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Other Name
CINCTURE
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL
Catalogue Number
P19970041744
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CINCTURE
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
288
Diameter
1
Description
BLACK ROPE BELT IS WOVEN WOOLEN ROPE WITH BLACK TASSELED ENDS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
CINCTURE IS THE ROPE BELT USED TO HOLD CLOSED A PRIEST'S ROBES. CINCTURE BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, REV. G.G. NAKAYAMA. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041744
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
CINCTURE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL
Catalogue Number
P19970041745
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CINCTURE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
350
Diameter
1.3
Description
BLACK ROPE BELT IS WOVEN WOOLEN ROPE WITH BLACK TASSELED ENDS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
CINCTURE IS THE ROPE BELT USED TO HOLD CLOSED A PRIEST'S ROBES. CINCTURE BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, REV. G.G. NAKAYAMA. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041745
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
ANGLICAN PRIEST'S STOLE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON
Catalogue Number
P19970041737
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ANGLICAN PRIEST'S STOLE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
NYLON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.5
Length
210
Width
18.4
Description
BLACK NYLON STOLE HAS DOUBLE FOLDED NECKLINE AND WIDE BAND ENDS. ENDS OF STOLE ARE SCALLOPED AND FRAYING SLIGHTLY.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
STOLE IS AN ANGLICAN PRIEST'S STOLE WHICH BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, REV. G.G. NAKAYAMA. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041737
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
COAT AND BOOTIES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20010070022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COAT AND BOOTIES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1945
Materials
WOOL
No. Pieces
3
Length
22.7
Width
43.0
Description
1. CLOAK. ABOVE DIMENSIONS. CROCHETED BABY'S SWEATER. OFF WHITE WITH LIGHT BLUE TRIM. BOTTOM EDGE OF COAT HAS A JAGGED EDGE. SLEEVES ARE SORT OF PUFFY AT CUFFS. 2. BOOTIES. 8.5 X 5.3. CROCHETED BABY BOOTIES. OFF WHITE WITH LIGHT BLUE TRIM. TOP OF BOOTIES ARE FOLDED OVER. ONE BOOTEE HAS A BLUE PIECE OF YARN AROUND LEG WITH POM POMS ATTACHED TO THE ENDS. OTHER BOOTEE ALSO A PIECE OF YARN AROUND LEG, BUT POM POMS ARE MISSING. THIS BOOTEE HAS A SMALL ORANGEY STAIN ON ONE SIDE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
MADE BY DONOR'S MOTHER DAGMAR DOYLE SIMPSON. THE GARMENTS WERE NEVER USED. DONOR SUSPECTS HER MOTHER MADE THE ITEMS IN HOPES OF ONE DAY HAVING A BABY BOY, BUT WAS UNABLE TO DO SO. DAGMAR OLSEN WAS BORN DECEMBER 28, 1914, RAISED ON A FAMILY FARM, AND SCHOOLED IN STAVLEY, ALBERTA. HER PARENTS, HILDA AND JOHN OLSEN, WERE IMMIGRANT PIONEERS FROM NORWAY. HER MOTHER HILDA, GOT DAGMAR HER FIRST JOB AS A TELEPHONE OPERATOR WITH THE STAVELY AGENCY AT THE AGE OF 15 YEARS. AFTER LIVING AT HOME WORKING SEVEN YEARS IN STAVELY, DAGMAR MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND WORKED FOR AGT UNTIL SHE MARRIED LAWRENCE DOYLE, ALSO FROM STAVELY AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. DAGMAR AND LAWRENCE HAD ONE DAUGHTER, BARBARA. DAGMAR LATER RETURNED TO AGT AS AN OPERATOR UNTIL HER RETIREMENT AT AGE 60, WHEN SHE MARRIED CLARE SIMPSON. CLARE AND DAGMAR LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, SOCIALIZED, AND TRAVELED EXTENSIVELY UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1985. DAGMAR OLSEN DOYLE SIMPSON DIED MARCH 14, 2001. SHE WAS RUMORED TO BE ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMEN IN LETHBRIDGE. DONOR, BARBARA DOYLE, WAS BORN AND SCHOOLED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE TRAINED AT ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL AS A LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIST; GRADUATED 1962. SHE WORKED IN THE LAB AT ST. MICHAEL'S FOR 5 YEARS; MARRIED AND HAD 2 SONS. GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY WITH A BACHELOR OF ARTS, THEN A MASTERS OF ARTS IN ENGLISH, IN 1987. SHE TAUGHT AT UNIVERSITYS OF CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE, THEN MOVED TO MONTREAL FROM 1990-1996. SHE RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE TO RETIRE. *UPDATE* IN 2016 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT RUTHANN LABLANCE CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF CLOTHING, INCLUDING CLOTHING ITEMS DONATED BY BARBARA DOYLE. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION WAS COMPILED USING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. DAGMAR CHRISTINA SIMPSON (NEE OLSEN) PASSED AWAY ON MARCH 14, 2001 AT THE AGE OF 88. SHE MARRIED LAWRENCE PATRICK (LARRY) DOYLE ON DECEMBER 4, 1940. LAWRENCE WAS BORN IN PEI IN 1910. HE MOVED TO VULCAN IN 1920, STAVELY IN 1924, AND TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1937. HE PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 58 ON MARCH 28, 1969. LAWRENCE WAS THE SON OF GEORGE FRANKLIN AND MINNIE MAGDALEN DOYLE. DAGMAR WAS REMARRIED ON MARCH 29, 1975 TO CLARE C. SIMPSON. CLARE WAS BORN AND RAISED IN BELLEVILE, ON AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1930 TO WORK FOR AGT. HE ENLISTED IN 1939 AND WAS A POW FOR 3.5 YEARS FOLLOWING DIEPPE. HE PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 75 ON FEBRUARY 18, 1983. THE DONOR, BARBARA DOYLE, IS THE DAUGHTER OF DAGMAR AND LAWRENCE. IN 1969, BARBARA WAS MARRIED TO PAUL TURNER AND IN 1983, SHE WAS THE WIFE OF MR. B.F. MCFADDEN. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF THE ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. *UPDATE* IN 2018 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF THE COLLECTION, INCLUDING A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS DONATED BY BARBARA DOYLE. ON SEPTEMBER 7, 2018, PUNDYK SAT DOWN WITH DOYLE FOR AN INTERVIEW REGARDING THAT DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: DOYLE EXPLAINED THAT HER MOTHER DAGMAR OLSEN – THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE ARTIFACTS – WAS BORN IN STAVLEY AND WAS THE THIRD OF FOUR SISTERS. GROWING UP IN A HOUSE OF DAUGHTERS PLAYED A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN OLSEN’S LIFE. DOYLE DESCRIBED THE SISTERS BY SAYING, “BESSIE WAS THE OLDEST, AND NORAH WAS THE SECOND OLDEST, AND THEN MY MOTHER, AND THEN VICKI. AUNT VICKI WENT BIG [BY MOVING] TO TORONTO. SHE WANTED TO GET OUT OF TOWN. SHE WAS BORED. SHE WAS BORN IN STAVELY AND THERE WAS NO WAY SHE WAS GOING TO STAY THERE. SHE WAS THE YOUNGEST, SO SHE GOT THINGS THAT THE OTHERS DIDN’T GET IN THEIR LIFE. NORAH TOOK TO CALGARY. SHE WENT UP THERE AND SHE WORKED FOR A WHILE AT PACKING COOKIES OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. BESSIE WAS [WORKING] WITH MRS. JOURNEK AND THEN IN CALGARY THAT WAY TOO.” MOVING ON TO DESCRIBE HER MOTHER, DOYLE ILLUMINATED, “SHE WORKED [AS A TELEPHONE OPERATOR] FROM WHEN SHE WAS 15 IN STAVELY FOR ABOUT 7 YEARS. SHE WAS THERE FOR THE FIRST TELEPHONES COMING IN. THEN SHE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. SHE KNEW MY DAD FROM STAVELY, AND THEN HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL AND THEY LIVED SEPARATELY IN A BOARDING HOUSE UNTIL THEY GOT MARRIED…SHE HAD BREAKS [IN BETWEEN WHEN SHE FIRST STARTED WORKING AND HER RETIREMENT] WHEN SHE COULDN’T WORK BECAUSE OF THE WAR. [ADDITIONALLY,] I WAS BORN IN ’42, AND ONCE YOU HAD A CHILD, YOU COULDN’T GO TO WORK. EVEN WHEN THE WAR WAS OVER, THE WOMEN COULD NOT GO TO WORK BECAUSE THEY WERE MAKING WAY FOR THE PEOPLE COMING BACK FROM THE WAR FOR THE JOBS. THAT WAS REALLY HARD ON MY MOTHER. SHE WAS SO INDEPENDENT AND TO NOT BE ABLE TO HAVE HER OWN MONEY AND EVERYTHING [WAS DIFFICULT].” “[MY MOTHER] KNITTED [THIS BABY SWEATER] BEFORE [LEAVING WORK TO HAVE CHILDREN]. I DON’T KNOW AT THAT TIME IF IT WAS BLUE FOR BOYS STRICTLY, AND GIRLS FOR PINK. AND I DON’T KNOW WHETHER I EVER WORE IT. [THIS IS FROM] MY MOTHER’S HANDIWORK AND SHE WASN’T ONE THAT CROCHETED VERY MUCH. WHEN SHE WAS WORKING [SHE WOULDN’T HAD A LOT OF EXTRA TIME]. AND I GUESS AT THAT TIME AFTER SHE HAD ME, SHE WASN’T WORKING, BUT OUR OLD WASHERS THAT HAD THE RINGERS AND STUFF LIKE THAT [WERE TIME-CONSUMING]. SHE HAD TO WORK HARDER AROUND THE HOUSE AND EVERYTHING TOO,” DOYLE EXPLAINED. “I WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE,” DOYLE CONTINUED, “[I LEFT MY PARENTS’ HOUSE] WHEN I WAS 18 BECAUSE I WAS IN RESIDENCE WHEN I WAS DOING MY LABORATORY STUFF. I WAS A LAB TECHNICIAN FIRST. AFTER I GOT MARRIED IN ’64, WE LIVED FIVE YEARS HERE BEFORE WE STARTED MOVING AROUND. IT WAS ’71 [WHEN] WE LEFT AND WENT TO SASKATCHEWAN, REGINA.” “[I RECEIVED THESE ITEMS FROM MY MOTHER] AFTER SHE PASSED AWAY. [THEY WERE] IN THE HOUSE,” DOYLE STATED, "ALL OF THIS STUFF WAS IN THE HOUSE ON THE SOUTH SIDE. I FEEL LIKE MY MOTHER IS STILL IN THE HOUSE. I HAD REALLY GOOD PARENTS. WE WEREN’T POOR, BUT WE WEREN’T RICH EITHER, YOU KNOW. WE WERE JUST COMFORTABLE, BUT THEY WORKED VERY HARD FOR IT. THEY BOTH WORKED VERY HARD.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20010070001 FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20010070022
Acquisition Date
2001-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DRESS, WEDDING
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180008002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DRESS, WEDDING
Date
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
134
Width
43
Description
A. WHITE WEDDING DRESS, 134 CM LONG X 43 CM WIDE. DRESS HAS CREAM LACE OVERLAID DOWN FRONT AND AROUND SHOULDERS; FRONT HAS WHITE BOW AT WAIST. SLEEVES ARE POINTED AT CUFFS WITH THREE WHITE CLOTH-COVERED BUTTONS ALONG CUFFS. BACK OF DRESS HAS WHITE METAL ZIPPER RUNNING FROM NECK TO WAIST, AND SILVER FASTENING HOOKS AND LOOPS AT COLLAR AND WAIST. BACK HAS FOUR WHITE SNAP-BUTTONS UNDER LACE AT SHOULDERS FOR FASTENING TRAIN; COLLAR HAS SILVER SNAP BUTTON FOR CLOSING LACE OVERLAY. BACK HEM HAS SLIT UP CENTER. DRESS HAS STAINING AND RIP ON FRONT LEFT SLEEVE; RIGHT SLEEVE HAS STAINING ON BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. B. TRAIN FOR WEDDING DRESS, 210.4 CM WIDE X 174 CM LONG, DETACHABLE. TRAIN HAS FIVE METAL SNAP BUTTONS AT NECK PAINTED WHITE AT BASES; TRAIN HAS A TRIANGULAR SLIT CUT OUT OF BACK AT LOWER EDGE; CUT-OUT IS OVERLAID WITH CREAM LACE, WITH IVORY BOW AT THE PEAK OF THE CUT-OUT. MACHINE-STITCHED AT EDGES; CREASED; STAINED ALONG INSIDE LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON APRIL 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARB CLARKE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE. THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE WERE WORN BY CLARKE FOR HER WEDDING IN 1965. ON HER WEDDING AND HER SELECTION OF THE WEDDING GOWN, CLARKE RECALLED, “I WENT SHOPPING FOR A WEDDING DRESS, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST DRESS I TRIED ON. IT COST ME $75.00. I JUST BOUGHT IT, AND SAID, 'OK, IT FITS. I GUESS WE’LL PUT IT AWAY, AND HANG IT UP IN THE CLOSET, AND IT’LL BE READY WHEN WE GET [IT].' AFTER SUMMER SCHOOL–-I GUESS I HAD WORKED HARD–-BUT I HAD LOST SOME WEIGHT. WHEN I STOOD IN THE DRESS THE HEM HUNG ON THE FLOOR, SO FOR THE PICTURES I HAD TO STAND UP ON MY TIPTOES, SO THAT THE DRESS WAS NOT CRUMPLING IN FRONT OF ME.” “[I BOUGHT IT FROM] ONE OF THE DRESS SHOPS ON FOURTH AVE. THERE’S A NUMBER OF DRESS SHOPS ALONG THAT STREET. IT WAS NOT A BIG SHOP; IT WAS NOT A BIG ‘WEDDING DRESS’ SHOP LIKE THEY HAVE NOW. IT WAS JUST A SHOP THAT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD SOME WEDDING DRESSES IN ONE SECTION.” “[IT] WAS NOT A BIG POUFY DRESS. I JUST WANTED SOMETHING VERY SIMPLE, BUT SOMETHING VERY STRAIGHT AND EASY TO WEAR. I ALWAYS LIKED THE ‘HEAVY LACE’ KINDS OF THINGS. WHEN I FOUND THIS, AND IT WAS 75 DOLLARS, [IT] SEEMED LIKE A LOT OF MONEY, BUT I WAS TEACHING. I HAD ALSO BORROWED SOME MONEY FROM MY DAD TO BUY A CAR, AND I WASN’T MAKING MUCH MONEY. WHEN I WAS STARTING TEACHING, MY COUSIN WHO WAS WORKING IN A BANK MADE MORE MONEY THAN I DID, BUT I HAD TO PAY OFF THE LOAN TO MY DAD FOR THE CAR. BUT I WAS ABLE TO SQUEEZE OUT ENOUGH MONEY TO BUY THIS DRESS.” “THIS WAS SOMEWHAT OF A DEPARTURE BECAUSE IT WAS JUST A STRAIGHT SHEATHE DRESS. MANY OF THEM WERE—I DON’T WANT TO SAY MORE STRAPLESS, BUT THEY HAD MORE ‘BEADING’, MORE ‘NETTING’, MORE POUFY WITH CRINOLINES, AND WIDER DRESSES. I JUST WAS TRYING TO GO AS SIMPLE AS I COULD. THIS ONE HAD THIS NICE LITTLE TRAIN ON IT, SO THAT MADE IT A LITTLE BIT MORE DRESSY AND ELEGANT. IT WAS NOT OVER-THE-TOP WITH POUFINESS. I WAS BRIDESMAID A FEW TIMES-–SO I THOUGHT I WAS NEVER GOING TO BE A BRIDE. MOST OF THE OTHER GIRLS HAD WIDER DRESSES. THIS ONE HAS THE LONG SLEEVES WITH THE LITTLE POINTY THING ON YOUR WRIST AND HAND, AND NOT MANY OF THEM WERE LIKE THAT. MOST OF THEM WERE SHORTER SLEEVES. I’M NOT SURE THAT THIS ONE WOULD BE TOTALLY REPRESENTATIONAL [OF THE FASHION OF THE TIME], BUT IT ALWAYS ACQUIRED MANY COMPLIMENTS AS BEING A VERY NICE DRESS.” ON HER WEDDING, CLARKE ELABORATED, “[I MARRIED] DAVE CLARKE. HE GREW UP AT CASTOR, ALBERTA, WHICH IS 