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248 records – page 1 of 13.

North American Indian art. It's a question of integrity

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/library1533
Author
Young Man, Alfred
Publisher
Kamloops Art Gallery
Material Type
Book
Material Type
Book
Author
Young Man, Alfred
Publisher
Kamloops Art Gallery
Publication Date
1998
Subjects
Indian art - North America
Call Number
E 98 A7 Y68 1998
Collection
Library
Less detail

Southern Alberta Art Galley Lethbridge Alberta

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions69658
Date Range
[1980's-1990's]
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
20101016110
Physical Description
35mm Color slide
Scope and Content
View of the entrance to the Southern Alberta Art Galley in Lethbridge Alberta. The gallery is located in Galt Gardens Park in the downtown area.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
[1980's-1990's]
Physical Description
35mm Color slide
Physical Condition
Good
History / Biographical
The Chinook Country Tourist Association is a not-for-profit organization serving the tourism industry in southern Alberta since 1969. Their mandate is tourism pormotion and development in the area known as Chinook Country. Chinook Country borders British Columbia to the west, Montana to the south, Calgary city limits to the north and Writing-On-Stone Park to the east. Chinook Country Tourist Association has a partnership with the City of Lethbridge operating two Visitor Information Centres in the city which help over 50,000 visitors to Lethbridge annually. The association is an advocate for the tourist industry of southwest Alberta and they believe in tourist development, historical preservation, cultural identity and economic growth. Chinook Tourist Association is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors and membership from the community.
Scope and Content
View of the entrance to the Southern Alberta Art Galley in Lethbridge Alberta. The gallery is located in Galt Gardens Park in the downtown area.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20101016110
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Southern Alberta Art Gallery at 601 3 Avenue South

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions77134
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
20031023002-078
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Scope and Content
View of the Southern Alberta Art Gallery at 601 3 Avenue South.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
View of the Southern Alberta Art Gallery at 601 3 Avenue South.
Notes
This photograph is part of 20031023002, the second group of Suncorp Valuations Limited's insurance appraisal of all City of Lethbridge property found in the manuscript section.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20031023002-078
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
20031023002-073
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Scope and Content
View of the Bowman Arts Centre at 811 5th Avenue South.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
View of the Bowman Arts Centre at 811 5th Avenue South.
Notes
This photograph is part of 20031023002, the second group of Suncorp Valuations Limited's insurance appraisal of all City of Lethbridge property found in the manuscript section.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20031023002-073
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Bowman Arts Centre at 811 5 Avenue South

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions77129
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
20031023002-073
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Scope and Content
Bowman Arts Centre at 811 5 Avenue South.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
1991
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Colour photograph
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
Bowman Arts Centre at 811 5 Avenue South.
Notes
This photograph is part of 20031023002, the second binder of Suncorp Valuations Limited's insurance appraisal of all City of Lethbridge property.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20031023002-073
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

The Museum and of Canadian Public--Pub. for Arts & Culture Branch, Dept. of the Sec. of State, Gov't of Canada

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/library1341
Author
Kettle, John
Publisher
Culturcan
Material Type
Book
Material Type
Book
Author
Kettle, John
Publisher
Culturcan
Publication Date
1997
Physical Description
391 Pages
Subjects
Museums- Canada- Statistics
Abstract
French & English
Call Number
Prof AM 21 A2 K47
Collection
Library
Less detail
Date Range
1953-2005
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181076
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records, incl. over 200 photographic prints, magazines and reproductions of artworks
Scope and Content
2018.1076.001 - Driediger 2018.1076.002 - Days Inn Mural - Guiness 1999 2018.1076.003 - Shopper’s World Various Newspaper Clippings 2018.1076.004 - Days Inn Motel Construction Album (Part 1) 2018.1076.005 - Days Inn Motel Construction Album (Part 2) 2018.1076.006 - The Dynastar Group Information Pa…
Date Range
1953-2005
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Art Batty and Sonja (Davis) Batty
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records, incl. over 200 photographic prints, magazines and reproductions of artworks
History / Biographical
Art Batty owned and operated several different businesses within Lethbridge during the mid to late 20th century and into the 21st. Art also owned Art Batty Construction, which he founded in Medicine Hat as an electrician. Art moved to Victoria in the 1960’s where he was given the opportunity to partner with the building of Josephine Tussaud wax museums in Canada and the USA. Art moved back to Lethbridge in 1968 where he continued his building and ownership of several businesses and motels. Art married Sonja (Davis) in 1976. Art had two children with his first wife Mary, Marcia and Lloyd. Lloyd passed away in 1988 in a motorcycle accident at Waterton Park. Art took up piloting as a hobby during the 1950’s, he was named Pilot of the Year in the late 1950’s by the Lethbridge Flying Club and Western Airlines. Art had recorded many of his life events and adventures in a book called “A Tough Ladder to Climb” with the help of Martin and Mary Oordt. Art passed away on March 20, 2007 at the age of 84. Source: Lethbridge Herald – March 8, 2005, May 12, 1988, March 25, 2007 Sonja (Davis) Batty, wife of Art Batty, business owner and operator who lived in Lethbridge. Sonja was a senior coach for the Lethbridge Skating club during the late 1960’s to 1978. Sonja started her skating career at age 9 at an outdoor rink in Toronto as a hobby before she turned to coaching and moved to Lethbridge to become the head coach of the Lethbridge Skating Club several years after making coaching her profession. Sonja and Art Batty married in 1976. Sonja played a key role in many of the businesses owned and operated by Art during the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st. Source: Lethbridge Herald – June 2, 1979, March 8, 2005, September 21, 1978
Scope and Content
2018.1076.001 - Driediger 2018.1076.002 - Days Inn Mural - Guiness 1999 2018.1076.003 - Shopper’s World Various Newspaper Clippings 2018.1076.004 - Days Inn Motel Construction Album (Part 1) 2018.1076.005 - Days Inn Motel Construction Album (Part 2) 2018.1076.006 - The Dynastar Group Information Package for a Proposed 95 Unit Motel 2018.1076.007 - Magazines that mention Art Batty
Accession No.
20181076
Collection
Archive
Less detail

ORNAMENT, CHRISTMAS TREE

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact12042
Other Name
ANGEL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2003
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20030049032
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ANGEL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2003
Materials
PLASTIC, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
18
Width
9
Description
PLASTIC ANGEL WITH WINGS IN A CLOUD OF COTTON. GLD STRING ATTACHED TO TOP OF ANGEL. ANGEL HAS CHILD-LIKE APPEARANCE WITH CLOSED EYES, ROSY CHEEKS, AND HANDS FOLDED IN PRAYER GESTURE. FACE AND WINGS ARE HAND PAINTED. YLLW WINGS ON BACK. ANGEL IS SITTING IN A CLOUD MADE FROM COTTON WITH SPARKLES AND FIVE SILVER STARS.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S AUNT, IRIS STEWART. SEE P20030049001 FOR COMPLETE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20030049032
Acquisition Date
2003-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE "KABEKAKE"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P19970041097
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE "KABEKAKE"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.7
Length
38.2
Width
5.7
Description
WOODEN PLAQUE HAS NATURAL FINISH AND IS RECTANGULAR IN SHAPE WITH BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER CUT AWAY. PLAQUE HAD BLACK PAINTED JAPANESE CHARACTERS DOWN LENGTH. AT BOTTOM IS CIRCULAR RED STAMP.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
WALL HANGING HUNG IN THE NAKAYAMA HOME IN VANCOUVER AFTER REV. NAKAYAMA RETURNED THERE IN 1980. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER AND WERE INTERNED IN SLOCAN CITY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. FOLLOWING THE WAR THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY MOVED TO COALDALE, ALBERTA. AT COALDALE REV NAKAYAMA FOUNDED THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION WHERE HE WAS RECTOR FROM 1945 TO 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY. *UPDATE* IN 2015 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. NO NEW INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT WAS FOUND. THE JAPANESE WORD "KABEKAKE" TRANSLATES AS "ORNAMENT".
Catalogue Number
P19970041097
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.2
Width
48.4
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN BROWN WOODEN FRAME. PAINTING DEPICTS TWO CLUSTERS OF TREES WITH GREEN AND YELLOW-ORANGE LEAVES, WITH A BROWN FOREGROUND AND BLUE BACKGROUND. BACKGROUND HAS TWO TONES OF BLUE DEPICTING HILLS AND SKY. FOREGROUND HAS RED AND GOLD TONES. BRUSH STROKES ARE DISTINCT SHOWING GRASS IN FOREROUND; PAINTING HAS PAINT APPLIED HEAVILY TO YELLOW-ORANGE TREE LEAVES. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLUE IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF CANVAS “M. PISKO”. FRAME AROUND CANVAS IS BROWN WITH DOUBLE-CIRCLES ENGRAVED BETWEEN DOUBLE LINES ALONG TRIM; FRAME HAS FOUR SCREWS LOCATED AT UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. BACK OF FRAME HAS CARDBOARD BACKING SECURED TO WOODEN FRAME WITH SILVER TAPE. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL ON LEFT SIDE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “MIKE PISKO, 1998 $100.00”; CARDBOARD BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL IN UPPER LEFT CORNER “TRUCK [UNDERLINED], 01 0066”. FRONT OF CANVAS HAS YELLOW DISCOLORATION AND STAINING IN UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. FRONT OF FRAME HAS MINOR CHIPPING AND DENTS ALONG OUTER EDGES. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS BROWN AND BLUE STAINING; BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE STAINING ALONG LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND BLUE STAINING AT UPPER LEFT EDGE; UPPER RIGHT EDGE OF FRAME IS SPLITTING ALONG SEAM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING PISKO OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FIGURINE
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEAD, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P19970041827
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIGURINE
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
LEAD, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.7
Length
4.5
Width
3.5
Description
LEAD SCULPTURE OF A FACELESS CHILD IN RAIN GEAR. RAIN GEAR HAS COPPER BUTTONS. STAMPED INTO BASE IS "HUDSON".
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
SCULPTURE WAS FOUND AMONG THE BELONGINGS OF DONOR'S PARENTS, REV. G.G. AND LOIS NAKAYAMA. ORIGIN UNKNOWN. THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041827
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
2 GIRLS DANCING
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MASONITE
Catalogue Number
P20020006002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
2 GIRLS DANCING
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
MASONITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.6
Length
60.5
Width
49.4
Description
OIL ON MASONITE; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. PICTURES TWO GIRLS DANCING. ONE IS WEARING A WHITE BLOUSE AND BLUE SKIRT, THE OTHER IS WEARING A RED AND BLACK DRESS, WITH A RED HAIRBAND. THEY ARE IN A ROOM WITH GREEN AND YELLOW WALLS, A GREEN FLOOR AND 2 DOORS BEHIND THEM. THERE IS ALSO A RADIATOR ON THE WALL. ARTIST'S SIGNATURE, ON RIGHT SIDE OF PAINTING, HAS BEEN CUT OFF: "H FLA". PAINTING IS UNFRAMED.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "LUCKILY THE HOUSE WAS LARGE. WE COULD PRACTICE DANCING THROUGH THE LIVING ROOM, DOWN THE HALL, THROUGH THE KITCHEN, AROUND THE DINING ROOM TABLE AND THROUGH SLIDING DOORS THROUGH THE LIVING ROOM." FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006002
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BEDTIME STORY
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MASONITE
Catalogue Number
P20020006003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BEDTIME STORY
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
MASONITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
60.5
Width
60.0
Description
UNFRAMED; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. PICTURES A WOMAN SITTING ON A BED WITH AN OPEN BOOK IN HER HANDS. BEHIND HER A SMALL CHILD IN RED IS COMBING HER HAIR, AND 3 OTHER CHILDREN ARE IN THE BED. THERE IS ALSO A CHAIR IN THE BACKGROUND AND A PICTURE ON THE WALL OF 2 SAILBOATS. IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER IS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE, "H FLAIG". WRITTEN ON BACK OF PAINTING, IN RED FELT PEN, IS "HELEN FLAIG 551-3-133 LETHBRIDGE ALTA. T1J 4B3 327 9791".
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "OUR MOTHER LOVED THE STORIES AS MUCH AS WE DID. BOTH PARENTS LOVED TO READ". FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006003
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"WATER FIGHT"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MASONITE, WOOD, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20020006007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"WATER FIGHT"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
MASONITE, WOOD, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.8
Length
64.5
Width
64.1
Description
PAINTING DONE IN NAIVE STYLE. FRAMED IN A VARNISHED WOOD FRAME. PICTURES THREE CHILDREN IN BLACK BATHING SUITS. THEY ARE IN FRONT OF A BARN, WITH A WATER TROUGH IN FRONT, AND A COW DRINKING FROM IT. THERE IS A DOG IN THE LOWER RIGHT HAND CORNER OF PAINTING. BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER ALSO HAS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE "H FLAIG". PAINTING HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING. ON PAPER READS "WATER FIGHT H. FLAIG 3279791". ALSO HAS A WIRE FOR HANGING.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "OUR BLACK WOOL SWIM SUITS OFTEN HAD MOTH HOLES. THE ICY COLD WATER FROM THE WELL MADE US SCREAM". FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006007
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MAKING A KITE
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20020006010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MAKING A KITE
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CANVAS, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
82.0
Width
68.1
Description
HAS A WOOD FRAME, WITH CLEAR VARNISH; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. PICTURES A MAN KNEELING WITH A KITE IN HIS HANDS, AND 2 CHILDREN WATCHING HIM. IN THE BACKGROUND IS A FARMYARD SCENE, INCLUDING A TRACTOR, CHICKENS, A DOG, A BARN, AND FENCES. IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER IS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE "H FLAIG". PAINTING HAS A CARDBOARD BACKING AND A WIRE FOR HANGING. *NOTE* FRAME HAD COME LOOSE FROM PAINTING, AND WAS REATTACHED IN DEC. 2015
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "OUR FATHER WAS 35 WHEN HE MARRIED AND COULD BE VERY STERN BUT HE LIKED US TO HAVE FUN. ONCE HE MADE A TENNIS COURT FOR THE OLDER GIRLS". FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006010
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"FALL DAY"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, MASONITE
Catalogue Number
P20020006011
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"FALL DAY"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, MASONITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.0
Length
63.5
Width
42.4
Description
OIL ON MASONITE; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. HAS A VARNISHED WOOD FRAME. PAINTING IS OF A MAN AND CHILD WITH THEIR HANDS IN A LARGE WOODEN TROUGH FULL OF GRAIN? (ORANGE). ANOTHER MAN IS SITTING ON EDGE OF TROUGH. IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER IS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE "H FLAIG". BACK OF PAINTING HAS A LABEL ON IT THAT READS "FALL DAY $150.00"; ALSO HAS A WIRE FOR HANGING.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "HAULING GRAIN (AND CHEWING SOME) TO THE ELEVATOR". FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006011
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MASONITE
Catalogue Number
P20020006014
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
MASONITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
61.3
Width
57.2
Description
OIL ON MASONITE; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. PICTURES A WOMAN, WEARING A RED DRESS AND GLASSES, IRONING CLOTHES. BEHIND HER IS A WOOD BURNING STOVE, AND THERE ARE 2 CHILDREN ON THE FLOOR (PLAYING?). THERE ARE 2 DOORS IN THE BACKGROUND; VISIBLE THROUGH ONE DOOR ARE SOME WHITE AND YELLOW CUPBOARDS.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006014
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CHURNING"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
MASONITE
Catalogue Number
P20020006015
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CHURNING"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
MASONITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
61.0
Width
58.0
Description
ACRYLIC ON MASONITE; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. PICTURES A GIRL IN A RED DRESS SITTING ON A STOOL, READING A BOOK, AND CHURNING BUTTER. ANOTHER GIRL IN A BLUE DRESS IS SITTING ON A SET OF STAIRS. THE GIRLS APPEAR TO BE IN A BASEMENT. IN BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER IS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE "H FLAIG". BACK OF PAINTING HAS A WOOD GRAIN APPEARANCE. THERE IS A LABEL ON BACK THAT READS "
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. "WE SAVED CREAM WITH A CREAM CAN SITTING IN THE COLD WATER THAT CAME UP FROM AN ARTESIAN WELL (296 FEET, I BELIEVE) BELOW THE GROUND. MY SISTER DIDN'T TIGHTEN THE TOP PROPERLY AND THE CREAM SPILLED ON THE FLOOR. CHURNING IN THE COOL CELLAR WAS A NICE JOB. WE MADE BUTTERMILK WHICH OUR FATHER LIKED. WE ALSO SOLD CREAM." FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006015
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"BLIND MAN'S BLUFF"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, CANVAS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20020006017
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"BLIND MAN'S BLUFF"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, CANVAS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.8
Length
61.8
Width
47.7
Description
OIL ON CANVAS; NAIVE STYLE OF PAINTING. HAS A VARNISHED WOOD FRAME. PICTURES 3 CHILDREN STANDING ON TOP OF A SHORT STAIRWAY. ONE CHILD, IN A GREEN TOP AND RED SHORTS, HAS A WHITE BLINDFOLD OVER HER EYES. THE OTHER TWO ARE LOOKING ON. THE WALLS IN PAINTING ARE BLUE. NEAR BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER IS ARTIST'S SIGNATURE "H FLAIG". PAINTING IS BACKED WITH BROWN PAPER; HELD ON BY PACKING TAPE AT THE BOTTOM AND MASKING TAPE ON SIDES AND TOP. ON PAPER IS A LABEL THAT READS "BLIND MAN'S BLUFF $150.00". THERE IS ALSO A WIRE FOR HANGING.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
PAINTED BY DONOR, HELEN FLAIG (1929 - 2015), AS PART OF HER "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" SERIES. PAINTING WAS INSPIRED BY ARTIST'S MEMORY OF LIFE ON THE PRAIRIES. FLAIG'S FATHER, LEWIS ALEXANDER HUMMASON, LEFT ONTARIO IN 1905 TO TAKE HIS SICK BROTHER'S PLACE TO GO HOMESTEADING IN SASKATCHEWAN. HER MOTHER, ESTELLA MARY STUBBS, WAS 8 YEARS YOUNGER THEN HER FATHER; SHE HAD COME WEST WITH HER PARENTS AND HER SISTER TO CALGARY; ESTELLA'S FATHER WAS A CARPENTER. ESTELLA BECAME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND IN THAT ROLE SHE TOOK A POSITION IN LOCKWOOD, SK. THE GREAT FLU CLOSED THE SCHOOL AND SHE BECAME A NURSE. FLAIG'S FATHER BECAME A HANDY MAN HELPING THE SICK, AND IN THIS WAY MET HIS WIFE. THERE WERE 8 CHILDREN IN DONOR'S FAMILY, HELEN WAS THE SEVENTH, BORN ON THE FARM IN LOCKWOOD IN 1929. HELEN'S YOUNGER SISTER BLANCHE DIED WHEN SHE WAS NEARLY NINE - THE PAINTINGS IN THIS SERIES REFERENCE THE TIMES WHEN SHE AND BLANCHE PLAYED TOGETHER. SHE STARTED THE "CHILDHOOD IN THE 30S" PAINTINGS IN 1994 AS A WAY TO BRING SOME CHEER INTO HER OLDER SISTER FERN'S LIFE, WHO WAS IN A COMA AT THE TIME. HELEN'S HUSBAND LLOYD FLAIG WAS RAISED IN ALBERTA. SHE AND LLOYD MET IN 1949 WHILE WORKING AT THE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL IN NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK. THEY MOVED TO CALGARY WHERE LLOYD DECIDED TO BECOME A SCHOOL TEACHER AND HIS FIRST POSITION WAS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1955. HELEN HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DRAWING AND JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB IN 1955. HELEN STARTED POTTERY CLASSES IN 1964 WITH THE OLDMAN RIVER POTTERS GUILD AND CONTINUED WITH THEM TO THE PRESENT DAY. SHE AND LLOYD MOVED TO THEIR ACREAGE IN 1974, BUT SHE HAS CONTINUED TO TAKE COURSES, ESPECIALLY FIGURATIVE WORK AT BOWMAN ART'S CENTER, THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND AT RED DEER COLLEGE. *UPDATE* IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE FOUND THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION OF HELEN FLAIG'S 'CHILDHOOD IN THE 1930S' SERIES IN THE BROCHURE PRODUCED BY THE RED DEER AND DISTRICT MUSEUM FOR THE 1997 EXHIBITION OF FLAIG'S WORK, WRITTEN BY EXHIBITS COORDINATOR DIANA ANDERSON: "THIS SERIES OF 20 PAINTINGS RETURNS HELEN TO HER CHILDHOOD DAYS OF GROWING UP ON A FARM IN RURAL SASKATCHEWAN... HELEN CHOOSES THE THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO HER. SHE STARTED WITH GRASSES AND VEGETABLES AND HER OWN CHILDREN, ORDINARY THINGS THAT SURROUNDED HER... HELEN IS INTERSTED IN THE MOOD OF THE PAINTINGS MORE THAN THE ACCURACY OF THE IMAGE. HER PERSONAL VISION AND FRESHNESS OF CONCEPT GIVE THIS SERIES ITS VISUAL IMPACT THROUGH THE USE OF NAIVE PAINTING... NAIVE PAINTING CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A TYPE OF PAINTING THAT IS UNSOPHISTICATED, CHILDLIKE, SIMPLE OR UNWORLDLY... IN HELEN'S CASE, THIS IS IMPLY A STYLE THAT SHE CHOSE TO BETTER EXPRESS HER SUBJECT MATTER, AS IT CAPTURES MOST CLOSELY THE FLAVOUR SHE WANTED TO GIVE OF THE 1930S... THE PAINTINGS SHOW AN OPEN, HONEST APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT AND EACH PAINTING HOLDS SPECIAL MEANING FOR HELEN." FOR A COPY OF THE BROCHURE AND FURTHER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20020006001. *UPDATE* ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS COLLECTED BY HIS PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. IN HIS INTERVIEW, DON FLAIG SPOKE ABOUT HIS MOTHER'S, HELEN FLAIG'S, ART PRACTICE. ON HIS MOTHER’S PAINTINGS AND PRACTICE, DON FLAIG ELABORATED, “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE…I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20020006017
Acquisition Date
2002-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PAPER, GLASS, ORGANIC MATERIAL
Catalogue Number
P19970041826
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
STEEL, PAPER, GLASS, ORGANIC MATERIAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.2
Length
9.2
Width
9.2
Description
SQUARE STEEL FRAME WITH BRASS COLOURING AND CLEAR GLASS. PICTURE IS OF FIVE PRESS MUSHROOMS WITH SEVERAL PRESSED FLOWERS TO THE SIDE. CIRCULAR RED INK JAPANESE SEAL.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
PICTURE WAS A GIFT TO DONOR'S PARENTS, REV. G.G. AND LOIS NAKAYAMA, FROM AYA SUZUKI SAEGUSA (DAVID SUZUKI'S AUNT). THE NAKAYAMA FAMILY WAS ORIGINALLY FROM VANCOUVER BUT MOVED TO COALDALE FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR WHEN THEY WERE INTERNED AT SLOCAN CITY IN THE INTERIOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. THE DONOR'S FATHER, REV. CANON G.G. NAKAYAMA, WAS AN ANGLICAN MINISTER IN VANCOUVER, AND THEN ESTABLISHED THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION IN COALDALE IN 1945 WHERE HE SERVED UNTIL 1970. SEE RECORD P19970041001 FOR EXPANDED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19970041826
Acquisition Date
1997-01
Collection
Museum
Less detail

248 records – page 1 of 13.