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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE”
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, LEATHERETTE
Catalogue Number
P20110031017
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE”
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
2000
Materials
STEEL, LEATHERETTE
No. Pieces
1
Height
84
Length
51
Width
39
Description
CHAIR WITH METAL FRAME AND GREEN LEATHERETTE PADDED SEAT AND BACK. LEGS HAVE GREY RUBBERIZED FEET. CHAIR BACK IS FINISHED WITH 12 METAL RIVETS. UNDERSIDE OF SEAT IS BROWN CARDBOARD, STAMPED IN THREE SPOTS WITH AN OVAL SHAPE IN RED. STAMP TEXT IS FADED AND SMUDGED BUT APPEARS TO GIVE NAME AND ADDRESS OF DONOR. CARDBOARD UNDERSIDE IS ATTACHED TO SEAT WITH METAL TACKS. LEATHERETTE IS SCUFFED AND DISCOLOURED. CHAIR FRAME IS SCUFFED, WITH MINOR RUST AT BOLTS. UNDERSIDE CARDBOARD HAS WATER STAIN AND REMNANTS OF CHEWING GUM. RUBBERIZED FEET ARE CRACKED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
FURNISHINGS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT COMES FROM INTERVIEWS HELD WITH MAY LEE AND JUDY CHAN, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND JANICE WONG. PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE FOUND BELOW THE ARTIFACT DETAILS AND BELOW THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY BUILDING. RICHARD THINKS THAT THE CHAIRS WERE PURCHASED BEFORE HE STARTED AT THE LEAGUE (HE ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953). HE THINKS THAT THEY WERE PROBABLY USED DURING MEETINGS AND POSSIBLY IN THE SCHOOL, WHICH WAS LOCATED IN THE MAIN HALL. A SERIES OF ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD GIVE BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY AND ITS BUILDING: THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY WAS BUILT IN 1909-1910 IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 2 AVENUE SOUTH AND IT WAS ORIGINALLY A RESTAURANT. BY 1915 IT HAD BECOME THE HEADQUARTERS FOR THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH OF THE KAO MIN TANG (ALTERNATIVE SPELLINGS INCLUDE KUOMINTANG, KUO MIN TANG, GUOMINDANG, AND GUO MIN DANG). THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNATED AS A PROVINCIAL HERITAGE RESOURCE IN 1995 BECAUSE OF ITS VALUE AS A SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CHINESE COMMUNITY. THE BUILDING WAS USED IN A VARIETY OF WAYS BY THE SOCIETY AND INCLUDED, AT VARIOUS TIMES, A RESTAURANT, A SCHOOL, AND LIVING ACCOMODATIONS. IN FEBRUARY 2011 A SECTION OF THE BRICK FAÇADE FELL OFF THE BUILDING AND CITY INSPECTORS DETERMINED THAT THE TIMBER AND RED BRICK STRUCTURE WAS POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE. THE BUILDING WAS TORN DOWN A SHORT TIME LATER. LETHBRIDGE'S CHINATOWN EMERGED IN 1901, A RESULT OF THE CHINESE POPULATION BEING RELEGATED TO A SECTION OF THE CITY BETWEEN GALT GARDENS AND THE COULEES. IN A JANUARY 7, 2002 ARTICLE ALBERT LEONG EXPLAINS THAT NO ONE REALLY WANTED CHINESE PEOPLE AROUND AND THAT “’ THEY WERE TOLD THAT THE ONLY PLACE THEY COULD START BUSINESSES WAS BETWEEN THE COULEES AT THE PARK, BECAUSE THE CITY DIDN’T WANT ANY COMPETITION FOR THE WHITE BUSINESSMEN … BUT ‘GHETTO-IZED’ OR NOT, THE CHINESE WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE FORMED AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE BACKBONE OF THIS CITY, [AND MADE] NOTEWORTHY [CONTRIBUTIONS] TO THE HISTORY OF THIS PLACE.’” BUSINESSES SUCH AS LAUNDRIES, MARKET GARDENS, AND RESTAURANTS WERE OPENED IN CHINATOWN, WITH THE RESIDENTS LIVING IN ROOMS ABOVE THE BUSINESSES. IN 1912 THERE WERE ABOUT 100 PEOPLE LIVING IN CHINATOWN AND BY THE 1930S, IT WAS A BUSTLING COMMUNITY. THE POPULATION OF CHINATOWN DWINDLED FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. JANICE WONG, PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY IN 2015, GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE SOCIETY IN AN INTERVIEW: AS OF 2015, THE SOCIETY EXISTS MORE AS A SOCIAL CLUB AND THE SOCIETY HOLDS THREE CELEBRATORY DINNERS EACH YEAR, USUALLY HELD AT THE NEW DYNASTY RESTAURANT. THE SOCIETY ALSO VISITS THE CEMETERY ON A YEARLY BASIS “TO HONOUR THE ANCESTORS, CLEAN THE TOMBS, BRING FOOD, DO THE USUAL THINGS THAT WE USED TO DO – EAT ON GRAVES, BURN THE INCENSE. WE DO THAT EVERY YEAR STILL TO HONOUR OUR ANCESTORS. IT IS USUALLY IN THE SPRING … IN APRIL.” JANICE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY, INDICATING THAT THERE IS SOME TALK ABOUT RE-BUILDING “BUT THAT INVOLVES A LOT OF PLANNING, AND MONEY, AND FUNDRAISING” AND SHE QUESTIONS WHETHER OR NOT THERE IS ENOUGH OF A MEMBERSHIP BASE TO GO FORWARD WITH RE-BUILDING. SHE ALSO EXPLAINED THAT PREVIOUS CHINESE IMMIGRANTS HAD TENDED TO COME FROM THE SAME GEOGRAPHIC REGION, BUT THAT PRESENTLY IMMIGRANTS ARE COMING FROM ALL OVER CHINA: “THERE’S A LOT OF INFLUX OF PEOPLE FROM CHINA THAT AREN’T FROM THE SAME AREA, BECAUSE TRADITIONALLY, THE PEOPLE WERE ALL FROM THE SAME AREA AND SPOKE THE SAME DIALECT AND HAD THAT SORT OF THING KEEPING THEM TOGETHER AS A COMMUNITY OVERSEAS FROM CHINA.” PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE BELOW: MAY LEE: MAY WAS ACTUALLY BORN IN CANADA AND IS KNOWN AS A GOLD MOUNTAIN GIRL, BECAUSE SHE IS A CANADIAN-BORN CHINESE WOMAN. MAY EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN IN CANADA. I WAS BORN IN NANOOSE BAY. WHEN I WAS 4 YEARS OLD, WE MOVED TO VICTORIA. WHEN I WAS 9 YEARS OLD AND THE WHOLE FAMILY, IN 1930, GO BACK TO CHINA.” DURING THE WAR, THE JAPANESE BOMBED THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN TOCSIN CITY AND MAY’S MOTHER DECIDED TO SEND MAY AND HER BROTHER TO HONG KONG TO START THE PROCESS OF COMING TO CANADA. MAY STARTED ENGLISH SCHOOL IN HONG KONG, BUT OFTEN MISSED CLASSES BECAUSE SHE WAS SICK FROM THE HEAT. SHE SAYS THAT SHE’S LEARNED MOST OF HER ENGLISH FROM HER HUSBAND, HER CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND EVEN GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN. SHE WAS MARRIED TO HOM MEN LEE, AKA JIMMY LEE, ON NOVEMBER 16, 1938 IN VICTORIA, BC. JIMMY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE AT THE GALT HOSPITAL, BUT WAS SENT BACK TO CHINA AS A CHILD FOR HIS EDUCATION. JIMMY’S FAMILY HAD COME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1914 AND OWNED LEE-DUC CLEANERS. THE LEE FAMILY LIVED ABOVE THE SHOP, WHICH WAS ON 13TH STREET NORTH, NEAR HIGA’S JEWELERS. MAY’S MAIN MEMORY OF CHINATOWN: “ALL I REMEMBER IN CHINATOWN, IN SUMMERTIME, LOTS OF OLD GUYS SITTING IN FRONT OF GUOMINDANG. AUNTIE HELEN GREW UP IN CHINATOWN. I THINK SHE KNOWS MORE ABOUT CHINATOWN. IN THE OLDEN DAYS, I HARDLY GO OUT, JUST TO BUY GROCERIES.” JUDY ADDED THAT MAY HAD 8 CHILDREN AND WAS KEPT BUSY AT HOME RAISING THEM. RICHARD LOO: RICHARD ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953, HAVING LEFT THE MAINLAND OF CHINA IN 1949. RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD MOVED TO CANADA IN EITHER LATE 1800S OR THE EARLY 1900S AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE HEAD TAX. HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED AS A COOK IN RESTAURANTS, EITHER IN LETHBRIDGE OR IN TABER (ACCORDING TO RICHARD, HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED THROUGH THE WAR YEARS IN TABER). RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD PLANNED ON MOVING BACK TO CHINA WHEN HE RETIRED, BUT THEN THE COMMUNISTS TOOK OVER, AND HE ELECTED TO STAY. AT THAT TIME, HE INVITED RICHARD TO MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL. RICHARD LEFT HONG KONG, AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 8 MONTHS, ON A FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 2PM LOCAL TIME. HE FINALLY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE SUNDAY AFTERNOON. HE WAS LUCKY IN THAT HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS FLIGHTS ON SALE. NORMALLY A TICKET FROM HONG KONG TO VANCOUVER WOULD HAVE COST $700, BUT RICHARD WAS ABLE TO SECURE A FLIGHT FOR ONLY $500. HE ALSO INDICATED THAT HIS FLIGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WAS ONLY $39.95. ON RECALLING HIS FIRST TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, RICHARD RECOUNTED THE FOLLOWING STORY: “SO, BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE AIRPORT, I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO SAY NOTHING. DIDN’T KNOW – MAYBE COULD SAY ‘GOOD MORNING’ – THAT’S ALL YOU COULD SAY, JUST ANYWAYS HOW TO SAY ‘HELLO’ – SO, ANYWAY, SO IN THE MEANTIME, THE FELLOW AT THE AIRPORT MUST HAVE KNOWN ZEKE, YOU KNOW ZEKE QUAN [OWNER OF] THE LOTUS INN [RESTAURANT], AND HE PHONED HIM UP. HE SAYS, ‘ZEKE.’ I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT – NOTHING. AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘HEY, THIS IS A CHINA BOY HERE. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH HIM?’ SO, ZEKE SAYS, ‘OH, JUST TAKE HIM TO CHINATOWN AND DUMP HIM.’ NOW, I DIDN’T KNOW THOSE, NOT UNTIL LATER ON. ZEKE’S SON GO TO SAME SCHOOL I DID – CENTRAL SCHOOL.” RICHARD INITIALLY LIVED IN THE SOCIETY BUILDING FOR SEVERAL YEARS, OCCUPYING A ROOM THAT HAD BEEN RECENTLY VACATED BY ANOTHER MAN NAMED LOO WHO HAD GONE TO WORK IN PICTURE BUTTE. RICHARD RECALLED THAT THE SOCIETY WAS A GOOD PLACE TO FEEL A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND THAT IT WAS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS, A PLACE WHERE THEY WEREN’T DISCRIMINATED AGAINST. HONG WONG: HONG ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AND WAS INVITED TO THE CITY BY HIS UNCLE SHUEY WONG, WHO WAS ALREADY LIVING HERE. UNCLE SHUEY HAD COME TO CANADA SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE $500 HEAD TAX. HONG TRAVELED WITH HIS BROTHER FROM MAINLAND CHINA TO HONG KONG, IN ORDER TO GO TO THE CANADIAN EMBASSY. ON HIS FERRY RIDE TO HONG KONG, HE WAS SHOT BY BANDITS AND WAS REQUIRED TO STAY IN THE HOSPITAL FOR QUITE SOME TIME TO RECOVER. HIS BROTHER ELECTED TO REMAIN IN HONG KONG, AS HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW LIVED IN THE CITY AND GOT HONG’S BROTHER WORK IN A THEATRE. TO GET TO CANADA, HONG FLEW FROM JAPAN TO GUAM, TO VANCOUVER, AND THEN FINALLY TO LETHBRIDGE. HIS FIRST IMPRESSION OF LETHBRIDGE: COLD. HONG SAID: “’WELL, IN HONG KONG IT WAS AROUND MAYBE 20 SOME 30 ABOVE. AND HERE, AT THAT TIME, MAYBE 20 BELOW, OR 20 SOME BELOW. I DIDN’T HAVE THE EAR MUFFS. I SAID, ‘GEE, I’M NOT SO HAPPY HERE, IT SEEMS SO COLD.’” UNCLE SHUEY TOLD HONG THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE COLDEST WINTERS HE COULD REMEMBER. HONG WORKED FOR HIS UNCLE IN HIS SHOP ON 9TH AVENUE, DOING CHORES AROUND THE STORE, UNTIL HIS ENGLISH HAD IMPROVED ENOUGH SO THAT HE COULD SERVE CUSTOMERS. HE JOINED THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE SOCIETY ALMOST AS SOON AS HE ARRIVED: “WHEN I CAME HERE, I JOINED IN THE SAME YEAR BECAUSE MY UNCLE WAS A MEMBER. SO THAT’S WHY HE GOT ME IN TO BE A MEMBER. OH, AT THAT TIME, I BET, 95% OF THE CHINESE PEOPLE THEY BELONG TO THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, I BELIEVE.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT YOU COULDN’T BE A MEMBER OF BOTH THE SOCIETY AND THE MASONS, AND HE BELIEVES ABOUT 5% OF THE CITY’S CHINESE POPULATION WOULD HAVE BELONGED TO THE MASONS. HE ADDED: “BUT WE ARE STILL FRIENDS, STILL FRIENDS. WE’RE NOT ENEMY OR ANYTHING BUT, IT’S JUST THAT THE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DIFFERENT. THAT’S ALL.” HONG ENJOYED THE CAMARADERIE OF THE SOCIETY. HE SAID: “I REMEMBER, I LIKE IT BECAUSE THEY HAVE THE PARTY AND SO MANY PEOPLE. AND THEN YOU MEET ALL THE CHINESE PEOPLE THERE IN THE ONE GROUP. WELL, ANYWAY, WHEN YOU SEE SO MANY PEOPLE IN ONE PARTY, AND THEN WHEN THEY COME OUT MOSTLY THE PEOPLE THAT PARTY AND IT FEELS LIKE A LOTS OF FRIENDS OR EVEN LIKE THE FAMILY. SO YOU FEEL GOOD, YOU FEEL BETTER, AND THEN, WELL, MY UNCLE BELONGS THERE TOO AND THEN THE OTHERS BELONG THERE TOO, YEAH, EVERYBODY LIKE IN THE BIG FAMILY. YES, NICE, OTHERWISE YOU DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS, YOU DON’T MEET ANYBODY, IF YOU NOT BELONG THERE, I THINK NOT SO FRIENDLY TO YOU.” HONG INDICATED THAT WHEN A SPECIAL MEAL WAS HELD AT THE SOCIETY, IT WAS THE MEN WHO DID THE COOKING: “AT THAT TIME JUST ABOUT EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW TO COOK BECAUSE MOSTLY WE WORK IN THE KITCHEN WHEN THEY CAME HERE.” HE SAID THAT DINERS WOULD PAY A SMALL FEE TO EAT AT THE LEAGUE WHEN SPECIAL MEALS WERE PUT ON. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND FOR INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20110031017
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1912
Date Range To
1952
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FIR
Catalogue Number
P20150011000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1912
Date Range To
1952
Materials
FIR
No. Pieces
2
Height
124
Length
97
Width
60.5
Description
RECTANGULAR WOODEN LECTERN, STAINED MAHOGANY COLOUR, WITH TONGUE & GROOVE INSET PANELS AT FRONT AND SIDES AND CROWN MOULDING AT BASE AND TOP. TOP PANEL HAS HINGED SECTION AT CENTRE THAT IS SLANTED – PANEL ANGLE CAN BE ADJUSTED WITH TWO SLATS OF WOOD SCREWED INSIDE LECTERN THAT CAN BE MOVED TO SUPPORT PANEL. BACK SIDE OF LECTERN HAS TWO HINGED CABINET DOORS. INNER CAVITY HAS ONE SHELF, ACCESSIBLE UNDER HINGED PANEL SECTION. VISIBLE WEAR THROUGHOUT, ESPECIALLY ALONG BASE, EDGES, AND TOP; SCRATCHES AND GOUGES ALONG SIDES AND TOP PANEL HAS LENGTHWISE CRACK. LECTERN IS ON METAL CASTERS – ONE IS BROKEN FROM ITS MOUNT AND HAS BEEN BAGGED FOR STORAGE INSIDE LECTERN. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS LECTERN WAS ACQUIRED BY THE DONOR, MICHAEL DIMNIK, FROM HIS CLIENT, RON BATSFORD. BATSFORD HAD INHERITED THE LECTERN FROM HIS FATHER, CHARLIE BATSFORD, WHO CLAIMED TO HAVE REMOVED IT FROM THE ORIGINAL LETHBRIDGE COURT HOUSE. PHOTOGRAPHS IN THE GALT ARCHIVES OF THE INTERIOR OF THE COURT HOUSE (IN OPERATION AT 327 6 STREET SOUTH FROM 1912 TO 1952, WHEN IT WAS REPLACED BY A NEW COURT HOUSE AT 4 AVENUE AND 10 STREET SOUTH AND SUBSEQUENTLY DEMOLISHED) SHOW SIMILAR WOODEN DESKS AND PODIUMS BUT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO DEFINITIVELY MATCH THIS LECTURN WITH THE FURNISHINGS VISIBLE IN THE ARCHIVAL PHOTOS. ON MARCH 3, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MICHAEL DIMNIK ABOUT THE LECTERN. DIMNIK SAID: “MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT IT WAS PART OF THE FIRST COURT ROOM IN LETHBRIDGE… I ACQUIRED IT FROM RON BATSFORD, AT THE TIME THAT HE WAS SELLING HIS HOUSE [IN JULY 2006]. AS PART OF MY LEGAL PRACTICE I DID A LOT OF REAL ESTATE, SO HE CAME TO ME AND ASKED ME TO ASSIST HIM… MY OFFICE WAS IN AN OLDER BUILDING [AT 334 12 STREET SOUTH], BUILT IN 1906. HE WAS IMPRESSED WITH THE FACT THAT I WAS PRACTICING OUT OF AN OLDER BUILDING, AND APPRECIATED THE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE HOUSE. AND HE SENSED THAT I WOULD APPRECIATE ITEMS OF HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE THAT HE HAD IN HIS POSSESSION. SO AS HE WAS MOVING OUT, HE WAS IN A BIT OF A QUANDARY BECAUSE HE HAD A NUMBER OF ITEMS THAT HE COULDN’T OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF [AND] THE HOUSE HAD TO BE VACATED… SO HE ASKED ME IF I HAD INTEREST IN ACQUIRING THESE THINGS… ONE WAS A SAFE, AND THE OTHER WAS THE LECTERN… WITH MY LEGAL CONNECTION, I WAS INTERESTED IN SEEING THE PODIUM. I TOOK IT SIGHT UNSEEN, SO I SENT SOMEBODY OVER TO PICK IT UP, ANTICIPATING WHAT IT MIGHT LOOK LIKE, AND WHERE I MIGHT POTENTIALLY BE ABLE TO PUT IT IN MY OFFICE [TO] DISPLAY IT. IT WAS SUCH A LARGE ITEM THAT IT JUST DIDN’T FIT ANYWHERE… [SO] FROM THE DAY I ACQUIRED IT, BASICALLY, IT HAS BEEN IN STORAGE... [RON] TOLD ME THAT HIS FATHER… WAS A CUSTODIAN AND HE TOOK ON JOBS WHERE HE BE CLEANING BUILDINGS. ONE OF THE JOBS HE HAD WAS CLEANING WHAT WAS THE ORIGINAL COURT HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO WHEN THEY STOPPED UTILIZING THE COURT ROOM, THEY STARTED DISPOSING OF THE ITEMS, AND HIS FATHER TOOK THE PODIUM, BECAUSE IT WAS GOING TO BE DISPOSED OF OTHERWISE.” ON MARCH 10, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BETTY DICKSON, RON BATSFORD’S WIFE, ABOUT HER RECOLLECTIONS OF THE LECTERN. DICKSON SAID: “IT WAS IN OUR HOUSE UNDER THE STEPS – IT USED IT BE HIS MOM AND DAD’S HOUSE [AND THE LECTERN] WAS JUST LEFT THERE FOR RON WHEN THEY PASSED AWAY… HIS FATHER, CHARLIE, CAME ACROSS A LOT OF THINGS LIKE THAT AND KEPT THEM BECAUSE OF THE HISTORY OF THEM… HE ACQUIRED A LOT OF ANTIQUES… THAT WAS JUST PART OF HIM, THAT’S WHAT HE LIKED TO DO… [RON] SAID IT WAS [FROM] AN OLD COURT ROOM THAT THEY JUST TORE DOWN… IT WAS PART OF HISTORY AND [RON] WANTED SOMEONE TO BE ABLE TO APPRECIATE IT… THAT’S [WHY] RON GAVE IT TO [MIKE DIMNIK].” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20150011000
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“GALT NURSES”
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20140006029
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“GALT NURSES”
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
9
Height
103.5
Length
60.25
Width
44.5
Description
WOOD WRITING DESK WITH EIGHT DRAWERS AND FOUR LEGS. EDWARDIAN STYLE. LEGS ARE CROSS BRACED. DESK IS INLAID WITH GEOMETRIC PATTERNS MADE OF WOOD IN A VARIETY OF HUES. DRAWERS .2 - .8 HAVE CENTRAL SQUARE PULL KNOB AND TWO DIAMOND-SHAPED INLAID DESIGNS. DRAWER .9 HAS TWO SQUARE PULL KNOBS AND FOUR DIAMOND-SHAPED INLAID DESIGNS. DESK TOP IS INLAID WITH TWO SYLIZED MAPLE LEAVES AND HEART SHAPES, AND TEXT READING “GALT NURSES”. MAPLE LEAF AND HEART DESIGN IS REPEATED ON LARGER SCALE ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF DESK BODY. TWO ROUND WOODEN WALL STOPPERS ATTACHED TO BACK OF DESK BODY. MINOR WEAR AND SCRATCHES ALONG FRONT EDGES OF DESK AND INSIDE DRAWER BEDS. SPLASH OF GREEN PAINT ON DESK FRONT EDGE, LEFT OF CENTRE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. INDIVIDUAL DRAWER DIMENSIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS: .2 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .3 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .4 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .5 – 5.75 X 20.2 X 16.75 .6 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .7 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .8 – 6 X 16 X 20.75 .9 – 6 X 49 X 36
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
HEALTH SERVICES
MILITARY
History
AT THE TIME OF DONATION, GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION PAST ARCHIVIST ELAINE HAMILTON SAID OF THIS DESK: “THERE WERE OLD RESIDENCES [AT THE GALT HOSPITAL], AND THE DESK WAS IN ONE OF THE OLD RESIDENCES… ALWAYS IN THE SITTING ROOM… WE KNEW THAT THE PRISONERS OF WAR [FROM CAMP 133] HAD MADE IT FOR THE STUDENT NURSES. THAT’S ALL WE KNEW… WE PUT AN AD IN THE PAPER, TRYING TO FIND OUT IF ANYBODY KNEW ANYTHING ABOUT IT, BUT WE NEVER DID GET ANY RESULTS FROM THAT.” FORMER ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION ARCHIVIST SUE KYLLO ADDED: “EVEN DURING TRAINING, I WOULD SNEAK IN AND LOOK AT THAT DESK… [IT] REALLY HIT HOME ABOUT WHAT THEY LIVED THROUGH, THESE GIRLS AT THE GALT AND WHAT THE PRISONERS OF WAR DID.” THE IDENTITY OF THE DESK’S CARPENTER(S) WAS STILL UNKNOWN AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BUT THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT GALT NURSES INTERACTING WITH GERMAN POWS WAS FOUND IN THE BOOK ‘WHITE CAPS AND RED ROSES’ BY LEAH POELMAN: “A CAMP FOR PRISONERS OF WAR WAS BUILT IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE TO ACCOMMODATE 14,000 GERMAN PRISONERS. EVERY MORNING SICK-PARADE WAS HELD AT THE CAMP. THOSE REQUIRING HOSPITALIZATION WERE TAKEN TO THE GALT HOSPITAL, WARD B. THESE PATIENTS WERE CARED FOR BY MEDICAL ATTENDANTS FROM THE CAMP. SURGERY WAS PERFORMED IN THE AFTERNOON AND OFTEN THE NURSES STAFFING THE OPERATING THEATRE WORKED LATE INTO THE NIGHT CLEANING UP FOLLOWING OPERATIONS… WARD B WAS [ALSO] USED BY THE NATIONAL GUARD AS A TEMPORARY HOSPITAL UNIT FOR THE PRISONERS OF WAR WHILE A HOSPITAL WAS BEING BUILT… AT THE PRISON CAMP. THIS ADDED MUCH EXCITEMENT TO HOSPITAL ROUTINE AND BROUGHT THE WAR CLOSER IN REALITY TO THE NURSES.” AT THE TIME OF DONATION, A SHEET OF PAPER WAS FOUND INSIDE THE BOTTOM DRAWER OF THIS DESK. THE PAPER IS A MIMEOGRAPH OF A TYPED PAGE, WITH TEXT TITLED “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING SONG (TUNE – WITCHRAFT)” AND 10 LINES OF LYRICS TO A SONG DESCRIBING GALT NURSES’ TRAINING AND SCHOOL LIFE. ELAINE HAMILTON MENTIONED THAT THE GSN “HAD A GLEE CLUB… A GROUP THAT SINGS [AND PERFORMED] AT GRADUATION [AND] FOR OUR OWN THINGS, [LIKE] CHRISTMAS.” THOUGH THE DESK WOULD HAVE BEEN BUILT BETWEEN 1942 AND 1946 (THE DURATION OF CAMP 133’S EXISTENCE), THE SONG ‘WITCHCRAFT’, AS REFERENCED ON THE LYRICS SHEET, WAS NOT RELEASED BY FRANK SINATRA UNTIL 1957. THE LYRICS SHEET WAS TRANSFERRED TO GALT ARCHIVES, AND ACCESSIONED AS PART OF THE GSN ALUMNAE FONDS, 20141073. IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF THE COLLECTED ARTIFACTS. HIGA, THE EARLIEST GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST, SAID: “I TRAINED MOSTLY AT THE GALT. THE STUDENTS, WE ALL KNEW EACH OTHER, HELPED EACH OTHER BECAUSE THERE WERE MOSTLY STUDENTS THERE: ONE REGISTERED NURSE FROM 7AM TO 7PM. THE REST WERE ALL US STUDENTS THAT RAN THE HOSPITAL SO, BUT WE WERE REALLY GOOD FRIENDS AND WE HELPED EACH OTHER… WE HAD SUCH GOOD RAPPORT BETWEEN THE STUDENTS IN MY CLASS… I JOINED [THE ALUMNAE] WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1955… I WAS INTERESTED IN HOW EVERYBODY TURNED OUT, AND THE ALUMNAE SORT OF KEPT IN CONTACT WITH THEM, AND IT WAS QUITE IMPORTANT TO ME. I FELT QUITE HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT ALL THE OTHER [NURSES]… IT’S NICE WHEN THEY CAME FOR THE REUNIONS. YOU SEE ALL THESE GIRLS YOU WORKED WITH, MAYBE ONLY FOR A LITTLE WHILE, BUT YOU REMEMBER THEM… I REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO BE THE ARCHIVIST, BUT WE DON’T HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE THAT OFFER TO DO THINGS… I WAS INTERESTED IN ALL THE HISTORY AND ALL THE THINGS THAT THE GIRLS THOUGHT ABOUT IT… [THE ARCHIVIST WAS TO] KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE HISTORY AND THE PEOPLE THAT WERE INVOLVED, AND KEEP TRACK OF THE STUFF WE COLLECT[ED]… [THE COLLECTION IS IMPORTANT TO ME BECAUSE] I LIKE EVERYBODY TO KNOW ABOUT THE GALT AND HOW WE TRAINED AND HOW IT PROGRESSED… AS YOU GET OLDER YOU KIND OF HAVE MEMORIES THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP, AND YOU KNOW YOU THINK ABOUT THOSE THINGS… [WHEN] YOU LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] YOU REMEMBER.” ELAINE HAMILTON BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN THE LATE 1980S AFTER SHIRLEY HIGA STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, HAMILTON SAID: “I THINK THE RETIRED NURSES DECIDED THAT THEY SHOULD FORM A GROUP TO HELP THE STUDENTS… I WASN’T THERE BUT IT WAS ’45 WHEN THEY FORMED, AND THEY DID THINGS FOR THE NURSES STUDENTS LIKE, THEY BOUGHT FURNITURE [FOR STUDENT RESIDENCES]… THEY DID A WHOLE BUNCH OF BAKE SALES AND CRAFT SALES; THEY WORKED AT THE BULL SALE OUT AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS. THEY DID A LOT OF THINGS LIKE THAT TO RAISE MONEY FOR LITTLE THINGS THAT COULDN’T BE BOUGHT OTHERWISE, LIKE THE PATIENT COMFORT, LIKE PATIENTS WOULD COME IN WITHOUT TOOTHBRUSHES AND COMBS… THEY HAD A BANQUET [FOR NURSING STUDENTS], AND THEY HAD A TEA WITH OUR PARENTS TOO, FOR US IN THE RESIDENCE… FOR ME, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING WAS THE BANQUETS, AND HAVING MY CLASSMATES COME EVERY FIVE YEARS, BECAUSE THEY ARE LIKE SISTERS TO ME… OF COURSE I LIKE HISTORY AND ARCHIVES TOO SO [THE COLLECTION] IS KIND OF IMPORTANT TO ME TOO… WE LIVED TOGETHER, AND ATE TOGETHER, AND CRIED TOGETHER AND DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER FOR THREE YEARS, BECAUSE WE LIVED RIGHT IN A RESIDENCE. SO, WE BECAME VERY CLOSE… AND IF YOU WORK IN THE ALUMNI, YOU BECOME KIND OF LIKE A LITTLE FAMILY TOO BECAUSE THERE’S NOT THAT MANY OF US THAT GO TO OUR MEETINGS, SO WHEN WE GET TOGETHER, IT’S KIND OF NICE TO SHARE WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON… IT’S A FELLOWSHIP.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, HAMILTON SAID: “IT’S AN ACCUMULATION OF ARTIFACTS FROM THE HOSPITALS AND FROM OUR TRAINING DAYS. AND, IT’S PART OF THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE IN A WAY, BECAUSE THE SCHOOL WAS HERE FOR QUITE A WHILE… I’M A CARE GIVER AND I LIKE TO LOOK AFTER STUFF. SO, IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME THAT IT GOT CARED FOR… I THINK WITH THE CLOSING [OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, IN 1979] WE GOT ALL THE CHARTS, AND WE ALREADY HAD THINGS FROM THE GALT HOSPITAL IN OUR STUFF THAT PROBABLY SOMEBODY [BEFORE HIGA] ACCEPTED… WHEN WE WENT INTO THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL [IN 1955] IT WAS ALL BRAND NEW, STAINLESS STEEL, SO THERE WAS NONE OF THE ENAMEL STUFF, AND THEN WHEN THE MUNICIPAL CLOSED [IN 1988], THE OPERATING ROOM GAVE US A LOT OF THINGS. THERE WERE A LOT OF DONATIONS THEN FROM DIFFERENT SPOTS BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T WANT TO MOVE STUFF SINCE IT WAS OLD… WE GOT A PLACE [FOR STORING THE COLLECTION IN THE REGIONAL HOSPITAL], ACTUALLY ABOVE THE WASHERS IN THE LAUNDRY FIRST. BUT IT WAS PRETTY MOIST UP THERE. AND THEN THEY GAVE US A ROOM IN THE SEWING ROOM, WHICH WAS VERY NICE, OUR OWN SEPARATE LITTLE ROOM THERE FOR OUR STORAGE… WE HAD THINGS UP ON A SHELF AND WE HAD A TRUNK IN THERE, AND… WE HAD ALL THE LETTERS FROM THE RESIDENCE… WE HAD A DISPLAY CASE THAT THEY BUILT AT THE REGIONAL [IN THE HOSPITAL ATRIUM] AND WE HAD STUFF IN THERE, AND WE’D MOVE IT AROUND… HAVING THE DISPLAY CASE WAS IMPORTANT TO ME, AND CHANGING THE UNIFORM ON [THE DISPLAY MANNEQUIN] EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, AND HAVING HER IN DIFFERENT OUTFITS… I ALWAYS HAD IT ALL TIDY FOR A REUNION… I WOULD CHANGE THE UNIFORM FOR THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT CLASS WAS HAVING THEIR REUNION.” SUE KYLLO BECAME THE GSN COLLECTION ARCHIVIST IN 2010 AFTER ELAINE HAMILTON STEPPED DOWN. OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION, KYLLO SAID: “[I ATTENDED THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING] FROM ’66 TO ’69, AND I JOINED IN 1976 AFTER I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE. I HAD TWO LITTLE KIDS AND I WANTED TO GET OUT AND MEET PEOPLE AND THE ALUMNI GAVE ME THAT… I WANTED TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH MY NURSING FRIENDS AND SEE IF I CAN HELP OUT IN SOME WAY… THE ALUMNI IS THE WAY TO GO TO KEEP OUR NURSING MEMORIES ALIVE AND I WANT TO DO THAT. SO NOW IT’S IMPORTANT TO ME WAY MORE THAN WHEN I WAS A YOUNG MOTHER THAT WANTED TO GET OUT… IT MEANS COMPANIONSHIP [AND] TO HELP EACH OTHER.” OF THE GSN COLLECTION, KYLLO SAID: “I DON’T KNOW HOW IT GOT STARTED. I WOULD THINK THAT MRS. BOYCHUCK WOULD HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH IT BECAUSE [SHE] WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE ALUMNI AT THE BEGINNING, AND I WOULD THINK THAT IF ANYBODY, IT WOULD BE HER THAT STARTED COLLECTING THE ODD LITTLE THING, AND THEN IT WENT TO SHIRLEY. I DON’T KNOW THAT THERE WAS ANYBODY BEFORE SHIRLEY… OUR ALUMNI ONLY STARTED IN [1945], SO THERE WERE THOSE PERIODS WHERE I DON’T THINK ANYBODY CARED ABOUT ANY OF THIS STUFF… TO ME, IT MEANS AN AWFUL LOT. IT MEANS THAT WE EXISTED REALLY… IF WE DIDN’T HAVE ALL THIS STUFF, WELL WHAT WERE WE? A NURSE, WHAT DOES A NURSE DO? WITH THIS WE CAN SHOW THEM THAT WE DIDN’T JUST GIVE BEDPANS. WE DID A LOT OF THINGS, AND I’M REALLY PROUD THAT WE HAVE WHAT WE’VE GOT.” OF THE SITUATION LEADING UP TO THE DONATION OF THE GSN COLLECTION TO THE GALT MUSEUM, KYLLO SAID: “WE HAD A DISPLAY AT THE NORTH END OF THE HOSPITAL [THAT] WAS GOING TO STAY THERE [AND ADDITIONAL COLLECTION STORAGE] AND WE DIDN’T HAVE A PROBLEM... WE WERE ALWAYS UNDER THE IMPRESSION OF ALL THE PAST ADMINISTRATIONS THAT WE ALWAYS HAD A PLACE IN THAT HOSPITAL… NOW THAT ALL THE OLD GUYS HAVE GONE, THEY JUST UP AND MOVED [THE COLLECTION, IN FALL 2012] AND DIDN’T CARE. THEY WERE BUILDING A NEW WING AND ‘TO HECK WITH YOUR GUYS’ STUFF’… NOBODY WANTED TO EVEN TALK TO US ABOUT IT. I FINALLY GOT AHOLD OF THE GUY IN CHARGE OF MAINTENANCE, [HE] SAID, “WELL IT’S UPSTAIRS IN THE PENTHOUSE.” WELL, WE KNEW WHAT THE PENTHOUSE WAS LIKE, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY HOT AND YOU DON’T WANT [THESE ARTIFACTS] IN SOMEPLACE REALLY HOT, SO I WANTED IT OUT OF THERE… SO THAT’S WHEN IT WENT OUT INTO A STORAGE LOCKER. AND IN THE STORAGE LOCKER… IT WAS JUST NOT CLEAN ENOUGH TO BE IN THERE… WE WERE VERY DISAPPOINTED.” HAMILTON ADDED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE ANYWHERE FOR [THE COLLECTION], AND IT’S IN PEOPLE’S GARAGES AND BASEMENTS AND LIVING ROOMS… [THE MUSEUM IS HOUSED IN] THE GALT HOSPITAL. AND A LOT OF OUR MEMBERS TRAINED HERE. SO IT’S PRETTY SPECIAL TO THEM, AND THEY WOULD LIKE TO LEAVE SOMETHING HERE TO BE REMEMBERED BY… IT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO US TO LEAVE SOMETHING BEHIND.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF PERTINENT PAGES FROM ‘WHITE CAPS AND RED ROSES’.
Catalogue Number
P20140006029
Acquisition Date
2014-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COURTHOUSE STEP PATTERN
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1954
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20110035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COURTHOUSE STEP PATTERN
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1954
Materials
SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
172
Length
137.5
Width
0.6
Description
QUILT, COURTHOUSE STEPS PATTERN. TOP OF QUILT HAS SECTIONS OF COLOUR MADE WITH NINE RECTANGULAR PIECES SEWN TOGETHER TO CREATE A SQUARES. THIRTY COLOURED SQUARES ARE RED, BLUE, GREEN, BROWN, WHITE, ORANGE AND PURPLE. BETWEEN COLOURED SQUARES ARE YELLOW SQUARES MADE WITH NINE RECTANGULAR PIECES SEWN TOGETHER. BACK OF QUILT IS SINGLE PIECE OF GREEN FABRIC WITH PATTERNED MOTIF OF GIRL IN BLUE DRESS WITH YELLOW FLOWERS. BACKING WRAPS AROUND EDGE TO CREATE BOARDER ON FRONT. AREAS OF FABRIC LOSS ON WHITE, PURPLE, ORANGE AND YELLOW SECTIONS. HAND QUILTED IN TIGHT DIAMOND PATTERN WITH WHITE THREAD.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
AT TIME OF DONATION ON 30 NOVEMBER 2011, DONOR GERALADINE BUCHANAN STATED THAT SHE ACQUIRED THE QUILTS IN THE EARLY 2000S FROM OWNER SHEILA PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE. “SHE KNEW I WAS A QUILTER” SHE SAID WHEN SHE MADE THE DONATION, “AND SHE KNEW I WOULD TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM. SHE ENTRUSTED ME WITH VERY VALUABLE HERITAGE ITEMS AND I WAS HAPPY TO TAKE ON THE RESPONSIBILITY.” THE QUILTS, THE DONOR SAID, WERE HUNG AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF A SHOW IN 2003 AS WELL AS AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE IN 2011. A NOTE, HANDWRITTEN BY THE DONOR AND PROVIDED TO THE GALT AT THE POINT OF DONATION, INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION “THESE QUILTS WERE GIVEN TO ME BY SHELIA PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE, DAUGHTER OF MRS. MAURINE DANIEL AND MR. CHARLES DANIEL. THE QUILTS WERE MADE BY MAURINE IN APPROXIMATELY 1939-1954 AFTER SHE BECAME BLIND. HER SISTER, VIRGINIA TALBOT CUT OUT THE PIECES FOR MAURINE. PIECES ARE ALL HAND SEWN. FABRIC IS SILKS FROM SCRAPS FROM HER DAUGHTERS’ DRESSES. TWO OF THE DAUGHTERS SEWED ALL THE DRESSES FOR THE SIX GIRLS. MOTHER – MAURINE DID NOT SEW CLOTHING. TWO OF MAURINE’S SISTERS – VIRGINIA AND DOROTHY DESIGNED ALL THEIR CLOTHES. QUILTS WERE USED ON TWIN BEDS IN DANIELS FAMILY HOME.” MAURINE DANIEL’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IS DATED NOVEMBER 24, 1954 AND READS, “MRS. MAURINE DANIEL, 73, A PIONEER RESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE DISTRICT AND A MEMBER OF A PROMINENT LETHBRIDGE FARMING FAMILY, DIED TUESDAY NIGHT IN A LOCAL HOSPITAL FOLLOWING A LONG ILLNESS. MRS. DANIEL LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE AREA SINCE 1905, WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND, C.R. DANIEL, FIRST BEGAN FARMING JUST EAST OF THE CITY. BORN IN MACON, MISSOURI, ON JAN. 4, 1881, MRS. DANIEL LEFT HER HOME AT THE AGE OF 18 TO TEACH SCHOOL IN BIG TIMBER, MONT. IN 1903, SHE MARRIED MR. DANIEL IN BILLINGS, MONTANA. TWO YEARS LATER, THE COUPLE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE MR. DANIEL TOOK UP FARMING ON THE SITE OF THEIR PRESENT HOME ON THE COALDALE HIGHWAY JUST OUTSIDE THE CITY. THEY LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE WHILE THEIR FARM HOME WAS BEING BUILT, MOVING OUT TO THE FARM IN 1910. MRS. DANIEL WAS PROMINENT IN MANY CIVIC ACTIVITIES. SHE WAS A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE MATHESIS CLUB AND A MEMBER OF THE WOMEN’S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH. SHE WAS A MEMBER OF THE UNITED CHURCH. BESIDES HER HUSBAND, MRS. DANIEL IS SURVIVED BY A SON, CHARLES ROLAND, JR., OF LETHBRIDGE; SIX DAUGHTERS, MRS. VIRGINIA L. TALBOTT OF LETHBRIDGE, MRS. DOROTHY Q. SAINTAMOUR OF MILFORD, CONN., MRS. DIXIE D. LEMIEUX OF WENATCHEE, WASH., MRS. VINCENT (ELIZABETH) HONAN OF CORONADA, CALIF., MRS. PATRICIA WALKER CASE OF SEATTLE, WASH., AND MRS. SHEILA LANE PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE; TWO SISTERS, MRS. LEILA LOOMIS OF GLENDALE, CALIF., AND MRS. NELL ALBERS OF HUNTINGTON BEACH CALIF.; FIFTEEN GRANDCHILDREN AND ONE GREAT GRANDCHILD.” IN AN ARTICLE DESCRIBING THE CELEBRATION FOR THE NORLAND’S ONE HUNDREDTH YEAR PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2010, LISA DOERKSEN HAS WRITTEN, “BUILT IN 1910, THE SEVEN-BEDROOM, SEVEN-BATHROOM MANSION WAS THE DREAM HOME OF MISSOURI NATIVE CHARLES RONALD DANIEL AND HIS WIFE MAURINE. THE COUPLE PURCHASED 2,000 ACRES NORTH OF THE JAIL IN LETHBRIDGE, AND BUILT THE 7,500-SQUARE-FOOT, THREE STOREY COLONIAL MANSION. REMINISCENT OF HOMES COMMON IN THE DEEP–SOUTH, THE PRE–FABRICATED HOUSE WAS ORDERED FROM A LUMBERMAN’S CATALOGUE WITH EACH PIECE NUMBERED AND SHIPPED READY FOR ASSEMBLY. DANIEL RAN A DAIRY FARM ON THE PROPERTY WHICH BECAME A POPULAR LOCATION FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO GATHER.” RECORDED IN AN ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED IN 2006, “SHELIA LANE PETHERBRIDGE, LONG TIME MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PASSED AWAY [ON MARCH 22, 2006]. BORN SHELIA DANIELS, SHE WAS ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HISTORY AND NATURE CONSERVATION. HER CHILDHOOD HOME WAS NORLAND, BUILT BY HER FATHER IN THE 1900’S DIRECTLY NORTH OF THE LETHBRIDGE CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTE. SHEILA WAS MARRIED TO DOUGLAS PETHERBRIDGE, WHOM SHE MET DURING WORLD WAR II.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE. UPDATE 16 JUNE 2014: ON 4-5 JUNE 2014, ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM (RAM) CURATOR LUCIE HEINS VISITED THE GALT AS PART OF THE RAM’S INITIATIVE TO DOCUMENT QUILTS IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE COLLECTIONS IN ALBERTA. THE DOCUMENTATION WORK IS KNOWN AS THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT. IN ADDITION TO HEINS’ PROGRAM, THE DATA IS ALSO SUPPOSED TO BE SUBMITTED AS PART OF THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE NORTH AMERICAN QUILT INDEX. THIS QUILT HAS BEEN ASSIGNED NO. “AQP 2-0266” BY THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT.
Catalogue Number
P20110035000
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BABY BUGGY
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, LEATHERETTE, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20130016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BABY BUGGY
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1945
Materials
TIN, LEATHERETTE, RUBBER
No. Pieces
2
Height
96
Length
118
Width
56
Description
. A - BABY CARRIAGE WITH BLUE TIN BODY. SUSPENDED BY FOUR CURVED STRIPS OF METAL, EACH ANCHORED IN PLACE WITH BLACK LEATHERETTE STRAPS WITH METAL BUCKLES. RETRACTABLE GREEN LEATHERETTE CANOPY HAS KNIT BLUE FRINGE ALONG EDGE AND BROWN FABRIC INTERIOR THAT IS STRETCHED OVER THREE METAL RIBS. INSIDE OF THE CARRIAGE IS LINED WITH GREEN LEATHERETTE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER STRAP AT CENTRE. METAL CARRIAGE HANDLE HAS FAUX IVORY GRIP THAT IS CRACKED. FOUR RUBBER TIRES ON METAL, SPOKED WHEELS; ONLY TWO OF FOUR WHEELS HAVE DOMED METAL HUBCAPS. GENERAL WEAR AND PAINT LOSS; LEATHERETTE IS CRACKED AND WORN WITH HOLES IN CANOPY; TIRE RUBBER IS HARDENED AND CRACKED; SOME RUST ON WHEEL RIMS AND SUSPENSION STRIPS. .B - SEPARATE GREEN LEATHERETTE COVER HAS GROMMETS THAT MATCH RIVETS ON OUTER EDGE OF CARRIAGE BODY. COVER IS WORN AND CRACKING ALONG SEAMS.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-HUMAN-POWERED
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON APRIL 4, 2013, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, GWEN KLONE, ABOUT HER CHILDHOOD ON HER FAMILY’S FARM NEAR BARONS, ALBERTA AND THE TWO RELATED OBJECTS SHE DONATED TO THE GALT: A CLOTH DIAPER (P20130016001-GA) AND A BABY CARRIAGE (P20130016002-GA). KLONE SAID: “I FEEL THAT WE GREW UP IN THE BEST POSSIBLE ERA. IN THE BEST POSSIBLE PLACE, TO BE RAISED ON A FARM WAS ABSOLUTELY GREAT. WE FOUND OUR OWN FUN.” REGARDING THIS ARTIFACT, KLONE SAID: “[MY MOTHER] TOLD THE DOCTOR THAT SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS HAVING TWINS AND HE ASKED WHY. SHE SAID BECAUSE SHE COULD FEEL MOVEMENT ON BOTH SIDES AT THE SAME TIME. THEY X-RAYED US. I THINK THAT SHE WAS SEVEN AND A HALF MONTHS PREGNANT WHEN WE GOT X-RAYED. THE GOOD NEWS FOR MY MUM WAS “WELL YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE AT LEAST TWINS”. THEY DID NOT KNOW ANYMORE THAN THAT… WHEN MY BROTHER AND I WERE BORN [IN 1944], I THINK THEY ORDERED IT OUT OF A CATALOG BUT THEY HAD TO ORDER TWO BUGGIES. I THINK AT THE TIME IF YOU ORDERED TWO, ONE OF THEM WAS FREE. BECAUSE YOU HAD TO. I AM NOT ONE HUNDRED PERCENT SURE BUT IT SEEMS SOMEWHERE IN MY BRAIN THAT. SO SHE ORDERED TWO CARRIAGES AND THAT IS WHAT, WE CAME HOME FROM THE HOSPITAL AND THAT WAS OUR BEDS FOR A YEAR. MUM LIKED IT BECAUSE SHE SAID IT WAS ON WHEELS AND IF WE GOT TO CRANKY OUT TO THE FARM WE WENT AND OUT THE DOOR. THEY WORKED GOOD… IT MEANT SOMETHING TO THEM, SENTIMENTAL… MY MUM AND DAD SAVED PRETTY MUCH ANYTHING. WE’VE STILL GOT OUR ORIGINAL CRIBS… THEY SAVED IT FOR US TO SAVE… I DID USE IT FOR MY GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE STILL AT THE FARM. OUR FARM HAD A RUNWAY JUST FOR A WALK. JUST FOR A RIDE FOR THE KIDS I WOULD PUT THEM IN THE BUGGY BECAUSE THE SUSPENSION IS NICE. IT IS JUST ON BELTS… JUST FOR A FUN THING TO DO BECAUSE THEY WOULD BOUNCE LOTS… IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD TO JUST SHARE. JUST SHARE. IT IS PART OF OUR LIFE AND NOW IT IS PART OF HISTORY. TIME SNUCK UP ON US AND ALL OF A SUDDEN IT’S THIS MANY YEARS LATER. I MEAN, WE ARE GOING ON TO SEVENTY. THIS STUFF IS STILL HERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20130016002
Acquisition Date
2013-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20130009001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1946
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
78
Width
53.5
Description
WHITE LINEN PILLOWCASE, HAND EMBROIDERED WITH TULIP DESIGN IN PURPLE, YELLOW AND GREEN ALONG FRONT OPEN EDGE. OPEN EDGE HAS WHITE CROCHETED BORDER IN CURVED BUTTERFLY DESIGN. GENERAL CREASING.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS PILLOWCASE SET WAS EMBROIDERED BY THE DONOR, JUNE MANCHAK, AT APPROXIMATELY AGE TWELVE, AS A GIFT FOR HER SISTER MERLIN’S WEDDING IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA, IN 1946. THE DONOR’S MOTHER ADDED THE CROCHETED BORDER. ON JUNE 12, 2013, GALT MUSEUM COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MANCHAK ABOUT THIS PILLOWCASE, AS WELL AS ANOTHER (P2013009002-GA) AND A DECORATIVE CUSHION TOP (P20130009003-GA), AND HER FAMILY’S LIFE IN CARDSTON. MANCHAK SAID: “I WAS GIVEN THESE OBJECTS BACK TO ME, OR SOME OF THEM, ANYWAY, BACK TO ME AFTER MY SISTER, MERLIN, PASSED AWAY. HER DAUGHTER RETURNED THEM TO ME… I HAD MADE… DONE THE EMBROIDERY ON THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES, BUT I WAS UNABLE TO CROCHET AT THE TIME, AND SO MY MOTHER DID THE CROCHETING ON THEM AT THAT TIME… ALL THESE PRETTY LITTLE BUTTERFLIES. AND THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES WENT, TRAVELLED QUITE A BIT. THEY WENT TO WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, AND THEN, WHEN MY SISTER DIED, HER DAUGHTER TOOK THEM BACK TO LAS VEGAS, AND WHEN SHE DECIDED THAT PROBABLY THEY SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ME, SO THEY WERE. AND WHEN ONE OF HER DAUGHTERS MARRIED, I GAVE ONE PAIR TO THAT DAUGHTER. AND SO THEY RETURNED FROM PHOENIX, THEN TO LAS VEGAS, AND NOW THEY ARE SITTING HERE IN LETHBRIDGE… WE MADE THEM FOR A WEDDING GIFT OR MY WEDDING GIFT FOR MY SISTER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… IT JUST CAME NATURALLY, I DON’T KNOW, MAKING DOLL CLOTHES… YOU WENT TO THE RAG DRAWER AND GOT OUT WHATEVER WAS AVAILABLE IN MATERIAL, AND GOT SOME THREAD, AND YOU MADE DOLL CLOTHES, AND THEN IT PROGRESSED… AND I ALWAYS LIKED WORKING WITH MY HANDS… I THINK THAT EVERYONE DID A LOT OF NEEDLWORK AND THINGS BACK THEN. IT WAS A GOOD WAY TO FILL YOUR TIME. YOU LISTENED TO THE RADIO AND YOU WORKED WITH YOUR HANDS… YOU DON’T REALLY LEARN. I MEAN YOU LEARN THROUGH DOING. AND, AH, LIKE ALMOST ANY OTHER SKILL, THE MORE YOU WORK AT IT, THE BETTER YOU GET… YOU ALWAYS DID IT IN THE EVENINGS WHEN YOU WERE BABYSITTING… JUST WHEN YOU HAD TIME... I LEFT HOME AT EIGHTEEN, WHEN I WENT TO CALGARY TO THE BUSINESS COLLEGE THERE. AND THEN I MARRIED, WHEN I WAS NINETEEN, AND STARTED RAISING A FAMILY WHEN I WAS TWENTY… I STILL DID A LOT OF NEEDLEWORK AND WORKED WITH MY HANDS, BUT I DID A LOT OF SEWING, AND I WAS MAKING MY OWN CLOTHES WHEN I WAS TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN. MADE MY OWN GRADUATION DRESS; MADE MY OWN WEDDING DRESS… I NEEDED A PAIR OF SHORTS TO GO TO BEEHIVE CAMP AND SO MY ELDEST SISTER BROUGHT HOME A PATTERN AND SOME MATERIAL, AND SHE SAYS, “HERE YOU ARE, JUNE.” AND SO I GOT OUT THE INSTRUCTIONS AND LEARNED.” MANCHAK SAID THE FOLLOWING OF HER MOTHER: "MY MOTHER TAUGHT HERSELF TO CROCHET BY LOOKING AT OTHER CROCHETING. I TAUGHT MYSELF EVENTUALLY TO CROCHET FROM AN INSTRUCTION BOOK… [THE EMBROIDERED LINEN] IS PART OF MY MOTHER. AND SHE ALWAYS LOVED PRETTY, BEAUTIFUL THINGS. AND BEING A PIONEER MOTHER, RAISING ELEVEN CHILDREN, SHE DID NOT HAVE VERY MUCH. AND SO, EVERY LITTLE THING SHE CHERISHED… WHERE I USED THREE THREADS AT THE BORDER, WHICH WAS DIVIDING IT IN HALF, MY MOTHER USED… DIVIDED IT IN THIRDS, TO SAVE ON THE THREAD… [MY MOTHER] WAS EXCITED ABOUT EVERYTHING IN LIFE. I MEAN THE LITTLE BIT OF TRAVELLING SHE WAS ABLE TO DO, AND SO APPRECIATIVE OF EVERYTHING… [MY MOTHER] WAS BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA, AND SHE CAME UP HERE WITH HER PARENTS… HER DAD WAS A COAL MINER… BUT HE DIDN’T LIKE IT, BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH DIRTY WORK… AND HE AND HIS WIFE CAME UP WITH THEIR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER, WHICH WAS MY MOTHER. AND STARTED A RANCH OUT BY BEAZER... [AND] I’M THE BABY OF ELEVEN." FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20130009001
Acquisition Date
2013-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20130009002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1955
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
78
Width
52
Description
WHITE LINEN PILLOWCASE, HAND EMBROIDERED WITH BUTTERFLY DESIGN IN BLUE, YELLOW, BLACK, WHITE AND GREEN ALONG FRONT OPEN EDGE. OPEN EDGE HAS WHITE CROCHETED BORDER IN SCALLOPED DESIGN. GENERAL CREASING.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS PILLOWCASE WAS EMBROIDERED BY THE MOTHER OF THE DONOR, JUNE MANCHAK. ON JUNE 12, 2013, GALT MUSEUM COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MANCHAK ABOUT THIS PILLOWCASE, AS WELL AS ANOTHER (P2013009001-GA) AND A DECORATIVE CUSHION TOP (P20130009003-GA), AND HER FAMILY’S LIFE IN CARDSTON. MANCHAK SAID: “I WAS GIVEN THESE OBJECTS BACK TO ME, OR SOME OF THEM, ANYWAY, BACK TO ME AFTER MY SISTER, MERLIN, PASSED AWAY. HER DAUGHTER RETURNED THEM TO ME… I HAD MADE… DONE THE EMBROIDERY ON THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES, BUT I WAS UNABLE TO CROCHET AT THE TIME, AND SO MY MOTHER DID THE CROCHETING ON THEM AT THAT TIME… ALL THESE PRETTY LITTLE BUTTERFLIES. AND THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES WENT, TRAVELLED QUITE A BIT. THEY WENT TO WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, AND THEN, WHEN MY SISTER DIED, HER DAUGHTER TOOK THEM BACK TO LAS VEGAS, AND WHEN SHE DECIDED THAT PROBABLY THEY SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ME, SO THEY WERE. AND WHEN ONE OF HER DAUGHTERS MARRIED, I GAVE ONE PAIR TO THAT DAUGHTER. AND SO THEY RETURNED FROM PHOENIX, THEN TO LAS VEGAS, AND NOW THEY ARE SITTING HERE IN LETHBRIDGE… WE MADE THEM FOR A WEDDING GIFT OR MY WEDDING GIFT FOR MY SISTER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… IT JUST CAME NATURALLY, I DON’T KNOW, MAKING DOLL CLOTHES… YOU WENT TO THE RAG DRAWER AND GOT OUT WHATEVER WAS AVAILABLE IN MATERIAL, AND GOT SOME THREAD, AND YOU MADE DOLL CLOTHES, AND THEN IT PROGRESSED… AND I ALWAYS LIKED WORKING WITH MY HANDS… I THINK THAT EVERYONE DID A LOT OF NEEDLWORK AND THINGS BACK THEN. IT WAS A GOOD WAY TO FILL YOUR TIME. YOU LISTENED TO THE RADIO AND YOU WORKED WITH YOUR HANDS… YOU DON’T REALLY LEARN. I MEAN YOU LEARN THROUGH DOING. AND, AH, LIKE ALMOST ANY OTHER SKILL, THE MORE YOU WORK AT IT, THE BETTER YOU GET… YOU ALWAYS DID IT IN THE EVENINGS WHEN YOU WERE BABYSITTING… JUST WHEN YOU HAD TIME... I LEFT HOME AT EIGHTEEN, WHEN I WENT TO CALGARY TO THE BUSINESS COLLEGE THERE. AND THEN I MARRIED, WHEN I WAS NINETEEN, AND STARTED RAISING A FAMILY WHEN I WAS TWENTY… I STILL DID A LOT OF NEEDLEWORK AND WORKED WITH MY HANDS, BUT I DID A LOT OF SEWING, AND I WAS MAKING MY OWN CLOTHES WHEN I WAS TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN. MADE MY OWN GRADUATION DRESS; MADE MY OWN WEDDING DRESS… I NEEDED A PAIR OF SHORTS TO GO TO BEEHIVE CAMP AND SO MY ELDEST SISTER BROUGHT HOME A PATTERN AND SOME MATERIAL, AND SHE SAYS, “HERE YOU ARE, JUNE.” AND SO I GOT OUT THE INSTRUCTIONS AND LEARNED.” MANCHAK SAID THE FOLLOWING OF HER MOTHER: "MY MOTHER TAUGHT HERSELF TO CROCHET BY LOOKING AT OTHER CROCHETING. I TAUGHT MYSELF EVENTUALLY TO CROCHET FROM AN INSTRUCTION BOOK… [THE EMBROIDERED LINEN] IS PART OF MY MOTHER. AND SHE ALWAYS LOVED PRETTY, BEAUTIFUL THINGS. AND BEING A PIONEER MOTHER, RAISING ELEVEN CHILDREN, SHE DID NOT HAVE VERY MUCH. AND SO, EVERY LITTLE THING SHE CHERISHED… WHERE I USED THREE THREADS AT THE BORDER, WHICH WAS DIVIDING IT IN HALF, MY MOTHER USED… DIVIDED IT IN THIRDS, TO SAVE ON THE THREAD… [MY MOTHER] WAS EXCITED ABOUT EVERYTHING IN LIFE. I MEAN THE LITTLE BIT OF TRAVELLING SHE WAS ABLE TO DO, AND SO APPRECIATIVE OF EVERYTHING… [MY MOTHER] WAS BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA, AND SHE CAME UP HERE WITH HER PARENTS… HER DAD WAS A COAL MINER… BUT HE DIDN’T LIKE IT, BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH DIRTY WORK… AND HE AND HIS WIFE CAME UP WITH THEIR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER, WHICH WAS MY MOTHER. AND STARTED A RANCH OUT BY BEAZER... [AND] I’M THE BABY OF ELEVEN." FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20130009002
Acquisition Date
2013-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OFFICE DESK
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OAK, NEWSPAPER, MOTHER-OF-PEARL
Catalogue Number
P20110027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OFFICE DESK
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1997
Materials
OAK, NEWSPAPER, MOTHER-OF-PEARL
No. Pieces
1
Height
76.4
Length
167.8
Width
86.4
Description
DESK, OAK WITH MOTHER-OF-PEARL CALL BUTTONS ON TOP FRONT RIGHT CORNER. TOP SURFACE HAS: WORN FINISH, AREA OF DARK BLACK STAINING NEAR FRONT CENTER, AND WATER DAMAGE CAUSING WOOD TO SPLIT AT THREE PLACES ON RIGHT SIDE. SEVEN DRAWERS, WITH THREE ON LEFT, THREE ON RIGHT AND ONE AT CENTER. DRAWER FACES HAVE BEVELED EDGES AND WOODEN HANDLES. BOTTOM TWO DRAWERS ON RIGHT, BOTTOM DRAWER ON LEFT AND CENTER DRAWER HANDLES HAVE CHUNKS OF WOOD MISSING. LEFT SIDE OF CENTER DRAWER HAS WHITE PAINT. LOCKING MECHANISMS AT TOP RIGHT, CENTER AND LEFT DRAWERS. ABOVE DRAWERS AT LEFT AND RIGHT ARE PULL OUT BOARDS. SIDES AND REVERSE OF DESK HAVE PANELED WOOD. RIGHT SIDE HAS FRAGMENT OF CORD EXTENDING FROM THE EDGE OF CALL BUTTONS. TOP DRAWER ON RIGHT HAS THREE LOOSE WOODEN SEPARATORS, ONE IN RIGHT MIDDLE AND ONE IN LEFT MIDDLE. SPILLED INK HAS STAINED THE BOTTOM OF TOP LEFT DRAWER INSIDE. FRAGMENT OF NEWSPAPER ON THE UNDERSIDE OF TOP CENTER DRAWER HAS, “FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1913.”
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
DESK BELONGED TO DONOR’S FATHER JERRY YAMAMOTO WHO PASSED AWAY ON OCTOBER 11, 1997. IN MAY 2012, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR TERRY YAMAMOTO. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE INTERVIEW’S TRANSCRIPTION. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS FIRST MEMORY OF THE DESK, YAMAMOTO RESPONDED BY SAYING, “WELL… IT GOES BACK TO WHEN I WAS ABOUT ELEVEN YEARS OLD. MY DAD BUILT THE HOUSE, HE BUILT IT ON HIS OWN AND THE FIRST YEAR WE MOVED IN THERE I WAS ELEVEN LIKE WE LIVED IN THE BASEMENT WHILE HE BUILT THE UPSTAIRS. AS FAR AS I CAN REMEMBER THAT DESK HAS BEEN THERE SINCE THE TIME WE MOVED IN SO I WAS ELEVEN SO THAT WOULD BE 1963. IT WAS IN WHAT WE CALLED HIS RADIO ROOM. HE WAS A RADIO TECHNICIAN FOR THE RCMP AND HE JUST HAD IT SET IN THERE FOR HIS MUSIC AS A DESK. YEAH, HE DID YOU KNOW WELL HE FIXED RADIOS HE WAS A RADIO TECH FOR THE RCMP SO HE WOULD TINKER AROUND FIXING RADIOS AND THINGS LIKE THAT. HE WAS ALSO A HAM OPERATOR. [FOR] AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER HE WAS WITH THE RCMP. I WAS BORN IN ‘52, 1952 SO IT HAD TO BE AROUND THAT TIME OR AFTER THAT HE JOINED THE RCMP BECAUSE AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER HE ALWAYS WORKED WITH THEM. HE STARTED OUT AS OPERATING RADIOS THEN JUST WENT ON COURSES AND WHATEVER WITH THE RCMP AND THEN HE BECAME THE RADIO TECHNICIAN FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. [WHEN HE STARTED, HE WAS DOING] THE RADIO TRANSMISSION WITH EVERY COP IN THE CARS. AND BASICALLY THE RCMP SENT HIM BACK AND PUT HIM ON TRAINING FOR RADIO TECHNICIAN AND HE WAS WITH THEM UNTIL HE RETIRED. HE LIKED IT BECAUSE HE SERVICED NOT ONLY THE CAR RADIOS BUT ALL THE RADIO TOWERS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. THE ONE THING HE REALLY ENJOYED WAS HE HAD RETIRED AND THEN WHEN THE OLYMPICS CAME, THE SKIING, THE WORLD CUP IN 1980, SECURITY OR WHATEVER. THE RCMP SENT HIM OUT TO OTTAWA ON A SPECIAL, BROUGHT HIM OUT OF RETIREMENT, SENT HIM TO OTTAWA FOR A SPECIAL COURSE AND THEN HE HAD TO HE WAS UP AT LAKE LOUISE AND BANFF AND THEY WERE DOING ALL THE SECURITY ON THE TOWERS AND EVERYTHING.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED ANY OF THE HISTORY OF THE DESK BEFORE HIS FATHER’S USE, YAMAMOTO SAID, “ALL I REMEMBER IS HIM SAYING IS THAT IT CAME FROM THE FORT MACLEOD RCMP BARRACKS AND HIM AND JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN HAD COLLECTED WEIRD THINGS. BUT ANYWAYS IT HAD SOMETHING TO DO WITH JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN SO I DON’T IF HE ACTUALLY HAD IT IN THE BEGINNING AND GAVE IT MY DAD TOOK IT BUT IT DID ACTUALLY COME FROM THE FORT MACLEOD RCMP BARRACKS. [MY FATHER] AND JUDGE GORE-HICKMAN WERE FRIENDS OF A DIFFERENT KIND AND LIKE I SAY THEY COLLECTED WEIRD THINGS.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE DAMAGE ON THE TOP SURFACE OF THE DESK, YAMAMOTO EXPLAINED, “YEAH, THAT WAS PROBABLY MY FAULT, I WAS USING IT FOR MY BEDDING PLANTS AND IT GOT SPRAYED WITH WATER. YOU KNOW I HAD THEM SITTING THERE I HAD A BOARD OVER TOP FOR A WHILE THERE.” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED BY KIM GUNN AND FORWARDED BY TOM EDGAR IN AN E-MAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION, “THE DESK IS AN OLD RCMP DESK THAT WAS STANDARD ISSUE TO RCMP OFFICES ACROSS CANADA. WHEN THE RCMP GOT NEW DESKS IT WAS GIVEN TO DR. GORE-HICKMAN’S DAD FOR USE IN HIS OFFICE AT THE OLD POLICE STATION ON 5TH STREET. GORDIE REMEMBERS JERRY Y. AND THE DESK BEING IN HIS DAD’S OFFICE. HE SAYS HIS DAD AND JERRY WERE GOOD FRIENDS. GORDIE SAYS THAT HIS DAD STARTED OUT AS A POLICE MAGISTRATE AND THAT IS WHY HIS OFFICE WAS AT THE POLICE STATION.” *UPDATE* AT THE TIME OF CATALOGUING IN AUGUST, 2013, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT DAVID SMITH DISCOVERED SOME ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS IN THE TOP CENTER DRAWER. UPON CONSULTATION WITH DONOR, THESE DOCUMENTS WERE TRANSFERRED TO GALT ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20110027000
Acquisition Date
2011-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TELEPHONE TABLE/CHAIR SET
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
2003
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20030049035
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TELEPHONE TABLE/CHAIR SET
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
2003
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
2
Height
72.5
Length
45
Width
33
Description
1. WOODEN TELEPHONE TABLE AND CHAIR SET. TABLE TOP IS FLAT WITH SURMOUNTING DECORATIVE MOLDING. BENEATH TABLE TOP IS A SHELF THAT IS SLIGHTLY CURVED TO ALLOW CHAIR TO BE PULLED IN CLOSER. LEGS OF TABLE ARE BEVELED AND JOINED NEAR BASE BY THREE WOODEN RAILS. 2. CHAIR HAS LOW BACK AND A FLAT SEAT. TWO FRONT LEGS ARE BEVELED. BACK LEGS ARE JOINED BY A WOODEN RAIL. NEAR BASE A H-SHAPED WOODEN SUPPORT IS HELD IN PLACE BY THE CHAIR LEGS. A FEW SCRATCHES AND NICKS ARE SEEN IN THE WOOD.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
PHONE TABLE AND CHAIR ORIGINALLY BELONGED TO DONOR'S MOTHER AND WAS GIVEN TO DONOR'S AUNT AT SOME POINT. DONOR RECALLED THAT HER FAMILY USUALLY RECYCLED OBJECTS THROUGH THE FAMILY AND RARELY TOSSED ANYTHING IN THE GARBAGE. THE DONOR ALSO STATED THAT SHE REMEMBERS HER AUNT ALWAYS HAD THE TABLE SET UP IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A OLD BLK PHONE UP UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY. SEE P20030049001 FOR COMPLETE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20030049035
Acquisition Date
2003-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20070007000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1929
Date Range To
1955
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
4
Description
BRWN 3/4 SIZE BED FRAME (4 PCE). FAUX WOOD GRAIN FINISH. HEAD BOARD IS LABELED ON BOTTOM STRUT WHICH READS "SIMMONS LTD". HEADBOARD 121 (L) X 95 (H) X 7 (W). BASEBOARD 121 (L) X 62 (H) X 7 (W). SIDE ROD (2 PCE) 187 (L) X 3 (H) X 5 (W).
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
DONOR'S FATHER'S UNCLE, GEORGE CLIRJAK, WAS THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE BED. CLIRJAK WAS BORN IN KALO SEMEN HUNGARY IN 1900. IN 1929 HE IMMIGRATED TO LETHBRIDGE IN SEARCH OF A BETTER LIFE. CLIRJAK FOUND A JOB IN THE MINES AND WORKED THERE UNTIL 1955. AT THAT TIME HE MOVED TO CALGARY AND PURCHASED A THREE STORY ROOMING HOUSE WHICH HE OPERATED UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1981. HE WAS BROUGHT BACK TO LETHBRIDGE AND BURIED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY. CLIRJAK WAS NEVER MARRIED. THE BED WAS ORIGINALLY PURCHASED IN LETHBRIDGE AND TRAVELED WITH HIM TO CALGARY. WHEN CLIRJAK PASSED AWAY, THE DONOR'S PARENT'S, JOHN AND KLARA CLIRJAK, INHERITED THE BED ALONG WITH OTHER ITEMS. THEY NEVER USED THE BED AND STORED IT IN THEIR BASEMENT. IN 1999 THE BED WAS GIVEN TO THE DONOR FOR HER SPARE ROOM. THE BED WAS OCCASIONALLY USED BY THE DONOR'S SON WHEN HE CAME FOR A VISIT.
Catalogue Number
P20070007000
Acquisition Date
2007-03
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, VINYL, RUBBER, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20060036009
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1997
Materials
STEEL, VINYL, RUBBER, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Description
CHROME FRAMED SHOE FITTING STOOL WITH BLK VINYL SEAT. STOOL DESIGNED ON AN ANGLE, BLK SEAT IS POSITIONED AT HIGHER POINT. LOWER END OF THE ANGLE FEATURES A RUBBER FOOT REST. GLD LABEL READS "ALLEN STORE EQUIPMENT LIMITED", WHICH CAN BE FOUND ON FRAME BELOW THE VINYL SEAT.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
STOOL USED IN ASSOCIATION WITH CHAIR (P20060036010). DONATED MATERIALS WERE COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE STORE IN NOV. 2006 BY THE GALT MUSEUM TECH, KEVIN MACLEAN. MACLEAN WAS CALLED TO THE STORE BY THE DONOR AFTER THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER PHYLLIS SINGER. DONOR WAS CLEANING OUT THE STORE IN ORDER TO LEASE. STORE HAD NOT BEEN CLEANED- OUT FOLLOWING THE PASSING OF HER FATHER, LEO SINGER, IN 1997. SEE P20060036001- GA FOR COMPLETE HISTORY OF LEO SINGER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20060036009
Acquisition Date
2006-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
CITY HALL CHAIR
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P19980048001
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CITY HALL CHAIR
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1990
Materials
METAL, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Height
83.5
Length
48.0
Width
53.4
Description
BROWN FRAMED CHAIR WITH GREEN LEATHER UPHOLSTERY. LABEL AT REAR OF CHAIR "ROYAL ..ETAL MANUFACTURING .. ONTARIO". FRAME AND LEATHER WORN.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
POLITICS
History
CHAIR WAS ONE OF MANY IDENTICAL FOUND THROUGHOUT PREMISES OF OLD CITY HALL BUILDING. CHAIR WAS RECOVERED BY MUSEUM ALONG WITH ENTIRE COLLECTION ON REQUEST OF CITY BUILDING OFFICIALS, WHO FEARED THAT HALL EMPLOYEES WOULD STEAL CITY PROPERTY DURING THE RELOCATION OF HALL OPERATIONS. OFFICIALS FELT THAT EMPLOYEES MIGHT BELIEVE CITY PROPERTY WAS THEIRS IF IT HAD BEEN IN THEIR OFFICE FOR TWENTY YEARS (EG. ARTWORK). OFFICIALS CALLED THE MUSEUM OVER IN THE MONTHS PRIOR TO THE DEMOLITION OF THE HALL IN ORDER TO INVENTORY SIGNIFICANT PROPERTY AND EVACUATE IT. THE CHAIRS ORIGINAL USE IS NOT KNOWN.
Catalogue Number
P19980048001
Acquisition Date
2002-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
CITY HALL BENCH
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P19980048002
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CITY HALL BENCH
Date Range From
1925
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
90.1
Length
50.5
Width
152.0
Description
A LARGE OFF-WHITE PAINTED OAK BENCH WITH A SEMI-OPEN BACK AND PAINT CHIPS FALLING OFF AROUND ALL FOUR LEGS. NO VISIBLE DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
POLITICS
History
BENCH WAS FOUND IN BASEMENT BATHROOM OF OLD CITY HALL BUILDING. BENCH WAS RECOVERED BY MUSEUM ALONG WITH COLLECTION ON REQUEST OF CITY BUILDING OFFICIALS WHO FEARED THAT HALL EMPLOYEES WOULD STEAL CITY PROPERTY DURING THE RELOCATION OF HALL OPERATIONS. OFFICIALS FELT THAT EMPLOYEES MIGHT BELIEVE CITY PROPERTY WAS THEIRS IF IT HAD BEEN IN THEIR OFFICE FOR TWENTY YEARS (EG. ARTWORK). OFFICIALS CALLED THE MUSEUM OVER IN THE MONTHS PRIOR TO THE DEMOLITION OF THE HALL IN ORDER TO INVENTORY SIGNIFICANT PROPERTY AND EVACUATE IT. THE BENCH'S ORIGINAL USE IS NOT KNOWN.
Catalogue Number
P19980048002
Acquisition Date
2002-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19850034000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
227.0
Width
167.0
Description
WOOL BLANKET, PINKISH COLOR WITH COTTON RICE SACK SEWN TO ONE END TO EXTEND LENGTH. "EXTRA FANCY KOKUHO RICE BILL & ED KODA SO. DOS PALOS, CALIF." PROBABLY ONE SACK DIVIDED AND SEWN IN. FADED BLUE STAIN TOWARDS ONE CORNER. IMPERFECTIONS IN WEAVE INDICATE POSSIBLY HAND WOVEN. BLUE INK STAINS ON END OPPOSITE TO SACK. SEAM ON END OPPOSITE TO SACK HAS BEEN LEFT UNHEMMED.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
RICE SACK WAS ADDED DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION WHEN GROWING CHILDREN NEEDED LONGER BLANKETS. DONOR OF JAPANESE EXTRACTION DID NOT WISH TO BE IDENTIFIED. LIVED DURING THE DEPRESSION IN UNITED STATES, NOW RESIDING IN ALBERTA.
Catalogue Number
P19850034000
Acquisition Date
1985 08
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P19738886000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
218.4
Width
208.3
Description
WHITE KNITTED COTTON IN CABLE AND DIAMOND PATTERN. ONE SMALL BROWN STAIN; SOME SMALL REPAIRS. DARK/BLACK GREASE STAIN ON FRINGE.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
Catalogue Number
P19738886000
Acquisition Date
1973-07
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P19930077001
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
98
Length
55
Width
52
Description
DARK STAINED WOODEN SWIVEL CHAIR ON ROLLERS. CHAIR HAS WOODEN SEAT, BACK AND ARMS ALONG WITH CAST IRON SWIVEL MECHANISM AND WOODEN LEGS WITH STEEL COASTERS PAINTED GOLD. TOP OF CHAIR BACK IS SINGLE PIECE WITH TOP EDGE CARVED IN ROLL STYLE. TWO WIDER WOODEN SLATS SLOT INTO BACK OF TOP PIECE TO FORM SIDES OF BACK. AT CENTER THERE ARE FIVE PLAIN SUPPORT SLATS. ARMS OF CHAIR ARE MADE UP OF TWO FINISHED PIECES JOINED AT A RIGHT ANGLE. THE BACK END IS SLOTTED INTO SIDE PIECES OF CHAIR BACK. SUPPORT STRUT FOR ARM IS FASTENED TO SIDES OF SEAT. RIGHT ARM HAS ROUNDED BOTTOM PIECE MISSING FROM END. SEAT IS 51CM SQUARE WITH ROUNDED CORNERS. FRONT EDGE AND TOP OF SEAT HAVE BEEN HEWN FOR USER COMFORT. BOTTOM EDGES OF SEAT ARE REINFORCED WITH WOODEN FRAMES WHICH SKIRT THE CIRCUMFRENCE OF SEAT. AT CENTER OF UNDERSIDE OF SEAT ARE TWO IRON CROSS PIECES SCREWED TO SEAT. CROSS PIECES FORM SUPPORT FOR SWIVEL MECHANISM. SWIVEL IS CAST IRON WITH SOME SCROLL WORK, PAINTED BLACK. HAS TWO LARGE SPRINGS AND KNOB TO ADJUST TENSION. LARGE THREADED SHAFT SCREWS INTO IRON FRAME WITH WOODEN LEGS ATTACHED TO IT. FOUR SLOPED WOOD LEGS ARE BOLTED TO IRON FRAME TO FORM "X" SHAPE. AT END OF EACH LEG IS BRASS COLORED STEEL COASTER. EACH COASTER IS ENGRAVED WITH "PATENTED" AND "STARLET BY SHEPHERD". CHAIR HAS VERY DARK FINISH WHICH IS WEARING ON EDGES OF CHAIR BACK AND SEAT, AS WELL AS ON ENDS OF ARMS AND LEGS. BLACK PAINT ON IRON SWIVEL IS CHIPPING.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
SAFETY SERVICES
History
CHAIR WAS USED IN WARDEN'S OFFICE OF LETHBRIDGE PROVINCIAL GAOL DURING THE 1930'S TO 1950'S. POSSIBLY PASSED ON TO L.C.C. BEFORE BEING DONATED TO MUSEUM.
Catalogue Number
P19930077001
Acquisition Date
1993-12
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P19990035172
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1970
Materials
GLASS, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.5
Length
51.1
Width
50.9
Description
OCTAGONAL; OR RECTANGULAR WITH CUT-OFF CORNERS. HAS SCALLOPED EDGES. TOWARD THE TOP OF THE MIRROR ARE TWO SILVER SCREW HEADS. ETCHED ONTO THE BOTTOM OF MIRROR IS A FLOWER POT WITH A CROSS-HATCH PATTERN, AND SIX FLOWERS THAT EXTEND OUTWARD FROM THE POT. ON THE BACK A WIRE, FOR HANGING MIRROR, IS SUSPENDED BY TWO METAL RINGS ATTACHED TO THE MIRROR BY TWO SCREWS AND NUTS.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
SEE P19990035001-GA FOR DONOR HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19990035172
Acquisition Date
2000-07
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
BOARD, HUNT
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P19990035173
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOARD, HUNT
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Materials
WOOD, BRASS
No. Pieces
3
Height
106.3
Length
152.3
Width
55.9
Description
DARK BROWN, PAINTED WOOD. BACK HAS TWO STRAIGHT LEGS, FRONT HAS TWO ORNATE LEGS. THERE IS A RECTANGULAR BAR THAT ACTS AS A BRACE BETWEEN EACH OF THE FRONT AND BACK LEGS. A LONGER BAR JOINS THE OTHER TWO; THIS BRACE HAS AN ORNATE CARVING IN THE CENTRE. EACH LEG HAS A CASTOR. THERE ARE TWO DRAWERS IN MIDDLE OF SIDEBOARD. TOP DRAWER IS SMALLER AND IS LINED INSIDE WITH GREEN FELT. THERE IS A CUPBOARD, WITH DOORS THAT OPEN ON THE VERTICAL, ON EITHER SIDE OF THE DRAWERS. HARDWARE ON DRAWERS AND CUPBOARD DOORS ARE GOLD RINGS ATTACHED TO AN ORNATE DIAMOND SHAPE. ON THE BACK, AN ORNATELY CARVED PIECE OF WOOD EXTENDS ABOVE TOP OF SIDEBOARD.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
SEE P19990035001-GA FOR DONOR'S HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19990035173
Acquisition Date
2000-07
Collection
Museum
Less detail

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