200 MILES NORTH OF TABER, ON HIGHWAY 36. WE MET WHEN WE WERE BOTH TEACHERS. WE MET AT CARSTAIRS. HE WAS TEACHING, AND I STARTED AN INTERNSHIP PROGRAM THERE. WE MET IN THE SPRING, AND THEN I GOT A JOB THERE THAT FALL. WE DATED THROUGHOUT THAT YEAR, AND GOT MARRIED THE FOLLOWING YEAR.” “I GREW UP EAST OF MILK RIVER, IN THE COMMUNITY OF MASINASIN BY WRITING-ON-STONE PARK. I HAD COMPLETED MY HIGH SCHOOL IN MILK RIVER, AND THEN I WENT OFF TO CALGARY TO UNIVERSITY. TWO YEARS OF UNIVERSITY…WAS ALL THAT WAS REQUIRED AT THAT TIME. THERE WAS A TEACHER SHORTAGE, SO YOU COULD GET A JOB AFTER TWO YEARS, WITHOUT YOUR DEGREE, AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. THEN I MET DAVE. WE DECIDED TO GET MARRIED. DAVE WAS HELPING OUT HIS PARENTS AT THEIR FARM IN CASTOR BECAUSE THEY WERE MOVING A HOUSE DURING THAT SUMMER, AND HE WAS HELPING GET THAT HOUSE MOVED FOR HIS PARENTS. I WAS PICKING UP SOME COURSES AT EDMONTON UNIVERSITY. IT JUST HAPPENED THAT I HAD NOT FELT THAT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO HAVE A WEDDING. I JUST THOUGHT WE WOULD JUST GET MARRIED, AND HAVE FAMILY MEMBERS THERE, AND THAT WOULD BE IT. OF COURSE, MY MOM AND DAD SAID, 'NO, WE’RE GOING TO HAVE A WEDDING.' SO, I SAID, 'WELL, I’M GOING.' AFTER MY YEAR OF SCHOOL TEACHING IN CARSTAIRS THAT FINISHED THE END OF JUNE, I WAS DUE IN EDMONTON FOR MY SUMMER SCHOOL CLASSES. SO, I SAID TO MOM AND DAD, 'I GUESS IF YOU WANT A WEDDING, WE’LL TALK BY PHONE, BUT YOU’LL HAVE TO MAKE ALL THE ARRANGEMENTS, AND THE PLANS FOR IT.' SO, THEY DID. WE HAD THE WEDDING.” “[THE WEDDING] WAS ALL THE SAME DAY. THE WEDDING WAS AT ONE O’CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON [AT SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. THEN THE RECEPTION WAS A BIT EARLIER [AT EL RANCHO, WHICH IS NOW THE COAST HOTEL]. THEN WE DROVE DOWN TO THE FARM, AND WE HAD A BIT OF AN ‘OPEN HOUSE’ THERE. THE DANCE WAS AT NINE O’CLOCK [AT THE MASINASIN SCHOOL]. I WAS IN THE [WEDDING] DRESS UNTIL TOWARDS THE END OF THE WEDDING DANCE BECAUSE AT THE WEDDING DANCE YOU HAD TO HAVE YOUR FIRST DANCE WITH YOUR DAD. THEN I WENT BACK TO THE FARM, WHICH WAS ONLY THREE MILES AWAY, AND CHANGED INTO THE GOING AWAY OUTFIT. WE CAME BACK TO THE DANCE, AND SAID GOODBYE TO EVERYBODY THERE, AND THEN WE LEFT FROM THERE.” “IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN A COMMUNITY EVENT. I WAS THE YOUNGEST IN MY FAMILY, AND THE ONLY GIRL. MOM AND DAD HAD BEEN VERY ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY, AND CERTAINLY HOSTING A WEDDING FOR YOUR DAUGHTER WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO THEM. I GREW UP THINKING, 'HUH, IT DOESN’T MATTER TO ME IF I HAVE A WEDDING OR NOT.' BUT IT CERTAINLY WAS TO THEM, AND TO THE EXTENDED FAMILY IT WAS IMPORTANT. I WAS AMAZED – EVEN WHEN I LOOK THROUGH MY WEDDING BOOK NOW – ALL OF THE AUNTS AND UNCLES THAT CAME. SOME CAME FROM THE UNITED STATES, AND DAVE’S UNCLE, WHO WAS MASTER OF CEREMONIES AT THE RECEPTION, WAS THERE FROM EDMONTON. I WAS AMAZED THAT PEOPLE WOULD COME. I DIDN’T THINK THAT I WAS THAT IMPORTANT THAT ANYBODY WOULD COME, BUT IT TURNED OUT TO BE A VERY, VERY NICE OCCASION, EVERYBODY HAD A VERY GOOD TIME. IT WAS CERTAINLY THE INTRODUCTION OF THE TWO FAMILIES TOGETHER. I RECOGNIZED AFTER-–SOME YEARS LATER-–THAT WEDDINGS ARE HAPPY OCCASIONS, AND THAT IF EXTENDED FAMILIES DON’T GET TOGETHER FOR HAPPY OCCASIONS, THEY OFTEN GET TOGETHER JUST FOR FUNERALS AND MORE SAD OCCASIONS. I CERTAINLY UNDERSTAND NOW HOW IMPORTANT IT WAS TO MY PARENTS, AND THAT IT WAS A GOOD OCCASION FOR THE WHOLE EXTENDED FAMILY.” “THE WAY THE SUMMER PROGRESSED, DAVE WAS VERY BUSY WITH HIS PARENTS…AND I WAS BUSY AT SUMMER SCHOOL. IF YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT SUMMER SCHOOL, YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE CRAMMING, AND TAKING CLASSES, AND YOU’RE DOING EXAMS. EVERYTHING IS FAST BECAUSE YOU ARE TRYING TO GET IT ALL DONE IN 6 WEEKS, AND YOU’RE TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE GETTING A FULL CREDIT FOR YOUR COURSE. MY FINAL EXAM WAS ON A TUESDAY, AND I PACKED UP MY THINGS, AND WENT TO CASTOR ON THE WEDNESDAY. [I] PICKED UP DAVE, AND WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON THE THURSDAY. WE MET WITH THE MINISTER ON THE THURSDAY, AND HE SAID THAT HE WAS BEGINNING TO WONDER IF THERE WAS A BRIDE AND GROOM BECAUSE HE HADN’T MET US…WE HAD THE REHEARSAL ON FRIDAY; THE WEDDING ON SATURDAY. FOR OUR HONEYMOON, WE WENT DOWN TO SANDPOINT AND COEUR D’ ALENE ON A LITTLE TRIP DOWN THERE. ONE WEEK LATER WE WERE IN A SMALL TOWN, NEIGHBOURING TO CASTOR, WHERE WE HAD TEACHING JOBS BECAUSE THE SCHOOL YEAR WAS TO START. WE HAD NO TIME TO SET UP A LITTLE TEACHERAGE. THE SCHOOL BOARD THERE RENTED US A HOUSE…THAT WAS HOW WE STARTED. IT WASN’T A VERY GRAND BEGINNING.” “[LETHBRIDGE WAS THE MID-POINT] TO ACCOMMODATE THE FAMILIES. MOM HAD MADE THE ARRANGEMENTS, SO I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN SOMETHING TO DO WITH WHETHER OR NOT THEY COULD HAVE THE RECEPTION CLOSE [TO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. BECAUSE I WENT TO SUNDAY SCHOOL AND BELONGED TO THE CHURCH IN MILK RIVER – SO DID MY PARENTS –WE WERE AFFILIATED WITH THE UNITED CHURCH. SOUTHMINSTER WAS DEFINITELY NOT OUR HOME CHURCH AT THAT TIME.” CLARKE SPOKE TO HER MOTIVES FOR KEEPING AND DONATING THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE, STATING, “IT’S ALWAYS [BEEN] EASY TO KEEP IT. I DON’T THINK I’M A HOARDER, BUT I DO LOVE SENTIMENTAL THINGS, AND I HAVE MY MOTHER’S WEDDING DRESS AND GOING-AWAY OUTFIT. THEY ARE VALUABLE PIECES. THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT, I HAD IT OUT AT OUR 25TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY. I COULDN’T WEAR IT MYSELF BECAUSE MY ARMS CHANGED, BUT MY NIECE WORE IT, AND WE HAD A BIG PARTY-–FAMILY PARTY–-FOR OUR 25TH. THEN A FEW YEARS AGO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH HAD A 100TH ANNIVERSARY, SO WE WERE ALL INVITED TO TAKE WHATEVER WE WANTED FROM OUR OWN HISTORY, AND SO [MY WEDDING] DRESS WAS WORN AT THAT OCCASION AS WELL.” “I’VE HUNG ONTO THESE MATERIALS FOR 52 YEARS, AND NOW I’M DOWNSIZING MY HOME SO THAT I CAN LIVE IN A CONDO. MY HUSBAND DIED LAST YEAR, AND, AS I’M DOWNSIZING, I LOOK THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE HAVE ACQUIRED AND PACKED AROUND WITH US FOR ALL OF OUR MARRIED YEARS. I DECIDED THAT THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT WERE NOT GOING ANYWHERE AS LONG AS IT WAS IN MY STUFF, AND THAT PERHAPS THERE WAS SOME VALUE IN IT HAVING IT AS PROPERTY OF THE MUSEUM.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180008002
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19960116152
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
126
Width
110
Description
1. CHASUBLE: 126 X 110CM PINK NYLON-POLYESTER GARMENT IS PONCHO STYLE CLOAK WITH SLIGHTLY TAPERED SHOULDERS. COLLAR IS ROUND WITH FLY OPENING AT BACK AND SNAP CLOSURE. CHASUBLE HAS GREEN LINING AND GREEN FELT STRIP DOWN CENTER OF BOTH SIDES. FRONT HAS LARGE GOLD LETTERS WITH GREEN EDGING THAT READ "IHS" WITH A SIMILAR STYLE CROWN ABOVE. SEWN INTO FRONT OF LINING ARE TWO LABELS. ONE READS "BY GASPARD GREATER LITURGICAL ART WINNIPEG CANADA". SECOND LABEL HAS "ORNEMENTS D'EGLISE GLOIRE CONFECTIONNES AU CANADA". BACK OF CHASUBLE HAS TWO SMALL WINE STAINS. 2. STOLE: 225 X 10CM STOLE MADE OF SAME MATERIAL AS CHASUBLE WITH IDENTICAL GREEN LINING. STOLE HAS GREEN FELT CHEVRON ON BOTH ENDS AND ENDS ARE TAPERED TO BROAD POINT. STOLE HAS CURVE CUT AT NECK WITH COTTON COLLAR WITH LACE. ALSO AT NECK IS GREEN FELT CROSS. STOLE HAS SMALL WINE STAIN.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
HEALTH SERVICES
History
CHASUBLE WAS REMOVED FROM THE CHAPEL AT ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL BEFORE THE HOSPITAL WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1996. FOR MORE HISTORY ON HOSPITAL SEE P19960116001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P19960116152
Acquisition Date
1996-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19960116153
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
127.5
Width
115.5
Description
1. CHASUBLE: 127.5 X 115.5CM RED NYLON CHASUBLE IS OVAL SHAPED WITH HOLE IN MIDDLE AND IS WORN PONCHO STYLE. HAS ROUND COLLAR WITH FLY OPENING AT BACK AND SNAP CLOSURE. COLLAR HAS EMBROIDERED BORDER THAT IS GREEN WITH YELLOW DOWN CENTER WITH CROSS AND DIAMOND PATTERN. ON FRONT AND BACK IS SEWN EMBROIDERY CROSS WITH LIFTED ARMS TO FORM "Y" CROSS. EMBRODERED BAND HAS GOLD CELTIC CROSSES WITH RED BACKGROUND AND CHAIN LINK DECORATION BETWEEN CROSSES. CENTER CREST IS GOLD CIRCLE WITH GREEN EDGE THAT HAS WHITE DESCENDING DOVE IN RED CROSS. 2. STOLE - 113 X 10.8CM STOLE IS SAME MATERIAL AS CHASUBLE WITH CURVED NECK AND GOLD TASSELS ON ENDS THAT ARE FADED. STOLE HAS WHITE COTTON COLLAR WITH LACE. AT COLLAR AND ON EACH END OF STOLE IS SEWN CROSS MADE OF STRIPS OF EMBROIDERED MATERIAL. EACH STRIP IS RED BACKGROUND WITH GOLD EDGING AND DIAMOND & FLOWER PATTERN.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
