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Lethbridge Native Sons 1953-1954

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95985
Date Range
1952-1953
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055018
Physical Description
14 X 12 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Lethbridge Native Sons were a Canadian Junior A hockey team, based in Lethbridge, AB. They played in the Western Canada Junior Hockey League from 1948-56. In 1953-54 the team finished third in their division and lost in the quarter finals of the playoffs. Front Row: George De rappard, Dick McGh…
  1 image  
Date Range
1952-1953
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
14 X 12 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Lethbridge Native Sons were a Canadian Junior A hockey team, based in Lethbridge, AB. They played in the Western Canada Junior Hockey League from 1948-56. In 1953-54 the team finished third in their division and lost in the quarter finals of the playoffs. Front Row: George De rappard, Dick McGhee, Ed Zemrau, Gerry Koehle, Ken Brown, Gerry Sorenson, Ron Morgan Second Row: Byron McDonald (coach), Jim Powers, Ron Hemmerling, Ed Bruchet (manager), E.S. Neils (president), Larry Ruptash, Ron Yanosik, Babe Phalen (trainer) Third Row: Art Hart, Earl Ingarfield, Les Colwill, Bill Voss, Dick Lamoureux, John MacMillan.
Accession No.
20191055018
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Interior of the Inn Purple

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions97469
Date Range
July 1967 - March 1968
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20201002058
Physical Description
35 mm colour Slide
Scope and Content
The walls were painted purple which is how the coffee house got its name. Along the west wall on the main floor, Cathy Evins designed a mural that was then painted according to her direction by volunteers. A jukebox sat in the corner, a coffee counter ran along the east wall towards the back, and a…
  1 image  
Date Range
July 1967 - March 1968
Description Level
Item
Creator
Robert (Bob) Shippobotham
Physical Description
35 mm colour Slide
History / Biographical
Robert (Bob) Howard Shippobotham was born on March 18, 1943 in the Galt Hospital. He is the only son of Frank and Garnette Shippobotham. Robert was employed with C.P. Rail as a Train Machine Clerk for 35 years until his retirement in 1997. He was married to Margaret Deans for 37 years until her passing in 2016 and he has one daughter, Bobbie Jean from a previous marriage. Robert was an amateur photographer and had his own dark room. He liked to try new photographing and processing techiniques. Inn Purple was a young adult coffee house that existed in 1967/68 in Lethbridge. It was a place where teens and young adults could go to hang out, listen to music and dance, without drugs, alcohol or their parents. It was run by the St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church youth group but was non-denominational. The idea for the coffee house was born out of the desire of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church youth group which motivated members of the congregation to find a way to “...uphold new approaches and experiments in establishing communication with youth.” A location was picked, volunteers were recruited, supplies were gathered and in July 1967 the doors to the Inn Purple opened. A jukebox, table tennis and board games were provided. Groups could rent out the venue for a small fee. Besides live music, dancing and poetry readings, the Inn Purple held occasional church services. The stage of the Inn Purple saw many local talents, like Cheri Thompson or Dale Ketcheson, fill the coffee house with songs and poems. None that visited the Inn were quite as iconic as Gordon Lightfoot. While in Lethbridge for his concerts at the Yates on September of 1967, he learned of the little coffee house and paid them a visit. Even with the modest admission fee, a $1 membership, a concession and a memorial fund, the Inn Purple was not able to generate enough income to stay open. In June 1968 the Inn Purple committee was forced to hold an auction to keep the doors open. By mid-September 1968 the coffers were empty. A year and a half after opening this teen/ young adult hangout closed forever.
Custodial History
Photographed by Robert Shippobotham and kept in the Shippobotham Family.
Scope and Content
The walls were painted purple which is how the coffee house got its name. Along the west wall on the main floor, Cathy Evins designed a mural that was then painted according to her direction by volunteers. A jukebox sat in the corner, a coffee counter ran along the east wall towards the back, and a simple stage stood at the back of the main floor. The basement walls were painted purple and adorned with Don Lancaster’s graffiti art.
Accession No.
20201002058
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Interior of the Inn Purple

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions97470
Date Range
July 1967 - March 1968
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20201002059
Physical Description
35 mm colour Slide
Scope and Content
The walls were painted purple which is how the coffee house got its name. Along the west wall on the main floor, Cathy Evins designed a mural that was then painted according to her direction by volunteers. A jukebox sat in the corner, a coffee counter ran along the east wall towards the back, and a…
  1 image  
Date Range
July 1967 - March 1968
Description Level
Item
Creator
Robert (Bob) Shippobotham
Physical Description
35 mm colour Slide
History / Biographical
Robert (Bob) Howard Shippobotham was born on March 18, 1943 in the Galt Hospital. He is the only son of Frank and Garnette Shippobotham. Robert was employed with C.P. Rail as a Train Machine Clerk for 35 years until his retirement in 1997. He was married to Margaret Deans for 37 years until her passing in 2016 and he has one daughter, Bobbie Jean from a previous marriage. Robert was an amateur photographer and had his own dark room. He liked to try new photographing and processing techiniques. Inn Purple was a young adult coffee house that existed in 1967/68 in Lethbridge. It was a place where teens and young adults could go to hang out, listen to music and dance, without drugs, alcohol or their parents. It was run by the St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church youth group but was non-denominational. The idea for the coffee house was born out of the desire of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church youth group which motivated members of the congregation to find a way to “...uphold new approaches and experiments in establishing communication with youth.” A location was picked, volunteers were recruited, supplies were gathered and in July 1967 the doors to the Inn Purple opened. A jukebox, table tennis and board games were provided. Groups could rent out the venue for a small fee. Besides live music, dancing and poetry readings, the Inn Purple held occasional church services. The stage of the Inn Purple saw many local talents, like Cheri Thompson or Dale Ketcheson, fill the coffee house with songs and poems. None that visited the Inn were quite as iconic as Gordon Lightfoot. While in Lethbridge for his concerts at the Yates on September of 1967, he learned of the little coffee house and paid them a visit. Even with the modest admission fee, a $1 membership, a concession and a memorial fund, the Inn Purple was not able to generate enough income to stay open. In June 1968 the Inn Purple committee was forced to hold an auction to keep the doors open. By mid-September 1968 the coffers were empty. A year and a half after opening this teen/ young adult hangout closed forever.
Custodial History
Photographed by Robert Shippobotham and kept in the Shippobotham Family.
Scope and Content
The walls were painted purple which is how the coffee house got its name. Along the west wall on the main floor, Cathy Evins designed a mural that was then painted according to her direction by volunteers. A jukebox sat in the corner, a coffee counter ran along the east wall towards the back, and a simple stage stood at the back of the main floor. The basement walls were painted purple and adorned with Don Lancaster’s graffiti art.
Accession No.
20201002059
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail