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Other Name
TEA TOWEL, MOUNTIES
Date Range From
2001
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140011000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TEA TOWEL, MOUNTIES
Date Range From
2001
Date Range To
2014
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
70.5
Width
44.5
Description
WHITE TOWEL, WOVEN WITH COTTON THREAD, WITH REPEATING DESIGN DEPICTING A FIGURE IN RCMP UNIFORM – BROWN HAT AND BOOTS, RED TUNIC, BLUE RIDING BREECHES. THE PATTERN RUNS ALONG BOTH SHORT EDGES OF THE TOWEL. A TAG ATTACHED AT ONE CORNER WITH MULTICOLOURED THREAD READS “HANDMADE BY MAXIENE, FORT MACLEOD ALBERTA CANADA T0L 0Z0, 403-380-3102” ON THE OUTSIDE, AND “100% COTTON, MACHINE WASH/DRY” ON THE INSIDE. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
MAINTENANCE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE DONOR AND WEAVER OF THIS TOWEL, MAXIENE BODGENER, WAS PROVIDED BY BODGENER TO GALT CURATOR WENDY AITKENS AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BODGENER WAS BORN TO RACHEL “DOLLY” LONG AND WILFRED PERRIN. HER MOTHER DIED WHEN BODGENER WAS 18 MONTHS OLD, SO SHE WAS RAISED BY HER GRANDFATHER HENRY GEORGE LONG, AN EARLY SETTLER IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHO WORKED AT THE STOPPING HOUSE NEAR KIPP IN 1889. BODGENER’S AUNT ALICE AND UNCLE HARRY “BUSTER” LONG HELPED GRANDFATHER HENRY ON THE FAMILY RANCH SOUTH OF FORT MACLEOD, ALONG THE BELLY RIVER. BODGENER SPENT HER CAREER TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS AT F.P. WALSHE SCHOOL IN FORT MACLEOD, AND SEWED CLOTHES FOR HER FAMILY. IN HER RETIREMENT SHE LEARNED HOW TO WEAVE FABRIC. 13 YEARS LATER, IN 2001, BODGENER PURCHASED A $7000 COMPUTERIZED LE CLERC LOOM. THE LOOM HAS A ‘BLACK BOX’ THAT PROCESSES THE PATTERNS SHE DEVELOPS WITH SPECIALIZED COMPUTER SOFTWARE, TRANSMITTING DIRECTIONS TO THE LOOM. BODGENER HAS DESIGNED AND MADE TEA TOWELS, SCARVES, PLACEMATS, TABLE RUNNERS, HAND TOWELS, AND AFGHANS USING THIS PROCESS. SHE WEAVES FOR HER OWN ENJOYMENT AND SELLS HER PRODUCTS AT A VERY REASONABLE PRICE. THE MOUNTIE TEA TOWEL, WHICH BODGENER SELLS FOR $11, IS CREATED WITH A PATTERN THAT BODGENER DESIGNED BY ASKING HER NEIGHBOUR, A RCMP OFFICER IN FORT MACLEOD, TO POSE IN HIS UNIFORM SO SHE COULD GET THE PROPORTIONS CORRECT. UPON THE COMPLETION OF THE PATTERN, BODGENER GAVE HIM A TOWEL AND HIS CO-OFFICERS AT THE DETACHMENT TEASED HIM ABOUT RECEIVING A TEA TOWEL. THIS TOWEL WAS INCLUDED IN THE EXHIBIT ‘WOVEN IN TIME – CELEBRATING 65 YEARS WITH LETHBRIDGE WEAVERS’, CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS, THAT RAN FROM JUNE 7 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 AT THE GALT MUSEUM.
Catalogue Number
P20140011000
Acquisition Date
2014-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASA GRAND OPENING RIBBON
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK
Catalogue Number
P20130030002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASA GRAND OPENING RIBBON
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Materials
SILK
No. Pieces
1
Length
228
Width
9.75
Description
LENGTH OF RED SILK RIBBON. HORIZONTAL EDGES ARE FACTORY-FINISHED; VERTICAL EDGES ARE ROUGHLY CUT, WITH FRAYED THREADS. MINOR CREASING THROUGHOUT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THIS PIECE OF RIBBON WAS CUT DURING THE CEREMONY CELEBRATING THE OPENING OF CASA, LETHBRIDGE’S COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE, ON MAY 14, 2013, AT 230 8 ST SOUTH. ACCORDING TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER LORI HARASEM, SEVEN REPRESENTATIVES HELPED CUT THE RIBBON: STEPHEN GRAHAM (ROTARY CLUBS OF LETHBRIDGE), KRIS HODGSON (PRESIDENT, ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL), GLENN MILLER (ASSISTANT TO LETHBRIDGE EAST MLA BRIDGET PASTOOR), DR. MIKE MAHON (PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE), MAYOR RAJKO DODIC, GREG WEADICK (LETHBRIDGE WEST MLA), AND JIM HILLYER (LETHBRIDGE MP). IN AN EMAIL TO COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, HARASEM DESCRIBED THE DAY’S EVENTS, WRITING: “[THE CEREMONY], ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE ON THE ROTARY PLAZA ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE BUILDING, WAS MOVED INDOORS DUE TO THE STRONG WINDS THAT DAY. ONCE THE SPEECHES WERE DONE, AND THE RIBBON WAS CUT, THE BUILDING WAS OPEN FOR TOURS WITH ALL SPACES BEING UTILIZED BY ARTISANS TO DEMONSTRATE TO THE PUBLIC THE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES THAT WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE FACILITY… THE RIBBON WAS IN MY POSSESSION AS I WAS PART OF THE PLANNING COMMITTEE [FOR THE OPENING CEREMONY]… ONCE THE RIBBON CUTTING WAS OVER, I ASSISTED WITH MOVING THE STANCHIONS AND RIBBONS OUT OF THE WALKWAY, AND REALIZED THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE RIBBON… [I] SUGGESTED WE PROVIDE IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT CASA WAS EXCERPTED FROM THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL WEBSITE. CASA IS A COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVE OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. THIS UNIQUE FACILITY SETS A NEW STANDARD FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTRES, AND PROMOTES EXPERIMENTATION, INCUBATION, AND LEARNING. CASA WAS BUILT TO SERVE A MULTI-GENERATIONAL COMMUNITY, WITH VARYING ART SKILL SETS AND INTERESTS IN A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES. FUNDING FOR THE 42,000 SQUARE FOOT CENTRE WAS PROVIDED BY THE FEDERAL BUILD CANADA FUND, THE ALBERTA MUNICIPAL SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE FUND, AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. IN ADDITION TO PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL ARTS PROGRAMMING, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS, PERFORMING ARTS SPACES, AND AN EXHIBITION GALLERY, CASA ALSO HOUSES THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. ON SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SUZANNE LINT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL, ABOUT THE OPENING OF CASA AND THE FACILITY’S IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY. LINT SAID: “IT WAS A PRETTY SIGNIFICANT DAY… YOU OPEN YOUR DOORS AND YOU EXPECTED TO HAVE PEOPLE BUT WE HAD THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE. THERE WERE ABOUT 3000 PEOPLE AND AS THAT RIBBON WAS CUT, THERE WERE PEOPLE ON THE STAIRWELLS AND PACKED IN EVERY HALLWAY AND HANGING OVER THE BALCONY LOOKING DOWN INTO THE FOYER WHERE THE ACTUAL RIBBON CUTTING OCCURRED. IT WAS PRETTY AWESOME, A PRETTY EXCITING DAY… IT’S THE FULL BREADTH OF THE ARTS ARE IN THAT BUILDING, AND THAT PRESENCE IS FABULOUS TO HAVE ALL OF THE DISCIPLINES INTERMIXING TOGETHER FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S HUGE. SO THAT RATHER INNOCUOUS PIECE OF RED SATIN RIBBON AND A PAIR OF RECEPTIONIST’S SCISSORS DON’T LOOK LIKE MUCH BUT THEY ARE PART OF THE OPENING OF SOMETHING THAT IS PRETTY SIGNIFICANT.” LINT CONTINUED: “WE WAITED A LONG TIME FOR A BUILDING LIKE THAT… A PURPOSE-BUILT CIVIC ARTS CENTRE FOR CREATING ARTWORK IN MANY DISCIPLINES, WHICH IS ALMOST NOT HEARD OF. I DON’T THINK ANYTHING LIKE IT EXISTS OFF A UNIVERSITY OR COLLEGE CAMPUS… IT IS A PROJECT THAT THE ARTS COMMUNITY [IN LETHBRIDGE] HAS WORKED ON FOR 20 – 30 YEARS… WE HAVE ENGAGED A WHOLE NEW COMMUNITY THAT WASN’T REALLY ACTIVE OR PARTICIPATING AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE… THE BOWMAN, WHICH SERVED THE COMMUNITY AMAZINGLY WELL, [WAS] REALLY BUILT ON A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES AND SPACES, [WHEREAS CASA] WAS DESIGNED TO BE AN OPEN CONCEPT AND REALLY INCLUSIVE SO THAT INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS AND OTHER DISCIPLINES WOULD HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE BUILDING… ANYBODY CAN COME… YOU TAKE YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND YOU CAN COME IN AND WORK… THIS BUILDING IS BUSY, WITH NEW GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL ARTIST AND IT’S ALSO ATTRACTING PEOPLE FROM AWAY… WE’RE SEEING A DIVERSITY OF PROGRAMMING THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE BEFORE; THE VERY NATURE OF THE BUILDING WE HAVE THE COMMUNITY ROOM WHICH ALLOWS FOR CERTAIN THINGS TO HAPPEN, THERE’S THE DANCE STUDIO, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND ALL THE SPACES FOR MUSIC… WE’RE SEEING PEOPLE WHO WEREN’T ENGAGED IN THE GENERAL COMMUNITY BECOMING ENGAGED. WE’VE GOT A WHOLE BRAND NEW GROUP OF ARTISTS AND MUCH BROADER DEMOGRAPHIC GROUP OF ARTISTS FROM ALL AGES COMING IN… WE’RE OFFERING MORE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES. THE BOWMAN HAD THE CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS BUT WE ARE NOW DOING SOME WORK WITH HOUSING FIRST CLIENTS WHO ARE TRANSITIONING. WE’VE GOT A RELATIONSHIP AND SOME FUNDING FROM ATB THAT IS ALLOWING US TO TRY AND BUILD SOME FIRST NATIONS PROGRAMING… ARTISTS ARE DEVELOPING PROGRAMS AND WE ARE FACILITATING THEM AND DELIVERING THEM. SO IT’S REALLY GRASSROOTS… IT’S A MUCH BIGGER COMMUNITY. NOT JUST THE SIXTY PEOPLE THAT USED TO BE BOWMAN ATTENDERS. [NOW] THERE’S 100,000 PEOPLE [WHO] VISITED THE BUILDING IN ITS FIRST YEAR OF OPERATION.” LINT CONCLUDED: “THAT BUILDING, SEEING IT RISE AND THE NATURE OF WHAT IT IS, IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PIECES OF WORK THAT I’VE WORKED ON, BUT IT ALSO REPRESENTS A TIME IN HISTORY WHERE THERE WAS THIS SERENDIPITOUS GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WORKED TOGETHER AROUND AN IDEA. SO THE COUNCIL WAS RIPE, THE CITY ADMINISTRATION WAS RIPE. WE HAD A FABULOUS BOARD THAT REALLY WENT TO THE WALL AROUND ARTS IN THIS COMMUNITY ENSURING THAT THEY SURVIVED… I THINK THAT’S THE KIND OF COMMUNITY IT IS. I THINK WE’RE ISOLATED ENOUGH THAT WE DO SOME FAIRLY CRAZY AND WILD THINGS. WE CAN BE PRETTY INVENTIVE AND PROGRESSIVE. THERE’S A REAL COMPONENT OF THAT AND A CREATIVE KIND OF COMMUNITY WHICH WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE IN. THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT IT IS SURROUNDED BY THE MOST SOCIALLY CONSERVATIVE PEOPLE. SO IT SOMETIMES FEELS TO ME LIKE A SPLIT COMMUNITY, [BUT] THERE IS THIS REALLY STRONG PROGRESSIVE, CREATIVE, INTUITIVE GROUP OF PEOPLE THAT ARE HERE, LOVE IT, AND CONTINUE TO BE HERE.” ON OCTOBER 8, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL THIBERT, FORMER CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY SERVICES PROGRAM CO-ORDINATOR. THIBERT WAS THE CITY LIAISON TO THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL DURING THE PLANNING, CONSTRUCTION, AND OPENING OF CASA. THIBERT SAID: “PART OF MY JOB WAS ORGANIZING THE OPENING CEREMONIES… [THE RIBBON CUTTING] WAS EXTREMELY WELL RECEIVED. THE COMMUNITY WAS VERY, VERY EXCITED. IT WAS FULL – THE MEZZANINE, THE MAIN AREA, AND PEOPLE LOOKING DOWN… THE DIFFERENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT WERE THERE TO SPEAK, SO IT WAS A GALA AFFAIR… IT WAS A LONG TIME COMING. I WAS ON THE COMMITTEE THAT STARTED LOOKING INTO WHAT A COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE WOULD LOOK [LIKE]. WE WENT TO CALGARY AND EDMONTON AND DID TOURS OF [THEIR] FACILITIES, AND [CASA] IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, AMAZING, FORWARD-THINKING COMMUNITY ART CENTRES IN OUR PROVINCE, MAYBE EVEN IN CANADA. SO IT’S SOMETHING TO BE VERY PROUD OF.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND PRESS RELEASES ABOUT CASA.
Catalogue Number
P20130030002
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“CRAFT SMART”
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130030001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“CRAFT SMART”
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
1
Length
21
Width
7.25
Description
STAINLESS STEEL SCISSORS WITH BLUE PLASTIC HANDLES. ONE BLADE IS STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “STAINLESS STEEL”; THE OTHER WITH TEXT READING “CRAFTSMART”. MINOR SPOTS OF DISCOLOURATION ON BLADES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THESE SCISSORS WERE USED DURING THE RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY CELEBRATING THE OPENING OF CASA, LETHBRIDGE’S COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE, ON MAY 14, 2013, AT 230 8 ST SOUTH. ACCORDING TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER LORI HARASEM, SEVEN REPRESENTATIVES HELPED CUT THE RIBBON: STEPHEN GRAHAM (ROTARY CLUBS OF LETHBRIDGE), KRIS HODGSON (PRESIDENT, ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL), GLENN MILLER (ASSISTANT TO LETHBRIDGE EAST MLA BRIDGET PASTOOR), DR. MIKE MAHON (PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE), MAYOR RAJKO DODIC, GREG WEADICK (LETHBRIDGE WEST MLA), AND JIM HILLYER (LETHBRIDGE MP). IN AN EMAIL TO COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, HARASEM DESCRIBED THE DAY’S EVENTS, WRITING: “[THE CEREMONY], ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE ON THE ROTARY PLAZA ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE BUILDING, WAS MOVED INDOORS DUE TO THE STRONG WINDS THAT DAY. ONCE THE SPEECHES WERE DONE, AND THE RIBBON WAS CUT, THE BUILDING WAS OPEN FOR TOURS WITH ALL SPACES BEING UTILIZED BY ARTISANS TO DEMONSTRATE TO THE PUBLIC THE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES THAT WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE FACILITY… THE RIBBON WAS IN MY POSSESSION AS I WAS PART OF THE PLANNING COMMITTEE [FOR THE OPENING CEREMONY]… ONCE THE RIBBON CUTTING WAS OVER, I ASSISTED WITH MOVING THE STANCHIONS AND RIBBONS OUT OF THE WALKWAY, AND REALIZED THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE RIBBON… [I] SUGGESTED WE PROVIDE IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT CASA WAS EXCERPTED FROM THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL WEBSITE. CASA IS A COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVE OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. THIS UNIQUE FACILITY SETS A NEW STANDARD FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTRES, AND PROMOTES EXPERIMENTATION, INCUBATION, AND LEARNING. CASA WAS BUILT TO SERVE A MULTI-GENERATIONAL COMMUNITY, WITH VARYING ART SKILL SETS AND INTERESTS IN A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES. FUNDING FOR THE 42,000 SQUARE FOOT CENTRE WAS PROVIDED BY THE FEDERAL BUILD CANADA FUND, THE ALBERTA MUNICIPAL SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE FUND, AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. IN ADDITION TO PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL ARTS PROGRAMMING, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS, PERFORMING ARTS SPACES, AND AN EXHIBITION GALLERY, CASA ALSO HOUSES THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. ON SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SUZANNE LINT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL, ABOUT THE OPENING OF CASA AND THE FACILITY’S IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY. LINT SAID: “IT WAS A PRETTY SIGNIFICANT DAY… YOU OPEN YOUR DOORS AND YOU EXPECTED TO HAVE PEOPLE BUT WE HAD THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE. THERE WERE ABOUT 3000 PEOPLE AND AS THAT RIBBON WAS CUT, THERE WERE PEOPLE ON THE STAIRWELLS AND PACKED IN EVERY HALLWAY AND HANGING OVER THE BALCONY LOOKING DOWN INTO THE FOYER WHERE THE ACTUAL RIBBON CUTTING OCCURRED. IT WAS PRETTY AWESOME, A PRETTY EXCITING DAY… IT’S THE FULL BREADTH OF THE ARTS ARE IN THAT BUILDING, AND THAT PRESENCE IS FABULOUS TO HAVE ALL OF THE DISCIPLINES INTERMIXING TOGETHER FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S HUGE. SO THAT RATHER INNOCUOUS PIECE OF RED SATIN RIBBON AND A PAIR OF RECEPTIONIST’S SCISSORS DON’T LOOK LIKE MUCH BUT THEY ARE PART OF THE OPENING OF SOMETHING THAT IS PRETTY SIGNIFICANT.” LINT CONTINUED: “WE WAITED A LONG TIME FOR A BUILDING LIKE THAT… A PURPOSE-BUILT CIVIC ARTS CENTRE FOR CREATING ARTWORK IN MANY DISCIPLINES, WHICH IS ALMOST NOT HEARD OF. I DON’T THINK ANYTHING LIKE IT EXISTS OFF A UNIVERSITY OR COLLEGE CAMPUS… IT IS A PROJECT THAT THE ARTS COMMUNITY [IN LETHBRIDGE] HAS WORKED ON FOR 20 – 30 YEARS… WE HAVE ENGAGED A WHOLE NEW COMMUNITY THAT WASN’T REALLY ACTIVE OR PARTICIPATING AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE… THE BOWMAN, WHICH SERVED THE COMMUNITY AMAZINGLY WELL, [WAS] REALLY BUILT ON A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES AND SPACES, [WHEREAS CASA] WAS DESIGNED TO BE AN OPEN CONCEPT AND REALLY INCLUSIVE SO THAT INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS AND OTHER DISCIPLINES WOULD HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE BUILDING… ANYBODY CAN COME… YOU TAKE YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND YOU CAN COME IN AND WORK… THIS BUILDING IS BUSY, WITH NEW GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL ARTIST AND IT’S ALSO ATTRACTING PEOPLE FROM AWAY… WE’RE SEEING A DIVERSITY OF PROGRAMMING THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE BEFORE; THE VERY NATURE OF THE BUILDING WE HAVE THE COMMUNITY ROOM WHICH ALLOWS FOR CERTAIN THINGS TO HAPPEN, THERE’S THE DANCE STUDIO, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND ALL THE SPACES FOR MUSIC… WE’RE SEEING PEOPLE WHO WEREN’T ENGAGED IN THE GENERAL COMMUNITY BECOMING ENGAGED. WE’VE GOT A WHOLE BRAND NEW GROUP OF ARTISTS AND MUCH BROADER DEMOGRAPHIC GROUP OF ARTISTS FROM ALL AGES COMING IN… WE’RE OFFERING MORE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES. THE BOWMAN HAD THE CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS BUT WE ARE NOW DOING SOME WORK WITH HOUSING FIRST CLIENTS WHO ARE TRANSITIONING. WE’VE GOT A RELATIONSHIP AND SOME FUNDING FROM ATB THAT IS ALLOWING US TO TRY AND BUILD SOME FIRST NATIONS PROGRAMING… ARTISTS ARE DEVELOPING PROGRAMS AND WE ARE FACILITATING THEM AND DELIVERING THEM. SO IT’S REALLY GRASSROOTS… IT’S A MUCH BIGGER COMMUNITY. NOT JUST THE SIXTY PEOPLE THAT USED TO BE BOWMAN ATTENDERS. [NOW] THERE’S 100,000 PEOPLE [WHO] VISITED THE BUILDING IN ITS FIRST YEAR OF OPERATION.” LINT CONCLUDED: “THAT BUILDING, SEEING IT RISE AND THE NATURE OF WHAT IT IS, IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PIECES OF WORK THAT I’VE WORKED ON, BUT IT ALSO REPRESENTS A TIME IN HISTORY WHERE THERE WAS THIS SERENDIPITOUS GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WORKED TOGETHER AROUND AN IDEA. SO THE COUNCIL WAS RIPE, THE CITY ADMINISTRATION WAS RIPE. WE HAD A FABULOUS BOARD THAT REALLY WENT TO THE WALL AROUND ARTS IN THIS COMMUNITY ENSURING THAT THEY SURVIVED… I THINK THAT’S THE KIND OF COMMUNITY IT IS. I THINK WE’RE ISOLATED ENOUGH THAT WE DO SOME FAIRLY CRAZY AND WILD THINGS. WE CAN BE PRETTY INVENTIVE AND PROGRESSIVE. THERE’S A REAL COMPONENT OF THAT AND A CREATIVE KIND OF COMMUNITY WHICH WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE IN. THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT IT IS SURROUNDED BY THE MOST SOCIALLY CONSERVATIVE PEOPLE. SO IT SOMETIMES FEELS TO ME LIKE A SPLIT COMMUNITY, [BUT] THERE IS THIS REALLY STRONG PROGRESSIVE, CREATIVE, INTUITIVE GROUP OF PEOPLE THAT ARE HERE, LOVE IT, AND CONTINUE TO BE HERE.” ON OCTOBER 8, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL THIBERT, FORMER CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY SERVICES PROGRAM CO-ORDINATOR. THIBERT WAS THE CITY LIAISON TO THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL DURING THE PLANNING, CONSTRUCTION, AND OPENING OF CASA. THIBERT SAID: “PART OF MY JOB WAS ORGANIZING THE OPENING CEREMONIES… [THE RIBBON CUTTING] WAS EXTREMELY WELL RECEIVED. THE COMMUNITY WAS VERY, VERY EXCITED. IT WAS FULL – THE MEZZANINE, THE MAIN AREA, AND PEOPLE LOOKING DOWN… THE DIFFERENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT WERE THERE TO SPEAK, SO IT WAS A GALA AFFAIR… IT WAS A LONG TIME COMING. I WAS ON THE COMMITTEE THAT STARTED LOOKING INTO WHAT A COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE WOULD LOOK [LIKE]. WE WENT TO CALGARY AND EDMONTON AND DID TOURS OF [THEIR] FACILITIES, AND [CASA] IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, AMAZING, FORWARD-THINKING COMMUNITY ART CENTRES IN OUR PROVINCE, MAYBE EVEN IN CANADA. SO IT’S SOMETHING TO BE VERY PROUD OF.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND PRESS RELEASES ABOUT CASA.
Catalogue Number
P20130030001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SANDAL
Date Range From
2010
Date Range To
2017
Material Type
Artifact
Catalogue Number
P20170007006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SANDAL
Date Range From
2010
Date Range To
2017
No. Pieces
2
Length
26.3
Width
9.3
Description
PAIR OF WHITE SANDALS, LADIES’ SIZE 8.5. SANDALS HAVE ANKLE STRAP WITH SILVER BUCKLE AND TOE STRAP WITH A CENTER STRAP CONNECTING TOE STRAP TO ANKLE; INSIDE OF SANDALS IS SILVER; BOTTOM OF SANDALS IS BROWN. LABELS INSIDE SANDALS READ “GEORGE” ON BOTTOM, “8 ½, 29 PADDY, MADE IN CAMBODIA, FABRIQUE EN CAMBODGE, 030829470 36131215 S14” INSIDE ANKLES. INSIDE LININGS HAVE RED/BROWN GRIME BUILDUP AROUND EDGES; ANKLES OF SANDALS ARE WORN AND DISCOLOURED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON THE SANDALS, WOOD ELABORATED, “THESE ARE RELATIVELY NEW SHOES [ABOUT FIVE OR SIX YEARS OLD] THAT WE GOT WHEN SHE WENT TO PARK MEADOWS BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T HAVE HEELS ANY MORE, OR ANY HEIGHT. SHE AND I WENT OUT AND WE FOUND THESE SHOES THAT SHE COULD WEAR TO THE MEETINGS.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007006
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COMMERCIAL, “F. DICK”
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CAST IRON, ALUMINIUM, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150007000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COMMERCIAL, “F. DICK”
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
2010
Materials
CAST IRON, ALUMINIUM, WOOD
No. Pieces
2
Height
84
Length
41.5
Width
28
Description
CAST IRON RECTANGULAR BASE WITH HOLLOW ALUMINIUM CYLINDER FIXED UPRIGHT AT CENTRE. ROUND METAL PLUNGER INSIDE CYLINDER MOVES UP AND DOWN ON A TOOTHED METAL COLUMN THAT IS CRANK DRIVEN BY REMOVABLE METAL HANDLE. HANDLE HAS WOOD GRIP. SPIGOT MOUTH AT BASE OF CYLINDER. CAST IRON COMPONENTS ARE PAINTED RED, BUT PAINT IS WORN AND ONLY TRACES REMAIN ON BASE. TEXT READING "F. DICK" IS STAMPED INTO THE OUTER CASE OF CRANK MECHANISM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
THIS SAUSAGE STUFFER WAS USED BY FOUR GENERATIONS OF MEAT CUTTERS IN THE GURR FAMILY AT THE SAME LOCATION OF 538 13 STREET SOUTH, WHICH SUCCESSIVELY HOUSED HOEFER & WOOD GROCERY, VALUE VILLAGE, AND AT THE TIME OF DONATION, LONDON ROAD MARKET. ON FEBRUARY 3, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DUANE GURR AND HIS SON, THE DONOR, DAVID GURR, ABOUT THEIR FAMILY HISTORY WITH THE GROCERY STORES, MEAT CUTTING IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THE SAUSAGE STUFFER. DUANE SAID: “MY GRANDFATHER [ALF GURR] CAME [TO CANADA] AS A FOURTEEN YEAR OLD BOY… MEAT CUTTING [HAD BEEN] HIS TRADE IN ENGLAND… WHEN HE CAME HERE HE HAD A NUMBER OF JOBS… HE RAN BURNS’ MEAT MARKET… EVENTUALLY HE LEFT BURNS AND STARTED HIS OWN MEAT MARKET ON 3RD AVENUE SOUTH WITH HIS SONS, MY UNCLE AND MY DAD [CALLED] PALACE MEAT MARKET. [THEN] HE WAS THE MEAT MANAGER AT [HOEFER & WOOD GROCERY] FROM 1954 TO 1957… IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS QUITE UNIQUE TO HAVE A STORE THAT SOLD GROCERIES AND HAD A MEAT DEPARTMENT IN IT, AND A PRODUCE DEPARTMENT AND A BAKERY… IT WOULD HAVE BEEN FAIRLY NEW TO HAVE EVERTYHING UNDER ONE ROOF… [GRANDFATHER] HAD TO LEAVE HIS JOB BECAUSE HE LOST HIS EYESIGHT AND THE FELLOW THAT WAS BROUGHT IN… FRED SIEMEN, ACTUALLY TAUGHT ME HOW TO CUT MEAT AND TO MAKE SAUSAGE IN 1978 [AFTER] I WENT TO WORK FOR VALUE VILLAGE… THE FELLOW THAT HIRED ME IN 1973, [GERARD] WESTWOOD, [HAD WORKED] CLEANING THE MEAT DEPARTMENT AFTER SCHOOL FOR MY GRANDFATHER… HE SAID ‘YOU’RE ALF GURR’S GRANDSON’, AND I HAD THE JOB JUST LIKE THAT… IT WAS ACTUALLY [GERARD] THAT SAID IN 1978, ‘I THINK YOU SHOULD LEARN HOW TO BE A MEAT CUTTER BECAUSE IT’S IN YOUR BLOOD.’” DUANE CONTINUED: “MY DAD WAS ALSO TRAINED [IN MEAT CUTTING] BUT WORKED FOR THE CPR… HE ALWAYS [CUT MEAT] IN HIS BASEMENT… HE ACTUALLY USED TO MAKE SAUSAGE WITH ME TWICE A WEEK [AT THE STORE]… WE DIDN’T PARTICULARLY GET ALONG THAT WELL [BUT] IN THAT INSTANCE, WE GOT ALONG VERY WELL… WE DIDN’T DO A LOT OF TALKING WHEN WE DID IT. WE JUST HELPED EACH OTHER, AND HE TAUGHT ME HOW TO DO IT, AND IT WAS ACTUALLY A PRETTY FUN TIME… IT WAS A FAMILY THING… I ALWAYS ENJOYED IT, AND NOW DAVID IS MAKING SAUSAGES AND DOING A GREAT JOB… IT’S A BIT OF A LOST ART… THERE’S NOT A LOT OF GUYS THAT CAN MAKE SAUSAGE AND LINK IT ANYMORE.” ON THE SAUSAGE-MAKING PROCESS, DAVID SAID: “YOU START WITH YOUR MEAT… YOU GRIND THAT THROUGH ONCE, AND THEN ADD YOUR SEASONINGS [AND] MIX THAT TOGETHER… [THE MIXTURE] ALWAYS HAS TO BE COLD TO KEEP THE CONSISTENCY, AND TO KEEP IT OFF YOUR HANDS.” DUANE SAID: “THE COLDER THE BETTER; IT DIDN’T STICK TO YOUR HANDS AND WENT INTO THE CASINGS EASIER, AND THE WARMER IT GETS, THE HARDER IT IS TO WORK… WHEN YOU’RE DOING IT BY HAND, THE COLD [GOES] RIGHT UP TO YOUR BRAIN.” DAVID SAID: “YOU PULL THE ALUMINIUM CANISTER OUT, AND THEN THERE IS A NOZZLE ON THE FRONT OF THE CANISTER THAT YOU PUT THE SAUSAGE NOZZLE ON… WHEN YOU START CRANKING IT IN LOW GEAR SO THAT IT’S EASIER TO CRANK, IT START PRESSING IT THROUGH… YOU CAN EITHER PUT HOG CASINGS ON, THAT’S YOUR TRADITIONAL, OR THE NEW SYNTHETIC ONES ARE COLLAGEN.” DUANE SAID: “WE ALWAYS WORKED WITH NATURAL CASINGS, WHICH WERE HOG OR LAMB.” DAVID SAID: “THE SYNTHETIC CASINGS DON’T HAVE A LOT OF GIVE TO THEM, SO YOU HAVE TO BE VERY CAREFUL… WHAT’S NICE [ABOUT THIS TYPE OF STUFFER] IS YOU CAN HANDLE IT… YOU CAN CONTROL THE FEED YOURSELF SO IF YOU’RE GOING A LITTLE TOO QUICK YOU EASE UP ON IT… AFTER THAT YOU LINK THEM, SMOKE THEM, HOPEFULLY SELL THEM.” ON THE USE OF THIS SPECIFIC MACHINE, DAVID SAID: “WE HAD A SAUSAGE PROGRAM [IN 2008/09]… IT’S TOUGH TO GET IT GOING AND I WAS FAIRLY NEW AT CUTTING MEAT. THE FIRST TIME WORKING ON THAT, IT WAS JUST A NIGHTMARE BECAUSE NOTHING WAS RIGHT. I DIDN’T HAVE THE CASINGS ON HERE PROPERLY; I DIDN’T HAVE THE RIGHT CONSISTENCY WITH THE MEAT; I WAS IN THE HIGH GEAR… IT WAS A THROWAWAY BATCH BECAUSE THERE WAS JUST NOTHING RIGHT ABOUT IT. THAT’S HOW YOU LEARN… MAKING SAUSAGES IS FUN… I THINK ABOUT TODAY WHEN I’M WORKING IN THERE WITH THE PEOPLE WE HAVE AND WE REALLY DON’T SAY MUCH… ONE’S MIXING, ONE’S STUFFING, ONE’S LINKING… IT’S A PROCESS AND EVERYBODY’S WORKING… WHEN YOU THINK BACK AND SAY, ‘OH, MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER WAS DOING THE EXACT SAME THING WITH THE EXACT SAME MACHINE 60 YEARS AGO.’ THAT’S PRETTY SPECIAL.” DUANE SAID: “IT WOULD BE NICE TO KEEP IT BUT IT’S JUST NOT SANITARY ANYMORE. IT’S SOMETHING THAT MADE A LOT OF SAUSAGE AND WHEN YOU LEARN SOMETHING LIKE SAUSAGE MAKING AND YOU MASTER IT, IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL… IT LINKS ME TO MY OWN FAMILY…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20150007000
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail