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Other Name
TEA TOWEL, MOUNTIES
Date Range From
2001
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140011000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TEA TOWEL, MOUNTIES
Date Range From
2001
Date Range To
2014
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
70.5
Width
44.5
Description
WHITE TOWEL, WOVEN WITH COTTON THREAD, WITH REPEATING DESIGN DEPICTING A FIGURE IN RCMP UNIFORM – BROWN HAT AND BOOTS, RED TUNIC, BLUE RIDING BREECHES. THE PATTERN RUNS ALONG BOTH SHORT EDGES OF THE TOWEL. A TAG ATTACHED AT ONE CORNER WITH MULTICOLOURED THREAD READS “HANDMADE BY MAXIENE, FORT MACLEOD ALBERTA CANADA T0L 0Z0, 403-380-3102” ON THE OUTSIDE, AND “100% COTTON, MACHINE WASH/DRY” ON THE INSIDE. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
MAINTENANCE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE DONOR AND WEAVER OF THIS TOWEL, MAXIENE BODGENER, WAS PROVIDED BY BODGENER TO GALT CURATOR WENDY AITKENS AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BODGENER WAS BORN TO RACHEL “DOLLY” LONG AND WILFRED PERRIN. HER MOTHER DIED WHEN BODGENER WAS 18 MONTHS OLD, SO SHE WAS RAISED BY HER GRANDFATHER HENRY GEORGE LONG, AN EARLY SETTLER IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHO WORKED AT THE STOPPING HOUSE NEAR KIPP IN 1889. BODGENER’S AUNT ALICE AND UNCLE HARRY “BUSTER” LONG HELPED GRANDFATHER HENRY ON THE FAMILY RANCH SOUTH OF FORT MACLEOD, ALONG THE BELLY RIVER. BODGENER SPENT HER CAREER TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS AT F.P. WALSHE SCHOOL IN FORT MACLEOD, AND SEWED CLOTHES FOR HER FAMILY. IN HER RETIREMENT SHE LEARNED HOW TO WEAVE FABRIC. 13 YEARS LATER, IN 2001, BODGENER PURCHASED A $7000 COMPUTERIZED LE CLERC LOOM. THE LOOM HAS A ‘BLACK BOX’ THAT PROCESSES THE PATTERNS SHE DEVELOPS WITH SPECIALIZED COMPUTER SOFTWARE, TRANSMITTING DIRECTIONS TO THE LOOM. BODGENER HAS DESIGNED AND MADE TEA TOWELS, SCARVES, PLACEMATS, TABLE RUNNERS, HAND TOWELS, AND AFGHANS USING THIS PROCESS. SHE WEAVES FOR HER OWN ENJOYMENT AND SELLS HER PRODUCTS AT A VERY REASONABLE PRICE. THE MOUNTIE TEA TOWEL, WHICH BODGENER SELLS FOR $11, IS CREATED WITH A PATTERN THAT BODGENER DESIGNED BY ASKING HER NEIGHBOUR, A RCMP OFFICER IN FORT MACLEOD, TO POSE IN HIS UNIFORM SO SHE COULD GET THE PROPORTIONS CORRECT. UPON THE COMPLETION OF THE PATTERN, BODGENER GAVE HIM A TOWEL AND HIS CO-OFFICERS AT THE DETACHMENT TEASED HIM ABOUT RECEIVING A TEA TOWEL. THIS TOWEL WAS INCLUDED IN THE EXHIBIT ‘WOVEN IN TIME – CELEBRATING 65 YEARS WITH LETHBRIDGE WEAVERS’, CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS, THAT RAN FROM JUNE 7 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 AT THE GALT MUSEUM.
