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Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions80795
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20071015
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1…
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
History / Biographical
Edward Fredric "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1800 with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward Hagell started the first newspaper in southern Alberta. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward (teddy). Teddy began drawing at the age of 2 1/2 years, winning numerous competitions without having any formal training. He was a self-taught artist, though he did take some lessons in etching while in Vancouver. E.F. Hagell gained fame as a Canadian range rider and artist, depicting the early cattle country in much of his work. His father and two uncles homesteaded and established the 'Three Links' cattle ranch west of Cardston, in the Mountain View district. Hagell's own experience of ranching complemented his love of the outdoors, from which he developed his own unique style in the tradition of artists such as Rosa Bonheur, Charles Russell, and Fredrick Remington. Hagell married Cora Marie Pelletier in 1919 and the couple left for Los Angeles that year. They had three children born in 1920, 1922, and 1923, before moving to Vancouver in 1929. Hagell had the first one-man exhibition at the Vancouver art gallery when it opened in 1932. That year the family returned to Coaldale, where they stayed until moving to Calgary in 1935, and back to Lethbridge two years later. In the mid 1940s the Hagells moved to Brampton, Ontario, where they remained until settling in pincher creek in 1952. E.F. Hagell returned to Lethbridge just prior to his death in 1964, at the age of 69. The work of E.F. Hagell is unique in that it was confined exclusively to prairie and mountain scenes of western Canada. Many of his works reproduced incidents he saw and experienced and most pieces were done in pen and ink. Every one of his drawings or paintings contained at least one animal; he had little interest in depicting people. Hagell wished, through his work, to preserve the history of the early days of the west before mechanization was introduced. Hagell received international recognition through a series of prints and etchings circulated through the Canadian national parks. Collections of his work were shown in or recognized by the Beaver Club in London, the Royal Canadian Academy, the London Illustrated News, Vista Del Arroya--Passadena, painters and etchers of Ontario, and the Glenbow foundation in Calgary (in 2006 Glenbow transferred a major part of their Hagel related artifacts to the Galt Museum & Archives. The Galt now holds the most significant collection of Hagel works.) His first major exhibition was in California, with subsequent shows in Oklahoma; Texas; the sportsman's show in Toronto; the Calgary Stampede; the 1951 Lethbridge Exhibition and Rodeo; the Calgary Petroleum Club; and an exhibit staged posthumously by his wife in 1970, at the Provincial Museum in Victoria, B.C.. During his career as an artist, hagell painted and drew about 1500 works. He also began writing in 1930, later publishing a collection of poems and short stories. He worked in various other jobs throughout his life, but mainly in window trimming and interior display for department stores. According to his son, Barnett, Hagell could not make a living from his art because if he showed in New York his work was considered too Canadian and in Toronto it was too western. He was not a good salesman for his own work as he considered the people who attended the exhibition cocktail parties to be phoney and insincere. He had a great love for the prairies and farming, and was a great storyteller, especially to children.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton G. Hagell
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1935-1963 2007.1015/005 Catalogue of originals; list of pictures sold to Glenblow; summary of Hagell biography; list of oils; list of black & white prints; address list; 2 photos; 2 negatives 2007.1015/006 Consignment invoices; price list with descriptions; Stampede Salon of Fine Arts program, picture list numbered; 3 art reproductions; 2 photos 2007.1015/007 Personal receipts 2007.1015/008 Guest register, July 28, 1970; Oklahoma Exhibition program; art samples, letter from mayor of Lethbridge; cards; invoices and receipts for art; 2 photos 2007.1015/009 Vancouver Art Gallery exhibition, 1932-1934; The Art Gallery of Toronto exhibition, 1935; Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, 1935 2007.1015/010 Newspaper clippings, Violet’s diaries 1924-1964; Wilma Wood correspondence; 1 photograph 2007.1015/011 Hagell family history documents; The Story of the Press, 1928 2007.1015/012 Correspondence 1959-1960 2007.1015/013 Artist’s notes on dinnerware; hanging art for display purposes; city art suggestions for historical subjects 2007.1015/014 Ted Hagel poetry 2007.1015/015 Correspondence 1932-1973 2007.1015/016 Prints and sketches for art; notes; 1 print; 35 sketches 2007.1015/017 Catalogue of Charles M. Russel artwork; taxidermist catalog; brochure: Indians of the Prairie Provinces 1 photo 2007.1015/018 The Noble Foundation [working documents] 2007.1015/019 American Scene [magazine of Glicrease Institute]; ideas for Calgary Brewery’s Horsemen’s Hall of Fame
Accession No.
20071015
Collection
Archive
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Lethbridge Native Sons 1953-1954

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95985
Date Range
1952-1953
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055018
Physical Description
14 X 12 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Lethbridge Native Sons were a Canadian Junior A hockey team, based in Lethbridge, AB. They played in the Western Canada Junior Hockey League from 1948-56. In 1953-54 the team finished third in their division and lost in the quarter finals of the playoffs. Front Row: George De rappard, Dick McGh…
  1 image  
Date Range
1952-1953
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
14 X 12 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Lethbridge Native Sons were a Canadian Junior A hockey team, based in Lethbridge, AB. They played in the Western Canada Junior Hockey League from 1948-56. In 1953-54 the team finished third in their division and lost in the quarter finals of the playoffs. Front Row: George De rappard, Dick McGhee, Ed Zemrau, Gerry Koehle, Ken Brown, Gerry Sorenson, Ron Morgan Second Row: Byron McDonald (coach), Jim Powers, Ron Hemmerling, Ed Bruchet (manager), E.S. Neils (president), Larry Ruptash, Ron Yanosik, Babe Phalen (trainer) Third Row: Art Hart, Earl Ingarfield, Les Colwill, Bill Voss, Dick Lamoureux, John MacMillan.
Accession No.
20191055018
Collection
Archive
Images
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Lethbridge Fire Department - staff portraits

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions85477
Accession No.
20151079
Physical Description
84 portraits, 3.5"x5" colour prints
Scope and Content
001 Bryon Freel ? 002 Ron Johnson Jan 07/64-Dec 30/91 003 Andy Rohal Dec 01/59- Aug 07/98 ? 004 Clare Jorgensen Sep 16/46- Dec 28/82 005 Hank Berry 006 Brian Krispjanjen ? 007 Doug Martin 008 Chief Ernie Hoberton Jan 01/46 -Sep 30/85 ? 009 Paul Little 010 John Sterenberg Nov 01/57- Jan 31/90 ? 011…
Creator
Lethbridge Fire Department
Physical Description
84 portraits, 3.5"x5" colour prints
Scope and Content
001 Bryon Freel ? 002 Ron Johnson Jan 07/64-Dec 30/91 003 Andy Rohal Dec 01/59- Aug 07/98 ? 004 Clare Jorgensen Sep 16/46- Dec 28/82 005 Hank Berry 006 Brian Krispjanjen ? 007 Doug Martin 008 Chief Ernie Hoberton Jan 01/46 -Sep 30/85 ? 009 Paul Little 010 John Sterenberg Nov 01/57- Jan 31/90 ? 011 No Name 012 Brent Brown Sep 26/ 66-Jan 03/99 013 Gordon Dow Apr 01/52- Mar 31/84 014 Ray Petit May 01/64- Mar 01/98 015 Earl Armour Mar 31/63-Jun 04/97 ? 016 No Name 017 Betty Qualke Dec 11/73-Apr 13/ 93 Transferred ? 018 Rusty McCutcheon Oct 01/53- Apr 30/84 019 Fred Alder Dec 01/63-Jan 02/99 020 Dave Lysak ? 021 Al Rowntree 022 Lynn Rosaine ? 023 Bob Daku ? 024 Gordie Dao ? 025 Walter Glover Feb 05/62-Dec 27/96 026 John Potts Jan 01/62-Jan 05/95 027 Ron Wakelen Oct 16/56- Oct 16/89 ? 028 Gerry Veres ? 029 George Jackei Dec 01/59- Jan 05/94 ? 030 Chris Vanderlee ? 031 Greg Hamilton 032 Bill Mellafont ? 033 Bill Howes ? 034 Jesse Brooks 035 Dave Orser 036 Doug Martin 037 Vic Dyck Jul 09/73 -Jun 27/84 Resigned 038 Theo Pecht ? 039 Joe Wood May 01/59- Dec 31/89 040 Clifford Brown 041 Tom Boychuk Feb 09/73- Nov 28/96 Deceased 042 Wayne McCunn ? 043 Randy Mayne ? 044 Ted Bouchon ? 045 Randy Mcaoniuk ? 046 Walter Willets Feb 16/57-Mar 04/90 047 Nick Janzen May 19/70- Aug 30/99 048 Bruce Mabin ? 049 Jack Chapman 050 John Kolibas Jun 15/59- Dec 15/86 ? 051 Jim McKenna Jan 01/46- Dec 03/83 052 Vic Shippopham Mar 27/47- May 02/78 ? 053 Ray Dow 054 Bob Embury ? 055 Tom Wickersham 056 Dwayne McKnight Nov 15/76 -Jan 01/94 Resigned 057 Ted Scheunkogel Dec 16/59- Apr 19/82 ? 058 Bob Moodie Feb 16/49-Jun 13/81 / 059 Ed Gilchrist Dec 16/56- Jan 02/91 060 Mike Stevens 061 Fred Manning Jan 03/64 -Aug 01/89 062 Ross Jestin Jun 16/51- Dec 31/82 ? 063 Larry Mead May 15/68- Mar 23/82 064 Bill Sinclair 065 Bob Frayn Mar 01/67 -Aug 01/95 ? 066 Roy Crawford Jan 06/64- Apr 29/98 067 Lloyd Stichel ? 068 Ralph May 069 Lou Sallenbach ? 070 Dave Tysseland Jan 09/64-Sep 09/94 ? 071 Ron Eagles Jun 16/59 -Jan 01/89 072 Leonard Bailey Jan 01/46-Sep 30/82 073 Hugo Fielder 074 Ed Kurtz May 21/63-May 20/88 075 Terry Wilson 076 Don Carpenter Jun 01/64-Feb 15/2000 077 Doug Schow Jan 16/66-Jan 01/2000 ? 078 Doug Kometz Dec 15/59 -Dec 31/91 ? 079 Leon Koch 080 Ken Sawatsky ? 081 Bud Belle Jun 11/56- Feb 09/80 082 Art Chamberland Nov 01/57- Jan 23/85 ? 083 Jim Culver Jan 16/64- Aug 01/96 084 George Sherring ?
Accession No.
20151079
Collection
Archive
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Lethbridge Fire Department fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92647
Date Range
1978-2011
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181062
Physical Description
Over 500 photographs, 0.8 m of textual records
Scope and Content
001: Chief for a Day 20 Photos (1987) 002: 76 photos 44 Negatives of safety programs, awards, flipped semi, and training exercise (1996-1997) 003: 284 photos of awards, training exercise, family day, and unidentified people (1978-1999) 004: 1993-1995 Newspaper clippings 005: 1995-1997 Newspaper cli…
Date Range
1978-2011
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Lethbridge Fire Department
Physical Description
Over 500 photographs, 0.8 m of textual records
History / Biographical
The Lethbridge Fire Department began in the town of Lethbridge in 1885 with the Bucket Brigade. There were several factors for this. The buildings were chiefly wood, rainfall in the area was low and the westerly winds were prevalent in the region. One factor to deter fires were the 100 foot wide streets. The first organized fire protection was provided by the NWMP in 1886. In 1887 a volunteer hook and ladder company was formed with W. D. Whitney as chief, A. J. Scot, first assistant chief, E. J. Hoddert, second assistant chief. J. D. Higinbotham was secretary-treasurer. When Lethbridge was incorporated as a town in 1891, the new town council had fire protection as their first order of business. In that same year a Volunteer Fire Brigade with William Colpman as chief was formed. In subsequent years other Fire Brigades were organized each with their own chief, assistant chiefs and members. The fire brigade was reorganized in 1902 and those elected became paid members. By 1909 a professional fire department was created. The men were on duty 24 hours per day seven days per week. Minute Books were introduced by Chief Kilkenny in 1909 listing the duty officer, persons on leave, exact time of fire calls and action taken, changes in location of men and equipment. Uniforms were introduced in 1909 and in 1912 the first Firemen's Association Contest between towns took place. In 1912, the Fire Department also began the combined model of fire suppression and emergency medical services. As the town grew incorporation was once again realized. In 1906 Lethbridge became a city. The population grew in three directions, north south and east and more fire stations were built to service the areas. No. 2 was built on the north side of the tracks at 2nd Avenue and 13th Street. A third fire hall was built in the 1960's. By 1920 the Lethbridge Fire Department was a fully professional body who could handle any emergency that occurred. Fire Prevention Programs begun as early as 1935 when Chief Lindsay introduced inspections to individual homes and fire drills began in the schools. Through the war years, the fire department held various courses teaching military firemen to handle pumpers and large equipment. The fire Department ambulance was constantly used for transported trainee crash victims to the Galt Hospital. Following the war improvements were made to both the member numbers and equipment including a two-way radio communications system and fire alarm boxes. Restrictions on sales and use of fireworks were dealt with in the late 1950's and by the early 1970's the sale of fireworks were banned. New fire stations were built in the 1970's. One to replace the old No. 2 which became the fire headquarters and training center located on 5th Avenue and 28th Street North and another on the west side at Jerry Potts Boulevard. The fire box system was abandoned in favor of a more effective communication-the telephone. Wooden ladders were replaced by lighter, stronger more serviceable aluminum ones. In 1985, computers were introduced to the fire department and were used to provide a preplan of many of the larger buildings, hydrant locations, fire department connections, sprinkler controls, exits, hazards etc. City Council also approved the implementation of an advance life support program and hired the first advanced care paramedics. In 1986 the Lethbridge Fire department celebrated its 100 anniversary. A lot of changes, improvements had occurred and with the modern fire fighting techniques many young men were becoming fire fighters to protect the public from any disasters such as fire, flood, explosion, cyclone of mechanical disaster. 