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Research Files on Donald W. Buchanan

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96018
Date Range
1934-2008
Description Level
Series
Accession No.
20191029
Physical Description
25cm of textual records; 255 photographs; 22 - 35mm slides
Scope and Content
2019.1029/001: Overview Research on Donald W. Buchanan Part 1/2, 1934-2008. 2019.1029/002: Overview Research on Donald W. Buchanan Part 2/2, 4 photographs, 1938-1966. 2019.1029/003: Buchanan Art Collection, 28 photographs, 22 slides, 1958-2008. 2019.1029/004: The Buchanan Collection Artworks wit…
Date Range
1934-2008
Description Level
Series
Creator
Compiled by Nancy Townshend
Physical Description
25cm of textual records; 255 photographs; 22 - 35mm slides
History / Biographical
Donald W. Buchanan was born in 1908 in Lethbridge, Alberta. He was the son of Senator William Ashbury Buchanan, the publisher of the Lethbridge Herald. He studied Modern History at the University of Toronto and Oxford University. In 1934, he received a fellowship from the Carnegie Corporation to train in museum administration. Following his research fellowship, Buchanan founded the National Film Society of Canada, as well as he worked for the Canadian Radio Commission (now the CBC). Buchanan was always involved in the arts and he was a firm believer in making the arts accessible to the public. In 1963, Donald Buchanan, and his brother Hugh, offered many fine works of art to the City of Lethbridge. This became the first significant public art collection ever to exist in Lethbridge. He believed that art was meant to be shared and enjoyed by all. After leaving the Canadian Radio Commission, Buchanan worked for the National Film Board, where he established the stills division; from 1947 until 1960 he was employed by the National Gallery of Canada, serving as director of the Industrial Design Division (1947-1953). His work with the National Industrial Design Committee and the curated the revolutionary exhibition “Design for Use in Canadian Products” (1946) which changed the standards of Canadian art. Donald W. Buchanan served as the Associate Director of the National Gallery of Canada, and took a leave of absence to explore his own artistic endeavors of photography while travelling throughout Europe. Buchanan returned to the Gallery in 1963 as a member of its Board of Trustees, and he became the Director of the International Fine Arts Exhibition at Expo ’67 in Montreal. In the last few years of his life, his friends recall him being busier than ever, organizing the exhibition. He never was able to see the fruits of his labor, however, because of his sudden death in 1966 after being struck by a car in Ottawa. His legacy centered on the accessibility of art to the public and his impact on the art community in Lethbridge.
Scope and Content
2019.1029/001: Overview Research on Donald W. Buchanan Part 1/2, 1934-2008. 2019.1029/002: Overview Research on Donald W. Buchanan Part 2/2, 4 photographs, 1938-1966. 2019.1029/003: Buchanan Art Collection, 28 photographs, 22 slides, 1958-2008. 2019.1029/004: The Buchanan Collection Artworks with Descriptions, 47 photographs, 1963-1985. 2019.1029/005: The Buchanan Library Art Collection Information, 2 photographs, 1956-2004. 2019.1029/006: DESIGN Exhibitions and Resources Part 1/2, 1946-2008. 2019.1029/007: DESIGN Exhibitions and Resources Part 2/2, 1947-1958. 2019.1029/008: DESIGN: Umbrella Theme for Buchanan’s Works, 1948-2007. 2019.1029/009: Donald W. Buchanan Website by Nancy Townshend, 2001-2008. 2019.1029/010: Resources used by Nancy Townshend for Donald W. Buchanan Website, 1938-2007. 2019.1029/011: Written Works by Donald W. Buchanan Part 1/2, 89 photographs, 1934-1947. 2019.1029/012: Written Works by Donald W. Buchanan Part 2/2, 61 photographs, 1945-1967. 2019.1029/013: EXPO ’67-Montreal, Part 1/2, 1960-2008. 2019.1029/014: EXPO ’67-Montreal, Part 2/2, 1965-2003? 2019.1029/015: Buchanan’s Photography, 21 photographs, 1959-2008. 2019.1029/016: Tributes to Donald W. Buchanan, 3 photographs, 1955-2008. 2019.1029/017: Miscellaneous Documents related to Buchanan’s Will, 2007-2008. 2019.1029/018: National Gallery of Canada Archives, 1963-2007
Accession No.
20191029
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Waterton Natural History Association fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92565
Date Range
1983-2017
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181022
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records, photographs, and 2 scrapbooks
Date Range
1983-2017
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Waterton Natural History Association
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records, photographs, and 2 scrapbooks
History / Biographical
The Waterton Natural History Association was formed in 1983 in Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP) as the first co-operating association in Western Canada. As a non-profit association with Parks Canada registered in the Province of Alberta, under the direction of a Board of Directors, its role was to provide and publish materials relevant to Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, provide funds for and execute projects undertaken to enhance WLNP and to sponsor special events and services for the enjoyment and education of the park visitor. The WNHA operated out of the Heritage Centre in the old Fire Hall on Waterton Avenue which was altered to house a museum of natural and cultural history exhibits about the area. The organization sold books, and topographic maps, sponsored natural history related events, workshops and art exhibits and well as providing one-on-one information to the visiting public. Summer employment programs were supported through the hiring of students, seniors, handicapped etc. Membership in the organization was open to all interested parties for a nominal fee. Over time, the WNHA operated the Crooked Creek Campground outside the park and sold plaques for a Cemetery Wall as well as raising funds for its various activities. In February, 2018, the association was formally dissolved at the final annual general meeting.
Custodial History
The documents in this fonds include meeting minutes, corporate documents, and photographs related to the natural history of the park as used in exhibits and programs. The collection is incomplete in that over the years many photographs and records found other homes including Parks Canada’s Waterton archives. 20181022.001 Organizational start up, 1982. 20181022.002 Meeting minutes, 1983. 20181022.003 Meeting minutes, 1984. 20181022.004 Meeting minutes, 1985. 20181022.005 Meeting minutes, 1986 20181022.006 Meeting minutes, 1987. 20181022.007 Meeting minutes, 1988. 20181022.008 Meeting minutes, 1989. 20181022.009 Meeting minutes, 1990. 20181022.010 Meeting minutes, 1991. 20181022.011 Meeting minutes, 1992. 20181022.012 Meeting minutes, 1993. 20181022.013 Meeting minutes, 1994. 20181022.014 Meeting minutes, 1995. 20181022.015 Meeting minutes, 1996. 20181022.016 Meeting minutes, 1997. 20181022.017 Meeting minutes, 1998. 20181022.018 Meeting minutes, 1999. 20181022.019 Meeting minutes, 2000. 20181022.020 Meeting minutes, 2001. 20181022.021 Meeting minutes, 2002. 20181022.022 Meeting minutes, 2003. 20181022.023 Meeting minutes, 2004. 20181022.024 Meeting minutes, 2005. 20181022.025 Meeting minutes, 2006. 20181022.026 Meeting minutes, 2007. 20181022.027 Meeting minutes, 2008. 20181022.028 Meeting minutes, 2009. 20181022.029 Meeting minutes, 2010. 20181022.030 Meeting minutes, 2011. 20181022.031 Meeting minutes, 2012. 20181022.032 Meeting minutes, 2013. 20181022.033 Meeting minutes, 2014. 20181022.034 Meeting minutes, 2015. 20181022.035 Meeting minutes, 2017. 20181022.036 Crooked Creek Campground annual reports 1995-1997. 20181022.037 Crooked Creek Campground water inspections. 20181022.038 Crooked Creek Campground assorted expenses, various years, 11 photos. 20181022.039 Crooked Creek Campground development, 1995, 2002. 20181022.040 Crooked Creek Campground shower house grant, 2004-2005. 20181022.041 Historic photo calendar, Sept. 1984-Dec. 1985. 20181022.042 Co-operating associations annual report, 1981-1983. 20181022.043 Trail of the Great Bear development. 20181022.044 Waterton centennial anthology, 1985. 20181022.045 Waterton’s Short Hikes and Strolls, 1987. 20181022.046 Cookbook project, 1993. 20181022.047 Request for school tax exclusion, 1994. 20181022.048 Wolf recovery project, 1995-1996. 20181022.049 Bear’s Hump self-guiding trail, 1996. 20181022.050 Waterton a Special Place, second draft, 1999. 20181022.051 Waterton-Glacier Writers Workshops. 20181022.052 Recognition documents to WNHA, 1985-2001. 20181022.053 Heritage Ball, 1986-2007. 20181022.054 WNHA logo contest, 1989. 20181022.055 Reproduction documentation, “Late afternoon glow on the Prince of Wales Lodge [sic]”. 20181022.056 Printing quotations, poster: Upper Waterton Valley, 2002. 20181022.057 Swim suit donation description by Joan Croskery, no date. 20181022.058 Centennial oral history project background, 1995. 20181022.059 National parks centennial celebrations, phamplets, clippings and programs, 16 negatives, 85 photos/ 20181022.060 Copy negatives for family albums displayed at Heritage Centre. 20181022.061 Dedication documents for “First Producing Oil Well in Western Canada”, 1968. 20181022.062 Prince of Wales Hotel book, first edition, 1991. 20181022.063 Doug Oland memoir excerpt re: building in Waterton. 20181022.064 National Parks of Canada by Jean Patterson, 1931. 20181022.065 Summary of the history of the first fire hall in Waterton. 20181022.066 Correspondence with Del Steed, 1986. 20181022.067 “A Classroom As Big As The Great Outdoors, 1998. 20181022.068 Board of Directors’ policies, 2002-2004. 20181022.069 Correspondence with Glenbow Museum, 1986. 20181022.070 Annual Meeting: “The First 10 Years”, 1993. 20181022.071 General Manager’s report for 1995. 20181022.072 Rotary plaques recovery, 2007. 20181022.073 Memorandum of understanding with Parks Canada, 1983. 20181022.074 Unidentified photographs and negatives, 2 photos, 8 negatives, 3 “disk” negatives. 20181022.075 Officers of the RCSCC “Chinook,” 1 photo, no date. 20181022.076 Waterton Heritage Centre, 70 slides. 20181022.077 Volunteers, 2007. 20181022.078 Memorandums of understanding, 2011-2016. 20181022.079 Bylaws review, July 2003. 20181022.080 Certificate of incorporate, 1983. 20181022.081Waterton Centennial Committee, 1994-1995. 20181022.082 Exhibit “Waterton A Special Place,” 1999. 20181022.083 Loan of artifacts, documentation. 20181022.084 Rocky Mountain Development Company, photocopy of share certificate. 20181022.085 Poems of G. Adell Rackette, Waterton resident, photographer and writer, 3 booklets, one photo. 20181022.086 Two historic promotional brochures, 1910 and 1930. 20181022.087 Feature family project, 1988. 20181022.088 Red Cross fund raising community raffle quilt, 1945, one photo. 20181022.089 Pine Ridge Highway Exhibit, 2011. 20181022.090 WNHA policies, 2004-2016. 20181022.091 Association dissolution, 2017. 20181022.092 Bylaws, 1983, 1986, 2011. 20181022.093 Wildlife sketches by Sue Powesland, horse, falcon, bull rider, bobcat. 20181022.094 Wildlife prints, 12 items. 20181022.095 Don Brestler art, “Wolf”, 1994. 20181022.096 Artwork, “Lynx”, three copies. 20181022.097 Western Wildlife portfolio, by James Jockerest 20181022.098 Bathing suit donation. 20181022.099 Special events, 2007. 20181022.100 First Nations (including Metis), background materials, one photo. 20181022.101Aldridge family clippings. 20181022.102 Modern WLNP brochures. 20181022.103 Trail of the Great Bear Map, 2002. 20181022.104 Membership brochure. 20181022.105 Guide to Hiking the Bear’s Hump, in French. 20181022.106 Stories of Waterton, skiing and the summer of 1963. 20181022.107 Charles Waterton, clippings and brochure. 20181022.108 Souvenir folder, Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 20181022.109 Waterton Dance Pavilion, one photo. 20181022.110 Waterton Community Centennial, one photo. 20181022.111 Souvenir views of Waterton, post 1936. 20181022.112 Waterton Weekly Guide, two issues only: June 26, 1936, July 24, 1936. 20181022.113 Postcards of Waterton, five cards. 20181022.114 Souvenir Views of Waterton, laminated. 20181022.115 WLNP centennial decals, 1885-1995, one large; two small. 20181022.116 Historical binder from Peggy and Andy Johnson. 20181022.117 Heritage Education Program, 1986-2002. 20181022.118 Book proposal, Prince of Wales Hotel history. 20181022.119 Cemetery Wall. 20181022.120 Employee dispute, 2011. 20181022.121 Policies and activities, 2011. 20181022.122 Frank Goble articles. 20181022.123 Parks Canada Report: Built Heritage Resources. 20181022.124 Maps of Canada, three maps, 1867-1982. 20181022.125 Inter-provincial boundary commission, background materials. 20181022.126 Waterton interpretive materials, French and English. 20181022.127 Parks Canada’s Waterton Resource Guide, 1997. 20181022.128 Newspaper clippings, Waterton history. 20181022.129 Royalty payments to authors. 20181022.130 Taped interview, “Prince of Wales Hotel”. 20181022.131 Background material on John George “Kootenai” Brown. 20181022.132 Strate family of Waterton, 5 mounted photos. 20181022.133 Goble family of Waterton, 4 mounted photos, one mounted history. 20181022.134 “Canada’s Scouts at the World Jamboree”, 1929. 20181022.135 “Jamboree,” boy scouting, October, 1946, Vol. One. 20181022.136 Second Canadian Boy Scout Jamboree song book, July 1953. 20181022.137 First Class Hike, instructions to Boy Scouts. 20181022.138 Waterton area boy scouts list, no date. 20181022.139 Journal of World Scouting, October, 1946. 20181022.140 History of Senator Buchanan Winter Sports Competition. 20181022.141 First and second winter sports competitions, newspaper clippings, 1956 and 1957. 20181022.142 Scrapbook of boy scouts in Waterton, 160 photos, clippings, programs, letters, 1958-1966. 20181022.143 Boy Scouts and Scout Masters, one photo. 20181022.144 Photographic prints of the Rockies, Peter Ramos, four photos. 20181022.145 Red Cross certificate, 1939. 20181022.146 Nahor W. Dilatush, one photo. 20181022.147 Ernest Haug Senior, one photo. 20181022.148 Oversized photos of Waterton Lakes National Park, two prints. 20181022.149 Photos of Waterton Lakes National Park, three prints. 20181022.150 Erik Hagglund, one photo. 20181022.151 Lions Club Convention, no date, no location. 20181022.152 Heritage Centre logo,, original artwork. 20181022.153 WLNP 100th anniversary poster, 1995. 20181022.154 Southern Alberta Tourism poster. 20181022.155 Brownies and Guides Album, 35 negatives, four photos, no identification. 20181022.156 Brownies and Guides Album, 16 newspaper clippings. 20181022.157 Brownies and Guides First Waterton Pack scrapbook. 20181022.158 Crandell family materials: one oversize photo, 1 family summary. 20181022.159 Crandell family, six photos. 20181022.160 Scrapbook: Boy Scouts in Waterton, uniform badges. 20181022.161CBC television, metal building plaque, 1994. 20181022.162 Parks Canada commemorative centennial coins, card and keychain, 1885-1995. 20181022.163 Two felt pendants and one centennial patch.