Catalogue Number
P20140011000
Acquisition Date
2014-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COMMERCIAL, “F. DICK”
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CAST IRON, ALUMINIUM, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150007000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COMMERCIAL, “F. DICK”
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
2010
Materials
CAST IRON, ALUMINIUM, WOOD
No. Pieces
2
Height
84
Length
41.5
Width
28
Description
CAST IRON RECTANGULAR BASE WITH HOLLOW ALUMINIUM CYLINDER FIXED UPRIGHT AT CENTRE. ROUND METAL PLUNGER INSIDE CYLINDER MOVES UP AND DOWN ON A TOOTHED METAL COLUMN THAT IS CRANK DRIVEN BY REMOVABLE METAL HANDLE. HANDLE HAS WOOD GRIP. SPIGOT MOUTH AT BASE OF CYLINDER. CAST IRON COMPONENTS ARE PAINTED RED, BUT PAINT IS WORN AND ONLY TRACES REMAIN ON BASE. TEXT READING "F. DICK" IS STAMPED INTO THE OUTER CASE OF CRANK MECHANISM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
THIS SAUSAGE STUFFER WAS USED BY FOUR GENERATIONS OF MEAT CUTTERS IN THE GURR FAMILY AT THE SAME LOCATION OF 538 13 STREET SOUTH, WHICH SUCCESSIVELY HOUSED HOEFER & WOOD GROCERY, VALUE VILLAGE, AND AT THE TIME OF DONATION, LONDON ROAD MARKET. ON FEBRUARY 3, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DUANE GURR AND HIS SON, THE DONOR, DAVID GURR, ABOUT THEIR FAMILY HISTORY WITH THE GROCERY STORES, MEAT CUTTING IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THE SAUSAGE STUFFER. DUANE SAID: “MY GRANDFATHER [ALF GURR] CAME [TO CANADA] AS A FOURTEEN YEAR OLD BOY… MEAT CUTTING [HAD BEEN] HIS TRADE IN ENGLAND… WHEN HE CAME HERE HE HAD A NUMBER OF JOBS… HE RAN BURNS’ MEAT MARKET… EVENTUALLY HE LEFT BURNS AND STARTED HIS OWN MEAT MARKET ON 3RD AVENUE SOUTH WITH HIS SONS, MY UNCLE AND MY DAD [CALLED] PALACE MEAT MARKET. [THEN] HE WAS THE MEAT MANAGER AT [HOEFER & WOOD GROCERY] FROM 1954 TO 1957… IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS QUITE UNIQUE TO HAVE A STORE THAT SOLD GROCERIES AND HAD A MEAT DEPARTMENT IN IT, AND A PRODUCE DEPARTMENT AND A BAKERY… IT WOULD HAVE BEEN FAIRLY NEW TO HAVE EVERTYHING UNDER ONE ROOF… [GRANDFATHER] HAD TO LEAVE HIS JOB BECAUSE HE LOST HIS EYESIGHT AND THE FELLOW THAT WAS BROUGHT IN… FRED SIEMEN, ACTUALLY TAUGHT ME HOW TO CUT MEAT AND TO MAKE SAUSAGE IN 1978 [AFTER] I WENT TO WORK FOR VALUE VILLAGE… THE FELLOW THAT HIRED ME IN 1973, [GERARD] WESTWOOD, [HAD WORKED] CLEANING THE MEAT DEPARTMENT AFTER SCHOOL FOR MY GRANDFATHER… HE SAID ‘YOU’RE ALF GURR’S GRANDSON’, AND I HAD THE JOB JUST LIKE THAT… IT WAS ACTUALLY [GERARD] THAT SAID IN 1978, ‘I THINK YOU SHOULD LEARN HOW TO BE A MEAT CUTTER BECAUSE IT’S IN YOUR BLOOD.’” DUANE CONTINUED: “MY DAD WAS ALSO TRAINED [IN MEAT CUTTING] BUT WORKED FOR THE CPR… HE ALWAYS [CUT MEAT] IN HIS BASEMENT… HE ACTUALLY USED TO MAKE SAUSAGE WITH ME TWICE A WEEK [AT THE STORE]… WE DIDN’T PARTICULARLY GET ALONG THAT WELL [BUT] IN THAT INSTANCE, WE GOT ALONG VERY WELL… WE DIDN’T DO A LOT OF TALKING WHEN WE DID IT. WE JUST HELPED EACH OTHER, AND HE TAUGHT ME HOW TO DO IT, AND IT WAS ACTUALLY A PRETTY FUN TIME… IT WAS A FAMILY THING… I ALWAYS ENJOYED IT, AND NOW DAVID IS MAKING SAUSAGES