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Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P19990061026
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
STEEL, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
27.5
Length
27.2
Width
11.6
Description
BLACK PAINTED, STEEL. HAS A FLAT, RECTANGULAR BASE. A METAL LABEL ON BASE, TOWARDS THE FRONT, READS "MADE IN U.S.A.", AND HAS A RED OUTLINE. A BLACK AND SILVER, METAL LABEL ON BASE, TOWARDS BACK, READS "SINCE 1887 CUMMINS MODEL 15 SERIAL 7539 CUMMINS PERFORATOR COMPANY CHICAGO". BACK OF PERFORATOR EXTENDS UP FROM BASE AND BENDS IN AN ARCH TOWARDS THE FRONT. TOWARDS THE FRONT, THIS ARCH EXTENDS DOWNWARD INTO A RECTANGULAR SHAPE. ON TOP IS A LARGE SLIGHTLY CURVED HANDLE - HANDLE CAN BE PUSHED DOWN. ON FRONT END OF PERFORATOR IS A STEEL DRAWER WITH A CIRCULAR HANDLE.
Subjects
PRINTING T&E
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
MUSEUM OBTAINED ITEMS FROM LETHBRIDGE EATON'S STORE IN 1999. DUE TO COMPANY BANKRUPTCY, EATON'S STORES ACROSS CANADA WERE CLOSED, INCLUDING THE LETHBRIDGE LOCATION IN PARK PLACE MALL. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING THOSE ASSOCIATED WITH THE T. EATON COMPANY STORES IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE'S EATON'S STORE WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM GALT ARCHIVES AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM THE FALL OF 1988. THE T. EATON COMPANY WAS FOUNDED IN TORONTO IN 1869 BY TIMOTHY EATON. THE FIRST LETHBRIDGE EATON'S 'TECO' STORE WAS OPENED IN 1927 IN THE BASEMENT OF THE DOMINION BLOCK ON THE CORNER OF 4 AVENUE AND SIXTH STREET SOUTH. AFTER A FIRE, THE BUILDING WAS RENOVATED AND COMPLETELY TAKEN OVER BY THE EATON'S STORE, WHICH OPERATED IN THAT LOCATION UNDER PERIODIC RENOVATIONS FROM 1929 UNTIL THE OPENING OF THE PARK PLACE MALL IN 1988, IN WHICH EATON'S WAS AN ANCHOR RETAILER. IN 1989 A PORTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ART COLLECTION WAS TEMPORARILY PUT ON DISPLAY IN THE VACANT EATON'S BUILDING, AND PROPOSALS WERE MADE TO MAKE THE INSTALLATION PERMANENT, BUT EVENTUALLY THE PROPERTY WAS SOLD AND DEMOLISHED TO MAKE WAY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A BANK OF MONTREAL BRANCH. IN 1999 THE EATON'S STORE IN PARK PLACE MALL CLOSED JUST PRIOR TO THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE BANKRUPTCY OF THE LARGER T. EATON COMPANY LIMITED. SEE PERMANENT FILE P19930072001 FOR HARDCOPIES OF SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P19990061026
Acquisition Date
1999-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
POLICE STATION PAY TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P19960112096
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
POLICE STATION PAY TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
60.6
Length
59.5
Width
31.5
Description
BLUE PLASTIC PAY TELEPHONE MOUNTED TO WHITE-PAINTED WOOD STAND. PHONE IS ROTARY DIAL, WITH COIN SLOT AT TOP BESIDE COIN REFUND BUTTON. CHANGE RETURN SLOT AT BOTTOM LEFT. DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING CALLS ON PANELS AT TOP AND BOTTOM, IN RED AND BLACK. METAL-COVERED CORD, WITH BLUE PLASTIC RECEIVER. INSIDE OF RECEIVER HANDLE IS EMBOSSED "NORTHERN ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED G-TYPE MADE IN CANADA". WOOD MOUNT CONSISTS OF TWO BOARDS MOUNTED IN INVERTED "T"; STEEL REINFORCEMENT OPPOSITE TELEPHONE. PAINT CHIPPED AND SCRATCHED.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THE MUSEUM WAS ORIGINALLY TOLD THAT THE TELEPHONE WAS USED TO TEACH CHILDREN HOW TO USE TELEPHONE FOR EMERGENCY PURPOSES, BUT IT WAS ALSO STATED, AND MORE LIKELY THE CASE, THAT THE PAYPHONE IS THE EXAMPLE THAT WAS INSTALLED AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE POLICE STATION. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112096
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
REMOTE DISPATCH RADIO
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P19960112070
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
REMOTE DISPATCH RADIO
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1975
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.7
Length
23
Width
22.5
Description
BLACK PLASTIC TABLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER CONNECTED BY COILED CORD. SPEAKER PLATE COVERS USUAL DIAL SECTION; SILVER "MOTOROLA" PLATE ACROSS CENTRE. KNOB AT UPPER LEFT WITH "DISABLE/NORM" STAMPED BESIDE. KNOB AT BOTH SIDES OF BOTTOM TO CONTROL "P.L." AND "VOL.". RED LIGHT AT TOP RIGHT CORNER OF FRONT PLATE. "STROMBERG-CARLSON" EMBOSSED AT BACK OF TELEPHONE. BOTTOM PLATE HAS MAKER/MODEL PLATE, "209778 SPECIAL" STAMP, AND WARNING LABEL. BLACK RUBBER-COATED POWER CORD EXTENDS FROM BACK. COILED CORD REPAIRED WITH ELECTRICAL TAPE.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
PHONE USED IN CONJUCTION WITH REMOTE DISPATCH RADIO, P19960112068 AND MICROPHONE, P19960112069. FOR MORE INFO ON THE RADIO, PLEASE SEE P19960112068 AND THE PERMANENT FILE. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE DISPATCH EQUIPMENT’S OPERATION, SEE ASSOCIATED MOTOROLA REPEATER EQUIPMENT P19960112070. THE PHONE WAS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE 5TH AVENUE STATION IN THE DETECTIVES’ OFFICE. IT PROVIDED DIRECT CONTACT WITH THE MAIN DISPATCH RADIO AND COORDINATORS OF THE PATROL DIVISION IN THE CASE THAT INFORMATION HAD TO BE IMMEDIATELY AND CONVENIENTLY RELAYED TO POLICEMEN OUT ON PATROL. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112070
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH KEY
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, CHROME, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19960112026
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH KEY
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Materials
STEEL, CHROME, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
2.51
Length
30.8
Width
4.0
Description
2 IDENTICAL KEYS, CONSISTING OF THREE PIECES EACH. TEAL BLUE PLASTIC HANDLE WITH STEEL PIN/SHAFT. PIN IS THREADED THROUGH LENGTH OF HANDLE, WITH CHROME KNOB AT END FOR TIGHTENING IT IN PLACE. HANDLE IS TAPERED TOWARD PIN, WITH SLIGHT FLARE AT NECK.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
PART OF KEY/PUNCH FINGERPRINT SYSTEM; USED WITH ITEMS P19960112025,27-GA. FINGERPRINT CHARACTERISTICS WERE IDENTIFIED ON CARD BY PUNCHING TAB IN CODED BOXES AROUND CARD EDGE. KEY WAS SLOTTED THROUGH STACK OF CARDS, WHICH WAS SHAKEN OUT TO IDENTIFY MATCHING CHARACTERISTICS AMONG CARDS, WHICH COULD THEN BE FURTHER NARROWED BY REPEATING PROCESS. USED BY LETHBRIDGE POLICE BEGINNING IN 1984. HOLES PUNCHED ON THE EDGE OF THE CARDS IDENTIFIED THE MAIN FEATURES OF EACH PRINT. BY INSERTING THE RODS THROUGH STACKS OF CARDS AND SHAKING THE PILE, INVESTIGATORS ELIMINATED PRINTS UNTIL A MATCHING CLASSIFICATION WAS FOUND. RESULTS WERE THEN CONFIRMED BY A FINGERPRINT TECHNICIAN. NO TWO FINGERPRINTS HAVE EVER BEEN FOUND TO BE IDENTICAL IN EVERY DETAIL. FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE IS THEREFORE "THE MOST COMMON, MOST SOUGHT AFTER, POSITIVE AND VALUABLE OF ALL TYPES OF EVIDENCE ENCOUNTERED IN CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS" ACCORDING TO IDENT OFFICER GLEN MICHELSON. THE CARD SYSTEM WAS REPLACED BY THE AUTOMATIC FINGER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM (AFIS), WHICH OFFERS LOCAL INVESTIGATORS ACCESS TO A COMPUTERIZED DATABASE IN CALGARY. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MICHELSON'S IDENT CAREER, SEE P19960112027. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112026
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH PUNCH
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, NICKEL
Catalogue Number
P19960112025
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH PUNCH
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Materials
STEEL, NICKEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.21
Length
14
Width
8.2
Description
STEEL AND CHROME HAND-HELD SINGLE HOLE PUNCH. SPRING-OPERATED HANDLE; ALSO BLUE PLASTIC SPRING-OPERATED TAB AT HEAD OF PUNCH TO CATCH PAPER BITS. INSIDE ARM OF HANDLE HAS IN RELIEF "MCBEE MADE IN USA". CUTS TAB-SHAPED, NOT ROUND, HOLES.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
PART OF KEY/PUNCH FINGERPRINT SYSTEM; USED WITH ITEMS P19960112026, 27-GA. FINGERPRINT CHARACTERISTICS WERE IDENTIFIED ON CARD BY PUNCHING TAB IN CODED BOXES AROUND CARD EDGE. KEY WAS SLOTTED THROUGH STACK OF CARDS, WHICH WAS SHAKEN OUT TO IDENTIFY MATCHING CHARACTERISTICS AMONG CARDS, WHICH COULD THEN BE FURTHER NARROWED BY REPEATING PROCESS. USED BY LETHBRIDGE POLICE BEGINNING IN 1984. HOLES PUNCHED ON THE EDGE OF THE CARDS IDENTIFIED THE MAIN FEATURES OF EACH PRINT. BY INSERTING THE RODS THROUGH STACKS OF CARDS AND SHAKING THE PILE, INVESTIGATORS ELIMINATED PRINTS UNTIL A MATCHING CLASSIFICATION WAS FOUND. RESULTS WERE THEN CONFIRMED BY A FINGERPRINT TECHNICIAN. NO TWO FINGERPRINTS HAVE EVER BEEN FOUND TO BE IDENTICAL IN EVERY DETAIL. FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE IS THEREFORE "THE MOST COMMON, MOST SOUGHT AFTER, POSITIVE AND VALUABLE OF ALL TYPES OF EVIDENCE ENCOUNTERED IN CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS" ACCORDING TO FORMER IDENT OFFICER GLEN MICHELSON. THE CARD SYSTEM WAS REPLACED BY THE AUTOMATIC FINGER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM (AFIS), WHICH OFFERS LOCAL INVESTIGATORS ACCESS TO A COMPUTERIZED DATABASE IN CALGARY. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MICHELSON'S IDENT CAREER, SEE P19960112027. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112025
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH CARDS
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER
Catalogue Number
P19960112027
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FINGERPRINT KEYSEARCH CARDS
Date Range From
1984
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PAPER
No. Pieces
4
Length
20.6
Width
13
Description
FOUR CREAM-COLORED PAPER CARDS WITH BLUE TRIM, AND "LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE FORCE KEYSEARCH LATENT FINGERPRINT FORM 1" PRINTED AT TOP. HOLES PERFORATED AROUND EDGES, ENCODED WITH VARIOUS FINGERPRINT CHARACTERISTICS. DETAILS: .1 FINGERPRINTS OF "TOPE BYRON DAVID"; DATED "85/05/29". REVERSE BLANK. .2 FINGERPRINTS OF "LABRECQUE, KENNETH WADE", PRINTED ON WHITE SHEETS ADHERE TO CARD. DATED "85-3-8". .3 PHOTO OF FINGERPRINTS FOUND ON OBJECT; TAPED TO CARD. PRINT IS CIRCLED IN PHOTO, AND SCALED BY RULED STICKER JUST ABOVE. NAME IDENTIFIED AS "CSIZMADIA"; DATED "85/4/9". REVERSE HAS HANDWRITTEN "KEYSEARCHED 85/4/10 85/4/19". .4 PHOTO OF FINGERPRINTS FOUND ON OJBECT; TAPED TO CARD. RULED STICKER ABOVE PRINT WITH "MOTOWN TOYOTA". "1984 - OTTAWA SUBMISSION - NEG." AT BOTTOM. DATED "84-6-24". REVERSE HAS SECOND PHOTO OF PRINTS FOUND ON OBJECT.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
PART OF KEY/PUNCH FINGERPRINT SYSTEM; USED WITH ITEMS P19960112025,26-GA TO COMPARE A PARTIAL FINGERPRINT FOUND AT A CRIME SCENE WITH AN ORIGINAL SET OF PRINTS PROVIDED BY THE ACCUSED. FINGERPRINT CHARACTERISTICS WERE IDENTIFIED ON CARD BY PUNCHING TAB IN CODED BOXES AROUND CARD EDGE. KEY WAS SLOTTED THROUGH STACK OF CARDS, WHICH WAS SHAKEN OUT TO IDENTIFY MATCHING CHARACTERISTICS AMONG CARDS, WHICH COULD THEN BE FURTHER NARROWED BY REPEATING PROCESS. USED BY LETHBRIDGE POLICE BEGINNING IN 1984. HOLES PUNCHED ON THE EDGE OF THE CARDS IDENTIFIED THE MAIN FEATURES OF EACH PRINT. BY INSERTING THE RODS THROUGH STACKS OF CARDS AND SHAKING THE PILE, INVESTIGATORS ELIMINATED PRINTS UNTIL A MATCHING CLASSIFICATION WAS FOUND. RESULTS WERE THEN CONFIRMED BY A FINGERPRINT TECHNICIAN. NO TWO FINGERPRINTS HAVE EVER BEEN FOUND TO BE IDENTICAL IN EVERY DETAIL. FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE IS THEREFORE "THE MOST COMMON, MOST SOUGHT AFTER, POSITIVE AND VALUABLE OF ALL TYPES OF EVIDENCE ENCOUNTERED IN CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS" ACCORDING TO IDENT OFFICER GLEN MICHELSON. THE CARD SYSTEM WAS REPLACED BY THE AUTOMATIC FINGER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM (AFIS), WHICH OFFERS LOCAL INVESTIGATORS ACCESS TO A COMPUTERIZED DATABASE IN CALGARY. IT IS CLAIMED THAT THE CARDS WERE "SIGNED BY MEMBERS SUCH AS CST. TERRY TOWNSEND AND GORD SCHEURMAN". FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MICHELSON'S IDENT CAREER, SEE ARTIFACT'S PERMANENT FILE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112027
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
Catalogue Number
P19950073019
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
PLASTIC, CHROME
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.8
Length
17
Width
11.5
Description
BLACK PLASTIC TEXTURED CASING WITH CHROME TRIM. TOP OF RADIO HAS BLACK PERFORATED PANEL FOR SPEAKER, WITH TWO DIALS ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE LABELLED "VOLUME" AND "SELECTOR", AND ONE ON THE RIGHT FOR TUNING. SELECTOR BAND ACROSS TOP, WITH CLEAR PLASTIC PANEL. "3 BAND 10 TRANSISTOR LLOYD'S" PRINTED BELOW SPEAKER. ANTENNA EXTENDS FROM TOP LEFT SIDE, WITH SHORT HANDLE WHICH CAN ALSO BE EXTENDED FROM MAIN CASE. BACK HAS SMALL PLATE READING "MODEL NO. TR-103 MB IS DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY FOR LLOYD'S". BATTERY COMPARTMENT AT BOTTOM OF BACK, WITH BATTERY HOLDER CONNECTED ONLY BY WIRING. PAPER LABEL WITHIN, READING "SERIAL NUMBER 12647" WITH "INSPECTED AS ANO" STAMPED IN ORANGE. BACK OF CASE EMBOSSED WITH "LLOYD'S", "EXT. ANT.", "EAR.", "AC ADP.", AND "JAPAN". SMALL CRACK IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF CASE.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073019
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO C/W CASE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P19950073043
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSISTOR RADIO C/W CASE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, PAPER
No. Pieces
3
Height
3.3
Length
10.9
Width
9.9
Description
1. 8 TRANSISTOR RADIO: WHITE PLASTIC HOUSING WITH CHROME FACE AND PERFORATED PLATE ON TOP. PLASTIC CONTROLS FOR TUNING AND VOLUME ON LEFT, WITH RED BUTTON BELOW. "ROXY" IN RED CIRCLE IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. TUNING DIAL ALONG TOP, MARKED WITH "53 6 7 8 10 16". OUTLET FOR PLUG AT BOTTOM, WITH EARPHONE OUTLET ALONG RIGHT SIDE. BACK HAS HORIZONTAL SLITS FOR SPEAKER, AND IS EMBOSSED AT BOTTOM WITH "8 TRANSISTOR JAPAN". 2. CASE: BLACK LEATHER, WITH GREEN FELT LINING OVER CARDBOARD INTERIOR. ZIPPERED AROUND THREE SIDES, WITH STRAP ATTACHED BELOW WITH SNAP FASTENERS. BOTTOM OF CASE IS PERFORATED, WITH VARIOUS HOLES FOR ACCESS TO TRANSISTOR CONTROLS. ZIPPER RIPPED FROM CASE ALONG ONE SIDE. STAMPED WITH "JAPAN" AND "EAR". 3. INSTRUCTION MANUAL: WHITE PAPER LEAFLET WITH BLUE PRINT. FRONT READS "CARSISTOR 8-TRANSISTOR RADIO UR-701", WITH "MRS. HARRY ING 538-27 ST.S. CITY" HANDWRITTEN. CONTAINS INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE, AND DIAGRAMS. SLIGHTLY WORN AND SOILED IN PLACES.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
*UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073043
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.5
Length
57
Width
11.3
Description
CAMCORDER COMPRISED OF LENS, BETACAM DECK, AND COLOR CAMERA. BETACAM DECK AT BACK OF CAMERA IS TWO-TONE GREY WITH TWO PLUG-INS FOR “AUDIO IN, CH-1, CH-2” AND ONE PLUG-IN FOR “DC-IN, 12V”. BETACAM DECK HAS TWO BLACK SLIDE BUTTONS ON TOP LABELLED IN WHITE “EJECT” AND “REW”. BETACAM DECK HAS GREY METAL HANDLE AT TOP THAT FASTENS TO BETA CASSETTE DECK. BETACAM DECK HAS YELLOWED PLASTIC WINDOW ON SIDE TO VIEW INSIDE MECHANISMS; BELOW WINDOW IS GREEN, RED AND BLUE DECAL READING “45 NEWS, 45”. REVERSE SIDE HAS SILVER “POWER ON/OF” SWITCH ABOVE METER MEASURING BATTERY CHARGE, “SONY VU”; BETACAM DECK HAS TWO ROUND BLACK BUTTONS LABELLED “RESET” AND “LIGHT” ABOVE BLACK SWITCH LABELLED “TAPE TIMER, TIME CODE”; SIDE HAS DIGITAL DISPLAY SCREEN READING “HOUR, MIN, SEC”. SIDE HAS ROW OF SIX RED LIGHTS NEAR BOTTOM LABELLED WITH WORN WHITE PAINT WITH FIRST TWO ILLEGIBLE, “HUMID, SLACK, TAPE END, BATTERY”. SIDE HAS PANEL THAT OPENS AT BOTTOM EDGE WITH SIX DARK GREY BUTTONS LABELLED IN PAIRS “HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND” AND TWO BLACK SWITCHES LABELLED “U-BIT, TIME” AND “REC RUN, FREE RUN”. SIDE HAS SILVER PLATE FIXED READING “SONY”. BACK OF BETACAM DECK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH RED, GREEN AND BLUE LOGO “45 CFCN TELEVISION”; BACK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY BETACAM, MODEL BVV-1, VIDEOCASSETTE BETACAM DECK, DCIN, 12V, 10W, NO. 11085, SONY CORPORATION, MADE IN JAPAN, 3-676-119-01”. TOP OF BETACAM DECK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SAVE MODE ONLY”. COLOR CAMERA IN MID-SECTION IS LIGHT GREY WITH SMALL PIECE OF SILVER TAPE FIXED TO TOP. SIDE OF CAMERA HAS YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK “1”; SIDE HAS DARK GREY CONTROL PANEL AT BOTTON EDGE WITH EMBOSSED TEXT AND SILVER SWITCHES AND BUTTONS, “AUTO WHITE BAL, CAMERA, PRE HEAT/ON, VTR, SAVE/STOP, GAIN, 12/6/0, OUTPUT, BASS/CAM, WHITE BAL, PRE SET/AUTO”. SIDE HAS DARK GREY BUTTON ABOVE CONTROL PANEL LABELLED “VTR START”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING BESIDE PANEL LABELLED “PEDESTAL”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH WORN BLACK TEXT “SONY MODEL NO. BVP-1, COLOR VIDEO CAMERA, DC, 12V, 11W, NO. 10505”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “FILTER, 1 3200’K, 2 5200’K + 1/4ND, 3 5200’K, 4 6800’K”. REVERSE SIDE HAS BLACK PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY” ABOVE BLACK LABEL WITH RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LOGO “TRINICON”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING AT LOWER EDGE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “MONITOR OUT”; LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER KEY HOLE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “BATTERY”. CAMERA HAS ATTACHED BLACK ABOVE-VIEWFINDER WITH RUBBER GUARD OVER GLASS LENS. VIEWFINDER IS FIXED TO FRONT OF CAMERA; VIEWFINDER HAS WHITE TAPE ATTACHED TO TOP WITH BLUE HANDWRITTEN TEXT “PASS JULZ DAMAGE TO TUBE OR MULT.PLER”. BACK OF VIEWFINDER HAS SILVER SWITCH “TALLY, ON/OF” AND TWO BLACK METAL TURN-KNOBS “BRIGHT, CONTR”. FRONT OF VIEWFINDER HAS BLACK PLATE ATTACHED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY”. BLACK LENS AT FRONT FIXED IN LENS STAND WITH LEATHER STRAP ON SIDE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS “VTR, RET, IRIS M”; SIDE OF LENS STAND HAS BLACK SWITCHES “W/T” AND “IRIS, A/M”. LENS HAS WHITE LABEL AROUND MID-SECTION “CANON MACRO TV ZOOMJ13X9C, 9-117MM, 1.1.6, NO.80581, CANON, JAPAN”. LENS ROTATES TO ADJUST FOCUS AND DEPTH. BETACAM HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND DISCOLORATION ON PLASTIC WINDOW; COLOR CAMERA HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND ADHESIVE RESIDUE ON SIDE; HANDLE ON TOP HAS WORN AND CHIPPED PAINT; VIEWFINDER IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARREN KRONLUND REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A SONY BVV-1 BETACAM AND CAMCORDER. THE CAMCORDER WAS USED IN THE 1980S BY THE CTV LETHBRIDGE FILM CREW. ON THE FUNCTION OF THE CAMERA IN THE CTV STUDIO, KRONLUND ELABORATED, “THE TECHNOLOGY WITH CAMERAS PROGRESSED QUICKER THAN THE DECKS DID. THESE CAMERAS AND DECKS ARE USED FOR ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION [AND ARE] CALLED THE EFP CAMERAS. THE DECKS KIND [ARE] THAT TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE MAJORITY OF STATIONS USED FOR THE LONGEST TIME [IN] SONY BETA CAM FORMAT. THAT’S WHAT THE DECK IS, BUT THE CAMERAS THEMSELVES HAD AT ONE TIME THREE TUBES FOR COLOUR CAMERAS. THEN TECHNOLOGY CAME WHERE THEY COULD DO IT WITH JUST SENSORS…SO YOU DIDN’T HAVE TUBES. IT WAS MORE SENSITIVE TO LIGHT AND THAT WAS AN IMPROVEMENT. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE TO BRING A BUNCH OF LIGHTS ALONG WITH YOUR SHOOTS. AS THOSE CAMERAS CAME OUT, THEY JUST DID SUCH A BETTER JOB, THAT THESE CAMERAS WERE NO LONGER USED. ALTHOUGH THEY WORKED, THEY WOULD JUST GET STORED AND NEWER TECHNOLOGY, BETTER PICTURES AND LIGHTER [WOULD BE USED].” “[THIS CAMERA] IS A COMPOSITE. AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVED, THEY COULD SUPPLY [THE] UPPER HALF, THE CAMERA HALF, [AND] YOU COULD CONTINUE TO USE THE OLDER DECK.” TO ME [THE DECK AND CAMERA] ARE DIFFERENT [AGES]. I THINK THE DECK IS NEWER THAN THE CAMERA. OTHERWISE THEY’D BE THE SAME COLOUR. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE OLD, ORIGINAL DECK BUT YOU COULD SWAP OUT DECKS BECAUSE THEY DID MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WITH DECKS AS WELL. THERE WAS A TIME THEY USED METAL TAPES WHICH WAS FOR AUDIO. IT HELPED, YOU COULD GET BETTER AUDIO QUALITY. THEY CALLED THEM METAL, IT’S JUST METAL PARTICLES IN THE TAPE.” “I WOULD SAY THIS CAMERA PROBABLY GOT USED, I’M GOING TO GUESS ’84…IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE…I PROBABLY SERVICED THE] CAMERA AND/OR DECK…[BY 1990 IT WAS] PROBABLY REPLACED WITH THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY. NOT THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY BUT NEWEST TO US, CALGARY WOULD HAVE HAD THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY.” “BETA WAS THE STAPLE FORMAT FOR VIDEO FOR MANY YEARS. PROBABLY LEADING RIGHT UP TO INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD IT WAS THE KING. PANASONIC HAD A FORMAT [TOO]…HITACHI HAD THEIR OWN TOO, BUT THEY EVEN MADE THEIR CAMERAS COMPATIBLE WITH BETA DECKS THAT’S HOW BIG INFLUENCE [WAS]. SOME SMALLER, INDEPENDENT STATIONS MAYBE WENT WITH SOME OF THAT STUFF, BUT I’D SAY 90% OF THE INDUSTRY WAS BETA.” “IT WAS [FOR] REPORTERS. IT WAS FOR NEWS AND VIDEO PRODUCTION.” KRONLUND ELABORATED ON THE CAMERA’S HISTORY IN PRODUCTION, NOTING, “IT’S BEEN IN THE BASEMENT FOR PROBABLY [TEN YEARS]…I FOUND IT IN AN OLD SHIPPING CONTAINER. THERE’S BEEN NUMEROUS UPGRADES TO CAMERAS SINCE THEN, SO NOTHING WAS DONE WITH IT. THE LAST TIME IT WAS USED I’M GOING TO GUESS [WAS] ROUGHLY TEN YEARS AGO, MAYBE MORE.” “I DOUBT YOU WOULD FIND ANYONE USING IT, BUT I WOULDN’T BE SURPRISED IF SOMEBODY HAD IT IN THEIR BASEMENT [FOR] THE SAME REASON OURS WAS. JUST OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND AND YOU’RE JUST GOING ABOUT YOUR DAY–TO-DAY BUSINESS, UNTIL YOU START CLEANING OUT THINGS AND YOU GO, “OH YEAH, THE OLD BBB1.”” “[WE ACQUIRED EQUIPMENT] USUALLY USED. CALGARY WOULD GET THE NEW STUFF AND THEN THE WORKING STUFF THAT THEY WERE REPLACING WOULD COME DOWN TO US, FOR THE MOST PART. THE CAMERAS WE HAVE NOW WERE BOUGHT BRAND NEW, STATE-OF THE-ART, SO THAT WAS NICE. IT IS NICE FOR THAT, BUT THIS WAS PROBABLY PRE-DATED EVEN ME AND I HAVE BEEN HERE TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS. IT WAS PROBABLY THE CAMERA THEY WERE USING, IF NOT AT THE TIME, BUT LIKELY BEFORE I STARTED.” “THIS [CAMERA] FUNCTIONS TODAY. I’M SURE YOU COULD MAKE PICTURES WITH IT, BUT THE USE OF IT WOULD PROBABLY BE, I’M GOING TO GUESS, MAYBE FIVE OR SIX YEARS. THEN [THE] BUDGETS WOULD [GROW], THEY GOT THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN SHOOT UNDER LESS LIGHT. IT’S A LIGHTER CAMERA AND [THEY] HAVE THESE BENEFITS, SO THEY WOULD BUDGET IN TO UPDATE THE CAMERAS AND DECKS. THROUGH THAT CYCLE, THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD PROBABLY GET A COUPLE OF NEW CAMERAS, THE OLDER STUFF WE’D PUT IN THE BASEMENT.” “I’M [NOW] CLEANING OUT OLD EQUIPMENT, BECAUSE IT BUILDS UP AND WE RUN OUT OF ROOM. IT’S SOMETHING HARD TO GET RID OF BECAUSE THEY’RE ALWAYS WORKING AND USUALLY WORKING AND FUNCTIONING FINE, BUT TECHNOLOGY PROGRESSES AND THEY BECOME BIGGER AND BETTER--OR THERE BECOMES BIGGER AND BETTER WAYS OF DOING THE SAME JOB. IT JUST GETS OUTDATED AND HITS THE SHELF. [I] HATE TO SEE IT JUST GET RECYCLED.” “I’M NOT REALLY THAT TYPE OF [NOSTALGIC] PERSON. THE CAMERAS TODAY ARE ALL DIGITAL, THEY GO RIGHT TO A SD CARD IN DIGITAL FORMAT. THERE’S NO MECHANICAL PARTS AND THAT’S PART OF THE REASON I WAS EMPLOYED BECAUSE SO MUCH OF WHAT I DID WAS BECAUSE PARTS WEAR OUT AND NEED TO BE FIXED AND REPLACED, WHERE THE NEW CAMERAS…IT’S NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO IF IT’S IN DIGITAL FORMAT AND [HAS] NO MECHANICAL MOVING PARTS. I DON’T MISS WORKING ON THEM, THAT COULD BE FRUSTRATING BECAUSE A LOT OF TINY LITTLE GEARS AND TIMING…YOU CAN SPEND HOURS AND NOT GET ANYWHERE, AND THEN FINALLY SHIP IT OUT TO THE MANUFACTURER BECAUSE YOU JUST COULDN’T GET ANYWHERE. YOU SPENT A WEEK WORKING ON IT AND NOW YOU’VE GOT TO, IN THE END, PAY SOMEONE TO DO IT. THOSE ARE FRUSTRATIONS, BUT IT IS SATISFYING WHEN YOU DO FIX A PROBLEM AND ARE ABLE TO FIX IT. BUT THOSE DAYS ARE BEHIND US AND I CAN’T SAY I MISS THEM. IT’S JUST DIFFERENT WAYS OF MAINTAINING CAMERAS NOW.” “IT’S HARD TO THROW OUT BECAUSE THE VALUE OF IT IS LIKE BUYING A CAR…AT THAT TIME. THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS PUTTING A CAR ON YOUR SHOULDER, MAYBE NOT QUITE A CAR, BUT I’M GOING TO GUESS THIS CAMERA WAS PROBABLY FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS BACK THEN. THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180005000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RCA-BK5A
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, IRON, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20190022004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RCA-BK5A
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1955
Materials
STEEL, IRON, FOAM
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.1
Length
17.8
Width
13.8
Description
GREY DESK MICROPHONE MOUNTED ON STAND; MICROPHONE IS CYLINDRICAL WITH TWO ADJUSTABLE DIALS ON SIDES FOR ATTACHING TO STAND. MICROPHONE HAS GREY METAL WINDSCREEN WITH METAL GUARDS; MICROPHONE HAS BLACK CORD EXTENDING FROM BACK WITH SILVER CONNECTOR AND ENGRAVED TEXT ON CONNECTOR, “SWITCHCRAFT, U.S. PAT. 3219961, CAN. PAT. 761114, A3M”. MICROPHONE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT ON BACK, “M V1 V2” WITH LINES POINTING TO SCREW IN CENTER; UNDERSIDE OF MICROPHONE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT, “TYPE BK-5A, M1-11010” AND ENGRAVED TEXT “1365”. MICROPHONE IS ATTACHED BY TWO ADJUSTABLE DIALS TO TWO METAL PRONGS ON THE STAND; STAND HAS BRASS ADJUSTABLE DIALS; STAND IS FIXED TO IRON BASE BY BRASS BOLT. BASE IS “V” SHAPED WITH STAND ATTACHED AT MERGE OF PRONGS; BASE HAS GREY FOAM LINING UNDERSIDE. CORD IS FRAYED AT CONNECTION TO MICROPHONE; DIALS ON MICROPHONE AND STAND ARE TARNISHED; BASE OF STAND IS SCUFFED AND CHIPPED; FOAM IS DISINTEGRATING; MICROPHONE CASING IS SCRATCHED AND CHIPPED, WITH WHITE AND BLUE-GREY RESIDUE ON TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE DESK MICROPHONE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “I ORIGINALLY THOUGHT THAT THIS MIC, (AND IT’S A WONDERFUL MICROPHONE FOR ITS TIME)…WAS USED WHEN RADIO WAS DOING THE NEWS AND THE NEWSROOM, BUT RON JOEVENNAZO, ENGINEER, TOLD ME THAT ‘NO, THIS WAS USED BY THE LIVE ANNOUNCER,’ AND HE COULD NOT RECALL ANY OF THE NAMES OF ANNOUNCERS AT THAT TIME…THIS GOES BACK A LONG WAY, BACK TO ’55…IT WAS NO LONGER IN USE WHEN I WAS THERE [BUT IT WAS STILL IN THE BUILDING].” “I KNOW [THE STATION] DID HAVE A DESK MIC IN THE NEWS BOOTH, AND ON THE NEWS SET, FOR A WHILE, THEY HAD A DESK MIC…RON JOEVENNAZO WAS THERE ALMOST FROM THE OUTSET OF THE OPERATION…HE WAS THERE BEFORE I WENT. ANOTHER ONE IS BOB JOHNSON. HE WAS THE STATION PRESIDENT, AND GENERAL MANAGER, AND BOTH OF THEM ARE STILL IN TOWN.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022004
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.7
Width
7
Description
BLACK PLASTIC MICROPHONE FLASH, SQUARE/CUBE WITH GREY FOAM INSIDE. TOP HAS HOLE CUT IN PLASTIC SHOWING FOAM INSIDE; FOAM HAS CIRCLE CUT IN CENTER FOR HOLDING A MICROPHONE. SIDES OF FLASH HAVE LOGO WITH WHITE TEXT “GLOBAL” AND RED TEXT “NEWS” BESIDE RED ARROW. TEXT ON SIDES OF FLASH IS FADED AND PEELING; TOP AND SIDES OF FLASH ARE SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE MICROPHONE FLASH, DWORNIK RECALLED, “[A HANDHELD MICROPHONE WITH A FLASH] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK [THE MICROPHONE AND FLASH] MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE HANDHELD MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” “[I STARTED UNDER] CJOC…THEN TWO MONTHS AFTER I STARTED THERE, WE CHANGED TO CFAC [AND THEY HAD FLASHES TOO].” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.5
Diameter
5
Description
BLACK METAL MICROPHONE WITH SILVER CONNECTOR AND BLACK RUBBER END. MICROPHONE HAS BLACK WINDSCREEN; MICROPHONE HAS BLACK LABEL WRAPPED AROUND BODY UNDER HEAD AND WINDSCREEN, WITH WHITE TEXT “EV, RE5ON/D-B, 150 OHMS DYNAMIC OMNIDIRECTIONAL”. BASE CONNECTOR HAS SILVER PUSH-SWITCH FOR REMOVAL. BODY IS HEAVILY SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; HEAD BELOW WINDSCREEN IS SCUFFED; LABEL BELOW HEAD IS PEELED AT CORNERS; BASE CONNECTOR HAS GREEN-BLUE RESIDUE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE HANDHELD ELECTRO VOICE MICROPHONE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “THIS [MICROPHONE] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK THIS ONE MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 1.