Accession No.
20181022
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Lethbridge Fire Department fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92647
Date Range
1978-2011
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181062
Physical Description
Over 500 photographs, 0.8 m of textual records
Scope and Content
001: Chief for a Day 20 Photos (1987) 002: 76 photos 44 Negatives of safety programs, awards, flipped semi, and training exercise (1996-1997) 003: 284 photos of awards, training exercise, family day, and unidentified people (1978-1999) 004: 1993-1995 Newspaper clippings 005: 1995-1997 Newspaper cli…
Date Range
1978-2011
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Lethbridge Fire Department
Physical Description
Over 500 photographs, 0.8 m of textual records
History / Biographical
The Lethbridge Fire Department began in the town of Lethbridge in 1885 with the Bucket Brigade. There were several factors for this. The buildings were chiefly wood, rainfall in the area was low and the westerly winds were prevalent in the region. One factor to deter fires were the 100 foot wide streets. The first organized fire protection was provided by the NWMP in 1886. In 1887 a volunteer hook and ladder company was formed with W. D. Whitney as chief, A. J. Scot, first assistant chief, E. J. Hoddert, second assistant chief. J. D. Higinbotham was secretary-treasurer. When Lethbridge was incorporated as a town in 1891, the new town council had fire protection as their first order of business. In that same year a Volunteer Fire Brigade with William Colpman as chief was formed. In subsequent years other Fire Brigades were organized each with their own chief, assistant chiefs and members. The fire brigade was reorganized in 1902 and those elected became paid members. By 1909 a professional fire department was created. The men were on duty 24 hours per day seven days per week. Minute Books were introduced by Chief Kilkenny in 1909 listing the duty officer, persons on leave, exact time of fire calls and action taken, changes in location of men and equipment. Uniforms were introduced in 1909 and in 1912 the first Firemen's Association Contest between towns took place. In 1912, the Fire Department also began the combined model of fire suppression and emergency medical services. As the town grew incorporation was once again realized. In 1906 Lethbridge became a city. The population grew in three directions, north south and east and more fire stations were built to service the areas. No. 2 was built on the north side of the tracks at 2nd Avenue and 13th Street. A third fire hall was built in the 1960's. By 1920 the Lethbridge Fire Department was a fully professional body who could handle any emergency that occurred. Fire Prevention Programs begun as early as 1935 when Chief Lindsay introduced inspections to individual homes and fire drills began in the schools. Through the war years, the fire department held various courses teaching military firemen to handle pumpers and large equipment. The fire Department ambulance was constantly used for transported trainee crash victims to the Galt Hospital. Following the war improvements were made to both the member numbers and equipment including a two-way radio communications system and fire alarm boxes. Restrictions on sales and use of fireworks were dealt with in the late 1950's and by the early 1970's the sale of fireworks were banned. New fire stations were built in the 1970's. One to replace the old No. 2 which became the fire headquarters and training center located on 5th Avenue and 28th Street North and another on the west side at Jerry Potts Boulevard. The fire box system was abandoned in favor of a more effective communication-the telephone. Wooden ladders were replaced by lighter, stronger more serviceable aluminum ones. In 1985, computers were introduced to the fire department and were used to provide a preplan of many of the larger buildings, hydrant locations, fire department connections, sprinkler controls, exits, hazards etc. City Council also approved the implementation of an advance life support program and hired the first advanced care paramedics. In 1986 the Lethbridge Fire department celebrated its 100 anniversary. A lot of changes, improvements had occurred and with the modern fire fighting techniques many young men were becoming fire fighters to protect the public from any disasters such as fire, flood, explosion, cyclone of mechanical disaster. 1994 Police moves into its own building. In 1998 the department hired the first female firefighter, Bonnie Williams. Her great grandfather Jack King was a Lethbridge firefighter in the 1920-30’s. 2001 fire department gets thermal imaging cameras. 2002 Chief T. Wickersham retires and the city hires Brian Cornforth as the new chief. The dispatch centre of fire/EMS merged with police dispatch to form the Public Safety Communications Centre (PSCC). 2003 Council approved $250,000 for a one-time funding for Advanced Life Support equipment. These units were placed on all frontline fire apparatus. Having advanced care paramedics on fire vehicles allow them to respond to emergency calls anywhere in the city and provide lifesaving care even when an ambulance is unavailable. 2005 Revised disaster services plan and bylaw. Plan outlines three levels of emergencies. Level one, less than eight hours and has little impact on the city. Level two, less than eight hours and moderate impact on city that may require additional support from other services. Level three, longer duration and will have high impact on the city which will require government support. Rope rescue training exercise also implemented. 2009 Alberta Health Services assumes governance of all emergency medical services (EMS) in the province. The city of Lethbridge becomes a contracted provider of EMS for the city of Lethbridge. 2011 New Headquarters (station 1) opens on 4th avenue south and renovations are completed on station 4 located at 5 avenue and 28 street north. Large grassfire starts on the Blood Reserve and threatens the west side of the city when it crosses the Oldman River on November 27 (Grey Cup day). 2012 The department celebrates 100 years providing EMS services in an integrated system. From our research, Lethbridge is the oldest integrated (fire/EMS) system in North America. A weeklong celebration of events were planned and an art piece was commissioned to remember the event. September 10 another large grassfire starts on the Blood Reserve and threatens the west side of the city and the town of Coalhurst when it crosses the Oldman River. 2013 flooding in High River and Calgary creates significant damage to the respective communities. Lethbridge sends numerous individuals to assist in the recovery efforts. Lethbridge also experiences high water but infrastructure is protected. 2014 The department receives EMS accreditation through Accreditation Canada – first integrated service in Canada to achieve accreditation. December - Chief B. Cornforth takes a position with Edmonton Fire Rescue Service. 2015 Rich Hildebrand is promoted to chief of the department. The Fire Smart Program begins to be implemented as a way to decrease fire risk in the transition zone where wild land and urban development meet. 2016 Fort McMurray wildfires damage huge areas of the city and forces the evacuation of 88,000 people. Lethbridge sends individuals to provide incident management support, critical incident stress management (CISM) support, dispatch assistance and inspection services over several weeks. 2017 Council gives support to build another station on the west side of the city. When station 2 was first built on the west side of the city in 1980 there was a population of around 4000 however today the west side population is approaching 40 000. Hiring will take place in 2018, 1019 and 2020 to have staffing ready to fill the hall in 2020 when it is scheduled to be completed. 2018 – Department receives “accreditation with commendation” from Accreditation Canada. First hiring for the new station begins – 10 recruits
Scope and Content
001: Chief for a Day 20 Photos (1987) 002: 76 photos 44 Negatives of safety programs, awards, flipped semi, and training exercise (1996-1997) 003: 284 photos of awards, training exercise, family day, and unidentified people (1978-1999) 004: 1993-1995 Newspaper clippings 005: 1995-1997 Newspaper clippings and 14 negatives of emergency vehicles 006: 1997-1999 Newspaper clippings 007: 1999-2000 Newspaper clippings 008: 2001 Newspapers and Facebook post pertaining to September 11 009: 2000-2002 Newspaper clippings, 12 photographs, and 8 negatives of kids program and emergency vehicles 010: 2003-2004 Newspaper clippings 011: 1973-2006 Newspaper clippings 012: 2003-2004 Certificates and temporary tattoo for kids 013-015: 2008-2011 Cds of opening Ceremonies for the new headquarters and Lethbridge Fire Operations 101 016: 166 negatives and 151 photographs of training exercises, emergency vehicles, awards, and kids programs (1987-1994) 017: 36 negatives and 34 photos of fire chief for a day and awards (1999) 018: 62 photos of group photographs, fire extinguisher training program, water training, kids program, fire inspections, and emergency vehicles (1986-1989) 019: 61 photos of training exercises, parade, fire inspection, information booth, and after fire photographs (1990-1992) 020: 138 photos and 89 negatives awards, emergency vehicles and buildings, and social events (1993-1995) 021: 67 photos and 63 negatives health and safety programs, kids programs, and pictures with the mayor (1994) 022: 42 negatives and 34 photos teachers program, and safety booth (1996) 023: 60 negatives and 62 photos of kids program, fire alarms, raising of the flag, and awards (1997) 024: 70 negatives and 102 photos Lakeview School program, awards, risk watch program, kids programs, and seniors program (1998) 025: 89 photos training exercises, awards, and family day (2000-2006) 026: 146 negatives and 39 photos of lake, smoke, emergency vehicles, and Wilson School hose event (1988-199-) 027: 23 photos of Fire aftermath used for education (1966-199-) 028: 28 photos emergency vehicles and headquarters, fires, and kids program (200-?) 029: Guide for owners of fire damaged property, Safety news source, stickers, Service recognition, fire training and customer service training for fire chief, and 3 photographs of two plaques (1991-1999) 030-036: 7 photographs on foam board showing public programs (199-?) 037-042: 5 photographs on foam board showing emergency vehicles (199-) 043- 067: 24 photographs on foam board showing emergency personnel during calls and training scenarios (199- 068 - 081: 13 photographs on foam board used for educational purposes showing a variety of fires and damages (1987-1991) 082: 11” X 16” colored photograph of the headquarters on 4th Avenue South oversize (2011) 083-086: 4 logos oversize (200- - 2012) 087: 24” X 10” black and white photograph of the fire department with Harley Davidson bikes and shirts oversize (199-) 088: 17” X 7” colored photograph of emergency vehicle and personnel with young boy. At the back it says Thank you Tony Stannard oversize (199-) 089: 18” X 24” poster with different emergency vehicles and their years: 1978 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1986 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1980 IHC Cargostar-1950, 1975 IHC Superior Hendrickson, 1973 Mack CF-600 Thibault, 1979 IHC Cargostar-1950B, 1978 Scott Pierreville-CIFD, 1982 Ford F600, 1970 Ford Cabover 900, 1985 Ford Econoline XL350, 1977 IHC 4X4 Loadstar, and 1979 IHC Cargostar 1950B oversize (1970-1986) 090: 17” X 28” poster talking about the Fire Department Mission, Vision and Values oversize (199-) 091: 22” X 29” poster talking about the Advance Life Support (ALS) pump response model and its advantages oversize (200-) 092: 24” X 30” poster mentioning five members of the department that passed away: Clifford Daniel Heaton, Douglas Henry J. Herbers, Edward Kenneth Kurtz, John Sterenberg, and Ted “Shakey” Gordon Bochan oversize (201-) 093: 24” X 30” poster of fire department staff oversize (2002) 094: 20” X 16” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by T. Bochan oversize (1978) 095: 24” X 30” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by Terry Bland Photography LTD oversize (1986) 096: 24” X 32” poster of fire department staff photographs taken by Terry Bland Photography LTD oversize (1989) 097: 30” X 20” photograph on wood of the 1995 flood with plaque on bottom left “Flood of the Century June 1995” oversize (1995) 098: 18” X 24” photograph of emergency vehicles in front of fire hall oversize (198-) 099: 28.5” X 82” photograph of emergency vehicles and personnel on the Westside with scenery of the high-level bridge and east Lethbridge oversize (198- - 199-)
Accession No.
20181062
Collection
Archive
Less detail