AND DOING A GREAT JOB… IT’S A BIT OF A LOST ART… THERE’S NOT A LOT OF GUYS THAT CAN MAKE SAUSAGE AND LINK IT ANYMORE.” ON THE SAUSAGE-MAKING PROCESS, DAVID SAID: “YOU START WITH YOUR MEAT… YOU GRIND THAT THROUGH ONCE, AND THEN ADD YOUR SEASONINGS [AND] MIX THAT TOGETHER… [THE MIXTURE] ALWAYS HAS TO BE COLD TO KEEP THE CONSISTENCY, AND TO KEEP IT OFF YOUR HANDS.” DUANE SAID: “THE COLDER THE BETTER; IT DIDN’T STICK TO YOUR HANDS AND WENT INTO THE CASINGS EASIER, AND THE WARMER IT GETS, THE HARDER IT IS TO WORK… WHEN YOU’RE DOING IT BY HAND, THE COLD [GOES] RIGHT UP TO YOUR BRAIN.” DAVID SAID: “YOU PULL THE ALUMINIUM CANISTER OUT, AND THEN THERE IS A NOZZLE ON THE FRONT OF THE CANISTER THAT YOU PUT THE SAUSAGE NOZZLE ON… WHEN YOU START CRANKING IT IN LOW GEAR SO THAT IT’S EASIER TO CRANK, IT START PRESSING IT THROUGH… YOU CAN EITHER PUT HOG CASINGS ON, THAT’S YOUR TRADITIONAL, OR THE NEW SYNTHETIC ONES ARE COLLAGEN.” DUANE SAID: “WE ALWAYS WORKED WITH NATURAL CASINGS, WHICH WERE HOG OR LAMB.” DAVID SAID: “THE SYNTHETIC CASINGS DON’T HAVE A LOT OF GIVE TO THEM, SO YOU HAVE TO BE VERY CAREFUL… WHAT’S NICE [ABOUT THIS TYPE OF STUFFER] IS YOU CAN HANDLE IT… YOU CAN CONTROL THE FEED YOURSELF SO IF YOU’RE GOING A LITTLE TOO QUICK YOU EASE UP ON IT… AFTER THAT YOU LINK THEM, SMOKE THEM, HOPEFULLY SELL THEM.” ON THE USE OF THIS SPECIFIC MACHINE, DAVID SAID: “WE HAD A SAUSAGE PROGRAM [IN 2008/09]… IT’S TOUGH TO GET IT GOING AND I WAS FAIRLY NEW AT CUTTING MEAT. THE FIRST TIME WORKING ON THAT, IT WAS JUST A NIGHTMARE BECAUSE NOTHING WAS RIGHT. I DIDN’T HAVE THE CASINGS ON HERE PROPERLY; I DIDN’T HAVE THE RIGHT CONSISTENCY WITH THE MEAT; I WAS IN THE HIGH GEAR… IT WAS A THROWAWAY BATCH BECAUSE THERE WAS JUST NOTHING RIGHT ABOUT IT. THAT’S HOW YOU LEARN… MAKING SAUSAGES IS FUN… I THINK ABOUT TODAY WHEN I’M WORKING IN THERE WITH THE PEOPLE WE HAVE AND WE REALLY DON’T SAY MUCH… ONE’S MIXING, ONE’S STUFFING, ONE’S LINKING… IT’S A PROCESS AND EVERYBODY’S WORKING… WHEN YOU THINK BACK AND SAY, ‘OH, MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER WAS DOING THE EXACT SAME THING WITH THE EXACT SAME MACHINE 60 YEARS AGO.’ THAT’S PRETTY SPECIAL.” DUANE SAID: “IT WOULD BE NICE TO KEEP IT BUT IT’S JUST NOT SANITARY ANYMORE. IT’S SOMETHING THAT MADE A LOT OF SAUSAGE AND WHEN YOU LEARN SOMETHING LIKE SAUSAGE MAKING AND YOU MASTER IT, IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL… IT LINKS ME TO MY OWN FAMILY…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20150007000
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.5
Length
57
Width
11.3
Description
CAMCORDER COMPRISED OF LENS, BETACAM DECK, AND COLOR CAMERA. BETACAM DECK AT BACK OF CAMERA IS TWO-TONE GREY WITH TWO PLUG-INS FOR “AUDIO IN, CH-1, CH-2” AND ONE PLUG-IN FOR “DC-IN, 12V”. BETACAM DECK HAS TWO BLACK SLIDE BUTTONS ON TOP LABELLED IN WHITE “EJECT” AND “REW”. BETACAM DECK HAS GREY METAL HANDLE AT TOP THAT FASTENS TO BETA CASSETTE DECK. BETACAM DECK HAS YELLOWED PLASTIC WINDOW ON SIDE TO VIEW INSIDE MECHANISMS; BELOW WINDOW IS GREEN, RED AND BLUE DECAL READING “45 NEWS, 45”. REVERSE SIDE HAS SILVER “POWER ON/OF” SWITCH ABOVE METER MEASURING BATTERY CHARGE, “SONY