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The Museum and of Canadian Public--Pub. for Arts & Culture Branch, Dept. of the Sec. of State, Gov't of Canada

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/library1341
Author
Kettle, John
Publisher
Culturcan
Material Type
Book
Material Type
Book
Author
Kettle, John
Publisher
Culturcan
Publication Date
1997
Physical Description
391 Pages
Subjects
Museums- Canada- Statistics
Abstract
French & English
Call Number
Prof AM 21 A2 K47
Collection
Library
Less detail

Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions80795
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20071015
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1…
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
History / Biographical
Edward Fredric "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1800 with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward Hagell started the first newspaper in southern Alberta. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward (teddy). Teddy began drawing at the age of 2 1/2 years, winning numerous competitions without having any formal training. He was a self-taught artist, though he did take some lessons in etching while in Vancouver. E.F. Hagell gained fame as a Canadian range rider and artist, depicting the early cattle country in much of his work. His father and two uncles homesteaded and established the 'Three Links' cattle ranch west of Cardston, in the Mountain View district. Hagell's own experience of ranching complemented his love of the outdoors, from which he developed his own unique style in the tradition of artists such as Rosa Bonheur, Charles Russell, and Fredrick Remington. Hagell married Cora Marie Pelletier in 1919 and the couple left for Los Angeles that year. They had three children born in 1920, 1922, and 1923, before moving to Vancouver in 1929. Hagell had the first one-man exhibition at the Vancouver art gallery when it opened in 1932. That year the family returned to Coaldale, where they stayed until moving to Calgary in 1935, and back to Lethbridge two years later. In the mid 1940s the Hagells moved to Brampton, Ontario, where they remained until settling in pincher creek in 1952. E.F. Hagell returned to Lethbridge just prior to his death in 1964, at the age of 69. The work of E.F. Hagell is unique in that it was confined exclusively to prairie and mountain scenes of western Canada. Many of his works reproduced incidents he saw and experienced and most pieces were done in pen and ink. Every one of his drawings or paintings contained at least one animal; he had little interest in depicting people. Hagell wished, through his work, to preserve the history of the early days of the west before mechanization was introduced. Hagell received international recognition through a series of prints and etchings circulated through the Canadian national parks. Collections of his work were shown in or recognized by the Beaver Club in London, the Royal Canadian Academy, the London Illustrated News, Vista Del Arroya--Passadena, painters and etchers of Ontario, and the Glenbow foundation in Calgary (in 2006 Glenbow transferred a major part of their Hagel related artifacts to the Galt Museum & Archives. The Galt now holds the most significant collection of Hagel works.) His first major exhibition was in California, with subsequent shows in Oklahoma; Texas; the sportsman's show in Toronto; the Calgary Stampede; the 1951 Lethbridge Exhibition and Rodeo; the Calgary Petroleum Club; and an exhibit staged posthumously by his wife in 1970, at the Provincial Museum in Victoria, B.C.. During his career as an artist, hagell painted and drew about 1500 works. He also began writing in 1930, later publishing a collection of poems and short stories. He worked in various other jobs throughout his life, but mainly in window trimming and interior display for department stores. According to his son, Barnett, Hagell could not make a living from his art because if he showed in New York his work was considered too Canadian and in Toronto it was too western. He was not a good salesman for his own work as he considered the people who attended the exhibition cocktail parties to be phoney and insincere. He had a great love for the prairies and farming, and was a great storyteller, especially to children.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton G. Hagell
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1935-1963 2007.1015/005 Catalogue of originals; list of pictures sold to Glenblow; summary of Hagell biography; list of oils; list of black & white prints; address list; 2 photos; 2 negatives 2007.1015/006 Consignment invoices; price list with descriptions; Stampede Salon of Fine Arts program, picture list numbered; 3 art reproductions; 2 photos 2007.1015/007 Personal receipts 2007.1015/008 Guest register, July 28, 1970; Oklahoma Exhibition program; art samples, letter from mayor of Lethbridge; cards; invoices and receipts for art; 2 photos 2007.1015/009 Vancouver Art Gallery exhibition, 1932-1934; The Art Gallery of Toronto exhibition, 1935; Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, 1935 2007.1015/010 Newspaper clippings, Violet’s diaries 1924-1964; Wilma Wood correspondence; 1 photograph 2007.1015/011 Hagell family history documents; The Story of the Press, 1928 2007.1015/012 Correspondence 1959-1960 2007.1015/013 Artist’s notes on dinnerware; hanging art for display purposes; city art suggestions for historical subjects 2007.1015/014 Ted Hagel poetry 2007.1015/015 Correspondence 1932-1973 2007.1015/016 Prints and sketches for art; notes; 1 print; 35 sketches 2007.1015/017 Catalogue of Charles M. Russel artwork; taxidermist catalog; brochure: Indians of the Prairie Provinces 1 photo 2007.1015/018 The Noble Foundation [working documents] 2007.1015/019 American Scene [magazine of Glicrease Institute]; ideas for Calgary Brewery’s Horsemen’s Hall of Fame
Accession No.
20071015
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Arrows of Cottonwood - novel by E.F. Hagell - manuscript

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions84453
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20081040002
Physical Description
Manuscript, 198 pages
Scope and Content
The novel was intended for young adult audience and tells the story of two young men growing up in the ranching country of southern Alberta: "the wild freedom and carefree courage of the romantic days." The author suggests that the book is a "Tom Sawyer-Huckleberry-Finn characterization set in a wi…
Description Level
Item
Creator
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell (E.F. Hagell)
Physical Description
Manuscript, 198 pages
History / Biographical
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1890. He started the first newspaper called “Lethbridge News”. He came with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: Violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward Fredrick “Teddy”. Growing up in southern Alberta, Hagell roamed the prairies sometimes working as a cowboy, indulging his love of horses and the prairie. Thoughout his life he pursued passion of visual art and writing. The major artistic themes in his work were the prairie landscape, animals and the pioneer era of western Canada. He studied in New York and Los Angeles, and lived in Vancouver and on a farm near Toronto before returning to southern Alberta in 1952 to live in Pincher Creek. During his lifetime Ted Hagell produced about 1,500 works of art, wrote poetry and short stories, and published one book. He began writing in 1930. His first works was a collection of poems and short stories. Later a chapter book entitled “When the Grass was Free…” published in January 1954. The "Harker of the Fiddleback" has never been published. The manuscript was created when the author lived in Ontario.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton Hagell
Scope and Content
The novel was intended for young adult audience and tells the story of two young men growing up in the ranching country of southern Alberta: "the wild freedom and carefree courage of the romantic days." The author suggests that the book is a "Tom Sawyer-Huckleberry-Finn characterization set in a wilder western range land."
Accession No.
20081040002
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20051073
Physical Description
Manuscripts and photographs
Scope and Content
Political cartoons drwn by Ted Hagell and appeared in the Calgary Herald 7 sepia-toned photographs. View of Galt Gardens and Opera House from 5th Street & 3rd Avenue corner; 6 views of the Frank Slide. "Case Lethbridge" is printed at the bottom of ech image. Biography of Edward Hagell typed and wr…
Description Level
Item
Creator
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell (E.F. Hagell)
Physical Description
Manuscripts and photographs
History / Biographical
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1890. He started the first newspaper called “Lethbridge News”. He came with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: Violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward Fredrick “Teddy”. Growing up in southern Alberta, Hagell roamed the prairies sometimes working as a cowboy, indulging his love of horses and the prairie. Thoughout his life he pursued passion of visual art and writing. The major artistic themes in his work were the prairie landscape, animals and the pioneer era of western Canada. He studied in New York and Los Angeles, and lived in Vancouver and on a farm near Toronto before returning to southern Alberta in 1952 to live in Pincher Creek. During his lifetime Ted Hagell produced about 1,500 works of art, wrote poetry and short stories, and published one book. He began writing in 1930. His first works was a collection of poems and short stories. Later a chapter book entitled “When the Grass was Free…” published in January 1954. The "Harker of the Fiddleback" has never been published.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton Hagell
Scope and Content
Political cartoons drwn by Ted Hagell and appeared in the Calgary Herald 7 sepia-toned photographs. View of Galt Gardens and Opera House from 5th Street & 3rd Avenue corner; 6 views of the Frank Slide. "Case Lethbridge" is printed at the bottom of ech image. Biography of Edward Hagell typed and written page 2 loose scrapbook pages regarding Edward Hagell and events in 1953-1954
Notes
The scrapbook pages are separated from the donation and placed in the grey boxes due theri size
Accession No.
20051073
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Harker of the Fiddleback - novel by E.F. Hagell - manuscript

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions84422
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20081040001
Physical Description
Manuscript, 227 pages
Scope and Content
The story unfolds in the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserves of Western Canada. Most of the action takes place in the North Fork Gap of the Oldman River and in the McGillvray and Allison valleys of the Crownest Pass. The main character, Rad Harker, raised in the cow country of southern Alberta, makes li…
Description Level
Item
Creator
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell (E.F. Hagell)
Physical Description
Manuscript, 227 pages
History / Biographical
Edward Fredrick "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1890. He started the first newspaper called “Lethbridge News”. He came with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: Violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward Fredrick “Teddy”. Growing up in southern Alberta, Hagell roamed the prairies sometimes working as a cowboy, indulging his love of horses and the prairie. Thoughout his life he pursued passion of visual art and writing. The major artistic themes in his work were the prairie landscape, animals and the pioneer era of western Canada. He studied in New York and Los Angeles, and lived in Vancouver and on a farm near Toronto before returning to southern Alberta in 1952 to live in Pincher Creek. During his lifetime Ted Hagell produced about 1,500 works of art, wrote poetry and short stories, and published one book. He began writing in 1930. His first works was a collection of poems and short stories. Later a chapter book entitled “When the Grass was Free…” published in January 1954. The "Harker of the Fiddleback" has never been published. The manuscript was created when the author lived in Ontario.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton Hagell
Scope and Content
The story unfolds in the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserves of Western Canada. Most of the action takes place in the North Fork Gap of the Oldman River and in the McGillvray and Allison valleys of the Crownest Pass. The main character, Rad Harker, raised in the cow country of southern Alberta, makes living as a ranch hand. He leaves his first good job for the 2-bar-reverse-K outfit in the Milk River Ridge country because of the "bold infatuation" on the part of the foreman's daughter. After making his way west, he finds job at the Fiddleback ranch, where he is hired by the Honeysett brothers. Rad developed affection for the owners' daughter - Iris Honeysett who return from their college schooling for the summer vacations. The story develops into a contest between quiet unassuming Harker and the boastful unprincipled Sam Parks for the heart of Iris. When Parks is exposed and defeated, Harker leaves the ranch believing he has nothing to offer to a ranch owners' daughter but eventually, with the help of friends, the young people find their happiness.
Accession No.
20081040001
Collection
Archive
Less detail