HEALTH SERVICES
History
CHASUBLE WAS REMOVED FROM THE CHAPEL AT ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL BEFORE THE HOSPITAL WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1996. FOR MORE HISTORY ON HOSPITAL SEE P19960116001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P19960116153
Acquisition Date
1996-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19960116151
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
130
Width
115
Description
1. CHASUBLE: 125 X 115CM GREEN CHASUBLE IS OVAL SHAPE CLOTH THAT FOLDS IN HALF TO BE WORN LIKE A PONCHO. CHASUBLE IS GREEN FABRIC SHELL WITH BRONZE COLORED LINING. GREEN FABRIC HAS WOVEN PATTERN OF MULTIPLE CHI-RHO AND CROSSES. HAS ROUND COLLAR WITH NYLON BORDER WHICH IS RED AND BROWN WITH GOLD COLORED CROSS AND DIAMOND PATTERN. BACK HAS FLY OPENING WITH SNAP CLOSURE. FRONT AND BACK HAVE SEWN CROSSES WITH RAISED ARMS TO MAKE "Y" SHAPE. CROSS IS MADE FROM 9 CM WIDE EMBROIDERED BAND WITH GEOMTRIC PATTERNS IN BROWN, GOLD AND GREEN. CENTER CREST ON BREAST IS BROWN "Y" SHAPED CROSS WITH DESCENDING WHITE DOVE AND HAND HOLDING TWO FINGERS DOWN. GREEN ARMS OF CROSS EXTEND FROM HAND. 2. STOLE: 266 X 9CM NYLON STOLE IS MADE OF SAME MATERIAL AS CHASUBLE WITH IDENTICAL LINING AND BORDER MATERIAL. STOLE IS NARROW IN MIDDLE AND WIDENS AT ENDS. ENDS HAVE BORDER AND BROWN NYLON TASSELS. MIDDLE HAS WHITE COTTON LACE COLLAR SEWN TO SIDE. MIDDLE ALSO HAS CROSS MADE OF BORDER MATERIAL. NEAR EACH END OF STOLE IS GOLD COLORED EMBROIDERED FRENCH CROSS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
HEALTH SERVICES
History
CHASUBLE WAS REMOVED FROM THE CHAPEL AT ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL BEFORE THE HOSPITAL WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1996. FOR MORE HISTORY ON HOSPITAL SEE P19960116001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P19960116151
Acquisition Date
1996-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19960116150
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
140
Width
115
Description
1. CHASUBLE - BEIGE WITH RED AND BRONZE COLORED TRIM. GARMENT IS OVAL SHAPE AND FOLDS IN HALF TO BE WORN LIKE A PONCHO. NYLON FABRIC IS BEIGE WITH WOVEN MULTIPLE PATTERN OF GERMAN CROSSES INSIDE DIAMOND SHAPES WITH LAURELS AND FLOWERS AROUND IT. HOLE IN MIDDLE HAS FLY OPENING WITH SNAP CLOSURE. HAS ROUND COLLAR WITH RED AND BRONZE COLORED EDGING WITH GEOMETRIC PATTERNS ON IT. CHASUBLE HAS FABRIC CROSS WITH ARMS IN "Y" SHAPE ON FRONT AND BACK. CROSS IS MADE FROM 8CM WIDE NYLON BAND WITH GERMAN CROSSES AND STONE PAVEMENT PATTERN IN RED, BLACK AND BRONZE COLORS. AT CENTER OF FRONT IS OVAL CREST WITH CHI-RHO AND ALPHA AND OMEGA IN BRONZE COLORED STITCHING. CHASUBLE HAS MODERATE AMOUNT OF RUST STAINS. 2. STOLE - STOLE IS 9.5CM X 260CM IN SIZE AND IS NARROW AT MIDDLE AND TAPERS WIDER AT ENDS. FABRIC IS BEIGE AND SAME PATTERN AS CHASUBLE. STOLE HAS DEEP RED NYLON LINING AND COTTON LACE COLLAR ALONG MIDDLE. STOLE HAS GOLD COLORED NYLON TASSELS AT ENDS WITH RED, BLACK AND BRONZE BORDER. ALSO HAS THREE CROSSES SEWN TO IT IN SAME MATERIAL AS BORDER, ONE ON EACH END AND ONE IN MIDDLE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
RELIGION
HEALTH SERVICES
History
CHASUBLE AND STOLE WERE REMOVED FROM THE CHAPEL AT ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL BEFORE THE HOSPITAL WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1996. FOR MORE HISTORY ON HOSPITAL SEE P19960116001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P19960116150
Acquisition Date
1996-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PNEUMONIA VEST, “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING”
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FLANNEL
Catalogue Number
P20140006033
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PNEUMONIA VEST, “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING”
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
FLANNEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
42
Width
48.5
Description
WHITE COTTON FLANNEL VEST, OPEN AT LEFT SIDE AND LEFT SHOULDER. WHITE COTTON TWILL TIES AT OPEN SIDE AND SHOULDER FOR CLOSURE. BOTTOM HEMMED WITH BLUE THREAD. STAMP AT BOTTOM LEFT CORNER READS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING” IN BLACK INK. MINOR STAINING AND YELLOWING ALONG UNDERARM SEAMS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