VU”; BETACAM DECK HAS TWO ROUND BLACK BUTTONS LABELLED “RESET” AND “LIGHT” ABOVE BLACK SWITCH LABELLED “TAPE TIMER, TIME CODE”; SIDE HAS DIGITAL DISPLAY SCREEN READING “HOUR, MIN, SEC”. SIDE HAS ROW OF SIX RED LIGHTS NEAR BOTTOM LABELLED WITH WORN WHITE PAINT WITH FIRST TWO ILLEGIBLE, “HUMID, SLACK, TAPE END, BATTERY”. SIDE HAS PANEL THAT OPENS AT BOTTOM EDGE WITH SIX DARK GREY BUTTONS LABELLED IN PAIRS “HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND” AND TWO BLACK SWITCHES LABELLED “U-BIT, TIME” AND “REC RUN, FREE RUN”. SIDE HAS SILVER PLATE FIXED READING “SONY”. BACK OF BETACAM DECK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH RED, GREEN AND BLUE LOGO “45 CFCN TELEVISION”; BACK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY BETACAM, MODEL BVV-1, VIDEOCASSETTE BETACAM DECK, DCIN, 12V, 10W, NO. 11085, SONY CORPORATION, MADE IN JAPAN, 3-676-119-01”. TOP OF BETACAM DECK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SAVE MODE ONLY”. COLOR CAMERA IN MID-SECTION IS LIGHT GREY WITH SMALL PIECE OF SILVER TAPE FIXED TO TOP. SIDE OF CAMERA HAS YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK “1”; SIDE HAS DARK GREY CONTROL PANEL AT BOTTON EDGE WITH EMBOSSED TEXT AND SILVER SWITCHES AND BUTTONS, “AUTO WHITE BAL, CAMERA, PRE HEAT/ON, VTR, SAVE/STOP, GAIN, 12/6/0, OUTPUT, BASS/CAM, WHITE BAL, PRE SET/AUTO”. SIDE HAS DARK GREY BUTTON ABOVE CONTROL PANEL LABELLED “VTR START”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING BESIDE PANEL LABELLED “PEDESTAL”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH WORN BLACK TEXT “SONY MODEL NO. BVP-1, COLOR VIDEO CAMERA, DC, 12V, 11W, NO. 10505”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “FILTER, 1 3200’K, 2 5200’K + 1/4ND, 3 5200’K, 4 6800’K”. REVERSE SIDE HAS BLACK PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY” ABOVE BLACK LABEL WITH RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LOGO “TRINICON”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING AT LOWER EDGE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “MONITOR OUT”; LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER KEY HOLE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “BATTERY”. CAMERA HAS ATTACHED BLACK ABOVE-VIEWFINDER WITH RUBBER GUARD OVER GLASS LENS. VIEWFINDER IS FIXED TO FRONT OF CAMERA; VIEWFINDER HAS WHITE TAPE ATTACHED TO TOP WITH BLUE HANDWRITTEN TEXT “PASS JULZ DAMAGE TO TUBE OR MULT.PLER”. BACK OF VIEWFINDER HAS SILVER SWITCH “TALLY, ON/OF” AND TWO BLACK METAL TURN-KNOBS “BRIGHT, CONTR”. FRONT OF VIEWFINDER HAS BLACK PLATE ATTACHED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY”. BLACK LENS AT FRONT FIXED IN LENS STAND WITH LEATHER STRAP ON SIDE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS “VTR, RET, IRIS M”; SIDE OF LENS STAND HAS BLACK SWITCHES “W/T” AND “IRIS, A/M”. LENS HAS WHITE LABEL AROUND MID-SECTION “CANON MACRO TV ZOOMJ13X9C, 9-117MM, 1.1.6, NO.80581, CANON, JAPAN”. LENS ROTATES TO ADJUST FOCUS AND DEPTH. BETACAM HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND DISCOLORATION ON PLASTIC WINDOW; COLOR CAMERA HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND ADHESIVE RESIDUE ON SIDE; HANDLE ON TOP HAS WORN AND CHIPPED PAINT; VIEWFINDER IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARREN KRONLUND REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A SONY BVV-1 BETACAM AND CAMCORDER. THE CAMCORDER WAS USED IN THE 1980S BY THE CTV LETHBRIDGE FILM CREW. ON THE FUNCTION OF THE CAMERA IN THE CTV STUDIO, KRONLUND ELABORATED, “THE TECHNOLOGY WITH CAMERAS PROGRESSED QUICKER THAN THE DECKS DID. THESE CAMERAS AND DECKS ARE USED FOR ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION [AND ARE] CALLED THE EFP CAMERAS. THE DECKS KIND [ARE] THAT TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE MAJORITY OF STATIONS USED FOR THE LONGEST TIME [IN] SONY BETA CAM FORMAT. THAT’S WHAT THE DECK IS, BUT THE CAMERAS THEMSELVES HAD AT ONE TIME THREE TUBES FOR COLOUR CAMERAS. THEN TECHNOLOGY CAME WHERE THEY COULD DO IT WITH JUST SENSORS…SO YOU DIDN’T HAVE TUBES. IT WAS MORE SENSITIVE TO LIGHT AND THAT WAS AN IMPROVEMENT. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE TO BRING A BUNCH OF LIGHTS ALONG WITH YOUR SHOOTS. AS THOSE CAMERAS CAME OUT, THEY JUST DID SUCH A BETTER JOB, THAT THESE CAMERAS WERE NO LONGER USED. ALTHOUGH THEY WORKED, THEY WOULD JUST GET STORED AND NEWER TECHNOLOGY, BETTER PICTURES AND LIGHTER [WOULD BE USED].” “[THIS CAMERA] IS A COMPOSITE. AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVED, THEY COULD SUPPLY [THE] UPPER HALF, THE CAMERA HALF, [AND] YOU COULD CONTINUE TO USE THE OLDER DECK.” TO ME [THE DECK AND CAMERA] ARE DIFFERENT [AGES]. I THINK THE DECK IS NEWER THAN THE CAMERA. OTHERWISE THEY’D BE THE SAME COLOUR. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE OLD, ORIGINAL DECK BUT YOU COULD SWAP OUT DECKS BECAUSE THEY DID MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WITH DECKS AS WELL. THERE WAS A TIME THEY USED METAL TAPES WHICH WAS FOR AUDIO. IT HELPED, YOU COULD GET BETTER AUDIO QUALITY. THEY CALLED THEM METAL, IT’S JUST METAL PARTICLES IN THE TAPE.” “I WOULD SAY THIS CAMERA PROBABLY GOT USED, I’M GOING TO GUESS ’84…IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE…I PROBABLY SERVICED THE] CAMERA AND/OR DECK…[BY 1990 IT WAS] PROBABLY REPLACED WITH THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY. NOT THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY BUT NEWEST TO US, CALGARY WOULD HAVE HAD THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY.” “BETA WAS THE STAPLE FORMAT FOR VIDEO FOR MANY YEARS. PROBABLY LEADING RIGHT UP TO INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD IT WAS THE KING. PANASONIC HAD A FORMAT [TOO]…HITACHI HAD THEIR OWN TOO, BUT THEY EVEN MADE THEIR CAMERAS COMPATIBLE WITH BETA DECKS THAT’S HOW BIG INFLUENCE [WAS]. SOME SMALLER, INDEPENDENT STATIONS MAYBE WENT WITH SOME OF THAT STUFF, BUT I’D SAY 90% OF THE INDUSTRY WAS BETA.” “IT WAS [FOR] REPORTERS. IT WAS FOR NEWS AND VIDEO PRODUCTION.” KRONLUND ELABORATED ON THE CAMERA’S HISTORY IN PRODUCTION, NOTING, “IT’S BEEN IN THE BASEMENT FOR PROBABLY [TEN YEARS]…I FOUND IT IN AN OLD SHIPPING CONTAINER. THERE’S BEEN NUMEROUS UPGRADES TO CAMERAS SINCE THEN, SO NOTHING WAS DONE WITH IT. THE LAST TIME IT WAS USED I’M GOING TO GUESS [WAS] ROUGHLY TEN YEARS AGO, MAYBE MORE.” “I DOUBT YOU WOULD FIND ANYONE USING IT, BUT I WOULDN’T BE SURPRISED IF SOMEBODY HAD IT IN THEIR BASEMENT [FOR] THE SAME REASON OURS WAS. JUST OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND AND YOU’RE JUST GOING ABOUT YOUR DAY–TO-DAY BUSINESS, UNTIL YOU START CLEANING OUT THINGS AND YOU GO, “OH YEAH, THE OLD BBB1.”” “[WE ACQUIRED EQUIPMENT] USUALLY USED. CALGARY WOULD GET THE NEW STUFF AND THEN THE WORKING STUFF THAT THEY WERE REPLACING WOULD COME DOWN TO US, FOR THE MOST PART. THE CAMERAS WE HAVE NOW WERE BOUGHT BRAND NEW, STATE-OF THE-ART, SO THAT WAS NICE. IT IS NICE FOR THAT, BUT THIS WAS PROBABLY PRE-DATED EVEN ME AND I HAVE BEEN HERE TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS. IT WAS PROBABLY THE CAMERA THEY WERE USING, IF NOT AT THE TIME, BUT LIKELY BEFORE I STARTED.” “THIS [CAMERA] FUNCTIONS TODAY. I’M SURE YOU COULD MAKE PICTURES WITH IT, BUT THE USE OF IT WOULD PROBABLY BE, I’M GOING TO GUESS, MAYBE FIVE OR SIX YEARS. THEN [THE] BUDGETS WOULD [GROW], THEY GOT THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN SHOOT UNDER LESS LIGHT. IT’S A LIGHTER CAMERA AND [THEY] HAVE THESE BENEFITS, SO THEY WOULD BUDGET IN TO UPDATE THE CAMERAS AND DECKS. THROUGH THAT CYCLE, THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD PROBABLY GET A COUPLE OF NEW CAMERAS, THE OLDER STUFF WE’D PUT IN THE BASEMENT.” “I’M [NOW] CLEANING OUT OLD EQUIPMENT, BECAUSE IT BUILDS UP AND WE RUN OUT OF ROOM. IT’S SOMETHING HARD TO GET RID OF BECAUSE THEY’RE ALWAYS WORKING AND USUALLY WORKING AND FUNCTIONING FINE, BUT TECHNOLOGY PROGRESSES AND THEY BECOME BIGGER AND BETTER--OR THERE BECOMES BIGGER AND BETTER WAYS OF DOING THE SAME JOB. IT JUST GETS OUTDATED AND HITS THE SHELF. [I] HATE TO SEE IT JUST GET RECYCLED.” “I’M NOT REALLY THAT TYPE OF [NOSTALGIC] PERSON. THE CAMERAS TODAY ARE ALL DIGITAL, THEY GO RIGHT TO A SD CARD IN DIGITAL FORMAT. THERE’S NO MECHANICAL PARTS AND THAT’S PART OF THE REASON I WAS EMPLOYED BECAUSE SO MUCH OF WHAT I DID WAS BECAUSE PARTS WEAR OUT AND NEED TO BE FIXED AND REPLACED, WHERE THE NEW CAMERAS…IT’S NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO IF IT’S IN DIGITAL FORMAT AND [HAS] NO MECHANICAL MOVING PARTS. I DON’T MISS WORKING ON THEM, THAT COULD BE FRUSTRATING BECAUSE A LOT OF TINY LITTLE GEARS AND TIMING…YOU CAN SPEND HOURS AND NOT GET ANYWHERE, AND THEN FINALLY SHIP IT OUT TO THE MANUFACTURER BECAUSE YOU JUST COULDN’T GET ANYWHERE. YOU SPENT A WEEK WORKING ON IT AND NOW YOU’VE GOT TO, IN THE END, PAY SOMEONE TO DO IT. THOSE ARE FRUSTRATIONS, BUT IT IS SATISFYING WHEN YOU DO FIX A PROBLEM AND ARE ABLE TO FIX IT. BUT THOSE DAYS ARE BEHIND US AND I CAN’T SAY I MISS THEM. IT’S JUST DIFFERENT WAYS OF MAINTAINING CAMERAS NOW.” “IT’S HARD TO THROW OUT BECAUSE THE VALUE OF IT IS LIKE BUYING A CAR…AT THAT TIME. THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS PUTTING A CAR ON YOUR SHOULDER, MAYBE NOT QUITE A CAR, BUT I’M GOING TO GUESS THIS CAMERA WAS PROBABLY FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS BACK THEN. THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180005000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail