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Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THAT BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS CONTINUED, “[MARY] WAS AT THE NUNNERY FOR 4-5 YEARS…[THE QUILT WAS NEVER USED] IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC SINCE IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY] NEVER CAME HOME. SHE WENT NURSING UP IN…WHERE THAT STELMACH CAME FROM [LAMONT, ALBERTA]…SHE LIVED AT THE ALEC [ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL, EDMONTON, ALBERTA] FOR 15 YEARS UNTIL THEY KICKED HER OUT OF THERE. SHE WAS A KIND OF RENEGADE.” “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’S QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
202
Width
260
Description
PURPLE QUILT WITH DOUBLE WEDDING RING PATTERN ON FRONT; QUILT HAS MACHINE-STITCHED GRID OF 80 SQUARES. RINGS ARE INTERLOCKED AND MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-PATTERNED WITH YELLOW, BLUE, PINK, AND RED PRIMARY COLOURS IN RINGS. QUILT TOP IS HAND-STITCHED AND SEAMS ALONG EDGES ARE MACHINE-STITCHED. BACK OF QUILT HAS LIGHTER PURPLE SECTIONS IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. EDGES ARE FRAYED; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS LOOSE STUFFING EXPOSED FROM INSIDE, STUFFING IS WOOL. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS INTERIOR FABRIC EXPOSED AND IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “[MOM] WAS ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING, ’CAUSE SHE COULDN’T SIT DOWN IDLY. SHE HAD TO BE CROCHETING, OR EMBROIDERING OR MAKING QUILTS.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “[IT WAS MADE IN THE] ‘60S, MAYBE EVEN THE ‘70S.” “WHEN I FIRST MET [KATHERINE], I CAN REMEMBER COMING INTO THE HOUSE AND SHE WAS SITTING AT THE OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE. THAT THING WAS JUST [GOING] AND THAT’S WHAT SHE WAS DOING, WAS JUST PIECING PIECES OF MATERIAL TOGETHER.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’S QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’S QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
187.5
Width
147
Description
QUILT TOP WITH GRID OF 20 SQUARES; EACH SQUARE HAS A PATCHWORK FAN BLOCK MADE OF ASSORTED PATTERNED FABRICS. QUILT TOP IS HANDSTICHED WITH UNFINISHED EDGES. QUILT BACKING IS PATCHWORK WITH BLACK AND WHITE SQUARES; BACKING SQUARE IN THE SECOND COLUMN AND THE 12TH SQUARE DOWN HAS BLACK TEXT ON WHITE FABRIC, “CRANE LIMITED; AT POINT OF MAILING; VALVES, FITTINGS, PUMPS, FABRICATED PIPE, HEATING AND PLUMBING MATERIALS”. QUILT HAS MINOR STAINING ON FRONT AND ALONG TOP EGDE; EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT HAS RIP BELOW CENTER SQUARE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE FAN BLOCK QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “[THE QUILT BACKING IS] FLOUR SACKS…OR SUGAR SACKS, THEY ALL [CAME] IN WHITE SACKS.” GLORIA BETTS ADDED, “[SHE PROBABLY PUT A BACKING ON THIS QUILT TOP] BECAUSE USUALLY, EVEN TODAY IN QUILTING, THE FANS ARE DONE ON A BACKING BECAUSE EVERYTHING ON THE PIECES IS ON A BIAS SO IT STRETCHES. SO IT’S PUT ONTO A BACKING. BUT THE BACKING ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE BEING EITHER THE FLOUR SACKS OR THE SUGAR SACKS, TO ME, MADE IT UNIQUE.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE. [WE CHOSE THE FAN QUILT TOP] PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE BACKING ON IT. A LOT OF THE TIME, IN THE OLD DAYS, THAT’S WHAT THEY DID, THEY PUT [QUILT TOPS] ON A BACKING.” “ON THE FAN [QUILT], [LUCY WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] IDENTIFIED FABRICS THAT WERE BACK TO THE EARLY 1900S. ONE SHE THINKS MIGHT BE BACK INTO THE LATE 1800S WHICH WAS PROBABLY A DRESS THAT [KATHERINE] GOT SOMEWHERE. THE BLUE BACKED ONE, THEY FOUND THERE WERE STILL PINS LEFT INSIDE THE QUILT AND THEY LEFT THEM THERE BECAUSE THEY SAID TO TAKE THEM OUT WOULD DAMAGE THE FABRIC. THEY WERE IMPRESSED WITH THE WORKMANSHIP ON THAT…ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PUT TOGETHER FROM A DESIGN DRAWN ON NEWSPAPER.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’S QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
215.4
Width
165
Description
QUILT TOP WITH EIGHT POINT STAR PATTERN IN 48 SQUARE GRID; QUILT TOP HAS BLUE TRIM ALONG EDGES AND BETWEEN SQUARES; EIGHT POINT STARS FASHIONED FROM MULTICOLOURED AND PATTERNED FABRICS. RIGHT EDGE HAS TWO SQUARES MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE AND ONE SQUARE WITH RIPPED BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE; LEFT EDGE HAS SQUARE MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE. UPPER LEFT CORNER HAS THREE SEAMS SEWN IN BLUE TRIM. STARS IN SQUARES HANDSTITCHED; SQUARES ATTACHED WITH MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS; MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS ATTACHING SQUARES TO BLUE TRIM AND EDGES. EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT TOP HAS NO BACKING AND THREADS ARE EXPOSED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE EIGHT-POINT STAR QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’S QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
POLICE REMOTE DISPATCH RADIO
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P19960112068
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
POLICE REMOTE DISPATCH RADIO
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1975
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
21.4
Length
39.5
Width
30.7
Description
GREY STEEL DISPATCH RECEIVER. LIGHT GREY PAINTED FRONT PANEL WITH "MOTOROLA" PRINTED ALONG BOTTOM. GREY SPEAKER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER; BESIDE IS GRADUATED METER AND CLOCK SET AT "12:00". VOLUME KNOB IN BOTTOM LEFT CORNER. REVERSE IS OPEN, REVEALING FUSES, OUTLETS, AND MECHANICAL WORKINGS. HAS STICKER WITH "USE GENUINE MOTOROLA REPLACEMENT PARTS". BLACK POWER CORD EXTENDS FROM BACK RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
ACOUSTICAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
REMOTE RADIO IS USED IN CONJUCTION WITH DISPATCH MICROPHONE, P19960112069 AND PHONE, P19960112070. SEE ALSO MOTOROLA REPEATER P19930061000. INFO BELOW WAS DEVELOPED FOR A POLICE EXHIBIT INSTALLED IN NOVEMBER 2007. DURING THE YEAR PRIOR, MUSEUM TECH KEVIN MACLEAN SPOKE TO NEARLY A DOZEN RETIRED AND SERVING OFFICERS IN ADDITION TO FORMER CIVILIAN DISPATCHER ANNE TODD AND CITY ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEE BILL STANTON. WRITTEN SOURCES INCLUDED THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ANNUAL POLICE CHEIF REPORTS AND THE BADGE AND THE BLOTTER. FOR AN IN DEPTH HISTORY OF THE RADIO, PLEASE REFERENCE THE PERMANENT FILE. AMONG ALL THE TOOLS USED BY POLICE TO CONDUCT THEIR WORK, FEW ARE AS SIGNIFICANT AS THOSE CALLED UPON WHEN POLICE NEED TO COMMUNICATE. FROM THE 1920S UNTIL THE MID-60S, “BEAT” PATROL OFFICERS WERE DEPENDENT ON A HANDFUL OF STREET-BASED “SIGNAL LIGHTS” AS THEIR SOLE MEANS OF POLICE COMMUNICATION (REF. ARCHIVAL PHOTO P19800122010-GP). CONTROLLED BY A SWITCH PANEL IN THE POLICE STATION, THE RED AND GREEN SIGNAL LIGHTS COMMUNICATED AN ELABORATE CODE TO PATROLMEN ON THE CENTRAL (1ST TO 6TH AVENUES BETWEEN 5TH AND 9TH STREETS) AND WEST (1ST TO 6TH AVENUES WEST OF 5TH STREET) BEATS. DEPENDENT ON THE LIGHTS’ ILLUMINATED COLOUR(S) AND SOLID-LIT OR FLASHING STATE, POLICEMEN KNEW IF THEY OR OTHERS WERE TO IMMEDIATELY PHONE THE STATION FROM ANY NUMBER OF HOTELS OR 24-HR BUSINESSES. IN 1952, THE FORCE INSTALLED ITS FIRST 2-WAY RADIOS IN ITS THREE TRAFFIC PATROL VEHICLES. SEVEN YEARS LATER, A CAMPAIGN WAS LAUNCHED TO ACQUIRE AND EVALUATE HANDHELD RADIOS AND, BY 1965, ALL MEMBERS, INCLUDING THOSE WALKING THE “BEATS”, HAD IMMEDIATE RADIO CONTACT WITH THE STATION. THIS SECOND GENERATION REMOTE RADIO UNIT (MOTOROLA) WAS ACQUIRED IN THE EARLY 60S AND FEATURED NEW SEMI-CONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY. FROM THE STATION, AUDIO SIGNALS WERE SENT OUT VIA LANDLINE TO A MOTOROLA TRANSMITTER/ RECEIVER LOCATED ON THE TOP OF THE LETHBRIDGE WATER TOWER ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE. FROM THERE, THE SIGNAL WAS TRANSMITTED THROUGH THE AIR TO VEHICLE-BASED OR HANDHELD 2-WAY RADIOS. ANN TODD WAS HIRED BY THE CITY POLICE FORCE IN 1962 AS A CLERK/ STENOGRAPHER. OVER THE YEARS, SHE OPERATED THE MOTOROLA RADIO (REF. PHOTO IN ARCHIVES COLLECTION), BUT WAS RESTRICTED TO ACKNOWLEDGING AND TRANSMITTING ONLY THE SIMPLEST OF MESSAGES. THE COMPLAINTS DESK CONSTABLE WAS THE PRIMARY USER OF THE RADIO, DISPATCHING CARS AND RECEIVING REPORTS. IN 1975/76, THE “RADIO ROOM” AND THE MOTOROLA RADIO WERE REPLACED BY A “COMMUNICATIONS CENTRE” WHICH, WAS SITUATED ACROSS THE HALL FROM THE COMPLAINTS DESK. NEW CENTRE EQUIPMENT INCLUDED A SWITCHBOARD, A REEL-TO-REEL INCOMING CALL RECORDER, A CANADIAN POLICE INFORMATION CENTRE (CPIC) COMPUTER AND A “DEAF PHONE” IN ADDITION TO MONITORING INTERNAL CCTV CAMERA MONITORS (REF. ARCHIVAL PHOTO COLLECTION). *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING SOME DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P19960112068
Acquisition Date
1996-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.