1994 Police moves into its own building. In 1998 the department hired the first female firefighter, Bonnie Williams. Her great grandfather Jack King was a Lethbridge firefighter in the 1920-30’s. 2001 fire department gets thermal imaging cameras. 2002 Chief T. Wickersham retires and the city hires Brian Cornforth as the new chief. The dispatch centre of fire/EMS merged with police dispatch to form the Public Safety Communications Centre (PSCC). 2003 Council approved $250,000 for a one-time funding for Advanced Life Support equipment. These units were placed on all frontline fire apparatus. Having advanced care paramedics on fire vehicles allow them to respond to emergency calls anywhere in the city and provide lifesaving care even when an ambulance is unavailable. 2005 Revised disaster services plan and bylaw. Plan outlines three levels of emergencies. Level one, less than eight hours and has little impact on the city. Level two, less than eight hours and moderate impact on city that may require additional support from other services. Level three, longer duration and will have high impact on the city which will require government support. Rope rescue training exercise also implemented. 2009 Alberta Health Services assumes governance of all emergency medical services (EMS) in the province. The city of Lethbridge becomes a contracted provider of EMS for the city of Lethbridge. 2011 New Headquarters (station 1) opens on 4th avenue south and renovations are completed on station 4 located at 5 avenue and 28 street north. Large grassfire starts on the Blood Reserve and threatens the west side of the city when it crosses the Oldman River on November 27 (Grey Cup day). 2012 The department celebrates 100 years providing EMS services in an integrated system. From our research, Lethbridge is the oldest integrated (fire/EMS) system in North America. A weeklong celebration of events were planned and an art piece was commissioned to remember the event. September 10 another large grassfire starts on the Blood Reserve and threatens the west side of the city and the town of Coalhurst when it crosses the Oldman River. 2013 flooding in High River and Calgary creates significant damage to the respective communities. Lethbridge sends numerous individuals to assist in the recovery efforts. Lethbridge also experiences high water but infrastructure is protected. 2014 The department receives EMS accreditation through Accreditation Canada – first integrated service in Canada to achieve accreditation. December - Chief B. Cornforth takes a position with Edmonton Fire Rescue Service. 2015 Rich Hildebrand is promoted to chief of the department. The Fire Smart Program begins to be implemented as a way to decrease fire risk in the transition zone where wild land and urban development meet. 2016 Fort McMurray wildfires damage huge areas of the city and forces the evacuation of 88,000 people. Lethbridge sends individuals to provide incident management support, critical incident stress management (CISM) support, dispatch assistance and inspection services over several weeks. 2017 Council gives support to build another station on the west side of the city. When station 2 was first built on the west side of the city in 1980 there was a population of around 4000 however today the west side population is approaching 40 000. Hiring will take place in 2018, 1019 and 2020 to have staffing ready to fill the hall in 2020 when it is scheduled to be completed. 2018 – Department receives “accreditation with commendation” from Accreditation Canada. First hiring for the new station begins – 10 recruits
Scope and Content
001: Chief for a Day 20 Photos (1987) 002: 76 photos 44 Negatives of safety programs, awards, flipped semi, and training exercise (1996-1997) 003: 284 photos of awards, training exercise, family day, and unidentified people (1978-1999) 004: 1993-1995 Newspaper clippings 005: 1995-1997 Newspaper clippings and 14 negatives of emergency vehicles 006: 1997-1999 Newspaper clippings 007: 1999-2000 Newspaper clippings 008: 2001 Newspapers and Facebook post pertaining to September 11 009: 2000-2002 Newspaper clippings, 12 photographs, and 8 negatives of kids program and emergency vehicles 010: 2003-2004 Newspaper clippings 011: 1973-2006 Newspaper clippings 012: 2003-2004 Certificates and temporary tattoo for kids 013-015: 2008-2011 Cds of opening Ceremonies for the new headquarters and Lethbridge Fire Operations 101 016: 166 negatives and 151 photographs of training exercises, emergency vehicles, awards, and kids programs (1987-1994) 017: 36 negatives and 34 photos of fire chief for a day and awards (1999) 018: 62 photos of group photographs, fire extinguisher training program, water training, kids program, fire inspections, and emergency vehicles (1986-1989) 019: 61 photos of training exercises, parade, fire inspection, information booth, and after fire photographs (1990-1992) 020: 138 photos and 89 negatives awards, emergency vehicles and buildings, and social events (1993-1995) 021: 67 photos and 63 negatives health and safety programs, kids programs, and pictures with the mayor (1994) 022: 42 negatives and 34 photos teachers program, and safety booth (1996) 023: 60 negatives and 62 photos of kids program, fire alarms, raising of the flag, and awards (1997) 024: 70 negatives and 102 photos Lakeview School program, awards, risk watch program, kids programs, and seniors program (1998) 025: 89 photos training exercises, awards, and family day (2000-2006) 026: 146 negatives and 39 photos of lake, smoke, emergency vehicles, and Wilson School hose event (1988-199-) 027: 23 photos of Fire aftermath used for education (1966-199-) 028: 28 photos emergency vehicles and headquarters, fires, and kids program (200-?) 029: Guide for owners of fire damaged property, Safety news source, stickers, Service recognition, fire training and customer service training for fire chief, and 3 photographs of two plaques (1991-1999) 030-036: 7 photographs on foam board showing public programs (199-?) 037-042: 5 photographs on foam board showing emergency vehicles (199-) 043- 067: 24 photographs on foam board showing emergency personnel during calls and training scenarios (199- 068 - 081: 13 photographs on foam board used for educational purposes showing a variety of fires and damages (1987-1991) 082: 11” X 16” colored photograph of the headquarters on 4th Avenue South oversize (2011) 083-086: 4 logos oversize (200- - 2012) 087: 24” X 10” black and white photograph of the fire department with Harley Davidson bikes and shirts oversize (199-) 088: 17” X 7” colored photograph of emergency vehicle and personnel with young boy. At the back it says Thank you Tony Stannard oversize (199-) 089: 18” X 24” poster with different emergency vehicles and their years: 1978 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1986 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1980 IHC Cargostar-1950, 1975 IHC Superior Hendrickson, 1973 Mack CF-600 Thibault, 1979 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1978 Scott Pierreville-CIFD, 1982 Ford F600, 1970 Ford Cabover 900, 1985 Ford Econoline XL350, 1977 IHC 4X4 Loadstar, and 1979 IHC Cargostar 1950B oversize (1970-1986) 090: 17” X 28” poster talking about the Fire Department Mission, Vision and Values oversize (199-) 091: 22” X 29” poster talking about the Advance Life Support (ALS) pump response model and its advantages oversize (200-) 092: 24” X 30” poster mentioning five members of the department that passed away: Clifford Daniel Heaton, Douglas Henry J. Herbers, Edward Kenneth Kurtz, John Sterenberg, and Ted “Shakey” Gordon Bochan oversize (201-) 093: 24” X 30” poster of fire department staff oversize (2002) 094: 20” X 16” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by T. Bochan oversize (1978) 095: 24” X 30” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by Terry Bland Photography LTD oversize (1986) 096: 24” X 32” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by Terry Bland Photography LTD oversize (1989) 097: 30” X 20” photograph on wood of the 1995 flood with plaque on bottom left “Flood of the Century June 1995” oversize (1995) 098: 18” X 24” photograph of emergency vehicles in front of fire hall oversize (198-) 099: 28.5” X 82” photograph of emergency vehicles and personnel on the Westside with scenery of the high-level bridge and east Lethbridge oversize (198- - 199-)
Accession No.
20181062
Collection
Archive
Less detail