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Other Name
"ELGIN" AIRCRAFT CLOCK
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20060019002
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ELGIN" AIRCRAFT CLOCK
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, WOOD, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.4
Length
6.5
Width
11.5
Description
CLOCK, AIRCRAFT. MOUNTED ON WOOD BY FOUR SILVER SCREWS, BLACK METAL CASING, GLASS OVER FACE, BLACK PLASTIC DIAL AT BOTTOM OF CLOCK. FACE MARKED “ELGIN, PIONEER, REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.,” NUMBERS “3, 6, 9 AND 12 AROUND FACE OF CLOCK. BACK OF CLOCK MARKED, “TYPE, 3310-2A-A, 19057, SERIAL…” SOME WRITING SCRATCHED IN BACK “W670T…???”
Subjects
AEROSPACE TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
TRANSPORTATION
History
ACCORDING TO DONOR GARY HODGE AT TIME OF DONATION, HE RECEIVED THE CLOCK FROM HIS UNCLE, ART LARSON (1913-2000). UPDATE: ON 6 NOVEMBER 2017, GALT CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH GLIDER OBJECTS’ DONOR GARY HODGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE THIS RECORD’S PERMANENT FILE AND RECORD P20060019001.
Catalogue Number
P20060019002
Acquisition Date
2009-04
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
"PIONEER"
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20060019001
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"PIONEER"
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
6.9
Length
9.4
Width
8.5
Description
ALTIMETER, GAUGE, METAL AND GLASS. BLACK FACE WITH BROWNISH RED NUMBERS AND BROWNISH RED AND BLACK NEEDLE, NUMBERS MARKED “0…18” AROUND EDGES, FACE MARKED “ALTITUDE… PIONEER…A743B-1137.” CASE SURROUNDING FACE IS BLACK PAINTED METAL, PAINT LOSS ON FRONT, FOUR HOLES IN FOUR CORNERS AND METAL ROD ON BOTTOM FRONT OF FACE. PAPER LABEL COMING OFF OF BACK OF GAUGE MARKED “UNDER, PATEN(?),” REDDISH BROWN AND PUCE SPLATTERS ON SIDE OF GAUGE.
Subjects
AEROSPACE TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
TRANSPORTATION
History
ACCORDING TO DONOR GARY HODGE AT TIME OF DONATION, HE RECEIVED THE ALTIMETER FROM HIS UNCLE, ART LARSON. CORRESPONDANCE BETWEEN LARSON AND "STEPHENS" (NICKNAMED STEVIE) FROM FEBRUARY 23 - MARCH 3, 1937 SHOWS THAT THEY WERE TRYING TO FIND AN ALTIMETER TO SUIT THEIR NEEDS. IT IS POSSIBLE THIS ARTIFACT IS THE "PIONEER ALTIMETER IN A SECOND HAND STORE FOR WHICH THE YID WANTED BUCKS TWO AND A HALF," STEPHENS WAS REFERRING TO. "LARSON SPENT HIS EARLY DAYS IN LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE COMPLETED HIGH SCHOOL. HIS FATHER WAS A CARPENTER AND MASTER CRAFTSMEN. LARSON BECAME INTERESTED IN AVIATION AFTER LINDBERG FLEW THE ATLANTIC. HE AND HIS FRIENDS, IVAN THOMSON AND JIM FINDLAY, BEGAN BUILDING GLIDERS IN 1929. FOR THE NEXT 10 YEARS LARSON WAS THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND THE LETHBRIDGE GLIDING CLUB. DURING THIS TIME HE MADE WELL OVER 300 GLIDER FLIGHTS. IN 1939 HE SET ONE OF THE FIRST UNOFFICIAL GLIDING RECORDS IN CANADA. LARSON SPENT THE WAR YEARS IN CALGARY AS AN AIRFRAME INSTRUCTOR FOR THE WAR EMERGENCY TRAINING PROGRAM. IN 1947 HE RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE WAS EMPLOYED AS AN ASSESSOR FOR THE CITY UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1978." UPDATE: ON 6 NOVEMBER 2017, GALT CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH GLIDER OBJECTS’ DONOR GARY HODGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE THIS RECORD’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20060019001
Acquisition Date
2006-04
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
WING CROSS SECTION SUPPORT
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20060019003
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WING CROSS SECTION SUPPORT
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.7
Length
99.8
Width
16.0
Description
WING SUPPORT CROSS-SECTION, WOOD, LEADING EDGE IS ROUNDED OFF AND TAPERS TO A POINT AT THE TRAILING EDGE, THE STRUCTURE IS REINFORCED BY SEVERAL TRIANGLE SHAPES, WING IS HELD TOGETHER BY ADHESIVE, PENCIL LINES THROUGHOUT, SMALL REMNANTS OF NEWS PAPER ON ONE SIDE OF LEADING EDGE AND ONE SIDE OF TRAILING EDGE. THIN PIECES OF WOOD WARPED THROUGHOUT.
Subjects
AEROSPACE TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
TRANSPORTATION
History
ACCORDING TO DONOR GARY HODGE AT TIME OF DONATION, HE RECEIVED THE WING CROSS SECTION FROM HIS UNCLE, ART LARSON (1913-2000). THE WING COMPONENT WAS BUILT IN THE 1930S. LARSON BUILT GLIDERS IN A BACKYARD SHOP ON HIS PROPERTY AT 1411 3 AVE. N. APPARENTLY LARSON ONCE EXPLAINED TO HODGE THAT THIS PART PERIODICALLY BROKE AND HAD TO BE REPAIRED OR REPLACED. THIS SUPPORT MAY BE A SPARE PART MADE BY MEMBERS OF THE CLUB. IT WAS LIKELY A SPARE PART FOR THE HUTTER GLIDER (H-17) A SINGLE MAN AIRCRAFT USED BY THE "LETHBRIDGE GLIDING CLUB." ACCORDING TO VARIOUS SAMPLES OF CORRESPONDANCE BETWEEN LARSON AND NORMAN BRUCE, JIM FRETWELL, AND A COMPANY IN WURTTEMBERG, LARSON WAS TRYING TO GET BLUEPRINTS FOR THE H-17 IN 1936. BY 1937 HE HAD STARTED BUILDING THE AIRCRAFT AND SUBSEQUENTLY FLEW IT (SEE ARCHIVES FOR LOG BOOK OF H-17). BY JUNE OF 1938 THE H-17 WAS THE ONLY GLIDER BEING USED BY THE CLUB. LARSON FLEW THE H-17 AS LATE AS 1947 BEFORE LEAVING IT IN THE CARE OF EVELYN SMITH, A FORMER MEMBER OF THE GLIDING CLUB. THE WING COMPONENT COULD HAVE ALSO COME FROM ONE OF TWO PRIMARY GLIDERS. UPDATE: ON 6 NOVEMBER 2017, GALT CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH GLIDER OBJECTS’ DONOR GARY HODGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE THIS RECORD’S PERMANENT FILE AND P20060019001.
Catalogue Number
P20060019003
Acquisition Date
2006-04
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, STEEL, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20070023004
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Materials
WOOD, STEEL, BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
202.0
Length
75.8
Width
31.5
Description
SET OF TWO WOODEN DOORS, BOTH PAINTED GREY-PURPLE WITH SMALL WINDOW, METAL DOOR CLOSURE DEVICE MOUNTED AT TOP, HANDLES ON ONE SIDE WITH STEEL PLATES ON REVERSE, STEEL PLATES ALONG BOTTOM WIDTH OF DOORS, AND THREE BRASS HINGES ALONG SIDES. ONE DOOR WITH "J" SHAPED PIECE OF METAL HANGING FROM HANDLE. 2 PIECES, IDENTICAL SIZE.
Subjects
BUILDING COMPONENT
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
DOOR SET IS ONE OF TWO ENTRANCE DOOR SETS TO PARAMOUNT THEATRE CINEMA ONE. DOOR SET WAS REMOVED FROM THEATRE AFTER ITS CLOSURE IN 2007. ACCORDING TO JOEY SHACKLEFORD (GRANDSON OF A.W. SHACKLEFORD) IN 2010, THE PANE OF GLASS ON THE DOOR ALLOWED MANAGEMENT TO SEE WHEN THE LIGHTS WERE COMING ON. THIS FACILITATED THE PROCESS OF SWITCHING FROM THE EARLY VIEWING TO THE LATE VIEWING. THE LOBBY WOULD BE ROPED OFF AND THE PATRONS WOULD EXIT OUT THE SIDE DOOR. NEW PATRONS WOULD WAIT IN THE LOBBY UNTIL THE ROPES WERE TAKEN DOWN BEFORE ENTERING THE THEATRE. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE P20070023001 AND PERMANENT RECORD. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING A PORTRAIT OF ALFRED WILLIAM SHACKLEFORD (P20060025001-GA), OWNER OF THE SHACKLEFORD THEATRES. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF MAYOR SHACKLEFORD WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM ARCHIVES CANADA ONLINE AND A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM MAY 31, 1992. A.W. SHACKLEFORD WAS BORN IN ESSEX, ENGLAND IN 1899 AND CAME TO CALGARY WITH HIS PARENTS IN 1909. AFTER HIGH SCHOOL HE TRAINED AS A DRAFTSMAN BUT WAS EMPLOYED BY THE FILM EXCHANGE AND FOX FILMS. IN 1921 HE WAS HIRED TO MANAGED THE KING'S THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE AND BECAME ASSOCIATED WITH MARK ROGERS, A LETHBRIDGE BUSINESSMAN WHO OWNED THREE LOCAL MOVIE THEATRES. SHACKLEFORD ALSO BECAME PARTNER IN THE AMUSEMENT COMPANY THAT OPENED THE HENDERSON LAKE PAVILLION IN 1924. BY 1925 HE WAS PART-OWNER OF THE FORMER EMPRESS THEATRE ON 5TH AVENUE SOUTH, RENAMING IT THE ROXY. HE THEN TEAMED UP WITH THE FAMOUS PLAYERS COMPANY TO REMODEL THE FORMER PALACE THEATRE AND RENAME IT THE CAPITOL. SHACKLEFORD ALSO OPENED THE THEATRE IN THE FORMER COLLEGE MALL, BUILT THE 960-SEAT PARAMOUNT THEATRE ON 4TH AVENUE SOUTH, AND TOOK OVER OPERATION OF THE DIRVE-IN THEATRE AT THE SOUTH CITY LIMITS. SHACKLEFORD WAS HEAVILY INVOLVED IN CIVIC LIFE, ACTIVE IN GROUPS INCLUDING THE CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY, THE GYRO CLUB, UNITED WAY, LETHBRIDGE & DISTRICT EXHIBITION BOARD, BOARD OF TRADE, ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHURCH, AND THE ALBERTA THEATRE OPERATORS ASSOCIATION. HE AND HIS WIFE ADA HAD TWO SONS, ROBERT AND DOUGLAS. AFTER SEVERAL TERMS AS ALDERMAN STARTING IN 1939, SHACKLEFORD FIRST SERVED AS MAYOR FROM 1944 - 1947, AND FOR TWO MORE TERMS FROM 1952 - 1955 AND 1957 - 1961. HE WORKED FOR 68 YEARS IN THE MOVIE BUSINESS, RETIRING AT AGE 90. W.A. SHACKLEFORD DIED IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 30, 1992. SEE PERMANENT FILE P20060025001 FOR HARDCOPIES OF SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20070023004
Acquisition Date
2008-08
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
PROJECTIONIST DOOR
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20070023002
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PROJECTIONIST DOOR
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Materials
STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
216.5
Length
91.0
Width
28.0
Description
STEEL DOOR, ONE SIDE PAINTED GREY-GREEN WITH BLACK SEMI-CIRCLE SURROUNDING METAL PUSH-PLATE AND KEYHOLE. BLACK METAL PROTECTIVE PLATE ALONG BOTTOM LENGTH OF DOOR. OTHER SIDE PAINTED WHITE, HAS METAL C-SHAPED HANDLE AND METAL DOOR CLOSURE DEVICE MOUNTED AT TOP. SIDE OF DOOR WITH DOOR LOCKING MECHANISM LABELLED, "SCHLAGE."
