND WITHIN THE RCMP RECORDS. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE.
Catalogue Number
P19970073003
Acquisition Date
1997-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PAIR RCMP GLOVES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19970073005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PAIR RCMP GLOVES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
0.6
Length
25.6
Width
10.2
Description
PAIR BROWN LEATHER DRESS GLOVES. THREE PLEATS SEWN INTO BACK OF HANDS. LETTER "D" PERFORATED WITH HOLES INTO BACK OF WRISTS. INTERIOR WRISTS HAVE 8.7CM SLIT AND ONE SNAP BUTTON ON EACH, MARKED "ACME MAKE". INTERIOR OF RIGHT GLOVE STAMPED "ACME TRADE MARK 8.. TABLE CUT RCMP". LEFT GLOVE STAMPED "RCMP".
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO E.D. WHITE, REG.# 21698; FEB. 21, 1941. USE UNKNOWN. SEE P19970073001-8-GA FOR RELATED PIECES AND P19970073001-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION. *UPDATE* IN 2017 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING ITEMS, INCLUDING SEVERAL ITEMS DONATED BY THE LEGION. EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE RCMP HISTORY SECTION GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: THE SERIAL NUMBER 21698 DOES NOT BELONG TO E.D. WHITE. IT BELONGED TO AN RCMP OFFICER WHO SERVED BETWEEN 1961-1997. NO RCMP MEMBER WITH THE LAST NAME "WHITE" AND INITIALS "E.D." WERE FOUND WITHIN THE RCMP RECORDS. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE.
Catalogue Number
P19970073005
Acquisition Date
1997-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WITH CROSS-STRAP
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19970073007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WITH CROSS-STRAP
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS
No. Pieces
3
Height
0.7
Length
123
Width
7.8
Description
BROWN LEATHER SAM BROWNE BELT WITH DETACHABLE CROSS-STRAP. BRASS BUCKLE AT ONE END, WITH DOUBLE PINS. BRASS KNOB AT SAME END, WHICH FASTENS INTO HOLES PERFORATED INTO OPPOSITE END. TWO LEATHER BANDS FOR SECURING END OF BELT; ALSO TWO KEEPERS WITH SEMI-CIRCULAR BRASS RINGS TO WHICH CROSS-STRAP IS CONNECTED. STRAP HAS CLASP AT ONE END; FOLDED LEATHER TAB AND BRASS KNOB AT OTHER. RCMP ISSUE; NO MARKINGS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO E.D. WHITE, REG. #21698; FEB. 21, 1941. ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE ISSUE; USE UNKNOWN. SEE P19970073001-8-GA FOR RELATED PIECES, AND P19970073001-GA FOR INFORMATION. *UPDATE* IN 2017 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING ITEMS, INCLUDING SEVERAL ITEMS DONATED BY THE LEGION. EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE RCMP HISTORY SECTION GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: THE SERIAL NUMBER 21698 DOES NOT BELONG TO E.D. WHITE. IT BELONGED TO AN RCMP OFFICER WHO SERVED BETWEEN 1961-1997. NO RCMP MEMBER WITH THE LAST NAME "WHITE" AND INITIALS "E.D." WERE FOUND WITHIN THE RCMP RECORDS. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE.
Catalogue Number
P19970073007
Acquisition Date
1997-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
C/W HOLSTER & POUCHES
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, CHROME
Catalogue Number
P19960112036
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
C/W HOLSTER & POUCHES
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER, CHROME
No. Pieces
7
Height
7.7
Length
121.6
Width
22.8
Description
BLACK LEATHER SAM BROWNE BELT WITH BASKET-WEAVE PATTERN. SILVER BUCKLE AT ONE END, AND TWO HOOKS AT OTHER FOR SECURING. STAMPED "TEXAS SHOEMAKERS & SONS" "N38". REVERSE IS BROWN LEATHER. ATTACHMENTS INCLUDE (R-L): .1 AMMUNITION POUCH. 9CM (L) X 7CM (W) X 7.5CM (H). INCLUDES LOOP TO ATTACH TO BELT; AND TWO POCKETS MOUNTED SIDE BY SIDE FOR HOLDING LOADERS. FLAP WITH SNAP ON EACH. .2 GUN HOLSTER. 22.8CM (L) 10.6CM (W) X 7.7CM (H). BASKET-WEAVE HOLSTER WITH OPEN BOTTOM, AND STRAP AT TOP WITH SNAP-FASTENER TO SECURE GUN. "B30 34W PAT. # 3,942,692" STAMPED ON REVERSE. .3 HANDCUFF POUCH. 13CM (L) X 9.2CM (W) X 4.6CM (H). BASKET-WEAVE POUCH WITH FLAP AND SNAP FASTENER. TAPERED SLIGHTLY TOWARD SQUARED BOTTOM. REVERSE STAMPED "TEX SHOEMAKER & SONS" "204". .4 FLASHLIGHT POUCH. 16.2CM (L) X 3.6CM (W) X 6CM (H). LONG NARROW POUCH WITH BASKET-WEAVE PATTERN. FLAP WITH SNAP FASTENER AT TOP. REVERSE STAMPED "TEX SHOEMAKER & SONS 93MMF". BACK OF SNAP STAMPED "PULL THE DOT". .5 WALKIE-TALKIE HOLDER. 9.8CM (L) X 7.7CM (W) X 3.2CM (H). LEATHER BAND LOOPED AROUND BELT. MOUNTED WITH PLASTIC SQUARE ON FRONT, WITH SEMI-CIRCULAR KNOTCH FOR SECURING WALKIE-TALKIE (NOT INCLUDED). "19" SCRATCHED INTO MOUNT. REVERSE OF HOLDER STAMPED "42C05857B01". .6 BATON HOLDER. 10.3CM (L) X 7.4CM (W) X 4.2CM (H). CONSISTS OF NARROW LOOP AROUND BELT, AND BAND WITH TWO SNAPS FOR ADJUSTING LENGTH, MOUNTED HORIZONTALLY TO BASE OF LOOP.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
FROM LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112036
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RCMP UNIFORM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19970111002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RCMP UNIFORM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.5
Length
131
109.0
Width
5.5
3.0
Diameter
2.3
Description
REDDISH BROWN LEATHER SAM BROWNE BELT WITH MATCHING & REMOVEABLE CROSS-STRAP, HOLSTER, & AMMUNITION POUCH. ONE END OF BELT HAS A BRASS BUCKLE, THAT FASTENS WITH DOUBLE PINS. OTHER END OF BELT HAS LARGER ROUND HOLES IN THE CENTRE TO ATTACH ACCESSORIES TO BELT, AND ALSO HAS DOUBLE HOLES FOR PINS ON BUCKLE. STAMPED "MP", "J.E. LORTIE CO. LTD. MONTREAL", AND "40". ITEMS SHOW LITTE WEAR OR DAMAGE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
DONOR JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN AUGUST 1951, AT WINNIPEG, MANITOBA. HE WAS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE FOR 25 YEARS, AND WAS STATIONED ALL OVER NORTHERN ALBERTA AND CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1974. WORKED IN THE OFFICE MOSTLY IN LETHBRIDGE, AND RETIRED OCTOBER 1976. THE BELT WAS ISSUED TO DONOR WHEN HE JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE, BUT HE RECEIVED A NEW HOLSTER WHEN THE FORCE SWITCHED FROM A .455 TO A 0.38 GUN LATER IN HIS CAREER. FOR HISTORY OF KEN VEALS PLEASE SEE P19970084001-GA, OR P19970111001-GA. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING AN RCMP UNIFORM DONATED BY KEN VEALS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THE WEBSITE WWW.RCMPVETS.CA. KENNETH GEORGE JOHN VEALS WAS BORN ON APRIL 14, 1928 IN WINNIPEG, MB. KEN JOINED THE RCMP IN AUGUST 1951 IN WINNIPEG, MB AND SERVED THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. HIS LAST TWO YEARS OF SERVICE WERE SPENT IN LETHBRIDGE. FOLLOWING HIS RETIREMENT IN 1976, KEN WORKED FOR PCL CONSTRUCTION AS A SAFETY COORDINATOR. HE PASSED AWAY ON OCTOBER 20, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 82. KEN’S WIFE, HELEN MARGARET GENEVIEVE VEALS (NEE CLEVEN) WAS BORN ON APRIL 7, 1935 AND PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 7, 2012. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THE WEBSITE WWW.RCMPVETS.CA.
Catalogue Number
P19970111002
Acquisition Date
1997-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON?
Catalogue Number
P19990088006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.M.P. UNIFORM
Date Range From
1932
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON?
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.1
Length
45.4
Width
10.9
Description
OLIVE DRAB COLLAR. TOP PART OF COLLAR IS PRESSED DOWN. THERE ARE THREE BUTTONHOLES ON BOTTOM OF COLLAR. STAMPED ON INSIDE OF COLLAR IS "ALLAN QUALITY" "16 31 48" "16" "R.C.M.P.".
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD BUCHANAN. EDWARD WAS A MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE FROM 1919 UNTIL 1932, WHEN HE TRANSFERRED TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. HE WAS A SENIOR STAFF SARGEANT, ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE AT LETHBRIDGE FROM MAY 1944 TO NOV. 1950. HE RETIRED IN 1950, THEN BECAME DIRECTOR OF CORRECTIONS FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING RETIREMENT, EDWARD BECAME A MEMBER OF THE RCMP VETERAN'S ASSOCATION IN EDMONTON IN 1950/51, AND REMAINED A MEMBER UNTIL HIS PASSING; HE ALSO SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THIS ASSOCIATION. SEE P20020090001-GA FOR COMPLETE BIOGRAPHY OF EDWARD BUCHANAN. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING A COLLAR DONATED BY TED BUCHANAN. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND FINDAGRAVE.COM STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD E. BUCHANAN PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 98 ON DECEMBER 15, 1998. HIS OBITUARY CREDITS HIM WITH 31 YEARS SERVICE WITH THE RCMP FOLLOWED BY 15 YEARS AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. AT THE TIME OF HIS DEATH, HE HAD BEEN MARRIED TO HIS WIFE, CHRISTENE BUCHANAN (MAIDEN NAME UNKNOWN) FOR 76 YEARS. CHRISTENE PASSED AWAY ON AUGUST 29, 1999, JUST SHY OF HER 100TH BIRTHDAY. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD.
Catalogue Number
P19990088006
Acquisition Date
2000-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
2.7
Description
A: SILVER-COLOURED METAL BUTTON. SHIELD OF ALBERTA EMBOSSED ON THE CENTER OF THE BUTTON. “ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE” EMBOSSED AROUND THE CREST. SHINY FINISH. THE BACK OF THE BUTTON IS BRASS IN COLOUR. AROUND THE CENTRE OF THE BACK “W. SCULLY MONTREAL” IS MACHINE ENGRAVED. THERE IS A LOOP FOR A PIN FASTENER LOOSELY ATTACHED TO THE BACK B: TWO-PRONGED BRASS PIN WITH A CIRCULAR LOOP ON ONE END AND THE TWO ENDS ON THE PIN EXTENDING OUT INTO A V-SHAPE ON THE OTHER. PIN IS 3.2 CM IN LENGTH AND AT THE WIDEST POINT THE PRONGS ARE 1.1 CM APART. CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE FRONT AND BACK SURFACES OF THE BUTTON. BRASS BACK IS SLIGHTLY TARNISHED. METAL OF PIN IN SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BUTTON BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“CANADA CD HEALTH”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150012003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“CANADA CD HEALTH”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.75
Length
16
Width
9.5
Description
KHAKI-COLOURED CANVAS ARMBAND WITH BUCKLED STRAP. PRINTED DESIGN ON FRONT IS YELLOW CIRCLE WITH BLUE LOGO READING “CANADA CD HEALTH”. TEXT STAMPED ON BACK READS “FINNIGANS LTD. Y.A. 5.000”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS ARMBAND WAS RECOVERED IN SPRING 2015 FROM A STORAGE AREA IN THE BASEMENT OF THE ENMAX CENTRE SPORTS ARENA, WHERE SUPPLIES RELATING TO LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE AND DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS/RISK MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN STORED FOR AT LEAST 30 YEARS PRIOR. DURING MARCH AND APRIL 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CURRENT AND RETIRED CITY STAFF THAT WERE INVOLVED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SUPPLIES AND DISASTER RESPONSE SERVICES, INCLUDING DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT JESSE KURTZ, RETIRED DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF MIKE ROSS, FORMER CITY DIRECTOR OF DISASTER SERVICES JOE KARL, FORMER CITY EMERGENCY SERVICES CO-ORDINATOR DENNIS JOBE, AND FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER/RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE OFFICER LEO VANDENHEUVAL. PREVIOUS RESEARCH INTO THE LETHBRIDGE CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE WAS CONDUCTED IN 2009, WHEN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROBERT GARDNER, A FORMER C.D. POLICE MEMBER (SEE RECORD P19870044001 FOR MORE INFORMATION). THE AUXILIARY CIVIL DEFENCE POLICE WAS ORGANIZED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AFTER THE PROVINCE APPEALED TO ALBERTA MUNICIPALITIES TO PREPARE DEFENCES IN CASE OF AN ENEMY ATTACK, INCLUDING A NUCLEAR STRIKE. THE C.D. POLICE WERE NOT OFFICIALLY PART OF THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE. THE AUXILIARY VOLUNTEERS DID, HOWEVER, RECEIVE TRAINING FROM THE CITY POLICE AND WHEN CALLED OUT BY THE C.D. DIRECTOR, CAME UNDER THE CONTROL OF CHIEF CONSTABLE JAMES H. CARPENTER.THE C.D. POLICE DISBANDED FOR UNKNOWN REASONS IN 1963. GARDNER WAS 33 WHEN HE JOINED THE C.D. POLICE IN 1960, AND EXPLAINS HIS MOTIVATION TO VOLUNTEER WAS BASED ON HIS PERCEPTION THAT A FUTURE WAR WAS LIKELY TO OCCUR – ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE PERIOD’S EVENTS, WHICH INCLUDED THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. GARDNER REMEMBERED TRAINING UNDER THE POLICE CHIEF AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, BUT MAINTAINED THAT OUTSIDE OF INITIAL TRAINING, C.D. POLICE OPERATIONS WERE NOT DIRECTED BY THE CITY POLICE. GARDNER SAID THAT MOST C.D. POLICE VOLUNTEERS WERE “MIDDLE AGED AND STAYED ON DUE TO THE THREAT OF WAR”. JOE KARL SAID: “[IN] LATE 1972 THE CITY MANAGER… [ASSIGNED ME TO] LOOK AFTER DISASTER SERVICES/CIVIL DEFENCE… IT’S HAD DIFFERENT NAMES AS TIME WENT ON… THIS EQUIPMENT… IS A CASUALTY COLLECTING UNIT, WITH WATER BOTTLES, BOOTS, RAIN GEAR, COVERALLS. THERE WERE STRETCHERS [AND] BLANKETS. THESE WERE ALL STORED AT THE OLD MUSEUM [ORIGINAL GALT MUSEUM BUILDING, BEFORE THE 1985 EXPANSION] NEAR THE BOILER ROOM… THAT’S WHERE I FIRST INHERITED THE STUFF. THERE WAS REALLY NO RECORD KEPT OF ANYTHING… [WHEN] WE FOUND OUT WE COULDN’T PUT [THE SUPPLIES] BACK INTO STORAGE [AT THE MUSEUM], BEING SAFETY OFFICER I KNEW AND SCOUTED ALL THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN THE CITY. THE SPORTSPLEX, DOWN IN THE DEEP BASEMENT, HAD A ROOM THAT WAS DRY AND UNOCCUPIED… SO I PUT THE STUFF DOWN THERE AND THAT’S BASICALLY WHERE IT WOUND UP… AT THAT TIME EACH MUNICIPALITY RECEIVED A MERE PITTANCE OF DOLLARS TOWARDS DISASTER SERVICES… 12-1500 EMPLOYEES AND THE ONLY SAFETY PERSON WAS ME… THEN AS THE MUNICIPAL ACT CHANGED, THE EMPHASIS WAS PUT ON POLITICALLY BY THE PROVINCE TO ESTABLISH A PEACETIME SCENARIO … IN THE BASEMENT OF THE OLD COURTHOUSE, THERE [WAS] A ROOM WHERE AN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE WITH ALL THE COMMUNICATIONS HAD BEEN SET UP… FOR GAS, WATER, SEWER, MAYOR, DEPARTMENT HEADS… [THE STRETCHERS AND BLANKETS] WERE USED IN HOSPITAL EXERCISES… TO SEE HOW PREPARED [STAFF WERE], HOW THEY COULD HANDLE MASS CASUALTIES… WE WOULD DO UP 30/40 KIDS IN BROKEN ARMS, AMNESIA, BURNS, FRACTURES, LOSS OF LIMB… THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS VERY GOOD, [DOING] TRAINING AND MOCK SCENARIOS.” ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD RANGING FROM 1957 TO 2006 DESCRIBE MOCK DISASTER EXERCISES TAKING PLACE ON A SEMI-REGULAR BASIS, TO TEST THE PREPAREDNESS OF FIRE, AMBULANCE, HOSPITAL, AND CITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. DENNIS JOBE SAID: “SHORTLY AFTER THE EDMONTON TORNADO [IN 1987] THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DECREED THAT EVERYONE, COUNTIES, CITIES, SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN… SO THE CITY WAS INSTRUCTED THAT THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT ONE TOGETHER… I WORKED FOR THE CITY MANAGER… WE WERE AWARE… THAT WE HAD TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PREPARATION… SO WE KNEW WHERE [THE SUPPLIES] WERE [AND] COUNTED THINGS… AND WE DID USE IT A COUPLE OF TIMES [WHEN] WE HAD AN EXERCISE.” LEO VANDENHEUVAL SAID: “WE USED TO HAVE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE COURT HOUSE… THE REASON IT WAS THERE IS THAT THEY HAD ROOM [AND] IT WAS QUITE A STRONG, FULL CONCRETE FACILITY THAT COULD PERHAPS WITHSTAND A LOT OF DAMAGE… I WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED BACK IN THOSE DAYS AS WELL FROM THE RISK MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT AND BECAUSE I WAS THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CITY WHENEVER THINGS WENT SIDEWAYS. THE CITY MANAGER WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THAT TEAM [AS WELL AS] THE FIRE CHIEF, POLICE CHIEF, ALL THE DIRECTORS… COMMUNITY SERVICES… ENGINEERING… THE MAYOR… THAT WHOLE TEAM WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED TOGETHER TO WORK TOGETHER IN A DISASTER SITUATION… NOTHING OF [HIGHLY EMERGENT] SIGNIFICANCE HAS EVER HAPPENED IN LETHBRIDGE. WE’VE NEVER HAD TO OPEN UP HOUSING CENTRES LIKE THE CIVIC CENTRE OR THE AREAS TO ACCOMMODATE THAT KIND OF THING BECAUSE WE’VE NEVER HAD A DISASTER THAT BIG… THE BIGGEST ONE THAT COMES TO MIND IS THE 1995 FLOOD… AT THAT TIME THERE WAS SOME TALK THAT WE WOULD GET THE MILITARY INVOLVED… BUT BACK THEN IT REQUIRED APPROVAL FROM OTTAWA, SO IT WAS AWFULLY DIFFICULT TO BRING THE MILITARY IN… TO SOME EXTENT WE KNEW THAT [THE CIVIL DEFENSE] EQUIPMENT EXISTED… [SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT] MIGHT HAVE COME INTO THE SYSTEM IN THE LATE ‘80S WHEN DENNIS JOBE WAS AROUND… BECAUSE HE HAD CERTAIN CONTACTS WITH THE MILITARY, BECAUSE HE WAS A RETIRED ARMY OFFICER… [IT IS IMPORTANT THAT] SOMEBODY WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION [IS] AWARE [AND] THAT IT’S INVENTORIED AND KEPT UP TO DATE.” MIKE ROSS SAID: “WHEN I BECAME DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF IN 1998 [THAT POSITION] WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS… WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE BUDGET AND [ASKED] ‘WHAT’S THIS $1000 WE PAID TO THE ENMAX CENTRE?’ BECAUSE THERE WAS A RENTAL [FEE] THAT NO ONE SEEMED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT… WE DID SOME INVESTIGATION AND THEN WE FOUND OUT THAT THERE WAS ALL THIS MATERIAL THAT WAS STORED IN THE DEEP BASEMENT… WE STARTED TO DO SOME RESEARCH AND FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PART OF A MOBILE HOSPITAL UNIT DATING BACK TO THE COLD WAR… IT [HAD BEEN] BASICALLY FORGOTTEN ABOUT… [IN 2006/2007, HEALTH CANADA] CONTACTED THE CITY AND SAID ‘ON OUR BOOKS THERE IS A [MOBILE] HOSPITAL IN LETHBRIDGE. DOES ANYBODY KNOW WHERE IT IS?’ AND THIS MESSAGE CAME TO ME AS THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CO-ORDINATOR … SUGGESTED THAT [THE SUPPLIES] HAD COME TO THE CITY IN THE ‘50S OR EARLY ‘60S… THE MATERIAL THAT’S THERE NOW IS PROBABLY A THIRD OF WHAT WAS THERE WHEN WE DID THE AUDIT… WE FOUND THINGS LIKE RADIATION BURN DRESSING THAT HAD A ‘BEST BY’ DATE… IV BOTTLES AND IV SOLUTION [THAT] INSTEAD OF BEING CLEAR, WAS CLOUDY… WE KEPT THE STRETCHERS [AND] A BUNCH OF BLANKETS BECAUSE WE FELT THAT… THEY WERE STILL GOOD AND WE COULD USE THEM IN A CURRENT DAY EMERGENCY… SO I REMOVED SOME OF THAT STUFF AND PUT IT OVER [IN] THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE [AT] THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, COPIES OF ORIGINAL EMERGENCY SERVICES SUPPLY INVENTORIES, AND RESEARCH MATERIAL ON LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE. FOR OTHER ARTIFACTS RELATING TO CIVIL DEFENSE IN LETHBRIDGE, SEE RECORDS P19870044001, P19870044002, P19960112110, P19960112111, P19970094001, AND P20090038000.
Catalogue Number
P20150012003
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TABLETS, “WATER DECONTAMINATION”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20150012010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TABLETS, “WATER DECONTAMINATION”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
5
Length
16.25
Width
10
Description
CLEAR PLASTIC BOTTLE WITH WHITE CAP, FILLED WITH ROUND WHITE TABLETS AND SEALED IN CLEAR PLASTIC BAG. PRINTED LABEL ON BOTTLE HAS TEXT IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH, READING “WATER DECONTAMINANT – EACH TABLET CONTAINS HALAZONE, N.F. 160 MG. WITH SODIUM BORATE AND SODIUM CHLORIDE. ONE HALAZONE TABLET IS SUFFICIENT FOR 5 GALLONS OF ORDINARY WATER. IF WATER IS GREATLY POLLUTED, USE TWO TABLETS. ALLOW WATER TO STAND FOR 30 MINUTES BEFORE DRINKING.” MINOR SCUFFING ON BAG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS BOTTLE OF WATER DECONTAMINATION TABLETS WAS RECOVERED IN SPRING 2015 FROM A STORAGE AREA IN THE BASEMENT OF THE ENMAX CENTRE SPORTS ARENA, WHERE SUPPLIES RELATING TO LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE AND DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS/RISK MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN STORED FOR AT LEAST 30 YEARS PRIOR. DURING MARCH AND APRIL 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CURRENT AND RETIRED CITY STAFF THAT WERE INVOLVED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SUPPLIES AND DISASTER RESPONSE SERVICES, INCLUDING DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT JESSE KURTZ, RETIRED DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF MIKE ROSS, FORMER CITY DIRECTOR OF DISASTER SERVICES JOE KARL, FORMER CITY EMERGENCY SERVICES CO-ORDINATOR DENNIS JOBE, AND FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER/RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE OFFICER LEO VANDENHEUVAL. PREVIOUS RESEARCH INTO THE LETHBRIDGE CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE WAS CONDUCTED IN 2009, WHEN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROBERT GARDNER, A FORMER C.D. POLICE MEMBER (SEE RECORD P19870044001 FOR MORE INFORMATION). THE AUXILIARY CIVIL DEFENCE POLICE WAS ORGANIZED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AFTER THE PROVINCE APPEALED TO ALBERTA MUNICIPALITIES TO PREPARE DEFENCES IN CASE OF AN ENEMY ATTACK, INCLUDING A NUCLEAR STRIKE. THE C.D. POLICE WERE NOT OFFICIALLY PART OF THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE. THE AUXILIARY VOLUNTEERS DID, HOWEVER, RECEIVE TRAINING FROM THE CITY POLICE AND WHEN CALLED OUT BY THE C.D. DIRECTOR, CAME UNDER THE CONTROL OF CHIEF CONSTABLE JAMES H. CARPENTER.THE C.D. POLICE DISBANDED FOR UNKNOWN REASONS IN 1963. GARDNER WAS 33 WHEN HE JOINED THE C.D. POLICE IN 1960, AND EXPLAINS HIS MOTIVATION TO VOLUNTEER WAS BASED ON HIS PERCEPTION THAT A FUTURE WAR WAS LIKELY TO OCCUR – ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE PERIOD’S EVENTS, WHICH INCLUDED THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. GARDNER REMEMBERED TRAINING UNDER THE POLICE CHIEF AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, BUT MAINTAINED THAT OUTSIDE OF INITIAL TRAINING, C.D. POLICE OPERATIONS WERE NOT DIRECTED BY THE CITY POLICE. GARDNER SAID THAT MOST C.D. POLICE VOLUNTEERS WERE “MIDDLE AGED AND STAYED ON DUE TO THE THREAT OF WAR”. JOE KARL SAID: “[IN] LATE 1972 THE CITY MANAGER… [ASSIGNED ME TO] LOOK AFTER DISASTER SERVICES/CIVIL DEFENCE… IT’S HAD DIFFERENT NAMES AS TIME WENT ON… THIS EQUIPMENT… IS A CASUALTY COLLECTING UNIT, WITH WATER BOTTLES, BOOTS, RAIN GEAR, COVERALLS. THERE WERE STRETCHERS [AND] BLANKETS. THESE WERE ALL STORED AT THE OLD MUSEUM [ORIGINAL GALT MUSEUM BUILDING, BEFORE THE 1985 EXPANSION] NEAR THE BOILER ROOM… THAT’S WHERE I FIRST INHERITED THE STUFF. THERE WAS REALLY NO RECORD KEPT OF ANYTHING… [WHEN] WE FOUND OUT WE COULDN’T PUT [THE SUPPLIES] BACK INTO STORAGE [AT THE MUSEUM], BEING SAFETY OFFICER I KNEW AND SCOUTED ALL THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN THE CITY. THE SPORTSPLEX, DOWN IN THE DEEP BASEMENT, HAD A ROOM THAT WAS DRY AND UNOCCUPIED… SO I PUT THE STUFF DOWN THERE AND THAT’S BASICALLY WHERE IT WOUND UP… AT THAT TIME EACH MUNICIPALITY RECEIVED A MERE PITTANCE OF DOLLARS TOWARDS DISASTER SERVICES… 12-1500 EMPLOYEES AND THE ONLY SAFETY PERSON WAS ME… THEN AS THE MUNICIPAL ACT CHANGED, THE EMPHASIS WAS PUT ON POLITICALLY BY THE PROVINCE TO ESTABLISH A PEACETIME SCENARIO … IN THE BASEMENT OF THE OLD COURTHOUSE, THERE [WAS] A ROOM WHERE AN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE WITH ALL THE COMMUNICATIONS HAD BEEN SET UP… FOR GAS, WATER, SEWER, MAYOR, DEPARTMENT HEADS… [THE STRETCHERS AND BLANKETS] WERE USED IN HOSPITAL EXERCISES… TO SEE HOW PREPARED [STAFF WERE], HOW THEY COULD HANDLE MASS CASUALTIES… WE WOULD DO UP 30/40 KIDS IN BROKEN ARMS, AMNESIA, BURNS, FRACTURES, LOSS OF LIMB… THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS VERY GOOD, [DOING] TRAINING AND MOCK SCENARIOS.” ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD RANGING FROM 1957 TO 2006 DESCRIBE MOCK DISASTER EXERCISES TAKING PLACE ON A SEMI-REGULAR BASIS, TO TEST THE PREPAREDNESS OF FIRE, AMBULANCE, HOSPITAL, AND CITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. DENNIS JOBE SAID: “SHORTLY AFTER THE EDMONTON TORNADO [IN 1987] THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DECREED THAT EVERYONE, COUNTIES, CITIES, SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN… SO THE CITY WAS INSTRUCTED THAT THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT ONE TOGETHER… I WORKED FOR THE CITY MANAGER… WE WERE AWARE… THAT WE HAD TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PREPARATION… SO WE KNEW WHERE [THE SUPPLIES] WERE [AND] COUNTED THINGS… AND WE DID USE IT A COUPLE OF TIMES [WHEN] WE HAD AN EXERCISE.” LEO VANDENHEUVAL SAID: “WE USED TO HAVE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE COURT HOUSE… THE REASON IT WAS THERE IS THAT THEY HAD ROOM [AND] IT WAS QUITE A STRONG, FULL CONCRETE FACILITY THAT COULD PERHAPS WITHSTAND A LOT OF DAMAGE… I WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED BACK IN THOSE DAYS AS WELL FROM THE RISK MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT AND BECAUSE I WAS THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CITY WHENEVER THINGS WENT SIDEWAYS. THE CITY MANAGER WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THAT TEAM [AS WELL AS] THE FIRE CHIEF, POLICE CHIEF, ALL THE DIRECTORS… COMMUNITY SERVICES… ENGINEERING… THE MAYOR… THAT WHOLE TEAM WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED TOGETHER TO WORK TOGETHER IN A DISASTER SITUATION… NOTHING OF [HIGHLY EMERGENT] SIGNIFICANCE HAS EVER HAPPENED IN LETHBRIDGE. WE’VE NEVER HAD TO OPEN UP HOUSING CENTRES LIKE THE CIVIC CENTRE OR THE AREAS TO ACCOMMODATE THAT KIND OF THING BECAUSE WE’VE NEVER HAD A DISASTER THAT BIG… THE BIGGEST ONE THAT COMES TO MIND IS THE 1995 FLOOD… AT THAT TIME THERE WAS SOME TALK THAT WE WOULD GET THE MILITARY INVOLVED… BUT BACK THEN IT REQUIRED APPROVAL FROM OTTAWA, SO IT WAS AWFULLY DIFFICULT TO BRING THE MILITARY IN… TO SOME EXTENT WE KNEW THAT [THE CIVIL DEFENSE] EQUIPMENT EXISTED… [SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT] MIGHT HAVE COME INTO THE SYSTEM IN THE LATE ‘80S WHEN DENNIS JOBE WAS AROUND… BECAUSE HE HAD CERTAIN CONTACTS WITH THE MILITARY, BECAUSE HE WAS A RETIRED ARMY OFFICER… [IT IS IMPORTANT THAT] SOMEBODY WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION [IS] AWARE [AND] THAT IT’S INVENTORIED AND KEPT UP TO DATE.” MIKE ROSS SAID: “WHEN I BECAME DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF IN 1998 [THAT POSITION] WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS… WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE BUDGET AND [ASKED] ‘WHAT’S THIS $1000 WE PAID TO THE ENMAX CENTRE?’ BECAUSE THERE WAS A RENTAL [FEE] THAT NO ONE SEEMED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT… WE DID SOME INVESTIGATION AND THEN WE FOUND OUT THAT THERE WAS ALL THIS MATERIAL THAT WAS STORED IN THE DEEP BASEMENT… WE STARTED TO DO SOME RESEARCH AND FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PART OF A MOBILE HOSPITAL UNIT DATING BACK TO THE COLD WAR… IT [HAD BEEN] BASICALLY FORGOTTEN ABOUT… [IN 2006/2007, HEALTH CANADA] CONTACTED THE CITY AND SAID ‘ON OUR BOOKS THERE IS A [MOBILE] HOSPITAL IN LETHBRIDGE. DOES ANYBODY KNOW WHERE IT IS?’ AND THIS MESSAGE CAME TO ME AS THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CO-ORDINATOR … SUGGESTED THAT [THE SUPPLIES] HAD COME TO THE CITY IN THE ‘50S OR EARLY ‘60S… THE MATERIAL THAT’S THERE NOW IS PROBABLY A THIRD OF WHAT WAS THERE WHEN WE DID THE AUDIT… WE FOUND THINGS LIKE RADIATION BURN DRESSING THAT HAD A ‘BEST BY’ DATE… IV BOTTLES AND IV SOLUTION [THAT] INSTEAD OF BEING CLEAR, WAS CLOUDY… WE KEPT THE STRETCHERS [AND] A BUNCH OF BLANKETS BECAUSE WE FELT THAT… THEY WERE STILL GOOD AND WE COULD USE THEM IN A CURRENT DAY EMERGENCY… SO I REMOVED SOME OF THAT STUFF AND PUT IT OVER [IN] THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE [AT] THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, COPIES OF ORIGINAL EMERGENCY SERVICES SUPPLY INVENTORIES, AND RESEARCH MATERIAL ON LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE. FOR OTHER ARTIFACTS RELATING TO CIVIL DEFENSE IN LETHBRIDGE, SEE RECORDS P19870044001, P19870044002, P19960112110, P19960112111, P19970094001, AND P20090038000.
Catalogue Number
P20150012010
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 1.