EDUCATION
History
AT THE TIME OF DONATION, GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION PAST ARCHIVIST ELAINE HAMILTON IDENTIFIED THIS VEST AS A “PNEUMONIA VEST USED WHEN PATIENT WENT TO THE O.R. [OPERATING ROOM]. PATIENT ALSO WORE A GOWN OVER THIS AND FLANNEL BOOTS THAT TIED AT OR ABOVE THE KNEE. [THIS VEST WAS] POSSIBLY USED AT THE GALT [HOSPITAL]. IN 1955 WHEN I ENTERED TRAINING AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL WE DRESSED PATIENTS THIS WAY TO GO TO THE O.R.” IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF THE COLLECTED ARTIFACTS. HIGA, THE EARLIEST GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST, SAID: “I TRAINED MOSTLY AT THE GALT. THE STUDENTS, WE ALL KNEW EACH OTHER, HELPED EACH OTHER BECAUSE THERE WERE MOSTLY STUDENTS THERE: ONE REGISTERED NURSE FROM 7AM TO 7PM. THE REST WERE ALL US STUDENTS THAT RAN THE HOSPITAL SO, BUT WE WERE REALLY GOOD FRIENDS AND WE HELPED EACH OTHER… WE HAD SUCH GOOD RAPPORT BETWEEN THE STUDENTS IN MY CLASS… I JOINED [THE ALUMNAE] WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1955… I WAS INTERESTED IN HOW EVERYBODY TURNED OUT, AND THE ALUMNAE SORT OF KEPT IN CONTACT WITH THEM, AND IT WAS QUITE IMPORTANT TO ME. I FELT QUITE HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT ALL THE OTHER [NURSES]… IT’S NICE WHEN THEY CAME FOR THE REUNIONS. YOU SEE ALL THESE GIRLS YOU WORKED WITH, MAYBE ONLY FOR A LITTLE WHILE, BUT YOU REMEMBER THEM… I REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO BE THE ARCHIVIST, BUT WE DON’T HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE THAT OFFER TO DO THINGS… I WAS INTERESTED IN ALL THE HISTORY AND ALL THE THINGS THAT THE GIRLS THOUGHT ABOUT IT… [THE ARCHIVIST WAS TO] KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE HISTORY AND THE PEOPLE THAT WERE INVOLVED, AND KEEP TRACK OF THE STUFF WE COLLECT[ED]… [THE COLLECTION IS IMPORTANT TO ME BECAUSE] I LIKE EVERYBODY TO KNOW ABOUT THE GALT AND HOW WE TRAINED AND HOW IT PROGRESSED… AS YOU GET OLDER YOU KIND OF HAVE MEMORIES THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP, AND YOU KNOW YOU THINK ABOUT THOSE THINGS… [WHEN] YOU LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] YOU REMEMBER.” ELAINE HAMILTON BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN THE LATE 1980S AFTER SHIRLEY HIGA STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, HAMILTON SAID: “I THINK THE RETIRED NURSES DECIDED THAT THEY SHOULD FORM A GROUP TO HELP THE STUDENTS… I WASN’T THERE BUT IT WAS ’45 WHEN THEY FORMED, AND THEY DID THINGS FOR THE NURSES STUDENTS LIKE, THEY BOUGHT FURNITURE [FOR STUDENT RESIDENCES]… THEY DID A WHOLE BUNCH OF BAKE SALES AND CRAFT SALES; THEY WORKED AT THE BULL SALE OUT AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS. THEY DID A LOT OF THINGS LIKE THAT TO RAISE MONEY FOR LITTLE THINGS THAT COULDN’T BE BOUGHT OTHERWISE, LIKE THE PATIENT COMFORT, LIKE PATIENTS WOULD COME IN WITHOUT TOOTHBRUSHES AND COMBS… THEY HAD A BANQUET [FOR NURSING STUDENTS], AND THEY HAD A TEA WITH OUR PARENTS TOO, FOR US IN THE RESIDENCE… FOR ME, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WAS THE BANQUETS, AND HAVING MY CLASSMATES COME EVERY FIVE YEARS, BECAUSE THEY ARE LIKE SISTERS TO ME… OF COURSE I LIKE HISTORY AND ARCHIVES TOO SO [THE COLLECTION] IS KIND OF IMPORTANT TO ME TOO… WE LIVED TOGETHER, AND ATE TOGETHER, AND CRIED TOGETHER AND DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER FOR THREE YEARS, BECAUSE WE LIVED RIGHT IN A RESIDENCE. SO, WE BECAME VERY CLOSE… AND IF YOU WORK IN THE ALUMNI, YOU BECOME KIND OF LIKE A LITTLE FAMILY TOO BECAUSE THERE’S NOT THAT MANY OF US THAT GO TO OUR MEETINGS, SO WHEN WE GET TOGETHER, IT’S KIND OF NICE TO SHARE WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON… IT’S A FELLOWSHIP.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, HAMILTON SAID: “IT’S AN ACCUMULATION OF ARTIFACTS FROM THE HOSPITALS AND FROM OUR TRAINING DAYS. AND, IT’S PART OF THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE IN A WAY, BECAUSE THE SCHOOL WAS HERE FOR QUITE A WHILE… I’M A CARE GIVER AND I LIKE TO LOOK AFTER STUFF. SO, IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME THAT IT GOT CARED FOR… I THINK WITH THE CLOSING [OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, IN 1979] WE GOT ALL THE CHARTS, AND WE ALREADY HAD THINGS FROM THE GALT HOSPITAL IN OUR STUFF THAT PROBABLY SOMEBODY [BEFORE HIGA] ACCEPTED… WHEN WE WENT INTO THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL [IN 1955] IT WAS ALL BRAND NEW, STAINLESS STEEL, SO THERE WAS NONE OF THE ENAMEL STUFF, AND THEN WHEN THE MUNICIPAL CLOSED [IN 1988], THE OPERATING ROOM GAVE US A LOT OF THINGS. THERE WERE A LOT OF DONATIONS THEN FROM DIFFERENT SPOTS BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T WANT TO MOVE STUFF SINCE IT WAS OLD… WE GOT A PLACE [FOR STORING THE COLLECTION IN THE REGIONAL HOSPITAL], ACTUALLY ABOVE THE WASHERS IN THE LAUNDRY FIRST. BUT IT WAS PRETTY MOIST UP THERE. AND THEN THEY GAVE US A ROOM IN THE SEWING ROOM, WHICH WAS VERY NICE, OUR OWN SEPARATE LITTLE ROOM THERE FOR OUR STORAGE… WE HAD THINGS UP ON A SHELF AND WE HAD A TRUNK IN THERE, AND… WE HAD ALL THE LETTERS FROM THE RESIDENCE… WE HAD A DISPLAY CASE THAT THEY BUILT AT THE REGIONAL [IN THE HOSPITAL ATRIUM] AND WE HAD STUFF IN THERE, AND WE’D MOVE IT AROUND… HAVING THE DISPLAY CASE WAS IMPORTANT TO ME, AND CHANGING THE UNIFORM ON [THE DISPLAY MANNEQUIN] EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, AND HAVING HER IN DIFFERENT OUTFITS… I ALWAYS HAD IT ALL TIDY FOR A REUNION… I WOULD CHANGE THE UNIFORM FOR THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT CLASS WAS HAVING THEIR REUNION.” SUE KYLLO BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN 2010 AFTER ELAINE HAMILTON STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, KYLLO SAID: “[I ATTENDED THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING] FROM ’66 TO ’69, AND I JOINED IN 1976 AFTER I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE. I HAD TWO LITTLE KIDS AND I WANTED TO GET OUT AND MEET PEOPLE AND THE ALUMNI GAVE ME THAT… I WANTED TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH MY NURSING FRIENDS AND SEE IF I CAN HELP OUT IN SOME WAY… THE ALUMNI IS THE WAY TO GO TO KEEP OUR NURSING MEMORIES ALIVE AND I WANT TO DO THAT. SO NOW IT’S IMPORTANT TO ME WAY MORE THAN WHEN I WAS A YOUNG MOTHER THAT WANTED TO GET OUT… IT MEANS COMPANIONSHIP [AND] TO HELP EACH OTHER.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, KYLLO SAID: “I DON’T KNOW HOW IT GOT STARTED. I WOULD THINK THAT MRS. BOYCHUCK WOULD HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH IT BECAUSE [SHE] WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE ALUMNI AT THE BEGINNING, AND I WOULD THINK THAT IF ANYBODY, IT WOULD BE HER THAT STARTED COLLECTING THE ODD LITTLE THING, AND THEN IT WENT TO SHIRLEY. I DON’T KNOW THAT THERE WAS ANYBODY BEFORE SHIRLEY… OUR ALUMNI ONLY STARTED IN [1945], SO THERE WERE THOSE PERIODS WHERE I DON’T THINK ANYBODY CARED ABOUT ANY OF THIS STUFF… TO ME, IT MEANS AN AWFUL LOT. IT MEANS THAT WE EXISTED REALLY… IF WE DIDN’T HAVE ALL THIS STUFF, WELL WHAT WERE WE? A NURSE, WHAT DOES A NURSE DO? WITH THIS WE CAN SHOW THEM THAT WE DIDN’T JUST GIVE BEDPANS. WE DID A LOT OF THINGS, AND I’M REALLY PROUD THAT WE HAVE WHAT WE’VE GOT.” OF THE SITUATION LEADING UP TO THE DONATION OF THE GSN COLLECTION TO THE GALT MUSEUM, KYLLO SAID: “WE HAD A DISPLAY AT THE NORTH END OF THE HOSPITAL [THAT] WAS GOING TO STAY THERE [AND ADDITIONAL COLLECTION STORAGE] AND WE DIDN’T HAVE A PROBLEM... WE WERE ALWAYS UNDER THE IMPRESSION OF ALL THE PAST ADMINISTRATIONS THAT WE ALWAYS HAD A PLACE IN THAT HOSPITAL… NOW THAT ALL THE OLD GUYS HAVE GONE, THEY JUST UP AND MOVED [THE COLLECTION, IN FALL 2012] AND DIDN’T CARE. THEY WERE BUILDING A NEW WING AND ‘TO HECK WITH YOUR GUYS’ STUFF’… NOBODY WANTED TO EVEN TALK TO US ABOUT IT. I FINALLY GOT AHOLD OF THE GUY IN CHARGE OF MAINTENANCE, [HE] SAID, “WELL IT’S UPSTAIRS IN THE PENTHOUSE.” WELL, WE KNEW WHAT THE PENTHOUSE WAS LIKE, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY HOT AND YOU DON’T WANT [THESE ARTIFACTS] IN SOMEPLACE REALLY HOT, SO I WANTED IT OUT OF THERE… SO THAT’S WHEN IT WENT OUT INTO A STORAGE LOCKER. AND IN THE STORAGE LOCKER… IT WAS JUST NOT CLEAN ENOUGH TO BE IN THERE… WE WERE VERY DISAPPOINTED.” HAMILTON ADDED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE ANYWHERE FOR [THE COLLECTION], AND IT’S IN PEOPLE’S GARAGES AND BASEMENTS AND LIVING ROOMS… [THE MUSEUM IS HOUSED IN] THE GALT HOSPITAL. AND A LOT OF OUR MEMBERS TRAINED HERE. SO IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL TO THEM, AND THEY WOULD LIKE TO LEAVE SOMETHING HERE TO BE REMEMBERED BY… IT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO US TO LEAVE SOMETHING BEHIND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20140006033
Acquisition Date
2014-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.