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Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions80795
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20071015
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1…
Date Range
1924-1973
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Edward Frederick (Ted) Hagell and Cora Marie Hagell
Physical Description
0.23 m of textual records; 69 photos; 48 art prints
History / Biographical
Edward Fredric "Teddy" Hagell was born June 20, 1895 in Coaldale, Alberta. His father, Edward Hagell, arrived in Lethbridge from England in about 1800 with his wife, who died with the birth of her first child, Cora. Edward Hagell started the first newspaper in southern Alberta. Edward and Ellen (2nd wife) had four children: violet, Freda, Albert, and Edward (teddy). Teddy began drawing at the age of 2 1/2 years, winning numerous competitions without having any formal training. He was a self-taught artist, though he did take some lessons in etching while in Vancouver. E.F. Hagell gained fame as a Canadian range rider and artist, depicting the early cattle country in much of his work. His father and two uncles homesteaded and established the 'Three Links' cattle ranch west of Cardston, in the Mountain View district. Hagell's own experience of ranching complemented his love of the outdoors, from which he developed his own unique style in the tradition of artists such as Rosa Bonheur, Charles Russell, and Fredrick Remington. Hagell married Cora Marie Pelletier in 1919 and the couple left for Los Angeles that year. They had three children born in 1920, 1922, and 1923, before moving to Vancouver in 1929. Hagell had the first one-man exhibition at the Vancouver art gallery when it opened in 1932. That year the family returned to Coaldale, where they stayed until moving to Calgary in 1935, and back to Lethbridge two years later. In the mid 1940s the Hagells moved to Brampton, Ontario, where they remained until settling in pincher creek in 1952. E.F. Hagell returned to Lethbridge just prior to his death in 1964, at the age of 69. The work of E.F. Hagell is unique in that it was confined exclusively to prairie and mountain scenes of western Canada. Many of his works reproduced incidents he saw and experienced and most pieces were done in pen and ink. Every one of his drawings or paintings contained at least one animal; he had little interest in depicting people. Hagell wished, through his work, to preserve the history of the early days of the west before mechanization was introduced. Hagell received international recognition through a series of prints and etchings circulated through the Canadian national parks. Collections of his work were shown in or recognized by the Beaver Club in London, the Royal Canadian Academy, the London Illustrated News, Vista Del Arroya--Passadena, painters and etchers of Ontario, and the Glenbow foundation in Calgary (in 2006 Glenbow transferred a major part of their Hagel related artifacts to the Galt Museum & Archives. The Galt now holds the most significant collection of Hagel works.) His first major exhibition was in California, with subsequent shows in Oklahoma; Texas; the sportsman's show in Toronto; the Calgary Stampede; the 1951 Lethbridge Exhibition and Rodeo; the Calgary Petroleum Club; and an exhibit staged posthumously by his wife in 1970, at the Provincial Museum in Victoria, B.C.. During his career as an artist, hagell painted and drew about 1500 works. He also began writing in 1930, later publishing a collection of poems and short stories. He worked in various other jobs throughout his life, but mainly in window trimming and interior display for department stores. According to his son, Barnett, Hagell could not make a living from his art because if he showed in New York his work was considered too Canadian and in Toronto it was too western. He was not a good salesman for his own work as he considered the people who attended the exhibition cocktail parties to be phoney and insincere. He had a great love for the prairies and farming, and was a great storyteller, especially to children.
Custodial History
Donated by Dalton G. Hagell
Scope and Content
2007.1015/001 Copies of art prints with explanation; 10 prints 2007.1015/002 Negatives, mounted photos, unmounted photos of artwork; 8 negatives; 40 photos 2007.1015/003 Death notice; book of remembrance, 1964; letter of condolence 2007.1015/004 Correspondence re: Crosby Company Ltd, Lake Louise, 1935-1963 2007.1015/005 Catalogue of originals; list of pictures sold to Glenblow; summary of Hagell biography; list of oils; list of black & white prints; address list; 2 photos; 2 negatives 2007.1015/006 Consignment invoices; price list with descriptions; Stampede Salon of Fine Arts program, picture list numbered; 3 art reproductions; 2 photos 2007.1015/007 Personal receipts 2007.1015/008 Guest register, July 28, 1970; Oklahoma Exhibition program; art samples, letter from mayor of Lethbridge; cards; invoices and receipts for art; 2 photos 2007.1015/009 Vancouver Art Gallery exhibition, 1932-1934; The Art Gallery of Toronto exhibition, 1935; Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, 1935 2007.1015/010 Newspaper clippings, Violet’s diaries 1924-1964; Wilma Wood correspondence; 1 photograph 2007.1015/011 Hagell family history documents; The Story of the Press, 1928 2007.1015/012 Correspondence 1959-1960 2007.1015/013 Artist’s notes on dinnerware; hanging art for display purposes; city art suggestions for historical subjects 2007.1015/014 Ted Hagel poetry 2007.1015/015 Correspondence 1932-1973 2007.1015/016 Prints and sketches for art; notes; 1 print; 35 sketches 2007.1015/017 Catalogue of Charles M. Russel artwork; taxidermist catalog; brochure: Indians of the Prairie Provinces 1 photo 2007.1015/018 The Noble Foundation [working documents] 2007.1015/019 American Scene [magazine of Glicrease Institute]; ideas for Calgary Brewery’s Horsemen’s Hall of Fame
Accession No.
20071015
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1947-1987
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20171094
Physical Description
0.3 m of textual records, over 500 photographs, 1 sketch
Scope and Content
The materials were preserved and enhanced through research by Joyce Sasse 001: 1963 Day planner 002: 1964 Day planner 003: 1965 Day planner 004: Book- Proud Procession (1947) 005: Book- Young Explorers (1947) 006: Book- Totem Tipi and Tumpline (1955) 007: Book- No Man Stands Alone (1965) 008: Book…
Date Range
1947-1987
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Annora Brown
Physical Description
0.3 m of textual records, over 500 photographs, 1 sketch
History / Biographical
Annora Brown was born outside of Red Deer in 1899 and died at the age of 88 in Deep Cove, British Columbia in 1987 where she retired. Brown is one of the Alberta’s foremost early artists. Based for much of her life in historic Fort Macleod, Brown played a major role in creating a ‘picture’ of Southern Alberta: its wild landscape, First Nations, pioneer rural communities, local history- above all its wondrous nature symbolized by the wildflower. Her work was able to capture the culture of the First nation communities that she lived near. Her father was Edmund Foster Brown and mother was Elizabeth Ethel (Cody) Brown. Her mother supported and encouraged Brown’s love for art and from 1925-1929 Brown attended the Ontario College of Art in Toronto. She returned in 1929 and developed and art program for Calgary’s Mounted Royal College but later had to leave due to her mother’s illness. A student of the celebrated landscape painters, known as the Group of Seven (1920-1933), Brown’s artistic practice spans the 1930s to mid-1980s. During that time, she cobbled together a living as an artist, often by teaching, illustrating books and magazines, and selling, whenever she could, her captivating paintings in watercolor, tempera oil and later serigraph prints. In 1945-1950, brown worked as a respected artist and teacher at the Banff School of Fine Arts. She was also commissioned to paint over 200 western wild flowers for the Glenbow Foundation. Brown’s work was also included in Crescent Heights High School in Calgary, University of Alberta in Edmonton, United College in Winnipeg, and the Canadian Handicrafts Guild in Montreal. She was also awarded a prize in the Alberta Government’s 1955 Jubilee Contest for Alberta painters. In 1965 Brown retired to Deep Cove British Columbia to paint and garden. She had given a “voice” to a region that had been rarely presented in Canadian art. Her attention to the unique aspects of Old Man’s Country like Niitsitapi, the character and isolation of its small rural communities as well as its unforgettable environment was expressed mainly through her focus on wildflowers and native plants. Buoyed by the conviction that a woman’s activities “need not be limited to polishing furniture and raising babies”, Brown was also a writer and author of two books: the Western Canadian classic Old Man’s Garden and her autobiographical Sketches from Life. She was the first woman to receive an honorary degree from the University of Lethbridge in 1971 for her contribution to “western art and living.” (written by Mary-Beth Laviolette; Summer 2016 Gallery Exhibit at Galt Museum)
Scope and Content
The materials were preserved and enhanced through research by Joyce Sasse 001: 1963 Day planner 002: 1964 Day planner 003: 1965 Day planner 004: Book- Proud Procession (1947) 005: Book- Young Explorers (1947) 006: Book- Totem Tipi and Tumpline (1955) 007: Book- No Man Stands Alone (1965) 008: Book- Canaries on the Clothesline (1974) 009: Sketch of Annora Brown oversized 010: 26 Photos of the Rockies 011: 2 Photos, Editorial, Crighton photocopy with description 012: 8 Photos of her house and her graduation 013: 17 Photos of the cabin, 5 prints, letters about her house in Fort Macleod, and letters from the Town of Fort Macleod 014: Research notes of Annora Brown by Joyce Sasse 015: 215 Photos building the cabin 016: 250 Photos of her art, excerpt of Sketches from Life, and later years; 3 Newspaper cutouts Language: English
Access Restrictions
Public
Accession No.
20171094
Collection
Archive
Less detail