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Other Name
FRITZ SICK OIL PORTRAIT
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CANVAS, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P19900020024
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FRITZ SICK OIL PORTRAIT
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1945
Materials
GLASS, CANVAS, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
66.2
Width
56.6
Description
FRAMED OIL FULL FACE PORTRAIT OF FRITZ SICK, BUST. ARTIST'S SIGNATURE BR, "DE GRANDMAISON".
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
INDUSTRY
History
THIS PAINTING WAS DONE BY NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON (1892-1978), A PORTRATIST WHOSE PASSION WAS DEPICTING THE FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. DE GRANDMAISON WAS BORN IN 1892 TO AN ARISTOCRATIC FAMILY IN RUSSIA. HE STUDIED ART, MUSIC, HISTORY, LANGUAGES, CARTOGRAPHY AND TOPOGRAPHY, AND EMIGRATED TO CANADA AFTER BEING CAPTURED AS A GERMAN PRISONER OF WAR IN WWI. DE GRANDMAISON FELT AN AFFINITY WITH THE FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE OF THE PLAINS, PICTORIALIZING THEIR LIKENESSES AND RECORDING THE ORAL HISTORIES OF HIS SITTERS. DE GRANDMAISON MADE HIS LIVING WITH COMMISSIONED PORTRAITS OF POLITICIANS, BUSINESSMEN, AND COMMUNITY LEADERS, SELLING THESE WORKS WHILE KEEPING HIS PORTRAITS OF NATIVE SITTERS IN HIS PERSONAL COLLECTION. DE GRANDMAISON RECEIVED MANY HONORS DURING HIS LIFETIME, INCLUDING INDUCTION INTO THE PEIGAN TRIBE AND HONOURARY TITLE OF CHIEF. WHEN HE DIED, HE WAS BURIED ON THE PIIKANI RESERVE IN BROCKET, ALBERTA. ALLEGEDLY FRITZ AND EMIL SICK HELPED THE ARTIST OUT DURING SOME DIFFICULT TIMES, AND THIS PAINTING WAS A RESULT OF THAT AID (POSSIBLY COMMISSIONED BY THE SICKS). FRITZ SICK FOUNDER OF LETHBRIDGE BREWERY, BORN IN 1859 IN FREIBURG GERMANY, LANDED IN AMERICA IN 1883, TRAVELLED TO CINCINNATI, THE BREWING CENTRE OF U.S TO LEARN THE FUNDAMENTALS OF BREWING. LATER WENT TO OTHER BREWERIES IN SAN FRANCISCO, TACOMA, SPOKANE & THEN TO TRAIL B.C. & TO FERNIE WHERE HE FOUNDED FERNIE-FORT STEELE BREWERIES, SELLING OUT IN 1901 HE MOVED TO & BUILT A NEW BREWERY IN LETHBRIDGE & WITH 2 HELPERS RAN THE BREWERY AND WAS THE BREWER,COOPER, MALTSER, SALESMAN & OFFICE FORCE & TURNED OUT 3000 BARRELS/YR. FRITZ SICK DIED IN VANCOUVER IN 1945. SOURCE: SICKS' ENTERPRISER FALL 1945. SEE P19900020001-GA FOR LETHBRIDGE BREWERY HISTORY. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, AND FOUND A CORRELATION WITH THIS PORTRAIT AND ANOTHER OF FRITZ SICK THAT WAS ALSO PAINTED BY NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON. SEE RECORD P20130007005 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P19900020024
Acquisition Date
1990-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1830
Date Range To
1953
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20090016040
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1830
Date Range To
1953
Materials
STEEL
No. Pieces
5
Length
3.8
Width
1.2
Description
(5) GLAZIER'S POINTS, STEEL, PARALLELOGRAM SHAPED. TARNISHED THROUGHOUT. DULL EDGES.
Subjects
GLASS, PLASTICS, CLAYWORKING T&E
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
DOMESTIC
History
FOR MORE INFORMATION SEE P20090016001 AND PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20090016040
Acquisition Date
2009-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BEVERAGE TAP
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P19651479000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BEVERAGE TAP
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1930
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
14.0
Length
21.3
Description
VALVE OPENS AND SHUTS BY BRASS KNOB ON TOP OF TAP. MINOR WEAR AND PITTING.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
BELIEVED USE AS A TAP FOR BEER KEG FROM SICKS' LETHBRIDGE BREWERY. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING THE VARIOUS DONATIONS PERTAINING TO EDWARD FREDERICK HAGELL. SEE RECORD P19960053001 FOR AN EXTENDED BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST; SEE PERMANENT FILES P19960053001, P20040009001, P20060027001, P20070008001, AND P20070012001 FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS, DETAILS ON PAST GALT DIRECTOR/CURATOR WILMA WOOD'S BOOK ON THE ARTIST, AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE HAGELL FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P19651479000
Acquisition Date
1965-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
SIGN "ALBERTA'S PRIDE"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20060008005
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SIGN "ALBERTA'S PRIDE"
Date
1913
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
36.5
Width
35
Description
BLACK METAL SIGN WITH CURLED UP CORNERS. GOLD PAINTED TEXT "ALBERT' S PRIDE", "THE LETHBRIDGE BREWING & MALTING CO., LTD. LETHBRIDGE, CANADA" CENTER CIRCULAR PAINTING OF WOMEN LOOKING OUT HER WINDOW, WITH RED ROSES. BOTTOM OF WINDOW IMAGE HAS MANUFACTURE STAMP " GOOD MORNING", " C 1913 AMERICAN ART WORKS COSHOCTON, O."
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ORIGINAL OWNER OF ITEMS, ERIC GAVRON, BEGAN WORKING AT THE SICKS BREWERY AFTER HE RETURNED FROM MILITARY SERVICE IN WWI. HE WAS THE SECOND GENERATION - FATHER MICHAEL THE FIRST - TO WORK AT THE BREWERY. DONOR STATED THAT IN 02/2007 MR GAVRON WORKED ON THE BREWERY'S BOTTLING LINE, RETIRING IN THE MID 80S. HE LIVED HIS WHOLE LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, PASSING AWAY ON 03/2004. SOME OF THE MATERIALS MAY HAVE MADE THEIR WAY INTO GAVRON'S POSSESSION VIA HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW MICHAEL "SPIKE" MARTELL. SPIKE WAS THOUGHT TO HAVE MANAGED THE LOCAL LETHBRIDGE ARENA AS WELL AS HAVING WORKED IN PUBLIC RELATIONS FOR THE BREWERY. THE DONOR'S WERE LONG TIME FRIENDS WITH GAVRON AND FARMED HIS WIFE LAND , BEGINNING IN 1973. KATHARINA HERBST BECAME THE RECIPIENT OF MR. GAVRON ESTATE AFTER HIS PASSING. MR.HERBST RECALLED SOME OF THE MATERIAL HANGING ON THE WALLS OF GAVRON'S BASEMENT, BUT MRS. HERBST FELT MUCH WAS SQUIRRELED AWAY IN BOXES.
Catalogue Number
P20060008005
Acquisition Date
2006-05
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
SELTZER
Date Range From
1905
Date Range To
1915
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, NICKEL PLATED STEEL
Catalogue Number
P19651656000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SELTZER
Date Range From
1905
Date Range To
1915
Materials
GLASS, NICKEL PLATED STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.2
Diameter
9.2
Description
LETHBRIDGE BREWING CO. LTD. ON NECK. "THE LETHBRIDGE BREWING AND MALTING CO. LTD. LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. HIGH CLASS CARBONATED WATER. BRITISH SYPHON CO. LONDON" PAINTED ON FRONT. NICKEL PLATE TOP. SEE CONSERVATION REPORT.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
MADE IN ENGLAND FOR LETHBRIDGE BREWERY, FOUNDED IN 1901 BY FRITZ SICK. ALSO CALLED SYPHON BOTTLES, THESE CONTAINERS WERE USED IN HOMES, HOTELS, BARS, AND CORNER SODA FOUNTAINS TO SPRITZ CARBONATED WATER. THE UNIQUE SYPHON TOP ALLOWED A PORTION OF THE BOTTLE’S CONTENTS TO BE DISPENSED WHILE PRESERVING THE REST FOR ANOTHER TIME. IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY THIS TYPE OF BOTTLE WAS ALSO PROMOTED AS BEING A SUITABLE SUBSTITUTE FOR A FIRE EXTINGUISHER, AND SOME USED THE SELTZER AS A CURE FOR HEARTBURN (ULTIMATELY THE ORIGIN OF ALKA-SELTZER). SELTZER WAS EXTREMELY POPULAR IN THE 1920S AND 30S, BUT HAD ALMOST DISAPPEARED BY THE 1940S. BREWERY CLOSED BY OWNER, MOLSONS IN 1990 & SUBSEQUENTLY DEMOLISHED.DONOR A FORMER VOLUNTEER AT THE MUSEUM IS DECEASED. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING FOUR PAINTINGS CREATED BY THE DONOR, CHRISTIAN GIBSON. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON GIBSON WAS EXCERPTED FROM HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY: CHRISTIAN GIBSON WAS BORN IN BELFAST, IRELAND IN 1887 AND EDUCATED IN LONDON, ENGLAND BEFORE ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1908. HE WORKED FOR THE CITY AS ZOO KEEPER AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS AND FOR THE ALBERTA RAILROAD AND IRRIGATION COMPANY BEFORE BEGINNING HIS 35 YEAR CAREER WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE IN 1913. GIBSON SERVED WITH THE 25TH BATTERY CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY FROM 1908 TO 1914 AND FROM 1914 TO 1919 HE SERVED IN ENGLAND IN FRANCE WITH THE 20TH BATTERY CFA. HE WAS ALSO VERY ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY AS A MEMBER OF THE KIWANIS CLUB, ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL, LETHBRIDGE AND DISTRICT HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PLAYGOERS OF LETHBRIDGE, ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION, PEMMICAN CLUB, MASONIC LODGE, AND THE GALT HOSPITAL BOARD. HE AND HIS WIFE LINDA WERE HEAVILY INFLUENTIAL IN THE RED CROSS SOCIETY’S LETHRBIDGE CHAPTER, AND HAD TWO CHILDREN, FRED AND DORIS. CHRISTIAN GIBSON PASSED AWAY ON MARCH 26, 1971. IN 2010 HIS DAUGHTER, DORIS BALCOVSKE, PARTICIPATED IN THE GALT MUSEUM’S FIRST ‘TREASURES & CURIOSITIES’ EXHIBIT BY SELECTING ONE OF HER FATHER’S PAINTINGS TO BE DISPLAYED. SHE SUBMITTED THE FOLLOWING NARRATIVE ABOUT GIBSON’S ASSOCIATION WITH THE GALT AND HIS PAINTING PRACTICE: “MY FATHER… WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE GALT MUSEUM AND HELPED COLLECT MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS. MY FATHER WAS A SELF-TAUGHT ARTIST WITH OILS, WATER COLORS, AND ALSO PEN AND INK… THE FAMILY OWNS MOST OF HIS PAINTINGS.” SEE PERMANENT FILE P19694807000 FOR HARDCOPY OF GIBSON’S OBITUARY. SEE RECORD P19930031001 FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE GIBSON FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P19651656000
Acquisition Date
1965-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
UNIFORM DRESS
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19950073156
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
UNIFORM DRESS
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
118.5
Width
83
Description
GREEN COTTON ANKLE-LENGTH UNIFORM DRESS. FRONT CLOSURE, WITH 9 BUTTONS HOLES DOWN ENTIRE LENGTH. WHITE PLASTIC BUTTONS, ATTACHED WITH SPLIT PINS (ONLY FOUR DOWN FRONT; REST MISSING). WHITE COLLAR AND TRIM ON SHORT SLEEVES. PLEATED WAIST, WITH TWO POCKETS ON FRONT OF SKIRT AND A BREAST POCKET. C/W COTTON BELT, FITS THROUGH TWO BELT LOOPS. TAG INSIDE COLLAR READS "LA CROSS PROFESSIONAL UNIFORMS SANFORIZED". "L518" STAMPED ON BOTH DRESS AND BELT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S MOTHER. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073156
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
WORK ROBE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19950073155
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WORK ROBE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
120
Width
81.5
Description
GREY COTTON WORK UNIFORM ROBE. HAS COLLAR, TWO LOWER FRONT POCKETS AND LEFT BREAST POCKET WITH PENCIL SLOT. SLEEVES HAVE BEEN RIPPED TO FOREARM LENGTH. SIDE HAND SLITS AND OPEN BACK KICK SPLIT. TAPERED WAIST TIES ATTACHED AT FRONT. TAG IN COLLAR READING "40 WEAR THE BEST SUNNY SOUTH GARMENTS LETHBRIDGE ALTA". SMOCK IS BADLY TORN, PAINT SPLATTERED, DISCOLORED, AND HAS BEEN REPAIRED MANY TIMES.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS, INCLUDING ONE DONATED AS PART OF THE ING ESTATE (P19950073023). SHE EXTRACTED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE ING FAMILY FROM PERMANENT FILE P19950073001, WHICH CONTAINS A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED WITH HAROLD ING JR., SON OF HAROLD AND MYRA, IN HIS ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN SEPTEMBER 2005. MYRA WAS BORN IN GOLDEN B.C. TO SHIN-BOW AND CHOW TING RAH; HER FATHER ORGINALLY EMIGRATED TO CANADA TO WORK ON CANADIAN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND LATER BECAME A RESTAURANTEUR, WHERE MYRA DEVELOPED HER ENGLISH SKILLS AS A WAITRESS. "IN 1906 MY DAD [HAROLD ING SR.] LEFT HONG KONG FOR VANCOUVER, HE COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH... HE'S GOT TO BE A WAITER, A BUSBOY... AND HE LEARNED ALL THE WAY UP, IN THE MEANTIME PICKING UP ENGLISH... WENT TO WINNIPEG. THIS IS BEFORE ME. BY THEN HE KNEW THE WHOLE SYSTEM OF RESTAURANTING." MYRA AND HAROLD SR. MARRIED AND ADOPTED HAROLD JR. WHEN HE WAS BORN INTO A POOR FAMILY OF ELEVEN IN 1944, IN VANCOUVER. "ME AND MY TWIN SISTER WERE SOLD BECAUSE THERE WERE JUST TOO MANY. SO DAD, MY MOM PICKED ME AND DAD SAID YES THAT'S GOOD... I DON'T KNOW WHERE MY SISTER IS... THERE'S NO WAY OF FINDING OUT." THE ING FAMILY SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE LATE 1940S, AND HAROLD SR. OWNS AND OPERATES THE NEW MOON CAFE AND TWO GROCERIES, WHICH ARE RUN BY THE FAMILY AND NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS THAT HAROLD SR. SPONSORED. "AT APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS OLD [MY FATHER] INTRODUCED ME TO THE NEW MOON CAFE, AND I WAS A BUSBOY AT THE AGE OF FIVE... IN 1951 HE SHOWED ME MY FIRST HUNDRED DOLLAR BILL... BECAUSE HE WAS THE OWNER... HE'D WAKE UP AT FIVE IN THE MORNING TO GO TO THE CAFE, OFF AND ON TO THE GROCERY STORE AND MIGHT BE DONE AT EIGHT AT NIGHT, SUPPER AND IMMEDIATELY TO CHINATOWN [FOR] GAMBLING, PUTTING DOWN MAH JONG." HAROLD JR. ATTENDED WESTMINISTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DURING THE DAY, AND CHINESE SCHOOL AT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE IN THE EVENINGS - HIS FATHER WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, AND THE ORGANIZATION RAN THE SCHOOL, CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS, FILM SCREENINGS, AND BANQUETS, FUNDED BY MEMBERSHIP FEES. HAROLD'S YOUNGER BROTHER, CALVIN, "GOT SENT TO A BOARDING SCHOOL SOMEWHERE. HE WAS GIFTED, BUT HE HAD A BYPASS SURGERY, HE HAD SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIS HEART. HE COULDN'T HANDLE PUBLIC SCHOOL, SO THEY SENT HIM TO B.C." AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND A BRIEF STINT IN CALGARY, HAROLD JR. RAN ING'S GROCERY FOR HIS FATHER, AND IN THE LATE 1960S AND EARLY 70S ALSO WORKED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND A SALESMAN AT SEARS. BOTH HAROLD SR. AND MYRA ING PASSED AWAY IN THE 1990S, AND THE OBJECTS ENCOMPASSING DONATION P19950073001-231 WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FAMILY HOME. FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND WRITTEN DETAILS ON THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P19950073155
Acquisition Date
1995-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PILSNER LABEL DISPLAY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, METAL, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20020030000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PILSNER LABEL DISPLAY
Date
1992
Materials
GLASS, METAL, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.4
Length
36.6
Width
38.6
Description
PLAQUE HAS A GOLD COLORED FRAME WITH A MAROON MATTE. THE MATTE IS CUT WITH A HEXAGONAL WINDOW IN THE CENTER. UNDER THE MATTE, AND VISIBLE THROUGH THE GLASS, THERE ARE NINE PILSNER STICKERS. THE LARGEST, IN THE CENTER HAS A PICTORIAL THAT INCLUDES TEE-PEES, A MID-20'S ERA MOTOR CAR, AN EARLY BI-PLANE, AND A HORSE AND CARRIAGE. THE TEXT READS "OLD STYLE PILSNER". AROUND THIS CENTER STICKER, THERE ARE SIX SMALLER STICKERS WITH PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF LETHBRIDGE THROUGHOUT VARIOUS STAGES OF IT'S DEVELOPMENT. AT THE TOP OF EACH OF THESE IMAGES IN A YELLOW BAND IT HAS THE TEXT "HAPPY 100TH LETHBRIDGE". AT THE BOTTOM RIGHT HAND OF EACH OF THESE STICKERS THERE IS A SMALL RED FLAG WITH THE LETTERS "PIL" ON IT. FINALLY, AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PLAQUE, THERE ARE TWO GREEN STICKERS. ON THE LEFT, IT COMMEMORATES THE LETHBRIDGE CENTENNIAL, WHILE AT THE RIGHT THE TEXT ON THE STICKER SAYS "IT'S HARD TO BE HUMBLE.... .....WHEN YOU'RE PERFECT IN EVERY WAY!"
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, ED BUSHEY, FIRST STARTED IN THE BREWING BUSINESS AT THE MOLSON'S BREWERY IN WINNIPEG, 1961. HE SERVED AS THE ASSISTANT BREWMASTER IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1967 TO 1972. IN 1973 HE MOVED TO EDMONTON WHERE HE WORKED AS THE PLANT MANANGER FROM 1973 UNTIL 1990. HE THEN MOVED TO VANCOUVER AND WAS THE PLANT MANAGER THERE UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1992. HE HAS WORKED AT EVERY MOLSONS BREWERY IN WESTERN CANADA AT ONE TIME OR ANOTHER. THIS PARTICULAR GIFT WAS GIVEN TO ED UPON HIS RETIREMENT BY THE LETHBRIDGE BREWERY AS A REMINDER OF HIS TIME AT THE BREWERY (OCT. 1967 - MAY 1972). *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. NO FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE DONOR, ED BUSHEY, WAS FOUND. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE BREWERY IS EXCERPTED FROM RECORD P19900020001: FRITZ SICK FOUNDED THE LETHBRIDGE BREWERY IN 1901, STARTING WITH $8,000 IN CAPITAL & COOPERING STORAGE TANKS HIMSELF ( HE WAS A COOPER BY TRAINING). NEEDING ADDITIONAL CAPITAL TO FINANCE A NEW MALT HOUSE & EXPANSION A FEW YEARS LATER, SICK ESTABLISHED THE ALBERTA BREWING CO. AND ISSUED STOCK SELLING FOR $100 SHARE. IN 1912 A NEW BREWERY WAS BUILT FOR $200,000 AND IT REMAINED THE NUCLEUS OF THE PLANT UNTIL THE BREWERY'S CLOSURE IN 1990. IN 1914 SICK WAS JOINED IN THE BUSINESS BY HIS SON EMIL, WHO IN 1923 EXPANDED THE OPERATION TO PRINCE ALBERT & SOON AFTER TO REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN. THE SLOGANS "ALBERTA'S PRIDE" & "QUALITY FIRST", PRINTED ON EVERY LABEL, BECAME WELL KNOWN ACROSS THE TWO PROVINCES. IN 1926 THE COMPANY TOOK CONTROL OF THE EDMONTON BREWERY & MALTING CO. AND IN 1928 FORMED A HOLDING COMPANY: "THE ASSOCIATED BREWERIES OF CANADA LTD." FOLLOWING FRITZ SICK'S MOVE TO VANCOUVER TO RETIRE, HE OBTAINED A LICENSE AND IN 1935, WHEN SICK WAS 76 YEARS OLD, THE CAPILANO BREWING CO. WAS FOUNDED. IN 1933 EMIL ACQUIRED CONTROL OF AMERICAN BREWERIES IN GREAT FALLS & MISSOULA MONTANA AND ANOTHER BREWERY IN SPOKANE. IN 1935 HE ACQUIRED THE RIGHTS TO SELL RAINIER BEER, AND IN 1954 THE SICKS' SEATTLE BREWING & MALTING CO. PURCHASED THE ENTIRE RAINIER BREWING CO. OF SAN FRANCISCO. BETWEEN 1935 & 1953 THE SICKS PAID CLOSE TO $2 MILLION IN ROYALTY AND ACQUISITIONS COSTS TO ACQUIRE THE RAINIER NAME. THE COMPANY ALSO PURCHASED HEMRICH BREWING CO. IN 1935 AND SOON AFTER BOTH APEX BREWING CO. & HORLUCKS BREWERS OF SEATTLE. IN 1943 A SALEM, OREGON BREWERY WAS ALSO ACQUIRED. A TOTAL OF 11 BREWERIES IN SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, MONTANA, OREGON, AND WASHINGTON, PLUS A HOP FARM AND DISTRIBUTION NETWORK FORMED THE SICK EMPIRE WHEN FRITZ SICK DIED IN 1945 AT THE AGE OF 86. THE COMPANY'S HEAD OFFICE WAS IN CALGARY, WHILE AMERICAN OPERATIONS WERE CONTROLLED BY EMIL SICK FROM SEATTLE. IN 1957 MOLSON'S BREWERIES OF MONTREAL DECIDED TO EXPAND NATIONALLY AND IN 1958-59 EMIL AGREED TO A PURCHASE PRICE OF $27 MILLION INCLUDING $9 MILLION IN PREFERRED SHARES REDEEMED IN 1963. THE MAIN ASSETS AS ACQUIRED IN 1959 WERE BREWERIES IN VANCOUVER, EDMONTON, LETHBRIDGE, PRINCE ALBERT, REGINA, SEATTLE, AND SPOKANE. EMIL SICK DIED IN 1964 AT THE AGE OF 70 IN SEATTLE. LETHBRIDGE BREWERY WAS EVENTUALLY CLOSED BY MOLSONS IN 1990 AND THE BUILDINGS WERE SUBSEQUENTLY DEMOLISHED.
Catalogue Number
P20020030000
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RCA-BK5A
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, IRON, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20190022004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RCA-BK5A
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1955
Materials
STEEL, IRON, FOAM
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.1
Length
17.8
Width
13.8
Description
GREY DESK MICROPHONE MOUNTED ON STAND; MICROPHONE IS CYLINDRICAL WITH TWO ADJUSTABLE DIALS ON SIDES FOR ATTACHING TO STAND. MICROPHONE HAS GREY METAL WINDSCREEN WITH METAL GUARDS; MICROPHONE HAS BLACK CORD EXTENDING FROM BACK WITH SILVER CONNECTOR AND ENGRAVED TEXT ON CONNECTOR, “SWITCHCRAFT, U.S. PAT. 3219961, CAN. PAT. 761114, A3M”. MICROPHONE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT ON BACK, “M V1 V2” WITH LINES POINTING TO SCREW IN CENTER; UNDERSIDE OF MICROPHONE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT, “TYPE BK-5A, M1-11010” AND ENGRAVED TEXT “1365”. MICROPHONE IS ATTACHED BY TWO ADJUSTABLE DIALS TO TWO METAL PRONGS ON THE STAND; STAND HAS BRASS ADJUSTABLE DIALS; STAND IS FIXED TO IRON BASE BY BRASS BOLT. BASE IS “V” SHAPED WITH STAND ATTACHED AT MERGE OF PRONGS; BASE HAS GREY FOAM LINING UNDERSIDE. CORD IS FRAYED AT CONNECTION TO MICROPHONE; DIALS ON MICROPHONE AND STAND ARE TARNISHED; BASE OF STAND IS SCUFFED AND CHIPPED; FOAM IS DISINTEGRATING; MICROPHONE CASING IS SCRATCHED AND CHIPPED, WITH WHITE AND BLUE-GREY RESIDUE ON TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE DESK MICROPHONE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “I ORIGINALLY THOUGHT THAT THIS MIC, (AND IT’S A WONDERFUL MICROPHONE FOR ITS TIME)…WAS USED WHEN RADIO WAS DOING THE NEWS AND THE NEWSROOM, BUT RON JOEVENNAZO, ENGINEER, TOLD ME THAT ‘NO, THIS WAS USED BY THE LIVE ANNOUNCER,’ AND HE COULD NOT RECALL ANY OF THE NAMES OF ANNOUNCERS AT THAT TIME…THIS GOES BACK A LONG WAY, BACK TO ’55…IT WAS NO LONGER IN USE WHEN I WAS THERE [BUT IT WAS STILL IN THE BUILDING].” “I KNOW [THE STATION] DID HAVE A DESK MIC IN THE NEWS BOOTH, AND ON THE NEWS SET, FOR A WHILE, THEY HAD A DESK MIC…RON JOEVENNAZO WAS THERE ALMOST FROM THE OUTSET OF THE OPERATION…HE WAS THERE BEFORE I WENT. ANOTHER ONE IS BOB JOHNSON. HE WAS THE STATION PRESIDENT, AND GENERAL MANAGER, AND BOTH OF THEM ARE STILL IN TOWN.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022004
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS" FLASH
Date Range From
2007
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLASTIC, FOAM, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.7
Width
7
Description
BLACK PLASTIC MICROPHONE FLASH, SQUARE/CUBE WITH GREY FOAM INSIDE. TOP HAS HOLE CUT IN PLASTIC SHOWING FOAM INSIDE; FOAM HAS CIRCLE CUT IN CENTER FOR HOLDING A MICROPHONE. SIDES OF FLASH HAVE LOGO WITH WHITE TEXT “GLOBAL” AND RED TEXT “NEWS” BESIDE RED ARROW. TEXT ON SIDES OF FLASH IS FADED AND PEELING; TOP AND SIDES OF FLASH ARE SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE MICROPHONE FLASH, DWORNIK RECALLED, “[A HANDHELD MICROPHONE WITH A FLASH] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK [THE MICROPHONE AND FLASH] MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE HANDHELD MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” “[I STARTED UNDER] CJOC…THEN TWO MONTHS AFTER I STARTED THERE, WE CHANGED TO CFAC [AND THEY HAD FLASHES TOO].” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022005
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ELECTRO VOICE RE5ON/D-B
Date Range From
1988
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, RUBBER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.5
Diameter
5
Description
BLACK METAL MICROPHONE WITH SILVER CONNECTOR AND BLACK RUBBER END. MICROPHONE HAS BLACK WINDSCREEN; MICROPHONE HAS BLACK LABEL WRAPPED AROUND BODY UNDER HEAD AND WINDSCREEN, WITH WHITE TEXT “EV, RE5ON/D-B, 150 OHMS DYNAMIC OMNIDIRECTIONAL”. BASE CONNECTOR HAS SILVER PUSH-SWITCH FOR REMOVAL. BODY IS HEAVILY SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED; HEAD BELOW WINDSCREEN IS SCUFFED; LABEL BELOW HEAD IS PEELED AT CORNERS; BASE CONNECTOR HAS GREEN-BLUE RESIDUE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE HANDHELD ELECTRO VOICE MICROPHONE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “THIS [MICROPHONE] WAS USED MORE SO FOR SOME PROMOTION IN PROGRAMMING STUFF. I THINK THIS ONE MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR THE JUNE 7TH BATTLE GROUND…IT WAS A REALLY HUGE UNDERTAKING. WE HAD OUR MOBILE CONSTRUCTED, AND ONE OF THE THINGS, AGAIN, TO DO COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING, WE WOULD DO A GAME SHOW THAT WE WOULD RECORD DURING WHOOP-UP DAYS. WE DID IT DOWNTOWN [BY THE IGA STORE, NOW CASA] AND I DID SOME VIDEOTAPING FROM THAT. IT WAS A THREE CAMERA OPERATION. MOST OF THE STAFF WOULD GO OUT TO IT, AND WE WOULD GET TEAMS OF PEOPLE FROM BUSINESSES COMPETING IN A THREE LEGGED RACE, A SKI RACE. THERE WERE FOUR PEOPLE ON A TWO BY TEN TREATED AS SKIS. THERE WAS A BOBBING-TANK THERE, WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE TO GET THEIR HEAD IN TO GET A DOZEN DUCKS OUT. THERE WAS A WOBBLY WHEEL CART AND ANOTHER ONE WITH SPRAYING WATER GUNS. IT WAS JUST A BLAST. PEOPLE WOULD COME OUT AND SET UP BLEACHERS ON THE STREET…WE ALSO DID IT ON ANOTHER STREET, I THINK IT WAS ON SIXTH STREET AT ONE TIME AND THEN WE DID IT OUT AT WHOOP-UP GROUNDS. WE ALSO TOOK IT OUT ON THE ROAD. WE DID IT IN TABER, PINCHER CREEK…IT WAS A BLAST, A REALLY GREAT TIME.” “I’M THINKING [WE RAN IT] ABOUT FIVE YEARS…I’M GOING TO SAY, 1990-95…I REMEMBER ONE BUDGET YEAR, JUST AFTER WICK BOUGHT THE STATION, THE WHOLE MANAGEMENT TEAM (AND AT THAT TIME I WAS THE PRODUCTION MANAGER) WE WERE FLOWN OUT TO VANCOUVER TO MEET THE EXECUTIVES OF WICK, AND WE WEREN’T SURE IF WE WERE GOING TO RECEIVE WALKING PAPERS OR WHAT. ACTUALLY, IT WAS QUITE AMIABLE REALLY, BUT WE HAD TO DO WHAT THEY CALLED, A ZERO-BUDGET PROCESS WHERE YOU TAKE EVERYTHING AWAY, START FROM ZERO AND SEE WHAT YOU NEED. THEN OF COURSE WE HAD BUDGET FIGURES TO MEET…WHAT CAN YOU DO WITHOUT AND WHAT IS GOING TO GET CUT BACK. A LOT OF IT WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING WE WERE DOING…[THIS HAPPENED] I THINK ABOUT ’92.” “I KNOW [THE INCLUDED HANDHELD MICROPHONE] DOESN’T FIT ON [THE] NEWS FLASHER…[THE MICROPHONE] WAS WIRED. IT HAS GOT AN XLR CONNECTION ON IT…IT WAS [STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM WHEN I GOT IT IN 2014].” “WE STARTED GOING WITH WHAT THEY CALL LAVALIER MICS…SOMETIMES THEY’LL STILL USE A HAND HELD MIC…ONE OF THE REASONS THEY USE A HAND HELD MIC IS THAT THEY CAN PUT THE FLASH ON RIGHT THERE, AND IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE FILM, THEY’VE GOT YOUR NAME IN FRONT…THEY HAD QUITE A FEW [GLOBAL NEWS] FLASHERS THERE FOR THAT VERY PURPOSE, WHEN YOU NEED…YOU COULD USE [THE MICROPHONE] AS A HAND RIGHT, IT WAS AN OLD WARHORSE CAMERA OR MICROPHONE, AND YOU WOULD JUST SLIDE THAT ON, BUT THEN THEY’D THROW IT IN THE BACK OF THE CAR, OR THE TRUCK AND IT GETS SCUFFED UP.” “WE HAD THOSE WHEN I WAS STILL A SHOOTER, AND YOU KNOW, THEY’D BEEN USED FOR DECADES REALLY…WHILE I DIDN’T USE THAT PARTICULAR ONE, WE HAD ONES THAT WERE LIKE THAT.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022006
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS"
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLEXIGLASS, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190022001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS"
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLEXIGLASS, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
76.2
Width
30.6
Description
CLEAR PLEXIGLASS SIGN; FRONT HAS RAISED WHITE WOOD LETTERS LEFT OF RAISED RED WOOD ARROW, “GLOBAL LETHBRIDGE”, FORMING THE “GLOBAL NEWS” LOGO. BACK OF SIGN HAS SILVER METAL BOLTS WITH WHITE PLASTIC NUTS FIXING LETTERS AND ARROW TO THE SIGN. SIGN HAS GRIME AND RESIDUE ON PLEXIGLASS; TOPS OF LETTERS HAVE MINOR STAINING AND SCUFFING; ARROW HAS SCUFFING ON TOP AND SIDES, AND MINOR STAINING ON TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE GLOBAL NEWS SIGN, DWORNIK RECALLED, “I NEVER WORKED WITH THAT [GLOBAL] SIGN, BUT IT WAS JUST SITTING IN THE ENGINEERING OFFICE…THERE WERE FIVE ENGINEERS, WHEN I LEFT THE FIRST TIME [IN 1996]…WHEN I LEFT IN 2015, ACTUALLY WE DID NOT HAVE EVEN ONE ENGINEER.” “[THE SIGN WOULD HAVE BEEN SHOWN ON-AIR] THERE WOULD BE SOME SCALE, BUT, BASICALLY, THIS WAS OVER THE SHOULDER OF THE PERSON WHO WAS READING THE NEWS, AND THEY WOULD USE A LONGER LENS THAT WOULD COMPRESS IT, AND THROW THINGS OFF. IT ALSO HAS A CURVED SURFACE ON IT TO CUT DOWN ON REFLECTION, SO THAT YOU DON’T GET REFLECTIONS THERE…[THERE WOULD ONLY BE ONE IN THE STUDIO] I SUSPECT.” “[THE GLOBAL NEWS LOGO IS] AN OLD LOGO, AND THE WAY COMPANIES ARE, THEY KEEP CHANGING THEIR LOGOS…THIS CHECK-MARK THERE WAS CHANGED QUITE A BIT, THREE TIMES AT LEAST. WHEN IT WAS WITH CANWEST, WHICH IS ANOTHER REMARKABLE STORY, OF WINNIPEG, AND IZZY ASPER FAMILY, THAT WAS ACTUALLY A CRESCENT MOON…I DON’T KNOW AT WHAT POINT, THEY MADE IT A CHECK-MARK, AND THEN THEY MADE IT AN EMBOSSED, GLOSSY CHECK-MARK…I’D SAY AROUND THE TURN OF THE CENTURY…2000 OR SO.” “[I GRABBED THE SIGN BECAUSE] I KNOW THAT I HAD SEEN IT ON AIR. IT WAS USED IN THE NEWS UPDATES THAT THEY WERE DOING…IT’S QUITE NEAT BECAUSE IT LOOKS HUGE, OF COURSE, ON SET, BUT, JUST THE WAY THEY POSITION IT…THAT’S SOME OF THE FUN STUFF OF TELEVISION. AND, I’M…[A] PACK-RAT…I SEE…SOME HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE THAT I DON’T WANT TO LET THE STORY OF LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION KIND OF JUST SLIDE BY, AND NOWADAYS, IT SEEMS TO BE THE THING. THERE’S SO MUCH TRANSIENCY, AND IT’S A 24 HOUR NEWS CYCLE, AND THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT STUFF THAT’S HAPPENING NOW. WHEN I WAS IN SCHOOL, I DIDN’T ENJOY HISTORY AT ALL REALLY, BUT NOW, AS THEY SAY, AS I AM A PART OF HISTORY, IT’S BECOME MORE NOTEWORTHY TO ME, AND PEOPLE DON’T REALIZE, I THINK, THAT WHAT IS HAPPENING TODAY AS JUST TODAY’S NEWS, AT SOME POINT, IS GOING TO BE PART OF HISTORY, AND I DON’T WANT TO SEE US LOSE STUFF LIKE THIS THAT I WAS INVOLVED WITH.” DWORNIK ELABORATED ON THE ROLE OF ENGINEERS AT THE STATION, NOTING, “[THE ENGINEER’S ROLE IS] BASICALLY TO KEEP US ON THE AIR. THERE’S SO MUCH ELECTRONIC AND TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT THEY HAD TO KNOW ABOUT TRANSMITTERS, MICROWAVE, VIDEOTAPE, ALL THE ELECTRONICS, AND THEY ALSO DID MAINTENANCE ON THE BUILDING.” “THE LAST ENGINEER WAS LET GO IN AN UNFORTUNATE SITUATION, IN THE SUMMER OF [2014]…WE DID NOT HAVE A STATION MANAGER. AT ONE TIME WE HAD A STATION MANAGER [PETER DEYES] WHO WAS ALSO THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHEN I CAME BACK. THAT FELLOW LEFT…THEY BROUGHT IN AN ASSIGNMENT EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND SHE WAS…NOT EVEN THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHICH WAS TERRIBLE; THEY CALLED HER THE NEWS MANAGER. MANAGEMENT OF THE STATION WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE CALGARY TELEVISION, AND THE ENGINEERING RESPONSIBILITIES WERE TAKEN OVER BY CALGARY TELEVISION.” “WE’D HAVE TO CALL [ENGINEERS WHEN THERE WAS EQUIPMENT ISSUES]. AT THAT TIME, WE HAD MORE CAMERAS THAN VIDEOGRAPHERS, SO THEY KIND OF HAD A SPARE ON HAND. IF ONE WENT DOWN, THEY’D BE OKAY. AND, AT THAT TIME, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE STATION, AND WAS AUTOMATED. IT WAS JUST MIND-BOGGLING THE AUTOMATION THAT THEY HAD AVAILABLE. CALGARY TELEVISION WAS…KIND OF THE MASTER CONTROL CENTER FOR ALL OF THE GLOBAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN CANADA. SO, IT WAS JUST AMAZING, ALL THE MONITORS IN THEIR MASTER CONTROL…ONE OF THE CENTERS WAS, I THINK, SWITCHED OUT OF EDMONTON…ALL THE COMMERCIALS THAT PLAYED ALL ACROSS CANADA, ORIGINATED OUT OF CALGARY TELEVISION. AND THEY WEREN’T VIDEO TAPE MACHINES, AT THAT TIME, THEY WERE BASICALLY COMPUTERS.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022001
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ON AIR"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1976
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190022003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ON AIR"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1976
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
56
Length
11
Width
15.6
Description
HANGING WOOD BOX PAINTED LIGHT BLUE; FRONT HAS PLASTIC SIGN PAINTED RED INSIDE WITH UNPAINTED, CLEAR TEXT “ON AIR”. BACK IS UNPAINTED WOOD WITH HOLE CUT-OUT IN UPPER LEFT CORNER. WOOD IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; FRONT HAS RED PAINT STAINING WOOD AROUND PLASTIC; PLASTIC SIGN HAS CRACK RUNNING HORIZONTALLY AT TOP; PLASTIC HAS HEAVY GRIME AND DUST ACCUMULATED; PAINT IS PEELING AT CORNERS OF WOOD; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. NOTE: INSIDE HAS LOOSE COMPONENTS, HANDLE WITH CARE.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE “ON AIR” LIGHT FIXTURE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “THE ON AIR…WAS USED IN, WELL BASICALLY ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE STUDIO DOOR…[IT WAS] NEVER USED IN THE MAIN STUDIO BUT THEY’D USE IT FOR AUDIO RECORDINGS, AND THAT [DESK] MICROPHONE AS WELL. THEY KIND OF GO HAND IN HAND…IN RADIO, ‘ON AIR’ [IS USED] SO YOU’RE NOT GOING TO WALK INTO THE STUDIO WHILE THE OTHER GUY’S TALKING. THAT WOULD SWITCH ON AUTOMATICALLY WHEN THE FELLOW SWITCHED THE KEY FOR THE MICROPHONE TO PUT THAT ON. I BELIEVE THIS ONE WAS USED FOR THE RADIO NEWS BECAUSE WHEN I FIRST STARTED THERE, IT WAS CGOC TIED IN WITH RADIO, AND THE NEWS WAS RUN OUT OF THE TELEVISION STATION, SO THE NEWS PEOPLE WOULD DO THE LEAD FOR THE RADIO NEWSCAST, AND THEN THEY’D PUT TOGETHER PRETTY MUCH THE SAME, AND THEN GO INTO THE STUDIO AT 6:00 AND DO THE NEWS THERE. I BELIEVE THIS ONE WAS USED ON THAT STUDIO, AND THEN THERE WAS ANOTHER GOING BACK TO THE BEGINNING OF LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION. THEY DID A COMMERCIAL ‘LIVE’, AND I JUST GOT THIS INFORMATION THIS MORNING, FROM OUR CHIEF ENGINEER AT THE TIME, RON JOEVENNAZO. THEY USED TO HAVE AN ANNOUNCEMENT RIGHT BESIDE THE PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM, AND AN ANNOUNCEMENT SITTING THERE ALL THE TIME EITHER WATCHING TV, READING A BOOK, OR WHATEVER, AND WHEN YOU CAME TO A COMMERCIAL BREAK THEY WOULD COUNT HIM INTO IT, AND HE’D HAVE A SCRIPT THERE, AND HE WOULD READ THE COMMERCIAL AUDIO, AND MOST OF THE COMMERCIALS WERE EITHER LIVE FROM THE STUDIO, OR THEY WOULD HAVE BALANCE, WHICH THEY BECAME. I MISSED THE ERA OF BALANCE, BUT WE WERE USING SLIDES, SO BASICALLY A SLIDE-PROJECTOR, PROJECTING INTO THE LENS OF A VIDEO CAMERA. HE WOULD RANGE THE COMMERCIAL, AND GO BACK, AND DO SOMETHING UNTIL THE NEXT COMMERCIAL BREAK CAME UP.” “IT WAS JUST THE TECHNOLOGY AT THE TIME, AND THE NEXT STEP ON THAT WAS…THEY WENT DOWN TO SEPARATE AUDIO BOOTHS, AND WOULD RECORD THEM ON A REEL-TO-REEL TAPE, AND THEN YOU PLAY THAT BACK, IN SYNC, WITH THE COMMERCIALS, AND WE USED TO GET THAT TIMING TOO. THEN THEY WENT INTO COMMERCIALS WITH REPEAT. THEY WOULD START RECORDING THEM ONTO WHAT LOOKED LIKE AN 8TRACK CARTRIDGE, BUT IT WAS JUST A FILM TRACK ON A LOOP, AND IT HELD 30 SECONDS WORTH OF TAPE. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF THOSE, AND THEY’D BE NUMBERED, AND SO VERY BIG ADVERTISERS, SOME OF THEM LIKE…SCHWARTZ REAL ESTATE…THEY HAD ALL THESE HOUSES FOR REAL ESTATE. I’D GO OUT AND CHOOSE SLIDES FOR THEM, AND THEY’D PUT THE AUDIO ONTO A CART, AND THEY WOULD BASICALLY DO THE DAY TAPE, AND THEY HAD, FROM THE TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT, IT WAS THE ORDER THE COMMERCIALS GO IN. THEY’D TAKE THE SCHWARTZ, PLAY THAT, RECORD THAT ONTO THE REEL-TO-REEL, THEN PUT IN THE NEXT ONE, THE STATION ID. THEY’D TAKE THAT UPSTAIRS, AND MASTER CONTROL WOULD RUN THAT, WITH THE SLIDES. BUT, THEN WE GOT INTO DOING MORE MOTION PICTURE AND VIDEO COMMERCIALS. THEY WOULD DO THAT ‘DAY TAPE’ SAME PROCESS, BUT DO IT ON VIDEO TAPE, SO THERE’D BE A 1” VIDEO TAPE TO RUN—CUE IT UP, AND THEN WE MOVED; WE TRANSITIONED FROM THAT INTO A BETA-CART. AGAIN, WE WERE THE ONLY STATION OF OUR SIZE THAT HAD A BETA-CART MACHINE, WHICH WAS BASICALLY LIKE THE 8TRACK CARTRIDGE, BUT IN A VIDEO FORMAT, AND IT WAS ON A ROBOT THAT WE’D HAVE A COUPLE OF HUNDRED OF THESE BETA CAM CARDS IN IT, AND WE’D LOAD IT, AND GO ON TO THE NEXT ONE.” “IT WAS STILL BEING USED IN (WHEN I WAS THERE)…INTO THE ‘80S, BECAUSE I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’90 THAT WE GOT THE BETA-CART. IN FACT IT WAS STILL BEING USED BECAUSE THEY STILL REQUIRE AN ANNOUNCER…WHEN THEY BUILT THE NEW PART OF THE BUILDING (AROUND 1990, I THINK, ACTUALLY)…THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN USED UP UNTIL ABOUT ’89…THEY MOVED THE SOUND BOOTH UPSTAIRS, AND USING DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGY THEN.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022003
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"2&7"
Date Range From
1987
Date Range To
1992
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190022007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"2&7"
Date Range From
1987
Date Range To
1992
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.2
Length
49
Width
46
Description
WOOD SIGN SHAPED LIKE THE NUMBERS 2 AND 7 CONNECTED. FRONT OF SIGN HAS ORANGE “2” AND RED “7” PAINTED WITH BLACK AMPERSAND “&” IN CENTER; NUMBERS ARE PAINTED ON WHITE BACKFROUND, WITH RED DROP-SHADOWS. SIDES OF SIGN ARE PAINTED WHITE. BACK IS UNPAINTED PRESSED WOOD BOARD; BACK HAS TWO DRILLED HOLES FOR HANGING IN CENTER. FRONT HAS LOSS ALONG LOWER EDGE OF “7”; FRONT IS STAINED AT TOP ARCH OF “2” AND ALONG EDGES; BACK IS STAINED RED AT EDGES AND STAINED IN THE CENTER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE “2&7” STATION SIGN, DWORNIK RECALLED, “[THE SIGN LOOKS HANDMADE, HAND-PAINTED] THAT’S AGAIN, JUST A STUDIO PROP FOR THE…NEWS READERS [AND STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM].” “[THE YEARS 2&7 RAN WERE A] VERY HIGH PROFILE, EXCITING TIME FOR THE STATION AS WELL. THE REASON THEY WENT WITH THE 2 AND 7, WE DIDN’T CHANGE, AT THAT TIME, TO OFFICIALLY CHANGE OUR CALL LETTERS, WE WERE STILL CFAC, SO WE MADE THAT TRANSITION INTO 2 AND 7. WHAT MANAGEMENT HAD DONE OUT OF CALGARY WAS ARRANGE WITH ALL THE CABLE COMPANIES TO PUT US ONTO EITHER CHANNEL 2 OR CHANNEL 7…[CALGARY’S] TRANSMITTER WAS BROADCASTING ON CHANNEL 2 OFF AIR. WE WERE BROADCASTING ON CHANNEL 7 OFF AIR. WE WERE CHANNEL 2 ON CABLE, AND THEY WERE 7 UP IN CALGARY, AND THEY WERE ABLE TO COMFORTABLY NEGOTIATE WITH ALL THE CABLE OPERATORS TO PUT US ON EITHER 2 AND 7…FROM CROWSNEST PASS INTO CRANBROOK AND CRESTON. THAT’S ALSO THE TIME WHEN THE OLYMPICS WAS HAPPENING AND THE PROMOTIONAL DIRECTOR IN CALGARY WAS JUST AMAZING. THE PROMOTIONAL MANAGER AND THEY HAD A SALES MANAGER. BOYD ASH WAS PROMOTIONS MANAGER THERE AND HE GOT ON THIS IDEA OF THE 2 AND 7, AND HE ALSO GOT ON TO [MAKING] LAPEL PINS. THEY MUST HAVE DESIGNED AND DISTRIBUTED…HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF [LAPEL] PINS…PEOPLE LOVED THEM…I THINK THAT’S WHAT PROMPTED IT, BECAUSE WELL, IT WAS KNOWN THAT TRADING PINS WAS A BIG DEAL…IT WAS VERY HIGH PROFILE AND LOTS OF GREAT PROMOTIONAL THINGS HAPPENING WITH, AGAIN, EXCITING TIMES AND SOME FUN STUFF.” “[THE ERA OF 2&7] I WOULD SAY ABOUT ’87 TO ABOUT ’92 AGAIN I THINK…[IT WAS VERY SHORT] AND I THINK PART OF THAT MIGHT BE TIED INTO THE FACT THAT THE SATELLITE STUFF IS COMING ON…THAT WAS THE REASON TO DO THE 2 AND 7 IS THAT IT’S EASY, LIKE IF YOU SAY, ‘WELL I’M LOOKING FOR CJOC, WHERE DO I FIND CJOC ON MY CABLE LINE UP?’ BUT IF YOU’RE JUST LOOKING FOR A NUMBER THAT WAS EASIER. BUT THEN I DON’T THINK THEY WERE GOING TO CONTINUE NEGOTIATING THAT, FOR WHATEVER REASON.” “[BEFORE 2&7 THE STATION WAS] CFAC…SAME COLOURS. THE RED AND YELLOW THERE.” DWORNIK ELABORATED ON THE ROLE OF ENGINEERS AT THE STATION, NOTING, “[THE ENGINEER’S ROLE IS] BASICALLY TO KEEP US ON THE AIR. THERE’S SO MUCH ELECTRONIC AND TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT THEY HAD TO KNOW ABOUT TRANSMITTERS, MICROWAVE, VIDEOTAPE, ALL THE ELECTRONICS, AND THEY ALSO DID MAINTENANCE ON THE BUILDING.” “THE LAST ENGINEER WAS LET GO IN AN UNFORTUNATE SITUATION, IN THE SUMMER OF [2014]…WE DID NOT HAVE A STATION MANAGER. AT ONE TIME WE HAD A STATION MANAGER [PETER DEYES] WHO WAS ALSO THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHEN I CAME BACK. THAT FELLOW LEFT…THEY BROUGHT IN AN ASSIGNMENT EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND SHE WAS…NOT EVEN THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHICH WAS TERRIBLE; THEY CALLED HER THE NEWS MANAGER. MANAGEMENT OF THE STATION WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE CALGARY TELEVISION, AND THE ENGINEERING RESPONSIBILITIES WERE TAKEN OVER BY CALGARY TELEVISION.” “WE’D HAVE TO CALL [ENGINEERS WHEN THERE WAS EQUIPMENT ISSUES]. AT THAT TIME, WE HAD MORE CAMERAS THAN VIDEOGRAPHERS, SO THEY KIND OF HAD A SPARE ON HAND. IF ONE WENT DOWN, THEY’D BE OKAY. AND, AT THAT TIME, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE STATION, AND WAS AUTOMATED. IT WAS JUST MIND-BOGGLING THE AUTOMATION THAT THEY HAD AVAILABLE. CALGARY TELEVISION WAS…KIND OF THE MASTER CONTROL CENTER FOR ALL OF THE GLOBAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN CANADA. SO, IT WAS JUST AMAZING, ALL THE MONITORS IN THEIR MASTER CONTROL…ONE OF THE CENTERS WAS, I THINK, SWITCHED OUT OF EDMONTON…ALL THE COMMERCIALS THAT PLAYED ALL ACROSS CANADA, ORIGINATED OUT OF CALGARY TELEVISION. AND THEY WEREN’T VIDEO TAPE MACHINES, AT THAT TIME, THEY WERE BASICALLY COMPUTERS.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022007
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SLATE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1976
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190022002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SLATE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1976
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
37.9
Width
53
Description
SLATE SIGN ON PRESSED WOOD BOARD WITH ROUNDED EDGES; SIGN FRONT IS BLACK WITH YELLOW AND BLACK STRIPED BORDER ALONG EDGES; FRONT HAS WORN WHITE TEXT REMAINING, “TITLE, RECORDED, PLAYBACK” WITH WORN, ILLEGIBLE TEXT. TOP OF SIGN HAS TWO DRILLED HOLES WITH METAL GUARDS FOR HANGING. BACK IS UNPAINTED, TEXTURED PRESSED BOARD. BACK HAS SEVERE STAINING AND PAPER RESIDUE; BACK HAS WATER STAINING AT TOP EDGE AND RIGHT EDGE; FRONT IS SCUFFED AT EDGES AND HAS LOSS AT UPPER AND LOWER RIGHT CORNERS, AND LOWER LEFT CORNER; FRONT HAS BORDER PAINT PEELING AND LOST; FRONT SLATE IS WORN AND TEXT FADED, WITH RESIDUE REMAINING; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE PRODUCTION SLATE, DWORNIK RECALLED, “THE SLATE HERE, THIS WAS USED…I THINK LIKELY FROM DAY ONE…IT’S A CHALK BOARD THAT [STAFF] WOULD WRITE ON THEM FOR PRIMARILY STUDIO PRODUCTIONS WHICH IS MOSTLY WHAT THEY DID FOR PROGRAMS BACK THEN. BECAUSE THE ONLY LOCATION STUFF WOULD HAVE BEEN DONE ON 16 MM BLACK AND WHITE FILM. SO, OFF THE TOP OF EVERY TAPE, THEY’D PUT THE TITLE ON TO IDENTIFY WHAT PROGRAM IT WAS, THE TAKE, THEY’D RECORD DATE, AND THEN THERE’S OTHER STUFF AS TO WHEN IT’S SCHEDULED TO PLAY BACK.” “THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN USED BY PEOPLE LIKE CORNY MARTINS WHO WAS IN STUDIO, JIM TUSTIAN…JIM WAS QUITE AN INTERESTING FELLOW BECAUSE HE WAS ORIGINALLY FROM FOREMOST, BORN AND BRED OUT AT FOREMOST THERE. HIS DAD WAS, I THINK HE WAS WITH THE RAILWAY. COMING OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL, JIM WORKED AT THE STATION FOR ONE SUMMER, FELL IN LOVE WITH TELEVISION, AND HE MOVED ON, AGAIN, ANOTHER FELLOW THAT MOVED ON, HE WAS…STUDIO CAM AND HE WENT UP TO EDMONTON AND WORKED WITH CFRN. BUT THOSE PEOPLE WOULD HAVE WORKED WITH THIS…A LOT OF SHOWS WOULD HAVE BEEN RECORDED WITH TITLES ON THERE…I THINK, OFTEN TIMES THEY’D PUT THE DIRECTOR’S NAME ON THERE, AND WHO WAS RUNNING VIDEO TAPE THEN.” “[I GRABBED THIS IN] 2014…IN THAT ENGINEERING ROOM…[I DON’T HAVE MEMORIES OF IT IN USE IN 1976] NOT FOR VERY LONG REALLY. BECAUSE AT THAT TIME, SHORTLY AFTER I GOT THERE…I THINK IT WAS IN THE FALL THAT WE GOT A CHARACTER GENERATOR. BASICALLY, IT’S A COMPUTER THAT, ITS SOLE PURPOSE IS TO TYPE OUT THE SLATE INFORMATION AND THEN YOU CAN SUPERIMPOSE THAT ON THE FRONT END OF THE TAPE. THAT ONE WAS VERY RUDIMENTARY AND SO THIS WAS IMMEDIATELY OBSOLETE.” “[I THINK IT SURVIVED FOR DECADES IN THE ENGINEERING ROOM BECAUSE] PERHAPS A LOT OF US PEOPLE IN TELEVISION ARE NOSTALGIC IN THINKING LIKE, WHEN THAT WAS DONE, LIKE SOME REMARKABLE PROGRAMS WERE DONE, AND SO I THINK SOME HANG ONTO THAT FOR MEMORABILIA. ENGINEERS ARE DEFINITELY PACK RATS. THEY DISMANTLE SOMETHING THAT’S OBSOLETE, THEY’RE GOING TO HAVE EVERY NUT AND BOLT AND WASHER SAVED SOMEWHERE TO USE TO PATCH UP SOMETHING ELSE DOWN THE ROAD.” DWORNIK ELABORATED ON THE ROLE OF ENGINEERS AT THE STATION, NOTING, “[THE ENGINEER’S ROLE IS] BASICALLY TO KEEP US ON THE AIR. THERE’S SO MUCH ELECTRONIC AND TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT THEY HAD TO KNOW ABOUT TRANSMITTERS, MICROWAVE, VIDEOTAPE, ALL THE ELECTRONICS, AND THEY ALSO DID MAINTENANCE ON THE BUILDING.” “THE LAST ENGINEER WAS LET GO IN AN UNFORTUNATE SITUATION, IN THE SUMMER OF [2014]…WE DID NOT HAVE A STATION MANAGER. AT ONE TIME WE HAD A STATION MANAGER [PETER DEYES] WHO WAS ALSO THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHEN I CAME BACK. THAT FELLOW LEFT…THEY BROUGHT IN AN ASSIGNMENT EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND SHE WAS…NOT EVEN THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHICH WAS TERRIBLE; THEY CALLED HER THE NEWS MANAGER. MANAGEMENT OF THE STATION WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE CALGARY TELEVISION, AND THE ENGINEERING RESPONSIBILITIES WERE TAKEN OVER BY CALGARY TELEVISION.” “WE’D HAVE TO CALL [ENGINEERS WHEN THERE WAS EQUIPMENT ISSUES]. AT THAT TIME, WE HAD MORE CAMERAS THAN VIDEOGRAPHERS, SO THEY KIND OF HAD A SPARE ON HAND. IF ONE WENT DOWN, THEY’D BE OKAY. AND, AT THAT TIME, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE STATION, AND WAS AUTOMATED. IT WAS JUST MIND-BOGGLING THE AUTOMATION THAT THEY HAD AVAILABLE. CALGARY TELEVISION WAS…KIND OF THE MASTER CONTROL CENTER FOR ALL OF THE GLOBAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN CANADA. SO, IT WAS JUST AMAZING, ALL THE MONITORS IN THEIR MASTER CONTROL…ONE OF THE CENTERS WAS, I THINK, SWITCHED OUT OF EDMONTON…ALL THE COMMERCIALS THAT PLAYED ALL ACROSS CANADA, ORIGINATED OUT OF CALGARY TELEVISION. AND THEY WEREN’T VIDEO TAPE MACHINES, AT THAT TIME, THEY WERE BASICALLY COMPUTERS.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022002
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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