Subjects
BUILDING COMPONENT
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
THE DOOR WAS REMOVED FROM THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE IN 2007. ACCORDING TO JOEY SHACKLEFORD (GRANDSON OF A.W. SHACKLEFORD) IN 2010, THE DOOR WAS FROM THE PROJECTION BOOTH. THE BOOTH WAS NEAR A PRIVATE VIEWING AREA ON THE UPPER FLOOR OF THE THEATRE. THE DOOR HAD A HALF CIRCLE WINDOW. HARRY BOYSE, AND RICHARD FURUKAWA WERE TWO OF THE PROJECTIONISTS AT THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE. WHILE SHACKLEFORD SAID MEMBERS OF HIS FAMILY WORKED ALMOST EVERY POSITION IN THE THEATRE THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THEIR LIVES, THE PROJECTIONIST JOB WAS THE “ONLY THING WE NEVER DID BECAUSE IT WAS A UNION POSITION. YOU HAD TO WRITE EXAMS AND PUT IN A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF HOURS BEFORE YOU WERE QUALIFIED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE P20070023001 AND PERMANENT RECORD. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING A PORTRAIT OF ALFRED WILLIAM SHACKLEFORD (P20060025001-GA), OWNER OF THE SHACKLEFORD THEATRES. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF MAYOR SHACKLEFORD WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM ARCHIVES CANADA ONLINE AND A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM MAY 31, 1992. A.W. SHACKLEFORD WAS BORN IN ESSEX, ENGLAND IN 1899 AND CAME TO CALGARY WITH HIS PARENTS IN 1909. AFTER HIGH SCHOOL HE TRAINED AS A DRAFTSMAN BUT WAS EMPLOYED BY THE FILM EXCHANGE AND FOX FILMS. IN 1921 HE WAS HIRED TO MANAGED THE KING'S THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE AND BECAME ASSOCIATED WITH MARK ROGERS, A LETHBRIDGE BUSINESSMAN WHO OWNED THREE LOCAL MOVIE THEATRES. SHACKLEFORD ALSO BECAME PARTNER IN THE AMUSEMENT COMPANY THAT OPENED THE HENDERSON LAKE PAVILLION IN 1924. BY 1925 HE WAS PART-OWNER OF THE FORMER EMPRESS THEATRE ON 5TH AVENUE SOUTH, RENAMING IT THE ROXY. HE THEN TEAMED UP WITH THE FAMOUS PLAYERS COMPANY TO REMODEL THE FORMER PALACE THEATRE AND RENAME IT THE CAPITOL. SHACKLEFORD ALSO OPENED THE THEATRE IN THE FORMER COLLEGE MALL, BUILT THE 960-SEAT PARAMOUNT THEATRE ON 4TH AVENUE SOUTH, AND TOOK OVER OPERATION OF THE DIRVE-IN THEATRE AT THE SOUTH CITY LIMITS. SHACKLEFORD WAS HEAVILY INVOLVED IN CIVIC LIFE, ACTIVE IN GROUPS INCLUDING THE CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY, THE GYRO CLUB, UNITED WAY, LETHBRIDGE & DISTRICT EXHIBITION BOARD, BOARD OF TRADE, ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHURCH, AND THE ALBERTA THEATRE OPERATORS ASSOCIATION. HE AND HIS WIFE ADA HAD TWO SONS, ROBERT AND DOUGLAS. AFTER SEVERAL TERMS AS ALDERMAN STARTING IN 1939, SHACKLEFORD FIRST SERVED AS MAYOR FROM 1944 - 1947, AND FOR TWO MORE TERMS FROM 1952 - 1955 AND 1957 - 1961. HE WORKED FOR 68 YEARS IN THE MOVIE BUSINESS, RETIRING AT AGE 90. W.A. SHACKLEFORD DIED IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 30, 1992. SEE PERMANENT FILE P20060025001 FOR HARDCOPIES OF SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20070023002
Acquisition Date
2008-08
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, WIRE
Catalogue Number
P20070023005
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2007
Materials
PLASTIC, WIRE
No. Pieces
1
Height
9.2
Length
24.0
Width
13.0 13.0
Description
PALE GREEN INTERCOM PHONE WITH SIX OFF-WHITE BUTTONS ON FRONT. BRAIDED PHONE CORD, SPEAKER AND RECEIVER OF PHONE OFF-WHITE COLOURED. LABELS NEXT TO BUTTONS READ, "MGR., LOBY, CONC., BOX. O., PROJ. 2." TEXT ON BACK READS, "MADE IN WESTERN GERMANY...". BROWN FOAM MATERIAL ON BACK OF PHONE DETERIORATING, SURFACE GRIME OVERALL, ESPECIALLY CONCENTRATED ON PHONE RECIEVER AND PHONE RESTING AREAS.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
INTERCOM WAS INSTALLED IN THE PROJECTIONSIT ROOM OF CINEMA 1 AT THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE. IT ALLOWED THE USER TO STRATEGICALLY CONNECT WITH VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN THE THEATRE. INTERCOM WAS REMOVED FROM PARAMOUNT THEATRE AFTER ITS CLOSURE IN 2007. NICOLE HEMBROFF, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT, CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH JOEY SHACKLEFORD (GRANDSON OF A. W. SHACKLEFORD) ON AUGUST 15, 2010, HE SAID THE INTERCOM SYSTEM WAS PRETTY BAREBONES. IT WAS USED FOR SEVERAL PURPOSES. FOR EXAMPLE, THE PROJECTIONIST'S ROOM WOULD RECEIVE A CALL TO START THE FILM. THIS WAS IMPORTANT BECAUSE THE MOVIES DIDN'T ALWAYS START ON TIME IN ORDER TO ALLOW BIG CROWDS TO COME IN. THE INTERCOM WAS ALSO USED BETWEEN THE MANAGER'S OFFICE AND THE CANDY BAR. THE PEOPLE WORKING AT THE CONCESSION COULD CALL THE MANAGER'S OFFICE TO OBTAIN MORE CANDY OR SUPPLIES. FINALLY, IT WAS COMMON FOR THE BOX OFFICE TO CALL THE MANAGER'S OFFICE IN ORDER TO GET MORE CHANGE OR TO GET MONEY TAKEN OUT. THIS WAS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT BECAUSE THE BOX OFFICE WAS EXPOSED TO THE PEOPLE. BY TAKING MONEY TO THE MANAGER'S OFFICE ON A REGULAR BASIS, ONE COULD ENSURE THAT IF THE BOX OFFICE WAS ROBBED, NOT TOO MUCH MONEY WOULD BE LOST. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE P20070023001 AND PERMANENT RECORD. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING A PORTRAIT OF ALFRED WILLIAM SHACKLEFORD (P20060025001-GA), OWNER OF THE SHACKLEFORD THEATRES. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF MAYOR SHACKLEFORD WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM ARCHIVES CANADA ONLINE AND A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM MAY 31, 1992. A.W. SHACKLEFORD WAS BORN IN ESSEX, ENGLAND IN 1899 AND CAME TO CALGARY WITH HIS PARENTS IN 1909. AFTER HIGH SCHOOL HE TRAINED AS A DRAFTSMAN BUT WAS EMPLOYED BY THE FILM EXCHANGE AND FOX FILMS. IN 1921 HE WAS HIRED TO MANAGED THE KING'S THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE AND BECAME ASSOCIATED WITH MARK ROGERS, A LETHBRIDGE BUSINESSMAN WHO OWNED THREE LOCAL MOVIE THEATRES. SHACKLEFORD ALSO BECAME PARTNER IN THE AMUSEMENT COMPANY THAT OPENED THE HENDERSON LAKE PAVILLION IN 1924. BY 1925 HE WAS PART-OWNER OF THE FORMER EMPRESS THEATRE ON 5TH AVENUE SOUTH, RENAMING IT THE ROXY. HE THEN TEAMED UP WITH THE FAMOUS PLAYERS COMPANY TO REMODEL THE FORMER PALACE THEATRE AND RENAME IT THE CAPITOL. SHACKLEFORD ALSO OPENED THE THEATRE IN THE FORMER COLLEGE MALL, BUILT THE 960-SEAT PARAMOUNT THEATRE ON 4TH AVENUE SOUTH, AND TOOK OVER OPERATION OF THE DIRVE-IN THEATRE AT THE SOUTH CITY LIMITS. SHACKLEFORD WAS HEAVILY INVOLVED IN CIVIC LIFE, ACTIVE IN GROUPS INCLUDING THE CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY, THE GYRO CLUB, UNITED WAY, LETHBRIDGE & DISTRICT EXHIBITION BOARD, BOARD OF TRADE, ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHURCH, AND THE ALBERTA THEATRE OPERATORS ASSOCIATION. HE AND HIS WIFE ADA HAD TWO SONS, ROBERT AND DOUGLAS. AFTER SEVERAL TERMS AS ALDERMAN STARTING IN 1939, SHACKLEFORD FIRST SERVED AS MAYOR FROM 1944 - 1947, AND FOR TWO MORE TERMS FROM 1952 - 1955 AND 1957 - 1961. HE WORKED FOR 68 YEARS IN THE MOVIE BUSINESS, RETIRING AT AGE 90. W.A. SHACKLEFORD DIED IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 30, 1992. SEE PERMANENT FILE P20060025001 FOR HARDCOPIES OF SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20070023005
Acquisition Date
2008-08
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VINYL, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20020022000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
VINYL, PAPER
No. Pieces
27
Height
0.2
Diameter
25.0
Description
27 BLACK VINYL PHONOGRAPH RECORDS. INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING: 1. "BLUEBIRD" "J.E. MAINER'S MOUNTAINEERS FIDDLING WITH GUITARS". SIDE B-6424-A, "NEW LOST TRAIN BLUES"; SIDE B-6424-B,"NUMBER 111". "LICENSED UNDER CANADIAN PATENT NO. 160997". 2. "BRUNSWICK". "AL HOPKINS AND HIS BUCKLE BUSTERS". SIDE 184-A, "DOWN TO THE CLUB"; SIDE 184-B, "THE FELLER THAT LOOKED LIKE ME". "THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED". 3. "VICTOR" "NAT SHILKRET AND THE VICTOR ORCHESTRA". SIDE 20474-A, "RIO RITA-FOX TROT (FROM THE ZIEGFELD PRODUCTION, "RIO RITA")"; SIDE 20474-B, "THE KINKAJOU-FOX TROT (FROM THE ZIEGFELD PRODUCTION, "RIO RITA")". "VICTOR TALKING MACHINE CO OF CANADA LIMITED MONTREAL". 4. "BRUNSWICK". "ARNOLD JOHNSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA". SIDE 1, "BREAKAWAY"; SIDE 2, "BIG CITY BLUES". "THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED". "4348". 5. "BRUNSWICK". "BEN BERNIE AND HIS HOTEL ROOSEVELT ORCHESTRA". SIDE 3771-A, "THE MAN I LOVE"; SIDE B, "DREAM KISSES". SIDE 3771-B HAS A CHRISTMAS STAMP ON IT THAT READS "CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1929". 6. "COLUMBIA RECORD". SIDE 1, "HAPPY THOS MARRIED. . . BY FRED DUPREZ A1516". SIDE 2, "COHEN ON THE TELEPHONE BY JOE HAYMAN A1516". 7. "CROWN". "THE ROYAL HAWAIIANS". SIDE 81411-A, "IT HAPPENED IN MONTEREY (FROM "KING OF JAZZ")". SIDE 81411-B, "DREAMY SOUTH SEA MOON". "CROWN RECORD CO. LACHINE MONTREAL CANADA". 8. "VICTOR". "NAT SHILKRET AND THE VICTOR ORCHESTRA". SIDE 20899-A, "ARE YOU THINKING OF ME TO-NIGHT? - WALTZ". SIDE 20899-B, "ARE YOU HAPPY? - FOX TROT". "VICTOR TALKING MACHINE CO. OF CANADA LIMITED MONTREAL". 9. "BRUNSWICK". "HANAPI TRIO". SIDE 3759-A, "INDIANA MARCH"; SIDE 3759-B, "SWEET HAWAIIAN MOONLIGHT". SIDE A HAS A CHRISTMAS STAMP ON IT THAT READS "CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1929". RECORD HAS A LARGE CHIP OUT OF ONE SIDE. 10. "HIS MASTER'S VOICE VICTOR". "REINALD WERRENRATH". SIDE 45166-A, "SMILIN' THROUGH"; SIDE 45166-B, "THINK LOVE OF ME". "BERLINER GRAM-O-PHONE CO. LIMITED. MONTREAL". 11. "VICTOR". "VICTOR SALON ORCHESTRA". SIDE 20279-A, "ESTRELLITA (LITTLE STAR)"; SIDE 20279-B, "A LITTLE LOVE, A LITTLE KISS (UN PEU D'AMOUR)". "VICTOR TALKING MACHINE CO. OF CANADA LIMITED MONTREAL". 12. "BRUNSWICK". "VERNON DALHART". SIDE 1, "NELLIE [??]RE AND CHARLIE BROOKS"; SIDE 2, "THE JEALOUS LOVER OF LONE GREEN VALLEY". THERE IS A "B" CARVED INTO THE PAPER ON SIDE 2. "THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY". 13. "CROWN". SIDE 81290-A, "THE ONE I LOVE JUST CAN'T BE BOTHERED WITH ME HOTEL BILTMORE ORCH.". SIDE 81290-B, "WHEN THE MOON SHINES DOWN ON SUNSHINE AND ME GOLDIE'S SYNCOPATORS". "CROWN RECORD CO. LACHINE MONTREAL CANADA". RECORD HAS A LARGE CHIP OUT OF ONE SIDE. 14. "CROWN". "THE THREE HAWAIIANS". SIDE 81293-A, "CHANT OF THE JUNGLE"; SIDE 81293-B, "MY HAWAIIAN HARBOR OF DREAMS". "CROWN RECORD CO. LACHINE MONTREAL CANADA". 15. "CROWN". "THE THREE HAWAIIANS". SIDE 81294-A, "I'M A DREAMER-AREN'T WE ALL?"; SIDE 81294-B, "BY THE CALM HAWAIIAN SEA". "CROWN RECORD CO. LACHINE MONTREAL CANADA". 16. "BRUNSWICK". "DICK ROBERTSON". SIDE 1, "SOMEWHERE IN OLD WYOMING"; SIDE 2, "THEY CUT DOWN THE OLD PINE TREE". "4785" "THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY". SIDE 2 HAS A CHRISTMAS STAMP ON IT THAT READS "CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1929". 17. "COLUMBIA RECORD". "STARKTON". SIDE 1, "PATENTLANDLER"; SIDE 2, "HALBWALZER MIT TROMPETEN BUETT". "E1801 (67740) COLUMBIA GRAPHOPHONE COMPANY". 18. "AURORA". "CHESTER AND ROLLINS". SIDE 212-A, "WILL THE CIRCLE BE UNBROKEN?"; SIDE 212-B, "YOU'LL NEVER MISS YOUR MOTHER TILL SHE'S GONE". "MADE IN CANADA". 19. "VICTOR". "ART LANDRY AND HIS ORCHESTRA". SIDE 19850-A, "FIVE FOOT TWO, EYES OF BLUE-FOX TROT"; SIDE 19850-B, "DON'T WAIT TOO LONG-FOX TROT". "VICTOR TALKING MACHINE CO OF CANADA LIMITED MONTREAL". 20. "RCA VICTOR". "INTERNATIONAL NOVELTY QUARTET". SIDE 20253-A, "CUCKOO-WALTZ"; SIDE 20253-B, "LENA-SCHOTTISCHE". "MADE IN CANADA BY RCA VICTOR COMPANY, LTD. MONTREAL". 21. "VICTOR". "JAS. BROWN". SIDE 120184-A, "HIGHLAND SCOTTISCHE"; SIDE 120184-B, "OVER THE WAVES WALTZ". "BERLINER GRAM-O-PHONE CO. LIMITED MONTREAL". 22. "CROWN". SIDE 83042-A, "SWEET JENNIE LEE LLOYD NEWTON AND HIS VARSITY ELEVEN"; SIDE 83042-B, "MY HEART IS SAD WILLIE CREAGER'S ORCHESTRA". "CROWN RECORD CO. LACHINE MONTREAL CANADA". 23. "BRUNSWICK". "HAROLD "SCRAPPY" LAMBERT". SIDE 3870-A, "RAMONA"; SIDE 3870-B, "I'M WINGING HOME". SIDE B HAS A CHRISTMAS STAMP ON IT THAT READS "CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1929". "THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY". 24. "COLUMBIA". SIDE 1, "LIFE ON THE OCEAN WAVE THE MARVIN FAMILY"; SIDE 2, "YODELING THEM BLUES AWAY FRANKIE MARVIN". "15474-D". BOTH SIDES HAVE A CHRISTMAS STAMP ON THEM THAT READ "CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1929". 25. "BRUNSWICK". "WENDELL HALL (THE RED-HEADED MUSIC MAKER)". SIDE 1, "WHO SAID I WAS A BUM?"; SIDE 2, "IN THE BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAINS". "4174" 26. "COLUMBIA". "PLAYED BY SAXO SEXTETTE". SIDE 1, "FOLLOW ME "WHAT DO YOU WANT TO MAKE THOSE EYES AT ME FOR?""; SIDE 2, "MISS SPRINGTIME "MY CASTLE IN THE AIR"". "A2205" "COLUMBIA GRAPHOPHONE COMPANY". 27. "COLUMBIA RECORD". "STRASSMEIER DACHAUER BAUERNKAPELLE". SIDE 1, "TOLZER TROMPETENLANDLER"; SIDE 2, "LOISACHTALER LANDLER". "E427 (41572)".
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
RECORDS WERE COLLECTED BY DONOR 15 YEARS AGO. HE ACQUIRED THEM FROM HIS IN-LAWS, DOUGLAS & KATHY MACDONALD OF LETHBRIDGE. THE RECORDS ARE SUSPECTED TO HAVE COME FROM SASKATCHEWAN ORIGINALLY; THE MACDONALDS MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1977. DONOR NEVER USED ITEMS.
Catalogue Number
P20020022000
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.7
Width
7
Description
BLACK PLASTIC MICROPHONE FLASH, SQUARE/CUBE WITH GREY FOAM INSIDE. TOP HAS HOLE CUT IN PLASTIC SHOWING FOAM INSIDE; FOAM HAS CIRCLE CUT IN CENTER FOR HOLDING A MICROPHONE. SIDES OF FLASH HAVE LOGO WITH WHITE TEXT “GLOBAL” AND RED TEXT “NEWS” BESIDE RED ARROW. TEXT ON SIDES OF FLASH IS FADED AND PEELING; TOP AND SIDES OF FLASH ARE SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE MICROPHONE FLASH, DWORNIK RECALLED, “[A HANDHELD MICROPHONE WITH A FLASH] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK [THE MICROPHONE AND FLASH] MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE HANDHELD MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” “[I STARTED UNDER] CJOC…THEN TWO MONTHS AFTER I STARTED THERE, WE CHANGED TO CFAC [AND THEY HAD FLASHES TOO].” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.5
Diameter
5
Description
BLACK METAL MICROPHONE WITH SILVER CONNECTOR AND BLACK RUBBER END. MICROPHONE HAS BLACK WINDSCREEN; MICROPHONE HAS BLACK LABEL WRAPPED AROUND BODY UNDER HEAD AND WINDSCREEN, WITH WHITE TEXT “EV, RE5ON/D-B, 150 OHMS DYNAMIC OMNIDIRECTIONAL”. BASE CONNECTOR HAS SILVER PUSH-SWITCH FOR REMOVAL. BODY IS HEAVILY SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; HEAD BELOW WINDSCREEN IS SCUFFED; LABEL BELOW HEAD IS PEELED AT CORNERS; BASE CONNECTOR HAS GREEN-BLUE RESIDUE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE HANDHELD ELECTRO VOICE MICROPHONE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “THIS [MICROPHONE] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK THIS ONE MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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