Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

1697 records – page 1 of 85.

Other Name
"LAKE LOUISE"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, OIL PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190017001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LAKE LOUISE"
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, OIL PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
26.3
Width
33.5
Description
OIL PAINTING IN WOOD FRAME; LANDSCAPE PAINTING DEPICTING SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS IN BACKGROUND, WITH BLUE LAKE IN MID-GROUND AND GREEN SPRUCE/PINE TREES IN FOREGROUND FRAMING THE LAKE. OIL PAINTS ARE LAYERED AND BUILT UP ON PANEL. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF PAINTING HAS TWO BLACK GUNS AROUND TEXT, “TWO GUN, ‘57”; LOWER EDGE OF PAINTING HAS BLACK TEXT “LAKE LOUISE”. PAINTING IS IN FRAME WITH OUTER WOOD TRIM PAINTED LIGHT BROWN; FRAME HAS OFF-WHITE COTTON MATTE, WITH BRASS-METAL INNER TRIM ABOVE PAINTING. BACK OF FRAME IS BROWN PAPER; BACK OF FRAME HAS SILVER METAL SAWTOOTH HANGER AT TOP EDGE; BACK OF FRAME HAS GOLD STICKER WITH BLACK TEXT, “RENAISSANCE IMPORTS, CENTRE VILLAGE MALL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, 328-8412”. BACK OF FRAME HAS MINOR TEARING ALONG UPPER LEFT EDGE; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK SPOTS AND STAINING ON WOOD TRIM; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON AUGUST 7, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JUDY AND LYLE YOUNG REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF THREE PAINTINGS BY KAINAI ARTIST PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN. THE PAINTINGS PREVIOUSLY BELONGED TO JUDY YOUNG’S FATHER, JACK GARD, AND LATER WERE GIFTED TO THE YOUNGS. ON THE TWO GUN LANDSCAPE PAINTINGS, JUDY YOUNG NOTED, “THOSE TWO LANDSCAPES, THERE’S A [PAPER] AT THE BACK NAMING A GALLERY SO WHETHER [DAD] WENT INTO THE GALLERY AND BROUGHT THEM HOME, I REALLY DON’T KNOW.” LYLE YOUNG ADDED, “[THE PAINTINGS WERE] IN OUR ORIGINAL HOME IN SHERWOOD PARK, THEY WERE ALL THREE HUNG…THE PORTRAIT WAS HUNG IN THE BASEMENT IN OUR GAME ROOM AND THE TWO SCENES WERE HUNG IN MY BEDROOM.” “FOR SOME REASON, THE LANDSCAPES DIDN’T SEEM TO BE AS SIGNIFICANT AS THE PORTRAIT WAS. THE PORTRAIT ALWAYS STOOD OUT. EVERYBODY NOTICED IT. THE LANDSCAPES, I DON’T KNOW THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE DID NOT KNOW WHO PAINTED THEM UNTIL THEY LOOKED AT THE SIGNATURE BUT THE PORTRAIT WAS ALWAYS OBVIOUS…WE’RE NOT TOTALLY SURE HOW HE CAME BY THEM INITIALLY. LIKE WHEN I MET JUDY [IN 1964] THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT.” ON ACQUIRING THE TWO GUN PAINTINGS, LYLE YOUNG RECALLED, “JACK GARD WHO GAVE THEM TO US [IN ABOUT 1998], INDICATED THAT THEY WERE QUITE VALUABLE TO HIM AND HE HAD HUNG THEM IN HIS HOME FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS AND TOWARD THE END OF HIS LIFE, HE DECIDED THAT HE WANTED TO GIVE THEM TO JUDY AND I BECAUSE HE FELT THAT THEY WERE SIGNIFICANT…FOR THE LETHBRIDGE AREA…EVEN THOUGH WE WERE IN EDMONTON, HE BROUGHT THEM UP TO US AND WE’VE HELD THEM NOW FOR PROBABLY 10 YEARS OR MORE WITH THE INTENTION OF PASSING THEM ALONG TO OUR CHILDREN AND THEN JUST KEEP THEM IN THE FAMILY AND WHO KNOWS WHERE THEY MIGHT GO IN THE LONG RUN. WELL, AS IT TURNS OUT, THE YOUNGER PEOPLE THESE DAYS AREN’T AS INTERESTED IN OLD TIME POSSESSIONS AND STUFF LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE SO OUR TWO CHILDREN DECIDED THEY REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO TAKE THEM SO WE WERE LOOKING FOR A HOME FOR THEM. WE LOOKED AT THE GLENBOW IN CALGARY AND WE LOOKED AT THE GALT IN LETHBRIDGE AND LOOKING AT A LITTLE BIT OF THE HISTORY OF TWO GUN IN THE AREA AND HIS HERITAGE…WE FELT THAT THE GALT WAS THE BETTER LOCATION FOR THEM.” JUDY YOUNG ELABORATED ON ACQUIRING THE PAINTINGS, NOTING, “I’M THE OLDEST DAUGHTER. THERE’S TWO OTHER DAUGHTERS AND NEITHER ONE OF THEM WERE IN A POSITION TO TAKE THEM AND KEEP THEM AND THEN WE’VE MOVED FROM OUR BIG HOUSE WHERE WE COULD HAVE KEPT THEM TO A SMALL APARTMENT IN EDMONTON AND WE JUST HAVE NO ROOM FOR THEM AND IT JUST SEEMED TO BE A SHAME TO HAVE THEM WRAPPED UP IN PAPER IN A CLOSET…[WE ACCEPTED THE PAINTINGS] BECAUSE I HAVE HUSBAND THAT WAS INTERESTED IN THEM. MY ONE SISTER’S NOT MARRIED. MY OTHER SISTER, HER HUSBAND…WASN’T [INTERESTED IN THEM].” ON HER FATHER, JACK GARD, AND HIS TIES TO THE PAINTINGS, JUDY YOUNG RECALLED, “[MY PARENTS, JACK AND GWYN GARD, SISTERS AND I LIVED AT]…115 DIEPPE BOULEVARD…[THE PAINTINGS HUNG] IN MY DAD’S BASEMENT. IT WAS A BASEMENT SUITE HE HAD RENTED OUT FOR YEARS AND QUIT RENTING IT OUT. HE HAD A NICE LIVING ROOM DOWNSTAIRS AND THEY WERE HUNG THERE OVER THE FIREPLACE…[ THE PORTRAIT] SCARED MY DAUGHTER…THEY WERE ON THE WALL IN THE SAME ROOM BUT I DON’T REMEMBER THEM AS STICKING OUT TO ME AT ALL…THOSE ARE THE ONLY REAL WORKS OF ART [MY FATHER HAD]. HE WAS VERY PROUD OF THEM. I DON’T REMEMBER HIM COLLECTING ANYTHING ELSE.” “[MY FATHER] WAS IN THE AIR FORCE WHEN MY MOM AND HE GOT MARRIED AND HE RETIRED FROM THE AIR FORCE AND HE HAD SEVERAL JOBS. HE OWNED A SERVICE STATION [GARD’S ESSO SERVICE ON 3RD AVENUE WEST OF MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE IN THE 1950S] IN LETHBRIDGE…THEN HE RETIRED FROM THAT. HE DIDN’T HAVE TIME TO SPEND RUNNING THE SERVICE STATION AND RUNNING THE DAUGHTERS AROUND IN HIS CAR…HE WAS A CAR SALESMAN, HE WORKED FOR ENERSON’S MOTORS FOR YEARS AND YEARS…HE BASICALLY RETIRED AND WENT TO WORK AT SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH. HE WAS THE CUSTODIAN, THE JANITOR THERE FOR QUITE A FEW YEARS.” LYLE YOUNG SHARED HIS MEMORIES OF THE PAINTINGS, RECALLING, “I THINK THEY WERE KIND OF UNIQUE; MORE SO THE PORTRAIT THAN THE SCENIC PICTURES…IT WAS ALWAYS FOUND IN HIS BASEMENT RIGHT FROM THE TIME I MET JUDY UNTIL HE GAVE THEM TO ME, IT WAS THE COMMON PLACE SIGHT TO SEE THAT PORTRAIT HANGING IN HIS GAME ROOM IN HIS BASEMENT AND I ALWAYS HAD AN AFFINITY FOR THEM.” “WHEN WE SAW THEM WHEN WE TOOK THEM, WE NEVER DID LOOK AT THEM AS A VALUABLE POSSESSION. WE JUST LOOKED AT THEM AS VERY UNIQUE AND WE ALSO THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT JACK CHERISHED, VALUED FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, WE NEVER REALLY WANTED BUT THEY WERE ALWAYS VALUABLE TO HIM. IT WAS JUST AN OPPORTUNITY TO CARRY ON THE PICTURES IN THE FAMILY AND WE HAD INTENDED ON GIVING THEM TO OUR CHILDREN…” “I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT ATTRACTED [JACK GARD] TO THESE BUT HE WAS VERY ATTRACTED. IT CERTAINLY WASN’T A CASE WHERE HE HAD ANY KNOWLEDGE OF OR RELATIONSHIP WITH TWO GUN. I DOUBT THAT HE EVEN KNEW WHO HE REALLY WAS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE DONATION FROM LYLE AND JUDY YOUNG INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190017001-GA. IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, TWO GUN, WITH INFORMATION FROM CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND RECORD P20130026000. PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN WAS BORN IN 1895 AND RAISED ON THE KAINAI RESERVE. WITH A GRADE SEVEN EDUCATION, HE LEFT RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL TO TAKE UP LIFE AS A COW PUNCHER. HE SOON BECAME AN EXPERT RIDER AND BRONC BUSTER AND RODEOED THROUGHOUT THE WEST. TWO GUN WAS NEARLY 50 BEFORE HE BEGAN TO TAKE A SERIOUS INTEREST IN ART. AS A MIDDLE-AGED MAN HE TOOK A FEW LESSONS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ART, AND PAINTED TRADITIONAL DESIGNS ON TEEPEES PRIOR TO HIS LATER PORTRAITURE PRACTICE. HIS DEPICTIONS OF TRADITIONAL NATIVE LIFE AND PORTRAITS OF IMPORTANT KAINAI AND BLACKFOOT INDIVIDUALS BECAME WELL KNOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND MONTANA. TWO GUN WAS COMMISSIONED TO PAINT A HISTORY OF THE BLACKFOOT TRIBES ON THE LOBBY WALLS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK. HE FIRST SOLD HIS PAINTINGS TO A LOCAL RESTAURANT FOR $5.00 BUT AS HE BECAME KNOWN DEMAND FOR HIS WORKS INCREASED. IT WAS ONLY IN THE LATER YEARS OF HIS LIFE THAT HE MADE A LIVING OFF HIS ART. DURING THE 1950S TWO GUN CONTRACTED TUBERCULOSIS AND WAS A PATIENT AT CHARLES CAMSELL HOSPITAL IN EDMONTON FOR FOUR YEARS. HE DIED AT AGE 66 IN CARDSTON HOSPITAL. HE USED THE SYMBOL OF TWO CROSSED OR PARALLEL RIFLES TO ACCOMPANY HIS SIGNATURE IN MANY CASES, AS THE NAME TWO GUN WAS HANDED DOWN BY AN UNCLE, CHIEF EAGLECHILD. HIS NEPHEW WAS GERALD TAILFEATHERS, ALSO A WELL-KNOWN CANADIAN NATIVE ARTIST. FOR COPIES OF CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ON TWO GUN, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20030029000. FOR HARDCOPIES OF THE ARTIST'S DEATH REGISTRATION, MATERIAL DEVELOPED FOR A 1990 EXHIBITION OF HIS WORK, AND CORRESPONDANCE BETWEEN MUSEUM STAFF AND HUGH DEMPSEY REGARDING THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19640615000.
Catalogue Number
P20190017001
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"FLATHEAD LAKE MONTANA"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, OIL PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190017002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"FLATHEAD LAKE MONTANA"
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, OIL PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
26.2
Width
33.7
Description
OIL PAINTING IN WOOD FRAME; LANDSCAPE PAINTING DEPICTING SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS AND GREEN FOREST IN BACKGROUND, WITH A BLUE LAKE ACROSS MID-GROUND, AND TREE-TRUNK ON A ROCKY BEACH IN FOREGROUND. UPPER LEFT CORNER SHOWS A BARE BROWN TREE; UPPER RIGHT CORNER SHOWS GREEN FOLIAGE FROM THE TREE IN THE FOREGROUND. LOWER LEFT CORNER HAS TWO BLACK GUNS PAINTED AROUND BLACK TEXT “TWO GUN ‘57”; PAINTING HAS BLACK TEXT PAINTED ALONG LOWER EDGE, “FLATHEAD LAKE MONTANA”. PAINTING IS IN FRAME WITH OUTER WOOD TRIM PAINTED LIGHT BROWN; FRAME HAS OFF-WHITE COTTON MATTE, WITH BRASS-METAL INNER TRIM ABOVE PAINTING. BACK OF FRAME IS BROWN PAPER; BACK OF FRAME HAS SILVER METAL SAWTOOTH HANGER AT TOP EDGE; BACK OF FRAME HAS GOLD STICKER WITH BLACK TEXT, “RENAISSANCE IMPORTS, CENTRE VILLAGE MALL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, 328-8412”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS CUTS IN PAPER BACKING RUNNING MID-WAY UP LEFT SIDE, DIAGONALLY ACROSS BACK, AND MID-WAY ACROSS TOP EDGE; CUTS ARE PATCHED WITH DISCOLOURED MASKING TAKE; BACK OF PAINTING HAS SILVER METAL PRONGS PROTRUDING THROUGH PAPER; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK SPOTS AND STAINING ON WOOD TRIM; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON AUGUST 7, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JUDY AND LYLE YOUNG REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF THREE PAINTINGS BY KAINAI ARTIST PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN. THE PAINTINGS PREVIOUSLY BELONGED TO JUDY YOUNG’S FATHER, JACK GARD, AND LATER WERE GIFTED TO THE YOUNGS. ON THE TWO GUN LANDSCAPE PAINTINGS, JUDY YOUNG NOTED, “THOSE TWO LANDSCAPES, THERE’S A [PAPER] AT THE BACK NAMING A GALLERY SO WHETHER [DAD] WENT INTO THE GALLERY AND BROUGHT THEM HOME, I REALLY DON’T KNOW.” LYLE YOUNG ADDED, “[THE PAINTINGS WERE] IN OUR ORIGINAL HOME IN SHERWOOD PARK, THEY WERE ALL THREE HUNG…THE PORTRAIT WAS HUNG IN THE BASEMENT IN OUR GAME ROOM AND THE TWO SCENES WERE HUNG IN MY BEDROOM.” “FOR SOME REASON, THE LANDSCAPES DIDN’T SEEM TO BE AS SIGNIFICANT AS THE PORTRAIT WAS. THE PORTRAIT ALWAYS STOOD OUT. EVERYBODY NOTICED IT. THE LANDSCAPES, I DON’T KNOW THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE DID NOT KNOW WHO PAINTED THEM UNTIL THEY LOOKED AT THE SIGNATURE BUT THE PORTRAIT WAS ALWAYS OBVIOUS…WE’RE NOT TOTALLY SURE HOW HE CAME BY THEM INITIALLY. LIKE WHEN I MET JUDY [IN 1964] THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT.” ON ACQUIRING THE TWO GUN PAINTINGS, LYLE YOUNG RECALLED, “JACK GARD WHO GAVE THEM TO US [IN ABOUT 1998], INDICATED THAT THEY WERE QUITE VALUABLE TO HIM AND HE HAD HUNG THEM IN HIS HOME FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS AND TOWARD THE END OF HIS LIFE, HE DECIDED THAT HE WANTED TO GIVE THEM TO JUDY AND I BECAUSE HE FELT THAT THEY WERE SIGNIFICANT…FOR THE LETHBRIDGE AREA…EVEN THOUGH WE WERE IN EDMONTON, HE BROUGHT THEM UP TO US AND WE’VE HELD THEM NOW FOR PROBABLY 10 YEARS OR MORE WITH THE INTENTION OF PASSING THEM ALONG TO OUR CHILDREN AND THEN JUST KEEP THEM IN THE FAMILY AND WHO KNOWS WHERE THEY MIGHT GO IN THE LONG RUN. WELL, AS IT TURNS OUT, THE YOUNGER PEOPLE THESE DAYS AREN’T AS INTERESTED IN OLD TIME POSSESSIONS AND STUFF LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE SO OUR TWO CHILDREN DECIDED THEY REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO TAKE THEM SO WE WERE LOOKING FOR A HOME FOR THEM. WE LOOKED AT THE GLENBOW IN CALGARY AND WE LOOKED AT THE GALT IN LETHBRIDGE AND LOOKING AT A LITTLE BIT OF THE HISTORY OF TWO GUN IN THE AREA AND HIS HERITAGE…WE FELT THAT THE GALT WAS THE BETTER LOCATION FOR THEM.” JUDY YOUNG ELABORATED ON ACQUIRING THE PAINTINGS, NOTING, “I’M THE OLDEST DAUGHTER. THERE’S TWO OTHER DAUGHTERS AND NEITHER ONE OF THEM WERE IN A POSITION TO TAKE THEM AND KEEP THEM AND THEN WE’VE MOVED FROM OUR BIG HOUSE WHERE WE COULD HAVE KEPT THEM TO A SMALL APARTMENT IN EDMONTON AND WE JUST HAVE NO ROOM FOR THEM AND IT JUST SEEMED TO BE A SHAME TO HAVE THEM WRAPPED UP IN PAPER IN A CLOSET…[WE ACCEPTED THE PAINTINGS] BECAUSE I HAVE HUSBAND THAT WAS INTERESTED IN THEM. MY ONE SISTER’S NOT MARRIED. MY OTHER SISTER, HER HUSBAND…WASN’T [INTERESTED IN THEM].” ON HER FATHER, JACK GARD, AND HIS TIES TO THE PAINTINGS, JUDY YOUNG RECALLED, “[MY PARENTS, JACK AND GWYN GARD, SISTERS AND I LIVED AT]…115 DIEPPE BOULEVARD…[THE PAINTINGS HUNG] IN MY DAD’S BASEMENT. IT WAS A BASEMENT SUITE HE HAD RENTED OUT FOR YEARS AND QUIT RENTING IT OUT. HE HAD A NICE LIVING ROOM DOWNSTAIRS AND THEY WERE HUNG THERE OVER THE FIREPLACE…[ THE PORTRAIT] SCARED MY DAUGHTER…THEY WERE ON THE WALL IN THE SAME ROOM BUT I DON’T REMEMBER THEM AS STICKING OUT TO ME AT ALL…THOSE ARE THE ONLY REAL WORKS OF ART [MY FATHER HAD]. HE WAS VERY PROUD OF THEM. I DON’T REMEMBER HIM COLLECTING ANYTHING ELSE.” “[MY FATHER] WAS IN THE AIR FORCE WHEN MY MOM AND HE GOT MARRIED AND HE RETIRED FROM THE AIR FORCE AND HE HAD SEVERAL JOBS. HE OWNED A SERVICE STATION [GARD’S ESSO SERVICE ON 3RD AVENUE WEST OF MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE IN THE 1950S] IN LETHBRIDGE…THEN HE RETIRED FROM THAT. HE DIDN’T HAVE TIME TO SPEND RUNNING THE SERVICE STATION AND RUNNING THE DAUGHTERS AROUND IN HIS CAR…HE WAS A CAR SALESMAN, HE WORKED FOR ENERSON’S MOTORS FOR YEARS AND YEARS…HE BASICALLY RETIRED AND WENT TO WORK AT SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH. HE WAS THE CUSTODIAN, THE JANITOR THERE FOR QUITE A FEW YEARS.” LYLE YOUNG SHARED HIS MEMORIES OF THE PAINTINGS, RECALLING, “I THINK THEY WERE KIND OF UNIQUE; MORE SO THE PORTRAIT THAN THE SCENIC PICTURES…IT WAS ALWAYS FOUND IN HIS BASEMENT RIGHT FROM THE TIME I MET JUDY UNTIL HE GAVE THEM TO ME, IT WAS THE COMMON PLACE SIGHT TO SEE THAT PORTRAIT HANGING IN HIS GAME ROOM IN HIS BASEMENT AND I ALWAYS HAD AN AFFINITY FOR THEM.” “WHEN WE SAW THEM WHEN WE TOOK THEM, WE NEVER DID LOOK AT THEM AS A VALUABLE POSSESSION. WE JUST LOOKED AT THEM AS VERY UNIQUE AND WE ALSO THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT JACK CHERISHED, VALUED FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, WE NEVER REALLY WANTED BUT THEY WERE ALWAYS VALUABLE TO HIM. IT WAS JUST AN OPPORTUNITY TO CARRY ON THE PICTURES IN THE FAMILY AND WE HAD INTENDED ON GIVING THEM TO OUR CHILDREN…” “I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT ATTRACTED [JACK GARD] TO THESE BUT HE WAS VERY ATTRACTED. IT CERTAINLY WASN’T A CASE WHERE HE HAD ANY KNOWLEDGE OF OR RELATIONSHIP WITH TWO GUN. I DOUBT THAT HE EVEN KNEW WHO HE REALLY WAS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE DONATION FROM LYLE AND JUDY YOUNG INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190017001-GA. IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, TWO GUN, WITH INFORMATION FROM CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND RECORD P20130026000. PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN WAS BORN IN 1895 AND RAISED ON THE KAINAI RESERVE. WITH A GRADE SEVEN EDUCATION, HE LEFT RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL TO TAKE UP LIFE AS A COW PUNCHER. HE SOON BECAME AN EXPERT RIDER AND BRONC BUSTER AND RODEOED THROUGHOUT THE WEST. TWO GUN WAS NEARLY 50 BEFORE HE BEGAN TO TAKE A SERIOUS INTEREST IN ART. AS A MIDDLE-AGED MAN HE TOOK A FEW LESSONS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ART, AND PAINTED TRADITIONAL DESIGNS ON TEEPEES PRIOR TO HIS LATER PORTRAITURE PRACTICE. HIS DEPICTIONS OF TRADITIONAL NATIVE LIFE AND PORTRAITS OF IMPORTANT KAINAI AND BLACKFOOT INDIVIDUALS BECAME WELL KNOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND MONTANA. TWO GUN WAS COMMISSIONED TO PAINT A HISTORY OF THE BLACKFOOT TRIBES ON THE LOBBY WALLS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK. HE FIRST SOLD HIS PAINTINGS TO A LOCAL RESTAURANT FOR $5.00 BUT AS HE BECAME KNOWN DEMAND FOR HIS WORKS INCREASED. IT WAS ONLY IN THE LATER YEARS OF HIS LIFE THAT HE MADE A LIVING OFF HIS ART. DURING THE 1950S TWO GUN CONTRACTED TUBERCULOSIS AND WAS A PATIENT AT CHARLES CAMSELL HOSPITAL IN EDMONTON FOR FOUR YEARS. HE DIED AT AGE 66 IN CARDSTON HOSPITAL. HE USED THE SYMBOL OF TWO CROSSED OR PARALLEL RIFLES TO ACCOMPANY HIS SIGNATURE IN MANY CASES, AS THE NAME TWO GUN WAS HANDED DOWN BY AN UNCLE, CHIEF EAGLECHILD. HIS NEPHEW WAS GERALD TAILFEATHERS, ALSO A WELL-KNOWN CANADIAN NATIVE ARTIST. FOR COPIES OF CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ON TWO GUN, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20030029000. FOR HARDCOPIES OF THE ARTIST'S DEATH REGISTRATION, MATERIAL DEVELOPED FOR A 1990 EXHIBITION OF HIS WORK, AND CORRESPONDANCE BETWEEN MUSEUM STAFF AND HUGH DEMPSEY REGARDING THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19640615000.
Catalogue Number
P20190017002
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MOUNTAIN HORSE"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, WOOD, OIL PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190017003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MOUNTAIN HORSE"
Date
1953
Materials
CANVAS, WOOD, OIL PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
48.4
Width
37.3
Description
OIL PAINTING IN WOOD FRAME; PORTRAIT OF MAN WITH BLACK AND WHITE EAGLE FEATHER IN HAIR, WHITE SHIRT, AND BEADED RED AND BLUE INVERTED TRIANGLES DECORATING FRONT OF SHIRT. MAN HAS TWO BLACK BRAIDS AND WHITE CIRCULAR ORNAMENTS ON BRAIDS. BACKGROUND IS PAINTED GREY WITH PICTOGRAPHS ON LEFT SIDE, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, RED HORSE, BLUE HORSE, YELLOW OUTLINE OF HORSE, RED HAND; PORTRAIT HAS PICTOGRAPHS ON RIGHT SIDE, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, RED OUTLINE OF A HALF-SQUARE, BLUE OUTLINE OF A HALF-SQUARE, YELLOW OUTLINE OF A QUARTER-SQUARE WITH AN ORANGE STEP-LINE , GREEN LIGHTING-BOLT LINE WITH BLUE “V” TURNED HORIZONTALLY. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF FRONT HAS PAINTED TWO BLACK GUNS SURROUNDING TEXT “TWO GUN, 1953”. PAINTING IS CONTAINED IN BROWN WOODEN FRAME; BACK OF PAINTING HAS TEXT IN BLUE INK, “MOUNTAIN HORSE KNOWN AS RATTLESNAKE JIM DIED 1952, PROPERTY OF T.J. GARD, LETHBRIDGE, PAINTED BY TWO-GUN”. BACK OF FRAME HAS TWO METAL CIRCLE HOOKS SCREWED INTO SIDES, WITH WIRE RUNNING BETWEEN TWO; FRAME HAS NAILS AT TOP, BOTTOM, AND SIDES BENT IN TO CANVAS TO HOLD PAINTING IN PLACE. BACK OF PAINTING IS STAINED AND SCUFFED; NAILS AND CIRCLE HOOKS ARE RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON AUGUST 7, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JUDY AND LYLE YOUNG REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF THREE PAINTINGS BY KAINAI ARTIST PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN. THE PAINTINGS PREVIOUSLY BELONGED TO JUDY YOUNG’S FATHER, JACK GARD, AND LATER WERE GIFTED TO THE YOUNGS. ON THE TWO GUN PORTRAIT, LYLE YOUNG NOTED, “[THE PAINTINGS WERE] IN OUR ORIGINAL HOME IN SHERWOOD PARK, THEY WERE ALL THREE HUNG…THE PORTRAIT WAS HUNG IN THE BASEMENT IN OUR GAME ROOM AND THE TWO SCENES WERE HUNG IN MY BEDROOM.” “FOR SOME REASON, THE LANDSCAPES DIDN’T SEEM TO BE AS SIGNIFICANT AS THE PORTRAIT WAS. THE PORTRAIT ALWAYS STOOD OUT. EVERYBODY NOTICED IT. THE LANDSCAPES, I DON’T KNOW THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE DID NOT KNOW WHO PAINTED THEM UNTIL THEY LOOKED AT THE SIGNATURE BUT THE PORTRAIT WAS ALWAYS OBVIOUS…WE’RE NOT TOTALLY SURE HOW HE CAME BY THEM INITIALLY. LIKE WHEN I MET JUDY [IN 1964] THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT.” ON ACQUIRING THE TWO GUN PAINTINGS, LYLE YOUNG RECALLED, “JACK GARD WHO GAVE THEM TO US [IN ABOUT 1998], INDICATED THAT THEY WERE QUITE VALUABLE TO HIM AND HE HAD HUNG THEM IN HIS HOME FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS AND TOWARD THE END OF HIS LIFE, HE DECIDED THAT HE WANTED TO GIVE THEM TO JUDY AND I BECAUSE HE FELT THAT THEY WERE SIGNIFICANT…FOR THE LETHBRIDGE AREA…EVEN THOUGH WE WERE IN EDMONTON, HE BROUGHT THEM UP TO US AND WE’VE HELD THEM NOW FOR PROBABLY 10 YEARS OR MORE WITH THE INTENTION OF PASSING THEM ALONG TO OUR CHILDREN AND THEN JUST KEEP THEM IN THE FAMILY AND WHO KNOWS WHERE THEY MIGHT GO IN THE LONG RUN. WELL, AS IT TURNS OUT, THE YOUNGER PEOPLE THESE DAYS AREN’T AS INTERESTED IN OLD TIME POSSESSIONS AND STUFF LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE SO OUR TWO CHILDREN DECIDED THEY REALLY DIDN’T WANT TO TAKE THEM SO WE WERE LOOKING FOR A HOME FOR THEM. WE LOOKED AT THE GLENBOW IN CALGARY AND WE LOOKED AT THE GALT IN LETHBRIDGE AND LOOKING AT A LITTLE BIT OF THE HISTORY OF TWO GUN IN THE AREA AND HIS HERITAGE…WE FELT THAT THE GALT WAS THE BETTER LOCATION FOR THEM.” JUDY YOUNG ELABORATED ON ACQUIRING THE PAINTINGS, NOTING, “I’M THE OLDEST DAUGHTER. THERE’S TWO OTHER DAUGHTERS AND NEITHER ONE OF THEM WERE IN A POSITION TO TAKE THEM AND KEEP THEM AND THEN WE’VE MOVED FROM OUR BIG HOUSE WHERE WE COULD HAVE KEPT THEM TO A SMALL APARTMENT IN EDMONTON AND WE JUST HAVE NO ROOM FOR THEM AND IT JUST SEEMED TO BE A SHAME TO HAVE THEM WRAPPED UP IN PAPER IN A CLOSET…[WE ACCEPTED THE PAINTINGS] BECAUSE I HAVE HUSBAND THAT WAS INTERESTED IN THEM. MY ONE SISTER’S NOT MARRIED. MY OTHER SISTER, HER HUSBAND…WASN’T [INTERESTED IN THEM].” ON HER FATHER, JACK GARD, AND HIS TIES TO THE PAINTINGS, JUDY YOUNG RECALLED, “[MY PARENTS, JACK AND GWYN GARD, SISTERS AND I LIVED AT]…115 DIEPPE BOULEVARD…[THE PAINTINGS HUNG] IN MY DAD’S BASEMENT. IT WAS A BASEMENT SUITE HE HAD RENTED OUT FOR YEARS AND QUIT RENTING IT OUT. HE HAD A NICE LIVING ROOM DOWNSTAIRS AND THEY WERE HUNG THERE OVER THE FIREPLACE…[ THE PORTRAIT] SCARED MY DAUGHTER…THEY WERE ON THE WALL IN THE SAME ROOM BUT I DON’T REMEMBER THEM AS STICKING OUT TO ME AT ALL…THOSE ARE THE ONLY REAL WORKS OF ART [MY FATHER HAD]. HE WAS VERY PROUD OF THEM. I DON’T REMEMBER HIM COLLECTING ANYTHING ELSE.” “[MY FATHER] WAS IN THE AIR FORCE WHEN MY MOM AND HE GOT MARRIED AND HE RETIRED FROM THE AIR FORCE AND HE HAD SEVERAL JOBS. HE OWNED A SERVICE STATION [GARD’S ESSO SERVICE ON 3RD AVENUE WEST OF MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE IN THE 1950S] IN LETHBRIDGE…THEN HE RETIRED FROM THAT. HE DIDN’T HAVE TIME TO SPEND RUNNING THE SERVICE STATION AND RUNNING THE DAUGHTERS AROUND IN HIS CAR…HE WAS A CAR SALESMAN, HE WORKED FOR ENERSON’S MOTORS FOR YEARS AND YEARS…HE BASICALLY RETIRED AND WENT TO WORK AT SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH. HE WAS THE CUSTODIAN, THE JANITOR THERE FOR QUITE A FEW YEARS.” LYLE YOUNG SHARED HIS MEMORIES OF THE PAINTINGS, RECALLING, “I THINK THEY WERE KIND OF UNIQUE; MORE SO THE PORTRAIT THAN THE SCENIC PICTURES…IT WAS ALWAYS FOUND IN HIS BASEMENT RIGHT FROM THE TIME I MET JUDY UNTIL HE GAVE THEM TO ME, IT WAS THE COMMON PLACE SIGHT TO SEE THAT PORTRAIT HANGING IN HIS GAME ROOM IN HIS BASEMENT AND I ALWAYS HAD AN AFFINITY FOR THEM.” “WHEN WE SAW THEM WHEN WE TOOK THEM, WE NEVER DID LOOK AT THEM AS A VALUABLE POSSESSION. WE JUST LOOKED AT THEM AS VERY UNIQUE AND WE ALSO THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT JACK CHERISHED, VALUED FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, WE NEVER REALLY WANTED BUT THEY WERE ALWAYS VALUABLE TO HIM. IT WAS JUST AN OPPORTUNITY TO CARRY ON THE PICTURES IN THE FAMILY AND WE HAD INTENDED ON GIVING THEM TO OUR CHILDREN…” “I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT ATTRACTED [JACK GARD] TO THESE BUT HE WAS VERY ATTRACTED. IT CERTAINLY WASN’T A CASE WHERE HE HAD ANY KNOWLEDGE OF OR RELATIONSHIP WITH TWO GUN. I DOUBT THAT HE EVEN KNEW WHO HE REALLY WAS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE DONATION FROM LYLE AND JUDY YOUNG INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190017001-GA. IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. SHE DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, TWO GUN, WITH INFORMATION FROM CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND RECORD P20130026000. PERCY “TWO GUN” PLAIN WOMAN WAS BORN IN 1895 AND RAISED ON THE KAINAI RESERVE. WITH A GRADE SEVEN EDUCATION, HE LEFT RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL TO TAKE UP LIFE AS A COW PUNCHER. HE SOON BECAME AN EXPERT RIDER AND BRONC BUSTER AND RODEOED THROUGHOUT THE WEST. TWO GUN WAS NEARLY 50 BEFORE HE BEGAN TO TAKE A SERIOUS INTEREST IN ART. AS A MIDDLE-AGED MAN HE TOOK A FEW LESSONS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ART, AND PAINTED TRADITIONAL DESIGNS ON TEEPEES PRIOR TO HIS LATER PORTRAITURE PRACTICE. HIS DEPICTIONS OF TRADITIONAL NATIVE LIFE AND PORTRAITS OF IMPORTANT KAINAI AND BLACKFOOT INDIVIDUALS BECAME WELL KNOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND MONTANA. TWO GUN WAS COMMISSIONED TO PAINT A HISTORY OF THE BLACKFOOT TRIBES ON THE LOBBY WALLS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK. HE FIRST SOLD HIS PAINTINGS TO A LOCAL RESTAURANT FOR $5.00 BUT AS HE BECAME KNOWN DEMAND FOR HIS WORKS INCREASED. IT WAS ONLY IN THE LATER YEARS OF HIS LIFE THAT HE MADE A LIVING OFF HIS ART. DURING THE 1950S TWO GUN CONTRACTED TUBERCULOSIS AND WAS A PATIENT AT CHARLES CAMSELL HOSPITAL IN EDMONTON FOR FOUR YEARS. HE DIED AT AGE 66 IN CARDSTON HOSPITAL. HE USED THE SYMBOL OF TWO CROSSED OR PARALLEL RIFLES TO ACCOMPANY HIS SIGNATURE IN MANY CASES, AS THE NAME TWO GUN WAS HANDED DOWN BY AN UNCLE, CHIEF EAGLECHILD. HIS NEPHEW WAS GERALD TAILFEATHERS, ALSO A WELL-KNOWN CANADIAN NATIVE ARTIST. FOR COPIES OF CALGARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ON TWO GUN, SEE PERMANENT FILE P20030029000. FOR HARDCOPIES OF THE ARTIST'S DEATH REGISTRATION, MATERIAL DEVELOPED FOR A 1990 EXHIBITION OF HIS WORK, AND CORRESPONDANCE BETWEEN MUSEUM STAFF AND HUGH DEMPSEY REGARDING THE ARTIST, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19640615000. IN JUNE 2009, THE GALT WAS CONTACTED BY A MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC, LYLE YOUNG, SEEKING BIO INFORMATION ON TWO GUN. YOUNG POSSESSED A TWO GUN OIL AND IT WAS REALIZED BY COLLECTIONS STAFF THAT ITS HUMAN SUBJECT WAS NEAR IDENTICAL TO THE UN-DOCUMENTED SUBJECT FEATURED IN THIS WORK. ON THE REVERSE SIDE OF THE YOUNG’S WORK WAS "MOUNTAIN HORSE KNOWN AS RATTLESNAKE JIM, DIED 1952". HIS WORK WAS ADDTIONALLY DATED BY THE ARTIST TWO GUN AS "1953". OTHER EXAMPLES OF THE SUBJECT HAVE TURNED UP LOCALLY IN LETHBRIDGE AS WELL AS AT AUCTION IN VANCOUVER. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P19738755000-GA. THE SUBJECT OF THIS PAINTING, IDENTIFIED AS “CHIEF MOUNTAIN HORSE”, IS LIKELY JIM MOUNTAIN HORSE, GIVEN THE SIMILARITIES BETWEEN THIS PORTRAIT AND UNTITLED PORTRAITS P19930018001-GA AND P19738755000-GA, WHICH WERE LINKED TO AN IDENTIFIED "MOUNTAIN HORSE" PORTRAIT IN THE POSSESSION OF LYLE YOUNG (SEE RECORD P19930018001 FOR DETAILS OF YOUNG'S CONTACT WITH GALT MUSEUM STAFF REGARDING HIS PAINTING). A TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM THE OCTOBER 15, 1937 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION AND A PHOTOGRAPH OF CHIEF MOUNTAIN HORSE IN A POSE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS PAINTING AS WELL AS P19930018001-GA AND P19738755000-GA. JIM MOUNTAIN HORSE WAS BORN C.1857, AS A MEMBER OF THE KAINAI NATION. HE WAS A WARRIOR AND FOUGHT IN THE LAST RECORDED BATTLE BETWEEN THE BLOOD AND CREE FIRST NATIONS ALONG THE OLDMAN (BELLY) RIVER IN THE FALL OF 1872. MOUNTAIN HORSE GREW UP TO BE A MINOR CHIEF OF THE KAINAI NATION AND HAD THREE SONS WHO ALL FOUGHT IN WORLD WAR I, INCLUDING THE CRITICALLY-ACCLAIMED AUTHOR MIKE MOUNTAIN HORSE. JIM MOUNTAIN HORSE IS PICTURED IN A 1935 PHOTOGRAPH OF THE LETHBRIDGE OLD-TIMER'S ( GALT ARCHIVES 20001076304), AND WHEN HE DIED ON OCTOBER 13, 1937, HIS CASKET WAS DRAPED IN THE UNION JACK AND HIS FUNERAL ATTENDED BY JOHN PUGH, THE KAINAI RESERVE INDIAN AGENT. HE WAS THE LAST LIVING SURVIVOR OF THE OLDMAN RIVER BATTLE. CHIEF JIM MOUNTAIN HORSE IS BURIED ON THE KAINAI RESERVE. FOR HARDCOPY OF JIM MOUNTAIN HORSE TRIBUTE ARTICLE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19738755000.
Catalogue Number
P20190017003
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS"
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLEXIGLASS, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190022001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GLOBAL NEWS"
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLEXIGLASS, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
76.2
Width
30.6
Description
CLEAR PLEXIGLASS SIGN; FRONT HAS RAISED WHITE WOOD LETTERS LEFT OF RAISED RED WOOD ARROW, “GLOBAL LETHBRIDGE”, FORMING THE “GLOBAL NEWS” LOGO. BACK OF SIGN HAS SILVER METAL BOLTS WITH WHITE PLASTIC NUTS FIXING LETTERS AND ARROW TO THE SIGN. SIGN HAS GRIME AND RESIDUE ON PLEXIGLASS; TOPS OF LETTERS HAVE MINOR STAINING AND SCUFFING; ARROW HAS SCUFFING ON TOP AND SIDES, AND MINOR STAINING ON TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE GLOBAL NEWS SIGN, DWORNIK RECALLED, “I NEVER WORKED WITH THAT [GLOBAL] SIGN, BUT IT WAS JUST SITTING IN THE ENGINEERING OFFICE…THERE WERE FIVE ENGINEERS, WHEN I LEFT THE FIRST TIME [IN 1996]…WHEN I LEFT IN 2015, ACTUALLY WE DID NOT HAVE EVEN ONE ENGINEER.” “[THE SIGN WOULD HAVE BEEN SHOWN ON-AIR] THERE WOULD BE SOME SCALE, BUT, BASICALLY, THIS WAS OVER THE SHOULDER OF THE PERSON WHO WAS READING THE NEWS, AND THEY WOULD USE A LONGER LENS THAT WOULD COMPRESS IT, AND THROW THINGS OFF. IT ALSO HAS A CURVED SURFACE ON IT TO CUT DOWN ON REFLECTION, SO THAT YOU DON’T GET REFLECTIONS THERE…[THERE WOULD ONLY BE ONE IN THE STUDIO] I SUSPECT.” “[THE GLOBAL NEWS LOGO IS] AN OLD LOGO, AND THE WAY COMPANIES ARE, THEY KEEP CHANGING THEIR LOGOS…THIS CHECK-MARK THERE WAS CHANGED QUITE A BIT, THREE TIMES AT LEAST. WHEN IT WAS WITH CANWEST, WHICH IS ANOTHER REMARKABLE STORY, OF WINNIPEG, AND IZZY ASPER FAMILY, THAT WAS ACTUALLY A CRESCENT MOON…I DON’T KNOW AT WHAT POINT, THEY MADE IT A CHECK-MARK, AND THEN THEY MADE IT AN EMBOSSED, GLOSSY CHECK-MARK…I’D SAY AROUND THE TURN OF THE CENTURY…2000 OR SO.” “[I GRABBED THE SIGN BECAUSE] I KNOW THAT I HAD SEEN IT ON AIR. IT WAS USED IN THE NEWS UPDATES THAT THEY WERE DOING…IT’S QUITE NEAT BECAUSE IT LOOKS HUGE, OF COURSE, ON SET, BUT, JUST THE WAY THEY POSITION IT…THAT’S SOME OF THE FUN STUFF OF TELEVISION. AND, I’M…[A] PACK-RAT…I SEE…SOME HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE THAT I DON’T WANT TO LET THE STORY OF LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION KIND OF JUST SLIDE BY, AND NOWADAYS, IT SEEMS TO BE THE THING. THERE’S SO MUCH TRANSIENCY, AND IT’S A 24 HOUR NEWS CYCLE, AND THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT STUFF THAT’S HAPPENING NOW. WHEN I WAS IN SCHOOL, I DIDN’T ENJOY HISTORY AT ALL REALLY, BUT NOW, AS THEY SAY, AS I AM A PART OF HISTORY, IT’S BECOME MORE NOTEWORTHY TO ME, AND PEOPLE DON’T REALIZE, I THINK, THAT WHAT IS HAPPENING TODAY AS JUST TODAY’S NEWS, AT SOME POINT, IS GOING TO BE PART OF HISTORY, AND I DON’T WANT TO SEE US LOSE STUFF LIKE THIS THAT I WAS INVOLVED WITH.” DWORNIK ELABORATED ON THE ROLE OF ENGINEERS AT THE STATION, NOTING, “[THE ENGINEER’S ROLE IS] BASICALLY TO KEEP US ON THE AIR. THERE’S SO MUCH ELECTRONIC AND TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT THEY HAD TO KNOW ABOUT TRANSMITTERS, MICROWAVE, VIDEOTAPE, ALL THE ELECTRONICS, AND THEY ALSO DID MAINTENANCE ON THE BUILDING.” “THE LAST ENGINEER WAS LET GO IN AN UNFORTUNATE SITUATION, IN THE SUMMER OF [2014]…WE DID NOT HAVE A STATION MANAGER. AT ONE TIME WE HAD A STATION MANAGER [PETER DEYES] WHO WAS ALSO THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHEN I CAME BACK. THAT FELLOW LEFT…THEY BROUGHT IN AN ASSIGNMENT EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND SHE WAS…NOT EVEN THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHICH WAS TERRIBLE; THEY CALLED HER THE NEWS MANAGER. MANAGEMENT OF THE STATION WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE CALGARY TELEVISION, AND THE ENGINEERING RESPONSIBILITIES WERE TAKEN OVER BY CALGARY TELEVISION.” “WE’D HAVE TO CALL [ENGINEERS WHEN THERE WAS EQUIPMENT ISSUES]. AT THAT TIME, WE HAD MORE CAMERAS THAN VIDEOGRAPHERS, SO THEY KIND OF HAD A SPARE ON HAND. IF ONE WENT DOWN, THEY’D BE OKAY. AND, AT THAT TIME, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE STATION, AND WAS AUTOMATED. IT WAS JUST MIND-BOGGLING THE AUTOMATION THAT THEY HAD AVAILABLE. CALGARY TELEVISION WAS…KIND OF THE MASTER CONTROL CENTER FOR ALL OF THE GLOBAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN CANADA. SO, IT WAS JUST AMAZING, ALL THE MONITORS IN THEIR MASTER CONTROL…ONE OF THE CENTERS WAS, I THINK, SWITCHED OUT OF EDMONTON…ALL THE COMMERCIALS THAT PLAYED ALL ACROSS CANADA, ORIGINATED OUT OF CALGARY TELEVISION. AND THEY WEREN’T VIDEO TAPE MACHINES, AT THAT TIME, THEY WERE BASICALLY COMPUTERS.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022001
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"2&7"
Date Range From
1987
Date Range To
1992
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190022007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"2&7"
Date Range From
1987
Date Range To
1992
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.2
Length
49
Width
46
Description
WOOD SIGN SHAPED LIKE THE NUMBERS 2 AND 7 CONNECTED. FRONT OF SIGN HAS ORANGE “2” AND RED “7” PAINTED WITH BLACK AMPERSAND “&” IN CENTER; NUMBERS ARE PAINTED ON WHITE BACKFROUND, WITH RED DROP-SHADOWS. SIDES OF SIGN ARE PAINTED WHITE. BACK IS UNPAINTED PRESSED WOOD BOARD; BACK HAS TWO DRILLED HOLES FOR HANGING IN CENTER. FRONT HAS LOSS ALONG LOWER EDGE OF “7”; FRONT IS STAINED AT TOP ARCH OF “2” AND ALONG EDGES; BACK IS STAINED RED AT EDGES AND STAINED IN THE CENTER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2019, COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED WAYNE DWORNIK REGARDING HIS DONATION OF GLOBAL NEWS STATION ITEMS. DWORNIK WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS FROM 1976-2013. ON THE “2&7” STATION SIGN, DWORNIK RECALLED, “[THE SIGN LOOKS HANDMADE, HAND-PAINTED] THAT’S AGAIN, JUST A STUDIO PROP FOR THE…NEWS READERS [AND STORED IN THE ENGINEER’S ROOM].” “[THE YEARS 2&7 RAN WERE A] VERY HIGH PROFILE, EXCITING TIME FOR THE STATION AS WELL. THE REASON THEY WENT WITH THE 2 AND 7, WE DIDN’T CHANGE, AT THAT TIME, TO OFFICIALLY CHANGE OUR CALL LETTERS, WE WERE STILL CFAC, SO WE MADE THAT TRANSITION INTO 2 AND 7. WHAT MANAGEMENT HAD DONE OUT OF CALGARY WAS ARRANGE WITH ALL THE CABLE COMPANIES TO PUT US ONTO EITHER CHANNEL 2 OR CHANNEL 7…[CALGARY’S] TRANSMITTER WAS BROADCASTING ON CHANNEL 2 OFF AIR. WE WERE BROADCASTING ON CHANNEL 7 OFF AIR. WE WERE CHANNEL 2 ON CABLE, AND THEY WERE 7 UP IN CALGARY, AND THEY WERE ABLE TO COMFORTABLY NEGOTIATE WITH ALL THE CABLE OPERATORS TO PUT US ON EITHER 2 AND 7…FROM CROWSNEST PASS INTO CRANBROOK AND CRESTON. THAT’S ALSO THE TIME WHEN THE OLYMPICS WAS HAPPENING AND THE PROMOTIONAL DIRECTOR IN CALGARY WAS JUST AMAZING. THE PROMOTIONAL MANAGER AND THEY HAD A SALES MANAGER. BOYD ASH WAS PROMOTIONS MANAGER THERE AND HE GOT ON THIS IDEA OF THE 2 AND 7, AND HE ALSO GOT ON TO [MAKING] LAPEL PINS. THEY MUST HAVE DESIGNED AND DISTRIBUTED…HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF [LAPEL] PINS…PEOPLE LOVED THEM…I THINK THAT’S WHAT PROMPTED IT, BECAUSE WELL, IT WAS KNOWN THAT TRADING PINS WAS A BIG DEAL…IT WAS VERY HIGH PROFILE AND LOTS OF GREAT PROMOTIONAL THINGS HAPPENING WITH, AGAIN, EXCITING TIMES AND SOME FUN STUFF.” “[THE ERA OF 2&7] I WOULD SAY ABOUT ’87 TO ABOUT ’92 AGAIN I THINK…[IT WAS VERY SHORT] AND I THINK PART OF THAT MIGHT BE TIED INTO THE FACT THAT THE SATELLITE STUFF IS COMING ON…THAT WAS THE REASON TO DO THE 2 AND 7 IS THAT IT’S EASY, LIKE IF YOU SAY, ‘WELL I’M LOOKING FOR CJOC, WHERE DO I FIND CJOC ON MY CABLE LINE UP?’ BUT IF YOU’RE JUST LOOKING FOR A NUMBER THAT WAS EASIER. BUT THEN I DON’T THINK THEY WERE GOING TO CONTINUE NEGOTIATING THAT, FOR WHATEVER REASON.” “[BEFORE 2&7 THE STATION WAS] CFAC…SAME COLOURS. THE RED AND YELLOW THERE.” DWORNIK ELABORATED ON THE ROLE OF ENGINEERS AT THE STATION, NOTING, “[THE ENGINEER’S ROLE IS] BASICALLY TO KEEP US ON THE AIR. THERE’S SO MUCH ELECTRONIC AND TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT THEY HAD TO KNOW ABOUT TRANSMITTERS, MICROWAVE, VIDEOTAPE, ALL THE ELECTRONICS, AND THEY ALSO DID MAINTENANCE ON THE BUILDING.” “THE LAST ENGINEER WAS LET GO IN AN UNFORTUNATE SITUATION, IN THE SUMMER OF [2014]…WE DID NOT HAVE A STATION MANAGER. AT ONE TIME WE HAD A STATION MANAGER [PETER DEYES] WHO WAS ALSO THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHEN I CAME BACK. THAT FELLOW LEFT…THEY BROUGHT IN AN ASSIGNMENT EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND SHE WAS…NOT EVEN THE NEWS DIRECTOR, WHICH WAS TERRIBLE; THEY CALLED HER THE NEWS MANAGER. MANAGEMENT OF THE STATION WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE CALGARY TELEVISION, AND THE ENGINEERING RESPONSIBILITIES WERE TAKEN OVER BY CALGARY TELEVISION.” “WE’D HAVE TO CALL [ENGINEERS WHEN THERE WAS EQUIPMENT ISSUES]. AT THAT TIME, WE HAD MORE CAMERAS THAN VIDEOGRAPHERS, SO THEY KIND OF HAD A SPARE ON HAND. IF ONE WENT DOWN, THEY’D BE OKAY. AND, AT THAT TIME, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE STATION, AND WAS AUTOMATED. IT WAS JUST MIND-BOGGLING THE AUTOMATION THAT THEY HAD AVAILABLE. CALGARY TELEVISION WAS…KIND OF THE MASTER CONTROL CENTER FOR ALL OF THE GLOBAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN CANADA. SO, IT WAS JUST AMAZING, ALL THE MONITORS IN THEIR MASTER CONTROL…ONE OF THE CENTERS WAS, I THINK, SWITCHED OUT OF EDMONTON…ALL THE COMMERCIALS THAT PLAYED ALL ACROSS CANADA, ORIGINATED OUT OF CALGARY TELEVISION. AND THEY WEREN’T VIDEO TAPE MACHINES, AT THAT TIME, THEY WERE BASICALLY COMPUTERS.” DWORNIK RECALLED HIS TIME WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE FOR BROADCAST NEWS, NOTING, “I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE TELEVISION FOR [25] YEARS…I JOINED THE STATION AS A PHOTOGRAPHER IN 1976. I HELD THAT POSITION FOR SEVEN YEARS AS CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEN I MOVED INTO MANAGEMENT, AND BECAME PRODUCTION MANAGER FOR TEN YEARS I GUESS, AND THEN I GOT INTO SALES AND MARKETING AND RESEARCH. I LEFT THE STATION IN 1996, AND I WAS ONE THE FIRST, IF NOT THE FIRST OF THE DOWNSIZING IN THAT ERA. AT THE TIME WHEN I LEFT IN ’96 THERE WERE AT LEAST SEVENTY-SIX PEOPLE ON STAFF. [TODAY] I BELIEVE THERE IS MAYBE A DOZEN…I RETURNED TO THE STATION IN THE CAPACITY OF…ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE IN 2008 AND I RETIRED AT…THE END OF DECEMBER 2014…WHEN I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, I THOUGHT I WOULD ONLY STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS AND MOVE ONTO A BIGGER STATION, YOU KNOW BIG CITY, BRIGHT LIGHTS…BUT I LOVED THE CITY AND THERE WAS SO MUCH TO OFFER HERE. I HAD SO MUCH FUN, THERE WERE SO MANY REMARKABLE, INCREDIBLY REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES I HAD AS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND PRODUCTION MANAGER, ESPECIALLY. SOME OF THESE ITEMS HERE GO BACK TO BEFORE MY TIME, BUT AGAIN LETHBRIDGE—LITTLE DIMPLE ON THE PRAIRIE HERE THAT WE ARE, WE ACTUALLY MADE A PRETTY GOOD NAME FOR THE CITY AND FOR THE STATION IN WHAT WE WERE PRODUCING IN NEWS, AND PARTICULARLY IN LOCAL PROGRAMMING. THAT WAS KIND OF ONE OF MY PASSIONS, WAS THE LOCAL PROGRAMMING, DOCUMENTARIES AND THEN OF COURSE, NEWS AS WELL.” “[THERE] WAS A FRIENDLY RIVALRY BETWEEN ALL THE MEDIA ACTUALLY, AND CTV WOULD PRODUCE THE ODD DOCUMENTARY, WHEREAS WE DID A LOT MORE…AT THE MOST THEY HAD I THINK MAYBE TWENTY PEOPLE ON STAFF, SO THEY WERE LIMITED. THEY WERE ACTUALLY A SATELLITE, OR A RE-BROADCASTER, THEY DIDN’T HAVE THEIR OWN LICENSE SO THEY WERE HANDLED DIFFERENTLY BY THEIR OWNERS THAN OUR STATION WAS. THEN AGAIN MANAGEMENT HERE WAS QUITE FORWARD THINKING IN MOST THINGS. I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, BOB JOHNSON, DECADES AGO TOUTING THE FACT THAT THE ONLY THING THAT WILL MAKE US SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT IS LOCAL NEWS. HE KNEW, BACK THEN, THROUGH BROADCASTER ASSOCIATIONS ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE COMING AHEAD OF US…WE COULD GET NEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD…WE CARRIED A LOT OF AMERICAN PROGRAMS…THE ONLY THING THAT IS GOING TO MAKE US DISTINCT IS WHAT WE CAN DO WITH OUR LOCAL NEWS AND AS AN EXTENSION OF THAT, OUR LOCAL PROGRAMMING, OUR DOCUMENTARIES. IT WAS QUITE GOOD FOR THE STAFF AND THE MORALE WAS TERRIFIC…WE HAD A SLOW PITCH BASEBALL TEAM, WE’D PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY THINGS, WITH THE PARADES, WHOOP-UP DAYS AND THE STAFF PARTIES WERE TERRIFIC.” “I WAS A PHOTOGRAPHER, AND I WAS OUT ON LOCATION INTERVIEWING ALL THESE INTERESTING PEOPLE, EDITING THESE PROGRAMS, NEWS STORIES, COMMERCIALS. I WAS IN MY ELEMENT…[I WORKED WITH] THE VISUAL CONTENT…BACK IN THE DAY, THERE WAS A NEWS REPORTER THAT WAS HIS JOB WAS TO BE ON CAMERA, TO RESEARCH THE STORY, SET UP THE CONTEXT, DO THE INTERVIEWS, WE WOULD RECORD THE VISUALS, RECORD THE INTERVIEWS, AND NOW AS YOU REFER TO IT, IT IS ALL DONE BY ONE…THEY CALL HIM A, AT DIFFERENT TIMES, EITHER A VIDEO JOURNALIST OR A VIDEOGRAPHER. MY TRAINING ACTUALLY WAS IN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY BACK IN WINNIPEG, BUT MY FIRST JOB WAS IN TELEVISION, SO I LEARNED ON THE JOB. SHOOTING BLACK AND WHITE FILM, COLOUR—AGAIN, SIXTEEN MILLIMETER FILM FOR COMMERCIALS. WE WERE STILL DOING A LOT OF SLIDE COMMERCIALS AT THAT TIME, AND WE PROCESSED OUR OWN SLIDE FILM IN THE BASEMENT AT THE STATION THERE, WITHOUT USING RUBBER GLOVES.” “AT THAT TIME WE HAD FIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WE ONLY HAD TWO VEHICLES TO GO OUT IN BUT, SO THE REPORTERS WOULD SOMETIMES USE THEIR OWN VEHICLES. I KNOW FOR THE FIRST YEAR OR TWO I USED MY OWN VEHICLE TO CARRY THE GEAR BECAUSE AT THAT TIME WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY STATION VEHICLES. OUR FIRST ONES WERE TWO…HONDA CIVIC STATION WAGONS, THEN WE GOT TWO NISSAN STATION WAGONS AND THEN WE WENT TO A FORD BRONCO I THINK IT WAS.” “I WOULD GO WHERE THERE WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND—ACTUALLY, ON OUR HONEY MOON, WE PACKED UP FROM SWIFT CURRENT…(I HAD THREE WEEKS HOLIDAY), AND WE MADE OUR WAY OUT TO THE WEST COAST, STOPPING AT EVERY TELEVISION STATION, ALONG THE WAY, HAVING A TOUR, AND LEAVING A RESUME. SO WE STOPPED AT MEDICINE HAT, LETHBRIDGE (WHICH I WAS REALLY IMPRESSED WITH), AND WE WENT THROUGH KELOWNA, (WHICH I WAS AGAIN VERY IMPRESSED WITH), AND SO I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE EITHER LETHBRIDGE, OR KELOWNA, I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE TO, AND THEN FROM THERE MAYBE CALGARY, VANCOUVER. AS I SAID, LETHBRIDGE WON OUT, THEY HAD A JOB OPENING…BECAUSE OF A STRIKE…AT THAT TIME…NABET…NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND TECHNOLOGISTS…THEY WERE WANTING TO FORM A LOCAL, AND GET UNION REPRESENTATION AND NEGOTIATIONS CAME TO A STAND-STILL, AND THEY WENT ON STRIKE I THINK, IN APRIL, OR MAY OF ’75 , ’76. SO I HAD JUST FAIRLY RECENTLY PUT MY RESUME IN THERE, AND THEY CALLED ME UP AND [IT WAS] A TOUGH SITUATION, AND I HELD OFF, AND I SAID, ‘WELL I’VE GOT TO WORK WITH THESE PEOPLE, IF I COME IN AS A STRIKE BREAKER, A SCAB—‘ AND SO I WASN’T TOO ANXIOUS TO DO THAT, BUT, AFTER A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS OVER I GUESS IT WAS A COUPLE OR THREE MONTH’S PERIOD, I SAID ‘WELL, YEAH, LET’S DO IT,’ AND I MOVED BACK.” DWORNIK SHARED THE HISTORY OF THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION IN LETHBRIDGE, RECALLING, “[BEFORE THE STATION WAS 2&7, IT WAS] CFAC. IT HAS GONE THROUGH A LOT OF CHANGES, IT STARTED OFF AS CJLH WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF CJOC RADIO AND THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT CO-OWNED THE STATION WHICH OPENED IN [NOVEMBER] 1955…THEN THE HERALD GOT OUT OF IT AND WE WERE BOUGHT BY SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND WE BECAME CJOC TELEVISION…THE STATION OPENED IN ’55, I THINK IT BECAME CJOC AROUND 1960, BUT DON’T QUOTE ME ON THAT. THEN WHEN I CAME IN [FALL] ’76…UP UNTIL THEN WE WERE A CBC AFFILIATE, AND THEN IN ’76 WE BECAME AN INDEPENDENT STATION AND CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS, AGAIN, TO CFAC TELEVISION. OUR LOGO WAS MODELED AFTER THE RONDELL OF CHC HAMILTON TELEVISION, WHICH WAS AN INDEPENDENT STATION OWNED BY SELKIRK. WE ARE THE SISTER STATION BUT WITH OUR OWN INDEPENDENT LICENSE, WE BECAME PART OF THE INDEPENDENT NETWORK…ABOUT THE TIME OF THE OLYMPICS…WE CHANGED TO TWO AND SEVEN…IT WAS AROUND 1992 MAYBE THAT WE CHANGED OUR CALL LETTERS ONCE AGAIN TO CISA, INDICATIVE OF, ALL STATIONS STARTED WITH ‘C’ RADIO OR TELEVISION IN CANADA, AND THE ‘ISA’ WAS FOR INDEPENDENT SOUTHERN ALBERTA…WITH MY BACKGROUND IN ART AND DESIGN WORKING WITH THAT, WE DID SOME STILL-FRAME ANIMATION. WE DID SOME FUN STUFF WITH THE LOGOS…WHILE I WAS STILL [WITH CISA] WE WENT THROUGH…ANOTHER TWO CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP. SELKIRK SOLD US TO, APPARENTLY TO MACLEAN’S MAGAZINE, AND THAT LASTED FOR ABOUT AN HOUR OR TWO AND THEN I THINK WITH WICK…WESTERN BOUGHT US, THEY BASICALLY BOUGHT ALL OF SELKIRK COMMUNICATIONS AND ADDED US TO THEIR FLOCK OF ITV EDMONTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA TV IN VANCOUVER, AND CHECK TV IN VICTORIA AND I THINK THEY ALSO HAD OKANAGAN TV AS WELL.” “[LETHBRIDGE IS AN ANOMALY] FOR SURE BECAUSE WHEN I CAME HERE WE WERE AROUND FORTY THOUSAND [IN POPULATION], AND THERE WERE TWO OPERATING TELEVISION STATIONS. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE ARE THE ONLY CITY OF THIS SIZE THAT HAD TWO TELEVISION STATIONS. IN MANY OTHER CITIES THEY WOULD HAVE WHAT THEY CALL A ‘TWINSTICK.’ SO WE WERE CBC, CFCN WAS A CTV AFFILIATE. IN MEDICINE HAT, CBC AND CTV WERE OPERATED OUT OF THE SAME BUILDING BY THE SAME STAFF. THEY WOULD LIKELY HAVE A DIFFERENT ANCHOR OR NEWS DEPARTMENT, BUT THE OTHER COMPONENTS OF OPERATIONS WERE ALL CONTAINED IN THE SAME [BUILDING]—AND THAT’S THE SAME IN, ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA…IN A CITY OF OUR POPULATION TO HAVE TWO STATIONS WAS QUITE REMARKABLE, AND VERY COMPETITIVE, AND ALONG WITH THAT, THE RADIO SIDE OF IT…RIGHT NOW WE’VE GOT REALLY SIX RADIO STATIONS, BACK THEN, THERE WERE NEARLY FOUR. AGAIN, QUITE UNUSUAL IN THE FACT THAT YOU’VE GOT TWO AM AND THEN TWO FM. ONE FM STATION ACTUALLY STARTED OFF PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC. WHAT THAT LENDS TO THE CITY IS A LOT MORE VARIETY IN PROGRAMMING THAN THEY WOULD OTHERWISE GET. WE HAVE GOT THE BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE HERE, AND THAT FED INTO OUR NEEDS QUITE WELL, IN RADIO AND IN TELEVISION. WE BROUGHT A LOT OF PEOPLE OUT ACTUALLY FROM DOWN EAST BECAUSE THEY HAD SOME REALLY GOOD PROGRAMS FROM FANSHAWE COLLEGE, OTTAWA AND WE WOULD BRING AS WELL, PEOPLE FROM SAIT AND NAIT, AS WELL AS MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE. THOSE PEOPLE COME STRAIGHT OUT OF COLLEGE, GETTING AN OPPORTUNITY IN A MID-SIZED MARKET…THEY HAD THEIR HANDS INVOLVED IN PROGRAMS, NEWS, COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION AND THEN BEING PART OF THE COMMUNITY.” “I BELIEVE THAT WE WERE STILL A PRETTY GOOD REVENUE-GENERATOR FOR [WICK TO BE SUPPORTIVE OF]. BECAUSE EVEN WITH THAT SIZE OF STAFF, WE WEREN’T PAID AS MUCH AS THEY WERE IN CALGARY, WHICH IS LIKELY WHY EVERYBODY WANTED THE UNION…THEY WEREN’T LOSING MONEY THERE. WE WEREN’T MAKING A WHOLE LOT OF MONEY, BUT…CRTC I THINK CAME INTO PLAY IN THAT, A LOT, TOO, BECAUSE CRTC WAS TO GOVERN THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR BROADCASTING. IT WOULD BE DIFFICULT, I THINK, IN ANY PURCHASE OF A STATION, FOR THEM TO GO, AND SHUT THAT STATION DOWN, AT THAT TIME. BUT, WHAT HAS HAPPENED IS THAT RADIO STATIONS HAVE SHUT DOWN, (LIKE RED DEER LOST THEIR STATION; IT WAS A TWINSTICK), AND I LOST TOUCH WITH THE INDUSTRY WHEN THAT SORT OF THING WAS HAPPENING.” “THE GLOBAL PERIOD, WHEN IT WAS OWNED BY CANWEST…ANOTHER REMARKABLE COMPANY (FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS), AND THEY WERE BUYING UP TELEVISION STATIONS ACROSS CANADA, AND THEN THEY EXPANDED. THEY BOUGHT SOME NEWSPAPERS; THEY BOUGHT A TELEVISION STATION IN ENGLAND, AND I THINK THEIR DOWNFALL ACTUALLY WAS OVER-EXTENDING THEMSELVES, AND GETTING INTO THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. I JOINED THE STATION IN 2008, WHEN THEY WERE STARTING TO SLIDE. OF COURSE, THE WHOLE ECONOMY WAS STARTING TO SLIDE, AND I CAME ON AS A FRESH, NEW SALESPERSON TO SELL ADVERTISING.” “THAT’S WHEN ALL THE DOWNSIZING OCCURRED [AROUND 2008], JUST IN THAT TRANSITION…WICK STARTED THE DOWNSIZING, AND THEN CANWEST CARRIED ON WITH IT. IT WAS JUST WELL, THE ONSLAUGHT OF GLOBALIZATION, AND THE BIG GET BIGGER, AND SMALL EITHER GET BOUGHT UP, OR SHUT DOWN…WHEN I STARTED AT THE STATION IN 2008, BACK IN SALES, THAT WAS WHEN THINGS REALLY CHANGED, BECAUSE WE STILL HAD A DIRECTOR, AND ONE VIDEOTAPE OPERATOR, AND THEY HAD ROBOT CAMERAS SET UP, BUT WE WERE STILL SWITCHING OUR OWN NEWS, AND ORIGINATING NEWS OUT OF OUR PRODUCTION CONTROL ROOM. THEN, TOWARDS THE END OF 2008, IS WHEN THOSE TWO PEOPLE WERE LET GO, AND WE STARTED WITH CALGARY TELEVISION DIRECTING THE NEWS. AS IT TURNED OUT, THERE WAS NO WAY THAT WE COULD PUT SOMETHING ON THE AIR, BECAUSE THEY DISCONNECTED THE SWITCHING EQUIPMENT…IF THERE WAS LIKE A WEATHER EMERGENCY, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WE COULD NOT PUT A CRAWL ACROSS THE SCREEN. IT WAS QUITE UNNERVING, ACTUALLY, THAT WE WERE LOSING THAT KIND OF LOCAL CAPABILITY.” “[I THINK] IT WAS IN 2013…WHERE EVERYONE BUT ME WAS LET GO, AND THEY COULD RE-APPLY FOR THEIR JOB. BASICALLY, IT WAS A WAY OF GETTING AROUND THE UNION. EVERYONE WAS CANNED; THEY GOT A SEVERANCE PACKAGE. IT WAS A PRETTY UNNERVING TIME, AND MORALE REALLY, REALLY HIT A LOW THERE. THEY ASSIGNED AN EDITOR FROM TORONTO, AND ANOTHER FELLOW WHO HAD BEEN BROADCASTING NEWS, THEY WENT…AND THEY WERE GOING TO RE-IMAGINE THE NEWS, AND THEY HAD BIG PLANS TO MAKE THE STATION WHOLLY-NEW, AND A WHOLE NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS, WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE…RESPONSIBILITIES WERE CHANGED; MORE LOAD WAS TAKEN ON, BUT, AS WELL, LESS THINGS WERE GOING TO BE DONE. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE ENGINEER, AND SO THEY HIRED A FELLOW TO BE A VIDEOGRAPHER. HE WOULD SHOOT SOME OF THE NEWS STORIES, BUT HE WAS ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR TWEAKING UP THE CAMERAS, AND IF THERE WAS A PROBLEM, SENDING IT UP TO CALGARY…I THINK WHAT THEY DID WAS THEY MEASURED OUT THE NUMBER OF HOURS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE, WHAT THEY WANTED TO COVER, WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO, AND THEY WENT WITH THAT NUMBER—TWELVE OR FOURTEEN PEOPLE, AND SO, CHANGING THE ROLES, WHOLE NEW JOB DESCRIPTIONS. BUT, AS I SAID TO [MANAGEMENT], ‘YOU KNOW, I THINK YOU OVERLOOKED THE FACT THAT ALL THE PEOPLE HERE, ON THE UNION CONTRACT, GET AT LEAST THREE WEEKS’ VACATION. MEANS YOU’VE GOT TWELVE PEOPLE—THAT’S THIRTY-SIX WEEKS—THAT YOU’VE GOT SOMEBODY AWAY. SO, YOU’RE RUNNING SHORT-STAFFED OVER HALF A YEAR.’ THAT’S PRETTY TOUGH ON PEOPLE, BECAUSE THIS GENERATION THAT’S IN THERE NOW, I DON’T THINK THEY HAVE THE SAME KIND OF ATTITUDE, OR WORK ETHIC. WE WOULD WORK. WELL, MY WIFE COULD ATTEST TO THE HOURS THAT I WOULD PUT IN AT THE STATION. AND, I DIDN’T GET PAID OVERTIME. I GOT A…FEE. THIS STUFF, BETWEEN THE CHANGE OF ATTITUDE, AND THE NEWS CYCLE, AND CUTTING BACK HOW THEY COULD, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH ON PEOPLE. BUT, I WAS THE FIRST ONE TO BE LET GO IN 1996, AND I WAS THE MARKETING RESEARCH AND SALES (WE WERE DOING VIDEO PRODUCTIONS), AND THE FELLOW WHO WAS THE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, JIM MCNALLY, I BROUGHT ON. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF OTTAWA, AND HE HAD, I THINK, ONE OF THE TOUGHEST TIMES BACK IN ’96 (ACTUALLY, MORE SO IN ’98). THEY MADE HIM GENERAL MANAGER OF THE STATION. HIS ENTIRE RESPONSIBILITY OVER, I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY WEEKS AND MONTHS WAS TO CUT THE STAFF DOWN TO, I DON’T KNOW, SIXTEEN PEOPLE. AND, WHEN THAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED, HE WAS LET GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF LETHBRIDGE BROADCAST OR TELEVISION NEWS, DWORNIK SHARED, “TELEVISION HAS ALWAYS BEEN FOR THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, A VERY EXCITING INDUSTRY BECAUSE THERE’S ALWAYS DEVELOPMENTS, TECHNOLOGY. WHEN YOU THINK THAT BACK IN THE DAY IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, BUT THEY DID LIVE COMMERCIALS AND THAT’S QUITE REMARKABLE TOO, HOW THEY WERE DOING THOSE THINGS. THEY DID A LOT OF PRANKS AND FUN STUFF ON AIR…THE TECHNOLOGY KEPT DEVELOPING. IT LOOKED AS GOOD AS IT COULD GET BACK IN THE DAY, BUT NOW THAT WE ARE UP TO 4K VIDEO…IN MY DAY WE HAD BEEN COLOUR FOR QUITE SOME TINE, BUT WHEN I CAME IN IN ‘76 IT WAS KIND OF THE LAUNCH OF ENG, ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING OR EFP, FIELD PRODUCTION. THE EQUIPMENT WAS THREE QUARTER INCH AT THAT TIME, THE CAMERAS WERE BIG AND HEAVY, AND THE TAPE DECK, IT WAS A TWO PIECE UNIT, IT NEEDED A LOT OF LIGHT SO WE CARRIED AROUND ABOUT A THIRTY POUND BOX FULL OF LIGHTING GEAR. TRUCKING THAT FROM ONE END OF THE UNIVERSITY HALL DOWN TO THE OTHER END WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS.” “FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, I THINK I WAS IN THE “GOLDEN AGE” OF TELEVISION IN LETHBRIDGE HERE, BECAUSE WE DID A LOT OF LOCAL PROGRAMS. WE ACTUALLY HAD A SYNDICATED SPORTS PROGRAM CALLED SKI WEST, AND THAT RAN ON HALF A DOZEN MARKETS—INDEPENDENT MARKETS—TELEVISION STATIONS WITH SELKIRK, AND, ACTUALLY THAT WAS WITH WICK AS WELL TOO. WE DID A LOT OF COMMERCIALS, PROGRAM PRODUCTION AND…I THINK IT WAS AROUND ’88 OR ’90, WE WERE ALREADY TALKING AND WE SAW ADVANTAGES IN WHAT WAS CALLED THEN HIGH-DEFINITION TELEVISION WHICH WAS TEN EIGHTY, BUT IT WAS A LONG WAY BEFORE IT CAME. WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TELEVISION IN CANADA UNTIL I THINK IT WAS 2009-2010, AND AS ONE OF OUR ENGINEERS MENTIONED, THAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE TECHNOLOGY-WISE. BECAUSE, WHEN WE STARTED IN BLACK AND WHITE, IT WAS A FOUR BY THREE FORMAT AND THEN THEY ADDED COLOUR, IMAGINATIVE COLOUR IN THE ‘60S. THAT WAS PRETTY SMOOTH BECAUSE YOU COULD, YOU KNOW, YOU ARE BROADCASTING THIS ONE SIGNAL OUT IN COLOUR, BUT IF YOU ONLY HAD A BLACK AND WHITE TV, YOU COULD STILL WATCH IT IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND IF YOU HAD COLOUR ALL THE BETTER. THAT WAS IN THE ERA WHEN CABLE WAS ON ITS UP RISE AND SO IT WENT THROUGH A PRETTY SMOOTH TRANSITION, BUT WHEN WE WENT DIGITAL IT WAS HARD LINE IN THE SAND. YOUR OLD TV SET WOULD NOT BE GETTING NOTHING ON IT. THERE WOULD BE NO SIGNAL COMING IN AT ALL, AND WE HAD TO SWITCH OVER TO EITHER CABLE, WHICH WOULD CONVERT THE DIGITAL SIGNAL INTO THE NTSC SIGNAL FOR YOU, OR ELSE YOU HAD TO GET A BRAND NEW TV THAT’S DIGITAL. IT REALLY DID SPUR THE INDUSTRY, AND IT WAS A HUGE FINANCIAL INVESTMENT. CBC WITH ALL THEIR BROADCAST SATELLITES TO COVER ALL OF CANADA, WAS GIVEN AN EXTRA YEAR TO SWITCH OVER TO DIGITAL. IN THE END THEY SAID, ‘NO WE CAN’T DO IT,’ SO THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY SHUT DOWN THEIR TELEVISION TOWER IN LETHBRIDGE [IN JUNE 2012].” “IN A MARKET LIKE OURS WHERE WE HAVE GOT CABLE THAT WAS OKAY, BUT IN THE RURAL AREAS…SOME [PEOPLE] WERE ALREADY ON SATELLITE, BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I WAS IN THE INDUSTRY, THE SATELLITE DISHES WERE HUGE AND WE WERE STILL USING A HUGE ONE…IT WAS MORE THAN 12 FEET, IT WAS HUGE, 20 SOME FEET ACROSS. AGAIN, BACK IN THE ‘80S I REMEMBER OUR PRESIDENT COMING BACK AND TELLING US THAT, ‘YOU KNOW, THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT SATELLITES GOING UP THERE AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE SO POWERFUL YOU COULD USE A SATELLITE DISH NO BIGGER THAN A PIZZA BOX.’…THAT’S WHAT WE’VE GOT NOW REALLY…I THINK IT’S A LOT OF ‘GOLDEN ERAS’ AS YOU WOULD SAY REALLY, BECAUSE NOW WITH DIGITAL IT’S JUST PHENOMENAL, AND IT WENT FROM 1080 UP TO 4K. 8K IS OUT THERE TODAY, BUT I THINK IT WILL BE A LONG TIME BECAUSE IT IS A LOT OF BAND WIDTH FOR PEOPLE…” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, DWORNIK SHARED, “MY WIFE WHO IS WITH US, SANDRA, SUGGESTED THAT I MIGHT CLEAN UP OUR GARAGE AND OTHER PLACES IN THE HOUSE, BECAUSE I COLLECT A LOT OF STUFF. THE OTHER REASON [I’M DONATING THE ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM] ACTUALLY IS IT MIGHT BE TIME—FROM A HISTORICAL VIEW POINT THAT WHAT IS NOW GLOBAL TELEVISION IS MOVING LOCATION. WHERE THEY HAVE BEEN IN THEIR ORIGINAL SITE…[IN] WHAT IS NOW THE INDUSTRIAL PARK, THEY ARE MOVING OUT OF THERE MID-SEPTEMBER OR SO TO A LOCATION DOWNTOWN AND THEY ARE MOVING INTO WHAT IS NOW THE NEW ROYAL BANK, WHICH USED TO BE THE MARQUIS HOTEL. THEY ARE JUST BUILDING THE STUDIO THERE NOW AND THEY WILL BE JOINING THE RADIO FROM THE PATERSON GROUP IN THAT SAME BUILDING, BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY SEPARATED. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT IT PERHAPS TIMELY AND SOME CONNECTIONS THERE.” “WHEN I RETIRED IT WAS KIND OF A HOLLOW BUILDING AND THERE WAS A LOT OF VIDEO TAPE AROUND, WHICH I CONVINCED THE CURRENT OWNERS OF THE STATION, SHAW MEDIA AT THE TIME…BETWEEN MYSELF AND AN ENGINEER, LARRY LAWDINEY, WE DID CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF HISTORY IN THOSE VIDEO TAPES, WHICH THEY WERE PREPARED TO THROW OUT IN THE DUMPSTER, AND END UP IN OUR LANDFILL. SO, WORKING WITH ANDREW [AT THE GALT ARCHIVES], AND HE HAS GOT—I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF THE TAPES NOW.” “SOME OF THESE ARTIFACTS, WHICH I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH YOU BEFORE, I FELT WERE SIGNIFICANT…REPRESENTATIVE OF SOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. THE STATION PRODUCED SOME VERY REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE GONE ON TO WIDE ACCLAIM ACTUALLY, RIGHT THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE STATION. INCLUDING PEOPLE LIKE DON SLADE…HE WAS A DISC JOCKEY WHEN I WAS LIVING IN WINNIPEG GROWING UP, AND THEN HE ENDED UP BEING IN EITHER CALGARY OR EDMONTON. THE FAMOUS WEATHER MAN…BILL MATHESON, OF COURSE FROM LETHBRIDGE, WENT TO NEW YORK, AND ENDED UP IN EDMONTON. I HAVE HAD A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED IN MY DEPARTMENT THAT HAVE GONE ON TO SOME SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS WELL. ONE IN PARTICULAR, DOUG GOAT, WAS A VIDEO JOURNALIST FOR NBC AND HE WENT OVER TO THESE WAR TORN COUNTRIES—HE WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY, HIS DAD ACTUALLY MADE SOME EQUIPMENT FOR US FOR OUR TRIPODS…RICK LUCHUCK, WHO WAS IN OUR PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT LEFT, WENT TO REGINA, AND THEN I THINK TORONTO…HE CAME BACK JUST THIS PAST YEAR FOR A REUNION AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE, FROM WHERE HE GRADUATED IN BROADCASTING. HE IS VICE PRESIDENT OF PROMOTIONS FOR CNN…WE HAVE HAD PEOPLE GO TO SPORTS NETWORK…A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH THE STATION, IT WAS A REVOLVING DOOR, BUT I WAS OKAY WITH THAT BECAUSE WE HELPED BUILD THEIR CAPABILITIES, AND THEY WERE VERY APPRECIATIVE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES AND THE TRAINING THAT WE DID PROVIDE…THE STUFF WE DID WE HAD…A VERY SMALL MOBILE PRODUCTION FACILITY, BUT IT WAS INVOLVED WITH THE OLYMPICS IN ’88, THE TORCH RUN. WE PICKED UP THE TORCH RUN WHEN IT ENTERED ALBERTA IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, BROADCAST THAT LIVE THROUGHOUT ALBERTA. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET PRINCE CHARLES AND PRINCE ANDREW AND FERGIE…THEY WERE DOWN FOR…THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP.” “THE STATION WON A [NATIONAL] AWARD…[THE] FOUNDERS AWARD OF EXCELLENCE FOR A DOCUMENTARY WE PRODUCED [CALLED ‘WE WON’T LET HIM DIE’], AND I WAS THE PHOTOGRAPHER ON THAT AND SHOT…IT WAS ACTUALLY THIRTY YEARS AGO THAT THIS YOUNG FELLOW, TOMMY JONES, WAS WORKING AT A CHURCH CAMP IN WATERTON AND WENT HIKING WITH SOME FRIENDS IN A MOUNTAIN AND FELL AND HAD A SERIOUS BRAIN INJURY. TWO YEARS LATER—THEY DIDN’T EXPECT HIM TO LIVE…WE DOCUMENTED THAT WHOLE STORY AND RECREATED THE SCENES IN THE DOCUDRAMA…THESE THINGS REMIND ME OF ANOTHER ARTIST CORNY MARTENS, BRONZE ARTIST, WAS OUR STUDIO DIRECTOR, AND SOME OF THE STUFF THEY USED TO DO, BACK IN THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE, THEY DID COMMERCIALS—THEY PAINTED THE FLOOR OF THE STUDIO TO MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A SWIMMING POOL, AND THEY HAD A FASHION SHOW WITH SWIMSUITS…THAT’S KIND OF WHAT PROMPTED ME [TO DONATE THE ITEMS], AND THAT’S THE CONNECTION TO THESE ITEMS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND ARTICLES ON THE GLOBAL NEWS STATION BEING DISMANTLED, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190022001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190022007
Acquisition Date
2019-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"I'M PAN-TASTIC"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190015002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"I'M PAN-TASTIC"
Date
2018
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
3.75
Description
PANSEXUAL PRIDE BUTTON; BUTTON FRONT HAS PANSEXUAL PRIDE FLAG STRIPES (PINK, YELLOW, BLUE), WITH BLACK TEXT “I’M PAN-TASTIC, THANKS FOR ASKING”. BACK OF BUTTON IS WHITE PLASTIC WITH SILVER METAL C-CLASP. BUTTON EDGES ARE CRIMPED TO THE BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JULY 11, 2019, CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KIRSTAN SCHAMUHN FOR A GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT, ‘INQUEERIES: 2SLGBTQ+ HISTORIES OF SOUTHWESTERN ALBERTA’, AND REGARDING SCHAMUHN’S DONATION OF PRIDE MATERIALS FROM LETHBRIDGE PRIDE. ‘INQUEERIES’ EXHIBITED 2SLGBTQ+ STORIES, OBJECTS, AND VOICES FROM SOUTHWESTERN ALBERTA, AND RAN FROM OCTOBER 12, 2019 TO FEBRUARY 9, 2020. ON THE PANSEXUAL PRIDE BUTTON, SCHAMUHN RECALLED, “I GOT [THE BUTTON] AT PRIDE 2018. I GOT [IT] BEFORE THE PARADE STARTED. I STARTED WALKING AROUND WITH MY FRIEND…THEY HAD [PRIDE] AT GALT GARDENS. AT GALT GARDENS IT WAS LOOKING LIKE IT WAS GONNA BE A BIT OF A RAINY DAY SO THEY SET VENDORS UP INSIDE UNDERNEATH THOSE COLUMNS AND PILLARS WITH THE OVERHANGS. THEY SET UP VENDORS IN THERE AND THEY HAD THESE NICE LITTLE TABLES AND I ACTUALLY GOT A LOT OF PRIDE [MATERIALS] LAST YEAR AND THESE ARE TWO OF THE THINGS THAT I PICKED UP. THEY WERE GIVING OUT THE FLAGS FOR FREE AND I BOUGHT THE BUTTON, I THINK, FOR FIFTY CENTS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. IT WAS BECAUSE, AS I WAS STARTING TO WALK AROUND, AND I SAW PEOPLE WHO WERE DRESSED UP FOR PRIDE, AND I SAW THEIR ENTHUSIASM, THAT WAS WHAT REALLY GOT TO ME; HOW ENTHUSIASTIC THEY WERE ABOUT BEING THERE AT PRIDE AND BEING A PART OF PRIDE AND SHOWING THEIR SUPPORT AND BEING ABLE TO, MORE OVERTLY AND VISIBLY, IDENTIFY AND BE THERE AND BE WELCOMED AND ACCEPTED. I JUST THOUGHT THAT THE PIN WAS SOMETHING SMALL BUT IT MEANT A LOT TO ME TO BUY THAT AND TO WEAR THAT WHILE I WATCHED THE PARADE AND AS I WALKED AROUND THROUGH THE DAY…IT WAS MY WAY OF EXPRESSING MYSELF AT PRIDE.” “[THE BUTTON] MEANT QUITE A LOT TO ME COMING OUT OF PRIDE AND THEN…I WORE [IT] AFTER THE FACT BECAUSE I FELT LIKE I FINALLY HAD THE COURAGE TO BE VISIBLE AND TO BE OUT THERE AND IT’S SOMETHING THAT I DON’T THINK I WOULD HAVE BEEN ABLE TO DO IF IT HADN’T BEEN FOR PRIDE. THAT PIN IS THE EMBODIMENT OF THE COURAGE THAT I HAD AFTER THAT DAY; TO COME OUT TO MORE PEOPLE. I STARTED COMING OUT TO MY BOARD…MY EMPLOYERS. WE HAD ANOTHER GIRL WHO WAS OPENLY OUT WORKING FOR [MY WORKPLACE] THAT SUMMER AND HER AND I TALKED AT LENGTH ON OUR BREAKS. WE WOULD TAKE OUR COFFEE BREAKS TOGETHER AND OUR LUNCH BREAKS TOGETHER AND WE’D JUST TALK ABOUT QUEER THEORY AND WE WOULD TALK ABOUT RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE AND WE WOULD TALK ABOUT HOW OUR FAMILIES FELT WHEN WE CAME OUT AND IT WAS, IN PART, THAT HAVING THAT PIN AND HAVING THAT FLAG WITH ME WHEN I WENT BACK TO DRAYTON AFTER PRIDE…[THE BUTTON] GAVE ME THE COURAGE ON A DAY-TO-DAY BASIS THAT I WOULD LOOK AT [IT] AND THINK THAT YES, I CAN BE HERE, THIS IS MY SPACE, TOO. I WAS ABLE TO GO IN AND TALK MORE WITH PEOPLE AND BE MORE OPEN WITH PEOPLE ABOUT HOW I IDENTIFIED AND WHO I WAS.” “WHEN I GO TO PRIDE, I TRY TO WEAR AS MUCH PINK, YELLOW, AND BLUE AS I CAN BECAUSE THOSE ARE THE COLOURS OF THE PANSEXUAL PRIDE FLAG…I WEAR A LOT OF PINK, YELLOW AND BLUE WHEN IT COMES TO BEING PANSEXUAL PRIDE DAY…THAT’S JUST SOMETHING THAT IT GIVES ME A SENSE OF EMPOWERMENT WHEN I DO THAT. WHEN IT COMES TO PRIDE, I’LL WEAR MY PIN TO PRIDE, NORMALLY, FOR THE LAST TWO YEARS. I PICKED IT UP IN 2018 AND HAVE CONTINUED TO WEAR THAT. WHEN I WAS BACK [IN MY HOMETOWN FOR THE SUMMER], IMMEDIATELY AFTER PRIDE IN 2018, I HAD MY PIN ON MY PURSE, JUST HANGING…ATTACHED TO THE STRAP…AND I WOULD WEAR THAT OUT INTO THE COMMUNITY AND NO ONE EVER STOPPED ME TO ASK ME ABOUT IT BUT IT DIDN’T REALLY MATTER TO ME. I ENJOYED HAVING IT THERE AND I KEPT IT ON MY BAGS…I WOULD KEEP IT THERE UNTIL IT STARTED FALLING OFF.” “PEOPLE UP [IN MY HOMETOWN], I THINK, ARE VERY UNAWARE. SO THEY WOULD LOOK AT THAT AND [MIGHT] THINK, “NICE COLOURS,” BUT THAT WOULD BE ABOUT IT. THEY WOULDN’T [GENERALLY] UNDERSTAND WHAT THE COLOURS MEANT OR SYMBOLIZED. THEY MIGHT IF THEY SAW THE RAINBOW FLAG? I’M SURE THAT THEY WOULD KNOW WHAT [THE LGBTQ2S+ RAINBOW FLAG] MEANT BUT THEY WOULDN’T KNOW WHAT OTHER [PRIDE] FLAG COLOURS MEANT AND SYMBOLIZED.” ON HER ORIENTATIONS, SCHAMUHN SHARED, “[MY GENDER ORIENTATION] IS VISIBLE BECAUSE I’M CIS-GENDER. I’M A CIS-WOMAN SO EVERYTHING THAT I DO, EVERY WAY THAT I DRESS, EVERY WAY THAT I LOOK IS VERY VISIBLY, “YEAH, THAT’S A WOMAN. THAT’S A GIRL, RIGHT THERE.” IN TERMS OF MY SEXUAL ORIENTATION, I DON’T REALLY DO MUCH THAT SCREAMS, “I’M PANSEXUAL,” BECAUSE I DON’T REALLY THINK THAT THERE’S A WAY TO OPENLY SCREAM, “I’M PANSEXUAL,” VISIBLY WHICH IS ONE OF THE THINGS I THINK IS KIND OF NICE BECAUSE IT SAVED ME A LOT...” SCHAMUHN ELABORATED ON HER IDENTITY AS PANSEXUAL AND BEING OPENLY OUT, NOTING, “IT REALLY HAS MEANT, FOR ME, JUST KNOWING WHO I AM. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT I STRUGGLED WITH WHEN I WAS A VERY YOUNG TEENAGER…TRYING TO FIND A SENSE OF IDENTITY. TO KNOW THAT I’M QUEER, TO KNOW THAT I’M PANSEXUAL, TO KNOW AND ACCEPT THAT I’M ATTRACTED TO WHOM I’M ATTRACTED TO AND THAT IT’S FINE, THAT, TO ME, HAS JUST BEEN A SENSE THAT IT’S HEIGHTENED AND STRENGTHENED MY OWN IDENTITY THAT I CAN DIP INTO. KNOWING WHO I AM NOW, TO GET COURAGE TO GO OUT AND DO THINGS THAT SHOW WHO I AM…BEING QUEER HAS MEANT A LOT TO ME, IN THAT REGARD.” “I AM PRETTY NEW TO VISIBLY BEING OUT WITH PEOPLE IN LETHBRIDGE AND, AS A RESULT OF PRIDE, HAVE STARTED TAKING MORE ACTION, AS MUCH AS I CAN, TO SUPPORT QUEER COMMUNITIES…I HAVEN’T, I DON’T THINK, HAD TO DEAL WITH SOME OF THE HOMOPHOBIA IN THE COMMUNITY OR SOME OF THE CONSERVATISM IN THE COMMUNITY. I THINK THAT, IN TERMS OF THE LETHBRIDGE QUEER COMMUNITY, MY TIES TO IT ARE BEING A PERSON WHO IS VERY MUCH ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF IT AND WOULD LIKE TO BE LESS ON THOSE OUTSKIRTS OF IT AT THIS POINT IN TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW HOW IT IS IN MOST CITIES WITH UNIVERSITIES, BUT I WOULD SAY THAT THE ONLY DIFFERENCE THAT I WOULD ADD THERE IS THAT BEING QUEER IN LETHBRIDGE HAS MEANT THAT I’VE HAD A LOT MORE KNOWLEDGE. [COMING] OUT OF MY UNIVERSITY DEGREE AND BEING ON CAMPUS HAS LENT ME…MORE KNOWLEDGE THAT I’M VERY GRATEFUL FOR; [THAT] I CAN DRAW SOME MORE ON MY OWN IDENTITY FROM THAT KNOWLEDGE…BEING QUEER IN LETHBRIDGE HAS GIVEN ME THE MOTIVATION TO CHECK OUT BEING QUEER IN MORE PLACES; TO CHECK OUT QUEER HISTORIES AND TO REALLY, JUST LEARN AS MUCH AS I CAN ABOUT THE HISTORY OF QUEER COMMUNITIES AND TRY TO UNDERSTAND WHERE THEY’VE GROWN FROM AND WHERE THEY’RE GROWING TO AND THAT WAY, WHEN I LEAVE LETHBRIDGE, I KNOW THAT I CAN GO INTO OTHER COMMUNITIES AND DO MY BEST TO CONTINUE PURSUING THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT THAT THEY WANT TO SEE…I DON’T KNOW HOW IT IS IN PLACES LIKE CALGARY OR EDMONTON, AS WELL WITH OTHER STRONG UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS…WHAT THAT WOULD LOOK LIKE BUT I KNOW THAT BEING QUEER IN LETHBRIDGE HAS MEANT THAT TO ME; JUST KNOWLEDGE, IN GENERAL.” ON LETHBRIDGE AS A CITY TO BE QUEER IN, SCHAMUHN SHARED, “I THINK THAT LETHBRIDGE IS AN INTERESTING PLACE TO BE QUEER. I THINK THAT BECAUSE IT’S IN ALBERTA AND BECAUSE IT’S IN THE SOUTH OF ALBERTA…AND ALSO IT’S IN THE BIBLE BELT...IT’S AN INTERESTING PLACE, I THINK, TO BE QUEER AND TO BE VISIBLY QUEER BUT I ALSO THINK IT’S A GOOD PLACE TO BE QUEER BECAUSE YOU DO, I THINK, HAVE A STRONG COMMUNITY. FROM JUST WHAT I’VE HEARD AND WHAT PEOPLE’S PERCEPTIONS HAVE BEEN, IT DOES SEEM LIKE IT’S A STRONG COMMUNITY…AND IT’S GOT THE UNIVERSITY. IT’S A BIG UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE TOWN SO I THINK THAT THERE’S MORE [LGBTQ2S+] AWARENESS BECAUSE OF THAT.” “I THINK THAT [THE QUEER COMMUNITY IS] VERY ENCOURAGING TO SEE AND I THINK THAT IT GIVES A LOT OF HOPE AND INSPIRATION TO YOUTH WHO ARE COMING UP FROM HIGH SCHOOL AND COMING UP FROM JUNIOR HIGH AND I’M VERY ENTHUSIASTIC AND EXCITED TO SEE [THE ‘INQUEERIES’] EXHIBIT AND TO BE A PART OF IT BECAUSE I THINK THAT MORE VOICES NEED TO BE HEARD FOR THOSE YOUTH TO REALLY FIND THEIR OWN VOICES AND TO FIND THEIR OWN UNDERSTANDING OF WHO THEY ARE. FIND THEIR OWN IDENTITIES AND FIND THE SUPPORT THAT THEY NEED TO GET THAT COURAGE; TO STAND UP AND BE PROUD OF WHO THEY ARE.” “VISIBLY, I HAVEN’T NOTICED GROWTH OR CHANGES [IN THE LETHBRIDGE QUEER COMMUNITY] BECAUSE I’M NOT A PART OF THOSE COMMUNITIES, REALLY. I HAVEN’T BEEN ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN THEM SO I CAN’T SAY IF THEY’VE GROWN NOR IF THEY’VE SHRUNK. I THINK THAT…ONE THING THAT HAS GROWN HAS BEEN STUDENT VOICES IN TERMS OF GETTING INVOLVED AND SAYING, “LISTEN, WE NEED TO TAKE ACTION.” STUDENTS ARE GETTING MORE INVOLVED AND THAT’S FROM CHECKING OUT MEDIA COVERAGE AND EVEN DRIVING BY AND CHECKING OUT WHAT’S GOING ON IN TERMS OF PROTESTS. I NOTICED THAT A LOT OF YOUTH ARE GETTING INVOLVED; A LOT OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, EVEN AS FAR DOWN AS JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS. I NOTICED PARENTS GETTING THEIR YOUTH INVOLVED SO, EVEN AT PRIDE, THE AMOUNT OF FAMILIES THAT I SEE OUT THERE IS SO HEARTENING, BECAUSE YOU SEE KIDS WHO ARE FIVE YEARS OLD, SIX YEARS OLD, WHO ARE OUT THERE AND IT’S THEIR PARENTS SHOWING THEM THAT IT’S OKAY TO BE QUEER. IT’S OKAY, IT’S ACCEPTABLE, AND THIS IS A COMMUNITY THAT WILL SUPPORT YOU AND THAT YOU CAN ACCESS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190015001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190015002
Acquisition Date
2019-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1910 MILLINERY SHOP" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1910 MILLINERY SHOP" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“1910 MILLINERY SHOP” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (LADIES HAT SHOP), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1992. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A SHOP FRONT, DISPLAYING A MILLINERY STORE FRONT, SHOWCASING HATS ON WOMEN HAT MOUNTS AND PORTRAITS OF WOMEN IN HATS. IN THE FOREGROUND, SHOPPERS MILL IN FRONT OF THE WINDOWS. AT THE TOP OF THE PAINTING RUNS THE SHOP SIGN READING “MILLINERY SHOP”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PINK WASH, MARKING THE INSIDE OF THE SHOP THROUGH WINDOWS. IN THE BOTTOM OF THE RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “1910 MILLINERY SHOP IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1992” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLED EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT TOP CORNER BEARS A PARTIAL WATERMARK. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” OF THE IMAGE TITLED, “1910 MILLINERY SHOP,” MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINED, “THIS [IMAGE] WAS A COMMERCIAL, BECAUSE THAT WAS WOMEN’S HATS.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031004
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MARTIN'S PLAY AUCTION" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARTIN'S PLAY AUCTION" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1990
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (BOY WITH ANIMALS AND TOYS), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1990. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A YARD POPULATED WITH A BOY SURROUNDED BY ANIMALS AND TOYS. IN THE BACKGROUND RUNS A WHITE FENCE, OVER WHICH THE SKY AND TWO FIGURES CAN BE SEEN. SIGNS IN THE PAINTING READ “AUCTION SALE APRIL 2”, “AUCTION SALE MARCH 1”, AND “AUCTION SALE FEBRUARY 9”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PALE BEIGE WASH, MARKING THE YARD, AND THE UNPAINTED PAPER OF THE FENCE, WITH THE COLOUR RED IN THE BOY’S SHIRT AND MOST OF THE TOYS SURROUNDING HIM. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1990 WHEELERVILLE SERIES” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLED EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE TOP AND BOTTOM CORNERS. THE PAPER IS MINIMALLY WARPED, LIFTING AT THE EDGES AND CORNERS RATHER THAN LYING TOTALLY FLAT. THE BACK OF THE PAINTING HAS AN INK DRAWING ON IT, DEPICTING A HOUSE AND THREE FIGURES, ONE ON HORSE CARRIAGE. THE DRAWING IS UNFINISHED AND UNPAINTED.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE WORK TITLED, “MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION,” MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINED THAT HE DID NOT KNOW THE BOY THE WORK IS TITLED FOR. SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031005
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFE 1890S" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFE 1890S" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1991
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFÉ 1890’S” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (COWBOYS RAIDING), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1991. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A CAFÉ, FOCUSING ON THE FIGURES IN THE BUILDING. CHINESE CAFÉ WORKERS WEAR WHITE AND BLACK, LEAVING THE BUILDING AND TRYING TO ESCAPE THE COWBOYS, DRESSED IN COLOUR, WHO ARE DESTROYING THE FURNITURE AND WINDOWS, AND CUTTING OFF THE HAIR OF THE CHINESE CAFÉ WORKERS. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PALE YELLOW WASH, MARKING THE FLOOR, AND A PALE BLUE WASH, MARKING THE WALL AND WINDOWS. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFÉ 1890’S IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1991” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE, NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE TOP AND BOTTOM CORNERS. THE PAPER IS SLIGHTLY WARPED, LIFTING AT EDGES AND CORNERS RATHER THAN LYING FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS WORK COULD BE ALLUDING TO A REAL EVENT, WHICH TOOK PLACE IN LETHBRIDGE ON CHRISTMAS DAY 1907. ACCORDING TO THE LOCAL HISTORY BOOK, “LETHBRIDGE: A CENTENNIAL HISTORY,” BY ALEX JOHNSTON AND ANDY DEN OTTER (PUBLISHED 1983), A PATRON TO THE COLUMBIA RESTAURANT NAMED HARRY SMITH “QUARRELED WITH A CHINESE WAITER… THE WAITER, GREATLY PROVOKED, ATTACKED SMITH WITH A HAMMER. ALTHOUGH POLICE MANAGED TO END THE MATTER BEFORE ANYONE WAS HURT, THE RUMOR THAT SMITH HAD BEEN KILLED SPREAD LIKE WILDFIRE. A MOB DESCENDED ON THE RESTAURANT AND WRECKED IT. THE RIOTERS WERE ABOUT TO VANDALIZE THE ADJOINING PROPERTY WHEN MAYOR W. S. GALBRAITH ARRIVED AND, WITH THE AID OF MOUNTED POLICE, DISPERSED THEM.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031006
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SHOPPERS" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SHOPPERS" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“SHOPPERS” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – INTERIOR SCENE (FABRIC STORE), DR. IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1996. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHT, ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A FABRIC SHOP, SHOWING SHELVES OF ROLLED FABRIC AND THREE QUILTS HUNG ON THE BACK WALL. HUTTERITE WOMEN SHOP FOR AMONG THE FABRIC ROLLS, WHILE TWO MEN WAIT AT THE FRONT OF THE SHOP. OTHER FIGURES INCLUDE CASHIERS AND A WOMEN IN A PINK DRESS AND HIGH HEELS. SIGNS IN THE PAINTING READ “RODEO QUILT CONTEST”, “BE HAPPY WHILE YOU WORK”, “QUILT CONTEST”, “ODDS + ENDS”, “BARGAINS”, “ELASTIC”, “SCISSORS”, “NEEDLES”, “THREAD”, “THIMBLES”, “TAPE”, “PATTERNS”, “CASH REGISTER”, AND “SMILES ARE FREE”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A YELLOW WASH MARKING THE WALL, AND AN ORANGE-BROWN WASH MARKING THE FLOOR AND DRAWERS. MOST OF THE COLOUR IN THE PIECE IS FOUND IN THE ROLLS OF FABRIC IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PAINTING. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “SHOPPERS DR. IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1996” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND PARTIALLY WATER MARKED “FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT SIDE CORNER. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031007
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"AUNT DIANA'S QUILTING PARTY" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"AUNT DIANA'S QUILTING PARTY" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (QUILTING PARTY), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1992. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING, ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A HOME, SHOWING A RED AND WHITE QUILT SPREAD OVER CHAIRS AND WOMEN WORKING WITH AND AROUND IT. SOME WOMEN WORK ON THE QUILT WHILE OTHERS PLAY PIANO AND SING, POUR TEA, AND EAT AND DRINK AROUND THE ROOM. THE WOMEN SING “IT WAS FROM AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY I WAS SEEING NELLIE HOME”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A YELLOW WASH MARKING THE FLOOR OF THE ROOM, A BLUE WASH MARKING THE WALL OF THE ROOM, AND THE RED AND WHITE QUILT. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1992” IN PENCIL. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE BOTTOM CORNER. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” WHILE LOOKING AT THIS WORK, THE PAINTER’S SON EXPLAINED, “NOW MANY THINGS THAT SHE DID IN HER WORK WERE OUT OF [PROPORTION]. I THINK SHE WOULD CALL THEM A RELATIVE SIZE…THIS ONE HERE (“AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY”) THAT YOU’VE GOT WITH THE QUILTING; THAT’S ONE MIGHTY BIG BED. I CAN REMEMBER THEM MAKING QUILTS [AND] SEWING THEM TOGETHER. BACK IN HER TIME, YOU DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING… THIS ONE [REFLECTS MY MOTHER’S OWN LIFE, BECAUSE] THAT’S SOMETHING SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN. EVERYBODY MADE QUILTS. THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD ON YOUR BED. YOU TOOK PATCHES AND SEWED THEM TOGETHER.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031008
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170023004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
19
Description
BLACK FELT PATCH WITH RED HORSESHOE AT TOP, GOLD BISON HED IN CENTER, AND GOLD BANNER AT BASE; WHITE TEXT ON HORSESHOE READS “CALGARY”, GOLD TEXT BELOW BISON READS “GINGER ALE”, RED TEXT ON BANNER READS “LETHBRIDGE HOTEL” AND BLACK TEXT ON BANNER READS “LETHBRIDGE”. BACK OF PATCH HAS WHITE BACKING THAT IS DETACHING; BACKING EXTERIOR IS STAINED WITH BLACK MARKER AND BACKING INTERIOR IS STAINED FROM ADHESIVE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE PATCH, ALLEN RECALLED, “THIS IS THE CREST FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL. MY UNCLE TED [TED FISK] WHEN HE WAS YOUNG…WORKED FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL, AND HIS JOB WAS [HE DID ALL SORTS OF ODD-JOBS] TO GO WITH A CART AND A HORSE, OR LATER AN AUTOMOBILE, TO THE STATION TO PICK UP ARRIVING GUESTS, TAKE THEM FROM THERE WITH THEIR BAGS OVER TO THE HOTEL, GET THEM IN THERE, TAKE THEIR BAGS UP TO THE HOTEL. “ “THE STREETCARS CAME ALONG BY GALT GARDENS, SO [THE HOTEL] WAS DIRECTLY TO THE SOUTH OF GALT GARDENS…[IT WAS THE] GARDEN HOTEL.” “HE WAS A ROOM CLERK, UNTIL HE RETIRED. IN THOSE DAYS, HE WORKED 7 DAYS A WEEK, NO TIME OFF AT ALL, AND HE WORKED A 12 HOUR SHIFT. THEY LIVED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, SO THEY WALKED ACROSS THAT BRIDGE THAT WENT ACROSS THE TRACKS. HE WOULD HAVE TO DO THAT AT NIGHT BECAUSE, UNLESS HE WAS ON DAY SHIFT.” “I JUST KNOW THAT TED HAD IT, AND IT WAS GIVEN TO ME.” JOANNE ALLEN ADDED, “HE STARTED [AT THE HOTEL], AND THEN WORKED THERE UNTIL HE RETIRED IN HIS ‘60S.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE GARDEN HOTEL, WHERE EDWARD FISK WORKED AS A CLERK, WAS CONVERTED FROM A CHINA SHOP AND APARTMENTS INTO A HOTEL IN 1925. AL FREED (THE GARDEN HOTEL MANAGER) AND THE KIRKHAM BROTHERS (THOMAS S. AND J.S. KIRKHAM) FORMED THE GARDEN HOTEL COMPANY IN 1927 AND REMAINED THE OWNERS OF THE HOTEL UNTIL 1956. MRS. J.S. KIRKHAM, THEN PRESIDENT OF THE GARDEN HOTEL COMPANY, SOLD THE HOTEL IN 1956 TO A BOARD OF FOUR HOTELLIERS FROM ACROSS ALBERTA, WITH MORRIE MILNER AS MANAGER AND BOARD MEMBER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 17, 1927 NOTED THAT RENOVATIONS IN THE GARDEN HOTEL WERE COMPLETED TO INCLUDE A BEER PARLOR FOR GUESTS. ACCORDING TO A JANUARY 29, 1926 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY PURCHASED THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN 1926. CALGARY BREWING MAINTAINED OWNERSHIP OF THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL UNTIL 1964 WHEN THE HOTEL WAS SOLD TO SAM AND RICHARD SCHULTZ AND OSCAR SABASCH. THE SCHULTZ BROTHERS AND SABASCH OPERATED THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL UNDER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA HOTEL COMPANY LIMITED, AS NOTED IN A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM 1964 DOCUMENTING THE SALE. ALBERTA BREWERIES BECAME INVOLVED IN PURCHASING AND MANAGING HOTELS UNTIL 1957, WHEN THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT PASSED A LAW THAT HOTELS COULD NOT BE OWNED BY BREWERIES. BREWERIES HAD TEN YEARS TO SELL THEIR EXISTING HOTELS AND WERE UNABLE TO PURCHASE NEW HOTELS, ACCORDING TO THE MOLSON BREWERIES, WESTERN DIVISION FONDS HELD BY THE GLENBOW MUSEUM (HTTPS://WWW.GLENBOW.ORG/COLLECTIONS/SEARCH/FINDINGAIDS/ARCHHTM/MOLSON.CFM). FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023004
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RETRACTABLE BANNER
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VINYL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20180006007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RETRACTABLE BANNER
Date
2017
Materials
VINYL, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
199.6
Width
83.6
Description
WHITE VINYL VERTICAL BANNER. MULTICOLOUR BORDER AROUND TEXT, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF AND GREEN BANNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH WHITE TEXT “2017; LETHBRIDGE CELEBRATES CANADA 150; WWW.LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150”. BANNER BACKGROUND HIS WHITE AND PRINTED WITH LIGHT GREY ENTERTAINMENT SYMBOLS, INCLUDING GUITAR, KITE, GOLF TEE, SKATER, ETC. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS BLUE TEXT “#CANADA150YQL, #GETMOVINGYQL”. TOP OF BANNER HAS MULTICOLOURED CANADA 150 MAPLE LEAF, WITH BLUE TEXT “CANADA 150, LETHBRIDGE CELEBRATES THE SESQUICENTENNIAL!” BANNER HAS IMAGES OF CHILDREN PLAYING IN SPLASH PARK AND SKATING, WITH PINK TEXT ON GREEN TRIANGLE “FREE SWIM”, AND YELLOW TEXT ON BLUE TRIANGLE “FREE SKATE”. BANNER HAS BLUE TEXT BELOW IMAGES “FREE SESQUI SWIMS & SKATES ALL YEAR LONG!” RED TEXT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BANNER READS “CANADA 150, SATURDAY JULY, 1, 2017; HENDERSON LAKE – LETHBRIDGE; 2 STAGES / FOOD VENDOR HUB/ KIDZONE” WITH RED, WHITE AND BLUE SPEAKER IMAGES ON SIDES OF TEXT. BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “CHECK ONLINE FOR SPECIAL CANADA 150 EVENTS HAPPENING ALL YEAR LONG! WWW.LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150”. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF BANNER HAS IMAGE OF GREEN MOOSE WITH BLUE OUTLINE AND PINK SUNGLASSES, WITH ORANGE TEXT BUBBLE EXTENDED FROM MOOSE WITH BLUE BORDERS AND BLUE TEXT “FOR SO MUCH MORE!” BOTTOM EDGE HAS CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SEAL AND RECREATION AND CULTURE LOGO. RIGHT EDGE HAS TEAR IN VINYL; VINYL IS CREASED FROM FOLDING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
LEISURE
History
ON MARCH 29, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LORI HARASEM AND JENNIE SUDO REGARDING THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MEMORABILIA. HARASEM AND SUDO WERE INVOLVED WITH ORGANIZING THE JULY 1, 2017 EVENTS FOR CANADA 150, WITH SUDO ACTING AS CHAIR FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA DAY COMMITTEE WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND HARASEM AS A MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE. ON THE BANNER, HARASEM ELABORATED, “THIS WAS A BANNER THAT WE HAD TO PROMOTE, OBVIOUSLY CANADA DAY, BUT WE ALSO HAD IT AT OTHER EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR TO PROMOTE CANADA DAY. AT THE TOP, IT MENTIONS THE FREE SWIM AND SKATING AS WELL. THE BIGGEST THING FOR US WAS AT THE BOTTOM, THE URL WHERE WE HAD ALL THE INFORMATION, YEAR-ROUND ABOUT WHAT WAS GOING ON WHICH WAS THE LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150. THIS WAS OUR BANNER THAT WENT TO MANY PLACES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR; ANY TRADE SHOWS WE WENT TO, SO THAT PEOPLE WOULD BE AWARE WHERE TO FIND OUT INFORMATION ABOUT CANADA DAY AND OTHER ACTIVITIES THAT WERE GOING ON.” “IT WAS…A POP-UP BANNER THING THAT…YOU JUST PULL UP AND DOWN AS WE NEEDED AND TRANSPORTED AS ONE, ROLLED-UP PIECE AT EVENTS.” “WE MADE THE [ONLY] ONE BUT WE DO HAVE TWO [OTHER BANNERS]. ONE’S THE FREE SWIM AND ONE’S THE FREE SKATE. THESE WERE THE ONES THAT WOULD BE PUT OUT AT THE POOL OR AT THE ARENA THAT WAS HOSTING THAT DAY TO SAY, 'TODAY, FREE SWIM. CANADA 150 CELEBRATION.' THOSE TWO BANNERS WERE EXCLUSIVE JUST TO SWIMMING AND SKATING. THIS ONE WENT TO ALL ACROSS THE COMMUNITY, ALL YEAR-LONG.” “ERIC SHARP…DESIGNED ALL OF THE BANNERS, ALL THREE.” “THEY WERE ALL DONE LOCALLY, AND WE USE THEM A LOT BECAUSE THEY LET US TRANSITION OUT THE BASE, SO WE CAN RE-USE BASES AND WE NEED TO SAVE MONEY…SIGN SUPERSTORE…CREATED ALL THREE.” HARASEM AND SUDO RECALLED THEIR TIME PLANNING AND ORGANIZING THE 2017 EVENTS, WITH SUDO NOTING ABOUT THE PLANNING COMMITTEE, “THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA-DAY COMMITTEE IS A COMMITTEE THAT’S MADE UP OF CITY OF LETHBRIDGE EMPLOYEES IN PART WITH COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS. MY POSITION AS THE COORDINATOR OF RECREATION AND CULTURE, I AM AUTOMATICALLY VOLUNTEERED FOR THIS COMMITTEE ALONG WITH OUR RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM. THE CHAIRING RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THAT COMMITTEE GET ROTATED BETWEEN OUR TEAM MEMBERS EVERY TWO YEARS AND MY YEAR JUST SO HAPPENED TO FALL ON THIS VERY IMPORTANT, NOSTALGIC YEAR FOR CANADA’S 150.” “[THE COMMITTEE IS] ALWAYS IN EXISTENCE. I THINK [THERE] WAS A LOT OF PRESSURE, BUT REALLY GREAT PRESSURE. I WAS VERY PROUD TO BE ABLE TO BE PART OF THE COMMITTEE. AND BEING ABLE TO LEAD THE TEAM FOR MY VERY FIRST TURN AT CHAIRING THE COMMITTEE. I FELT A LOT OF PRIDE TO BE ABLE TO SHOW THAT OUR COMMUNITY CAN COME TOGETHER AND CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150.” “[THE] COMMITTEE [WAS] COMPRISED OF THE RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM, WHICH WAS TWO MANAGERS, LORI HARASEM AND JASON FREUND, MYSELF AS THE CHAIR FOR [2017]. WE ALSO [HAD] MARLENE LAPOINTE, SARAH BURTON, SCOTT CARPENTER AND ONE OF OUR TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES, ERIC SHARP, [AS] PART OF THE COMMITTEE AS FAR AS THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SIDE GOES. WE ALSO HAD THREE PUBLIC VOLUNTEERS FROM THE COMMUNITY. WE HAD ADELLE HARRINGTON, BOBBY MCCALLUM AND DAVID FRITZ WHO ALSO PLAYED A HUGE ROLE IN HELPING COORDINATE SOME OF THE ACTIVITIES THERE.” “AS SOON AS CANADA DAY 2016 ENDED, WE WERE ALREADY THINKING ABOUT WHAT WE WERE GOING TO BRING BACK, WHAT KIND OF BUDGET WE WERE GOING TO NEED, WHAT KIND OF ACTIVITIES WE WERE GOING TO HAVE, HOW WE WERE GOING TO MAKE IT SPECIAL, AND MAKE IT STAND OUT THE NEXT YEAR…FOR THE REST OF THE CANADA DAY [EVENTS], THE ONES THAT AREN’T CANADA 150 OR STAND-OUT, WE WOULD PROBABLY ONLY START [PLANNING] ABOUT SIX MONTHS IN ADVANCE. BUT, THE PLANNING PROCESS FOR CANADA DAY, PERIOD, IS QUITE LONG AND STRENUOUS. WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT SOME PRETTY TIGHT TIMELINES WHEN WE’RE TALKING ABOUT PLANNING AN EVENT THAT BIG. WE DEFINITELY NEEDED THE FULL YEAR TO PLAN CANADA 150.” “CURRENTLY, THE ONLY SPECIAL EVENT THAT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REALLY HOSTS, AS A CORPORATION, IS THE CANADA DAY EVENT. WE RELY ON OUR COMMUNITY GROUPS TO DO MOST OF OUR OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS." ON THE EVENTS PLANNED, HARASEM RECALLED, “IN ALL HONESTY, FOR THE CANADA DAY ACTIVITIES ITSELF, THOUGH I’M ON THE COMMITTEE, I’M NOT AS INVOLVED WITH THAT AS OTHER THINGS THAT I OVERSAW THAT LASTED FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST. SEEING JENNIE AND THE TEAM AND HOW MUCH THEY WORKED…THEY EVEN CHANGED THE LAYOUT AT HENDERSON LAKE THAT HAD BEEN THE SAME WAY FOREVER AND WE HAD TO GO TO SENIOR LEADERS OF THE CITY AND ASK FOR EXTRA MONEY BECAUSE THE BUDGET FOR CANADA DAY HASN’T CHANGED FOR TWELVE OR FIFTEEN YEARS. TO PUT ON SOMETHING THAT WE KNEW THE PUBLIC EXPECTED A LOT [FROM]…[WAS] MY BIGGEST ROLE WITH THE CANADA DAY. IT WAS A HUGE AMOUNT OF WORK AND IT WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, ESPECIALLY ON THE SOCIAL MEDIA SIDE. AT THE CITY, WE’RE USED TO SEEING A LOT OF NEGATIVE COMMENTS. OUR COMMUNICATIONS TEAM HAS SAID THAT THE MOST POSITIVE COMMENTS THEY’VE EVER HAD ON ANYTHING THAT THEY’VE EVER POSTED ON THEIR FACEBOOK WAS AFTER THE CANADA DAY. I THINK THAT THEIR TEAM, JENNIE’S TEAM, DID AMAZING AT MEETING THE EXPECTATIONS OF THE PUBLIC WHICH WERE VERY HIGH.” “I CAME IN [WITH THE COMMUNITY GROUPS ORGANIZING]. WE HAD A GRANT, ‘CANADA 150’. WE HAD EXTRA FUNDING INJECTED INTO OUR BUDGET FOR 2017 [AT] OUR REQUEST, SO THAT WE COULD HELP LOCAL GROUPS THAT WERE ALREADY DOING EVENTS TO THEME IT AROUND CANADA 150. NORMALLY, THE CITY’S RULES IS YOU CAN ONLY GET ONE GRANT FOR ANY EVENT, EVEN THOUGH THERE’S MULTIPLE GRANTS AVAILABLE. BUT, FOR CANADA 150, WE ALLOWED GROUPS TO GET THEIR NORMAL GRANT, AND WE ALLOWED THEM TO ASK FOR UP TO $750 EXTRA, AND THAT WOULD ALLOW THEM TO THEN THEME THEIR EVENT. WE DIDN’T CARE HOW THEY DID THAT. IF THEY WANTED TO USE $750 TO BUY RED AND WHITE CUPCAKES AND BALLOONS [THEY COULD]. WE HAD [AT THE] JAPANESE GARDEN A HUNDRED AND FIFTY JAPANESE DANCERS PERFORMING AND THEY BOUGHT SPECIAL RED MATCHING JACKETS WITH THE MONEY THEY GOT. IT WAS OUR WAY OF ENCOURAGING THE COMMUNITY TO CELEBRATE CANADA 150 ALL YEAR-ROUND. BECAUSE ALL WE DO IS CANADA DAY, WE HAD TO FIND A WAY TO HELP THE COMMUNITY CELEBRATE CANADA 150 AND TO PUT IT IN THE PUBLIC’S EYES ALL YEAR-ROUND IN ANY WAY WE COULD. WE HAD A LOT OF GROUPS AND A LOT OF EVENTS. THERE WAS THIRTY-EIGHT EVENTS THAT RECEIVED FUNDING OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR, SO THERE WAS SOMETHING EVERY MONTH OF THE YEAR.” “DURING 'PRETTY, WITTY AND GAY', WHICH IS AN EVENT THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY PUTS ON IN FEBRUARY/MARCH, THEY USED THEIR FUNDING TO [HAVE] A BIG BULLETIN BOARD WHERE PEOPLE [COULD] WRITE DOWN THEIR THOUGHTS ABOUT WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO BE GAY IN CANADA. AND TO SHARE THEIR FEELINGS ON [BEING GAY IN CANADA] TO CONNECT BECAUSE, OBVIOUSLY, WE’RE A MORE OPEN-MINDED COUNTRY AROUND THAT THAN MOST OF THE WORLD. THAT, TO ME, WAS A REALLY UNIQUE WAY TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD A SMALL THEATRE GROUP COME TOGETHER, A COLLECTIVE THAT HAD NEVER EXISTED BEFORE. THEY PUT ON A VERY CONTROVERSIAL PLAY ABOUT FORMER PRIME MINISTER STEPHEN HARPER WHICH I WENT TO SEE AND IT WAS PRETTY SMALL. IT WASN’T THIS HUGE PLAY WHICH IS DONE IN CASA IN THE BLACK BOX [THE COMMUNITY ATB ROOM] BUT IT WAS FUNNY. IT WAS VERY CONTROVERSIAL AND WE DID PUT SOME MONEY BEHIND THAT.” “[THERE WAS] UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURS. I HAD SO MANY NEIGHBOUR DAYS. BUT WITH NEIGHBOUR DAY BEING A VERY POPULAR EVENT IN JUNE, AND WE’VE GOT MORE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS FORMING, WE REALLY ENCOURAGED THE NEIGHBOURHOODS TO APPLY FOR THE GRANT. MOST OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS, AT THIS POINT, THEIR NEIGHBOUR DAY EVENTS ARE PRETTY SMALL, UNDER A HUNDRED PEOPLE. BUT IT’S THE PERFECT PLACE TO CELEBRATE CANADA DAY AND CELEBRATE YOUR NEIGHBOURS. OF COURSE, UPPER VICTORIA PARK IS THE ‘GO BIG OR GO HOME’ NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION FOR NEIGHBOUR DAY. IT’S EXCITING WHENEVER WE’RE ABLE TO SUPPORT THE THEME OF THE EVENT IN ANY WAY BECAUSE WE KNOW THAT PEOPLE FROM EVEN OUTSIDE LETHBRIDGE ATTEND THAT EVENT. WE’RE NOT JUST SUPPORTING THE MEMBERS OF UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION WHEN WE SUPPORT SOMETHING, SO IT WAS NEAT TO BE ABLE TO PUT SOME MONEY THERE.” “OF COURSE, WINTER LIGHTS FESTIVAL AT JAPANESE GARDEN IS A VERY NEW EVENT. THIS WAS ONLY ITS SECOND YEAR, EVER. THOUGH IT IS A TRADITIONAL, JAPANESE, CULTURAL WINTER EVENT, WE WERE ABLE TO GIVE THEM SOME FUNDING, TOO, BECAUSE THEY ACTUALLY [HAD] THE FIRST EVENT IN 2017 BECAUSE THEY START IN EARLY DECEMBER AND GO TILL FEBRUARY. THEY WERE THE LAST EVENT, ‘CAUSE THEY WERE ON NEW YEAR’S EVE IN 2017. THAT FESTIVAL, THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF IT, KICKED OFF THE BEGINNING OF CANADA 150 AND ENDED CANADA 150 FOR US. IT WAS NEAT TO HAVE SUCH AN IMPORTANT CULTURAL GROUP AND ATTRACTION IN LETHBRIDGE…BE THE FOCUS OF THAT. THERE WERE EVENTS OF ALL SIZES. WE EVEN HAD THE DOGS THAT [ON] THE LAST DAY OF OPERATIONS [AT WESTMINSTER POOL] IS JUST FOR DOGS. EVEN THE HUMANE SOCIETY GOT MONEY TO [HAVE] DOG CANDIES THAT WERE RED AND WHITE…DOG TREATS DECORATED WITH RED AND WHITE BALLOONS AND RIBBONS. I WENT TO IT AND IT WAS HILARIOUS. THE DOGS [TOOK] OVER THE POOL AND THEY’RE SO HAPPY, IN CELEBRATION OF CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD FREE SWIMMING AND SKATING THROUGHOUT THE YEAR THAT THE CITY SPONSORED AS A CELEBRATION. THAT WAS BECAUSE WE OBVIOUSLY WANT PEOPLE TO BE ACTIVE AND WE WANT PEOPLE TO USE OUR FACILITIES, AND WE KNOW THAT COSTS CAN BE A BARRIER. EVERY MONTH WE HAD AT LEAST ONE FREE SWIMMING WHERE THE FIRST HUNDRED AND FIFTY PEOPLE WERE FREE. IN THE SUMMER THAT INCLUDED BOTH OF THE OUTDOOR POOLS, HENDERSON AND WESTMINSTER. HENDERSON WAS REALLY POPULAR ‘CAUSE IT’S ONLY SECOND YEAR OF OPERATIONS…IT’S STILL [A] VERY POPULAR PLACE TO GO. THEN, WE HAD FREE SKATING AT ALL OUR ARENAS, INCLUDING THE NEW ATB CENTRE AND WE HAD THOSE AT LEAST [ONCE] A WEEK THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE YEAR. THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN LETHBRIDGE GOT TO PARTICIPATE IN SWIMMING OR SKATING FOR FREE AS [PART OF THE] CELEBRATION. AT SOME OF THOSE, WE HANDED OUT LITTLE CANADA FLAGS OR CANADA TATTOOS OR HAD BALLOONS.” ON THE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MATERIALS TO THE MUSEUM, HARASEM NOTED, “I BELIEVE THAT THIS IS IMPORTANT TO GO TO THE GALT BECAUSE I KNOW THAT WHEN WE FIRST REALIZED WE NEEDED TO DO SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE THE 150TH, THE FIRST THING WE DID WAS LOOK BACK TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED AT THE 100TH AND WHAT WE HAD IN THE MUSEUM AND ELSEWHERE IN LETHBRIDGE FOR CELEBRATIONS THAT OCCURRED AT THAT TIME. [WE WERE LOOKING TO] SEE IF THERE WERE THINGS THAT WE COULD MIMIC OR SHOULD KNOW ABOUT. WE USED A LOT OF PHOTOS THROUGH OUR REC AND CULTURE GUIDE FOR THAT YEAR TO REMIND PEOPLE THAT, FIFTY YEARS AGO WAS THE BIG CENTENNIAL. WE THOUGHT THAT WHEN THE 200TH COMES, THAT PEOPLE WOULD PROBABLY BE WANTING TO LOOK BACK TO 2017 TO SEE WHAT HAD HAPPENED.” SUDO ADDED, “I THINK CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL [150TH ANNIVERSARY] WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER BECAUSE FIFTY YEARS IS A LONG TIME AND A LOT HAPPENS IN FIFTY YEARS. IT’S GREAT TO BE ABLE TO LOOK BACK AT ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE DID FOR CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL AND REMEMBER ALL OF THE HARD WORK, AND THE COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER AND SHOWING THEIR CANADIAN PRIDE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180006007-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180006007
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.2
Width
48.4
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN BROWN WOODEN FRAME. PAINTING DEPICTS TWO CLUSTERS OF TREES WITH GREEN AND YELLOW-ORANGE LEAVES, WITH A BROWN FOREGROUND AND BLUE BACKGROUND. BACKGROUND HAS TWO TONES OF BLUE DEPICTING HILLS AND SKY. FOREGROUND HAS RED AND GOLD TONES. BRUSH STROKES ARE DISTINCT SHOWING GRASS IN FOREROUND; PAINTING HAS PAINT APPLIED HEAVILY TO YELLOW-ORANGE TREE LEAVES. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLUE IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF CANVAS “M. PISKO”. FRAME AROUND CANVAS IS BROWN WITH DOUBLE-CIRCLES ENGRAVED BETWEEN DOUBLE LINES ALONG TRIM; FRAME HAS FOUR SCREWS LOCATED AT UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. BACK OF FRAME HAS CARDBOARD BACKING SECURED TO WOODEN FRAME WITH SILVER TAPE. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL ON LEFT SIDE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “MIKE PISKO, 1998 $100.00”; CARDBOARD BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL IN UPPER LEFT CORNER “TRUCK [UNDERLINED], 01 0066”. FRONT OF CANVAS HAS YELLOW DISCOLORATION AND STAINING IN UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. FRONT OF FRAME HAS MINOR CHIPPING AND DENTS ALONG OUTER EDGES. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS BROWN AND BLUE STAINING; BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE STAINING ALONG LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND BLUE STAINING AT UPPER LEFT EDGE; UPPER RIGHT EDGE OF FRAME IS SPLITTING ALONG SEAM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING PISKO OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
34.2
Length
49.3
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN WHITE WOODEN FRAME. IMAGE OF TREES AND HOUSES IN SNOW, WITH SIDE OF BUILDING AT LEFT EDGE AND HOUSE PILLAR AT RIGHT EDGE; HOUSES WHITE WITH RED-BROWN ROOFS IN BACKGROUND, AND TREES IN FOREGROUND. SNOW COMPRISED OF BLUE AND WHITE PAINT; TREES COMPLETED IN BLACK, GREEN, BROWN AND ORANGE TONES; HOUSE PILLAR AND SIDING IN BROWN AND GREEN. PAINTING SIGNED IN RED IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “E.E. RIETHMAN”. MID-GROUND HAS BROWN FENCE BETWEEN TREES AND BUILDINGS IN BACKGROUND. FRONT OF FRAME HAS WHITE TRIM ALONG FRONT OF CANVAS, WITH GOLD TRIM ABOVE WHITE TRIM; FRAME PAINTED OFF-WHITE. BACK OF PAINTING HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH TWO BLACK METAL SCREW ON UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, WITH WHITE CORD FASTENED TO SCREWS. LEFT EDGE OF BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER “OWNED BY H. FLAIG 3279791, NF5”; BACKING HAS STAMPED TEXT IN FADED INK ALONG LOWER EDGE “GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, 310 – 7TH ST. SOUTH – LETHBRIDGE”. BACKING HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL AT UPPER EDGE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “$20.00 /1970”; BACKING HAS PRINTED ARTICLE IN CENTER ON WHITE PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT “ERNEST E. RIETHMAN, EXHIBITION APRIL 25 – MAY 31 ORGANIZED BY THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY WITH FUNDING ASSISTANCE FROM THE ALBERTA ART FOUNDATION…” WITH BIOGRAPHY ON ERNEST E. RIETHMAN BY “BRENT LAYCOCK, GUEST CURATOR” AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO “WATERTON LAKE, C.1958, OIL ON PANEL, 56 X 86 CM, COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. DON AND JUDY NILSSON, PHOTO: DON CORMAN”. PAPER BACKING HAS TEARS BESIDE SCREWS; BACKING HAS YELLOWED MASKING TAPE ALONG LOWER EDGE OF PAPER ARTICLE; ARTICLE EDGES STAINED YELLOW FROM ADHESIVE RESIDUE. BACK OF FRAME HAS PAIRS OF METAL NAILS IN UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS, WITH NAILS HEADS COVERED WITH BROWN PAINT. BACK OF FRAME IS STAINED AND CHIPPED AT EDGES AND CORNERS; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BROWN AND WHITE STAINING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “ “VIEW FROM THE PORCH” WOULD HAVE BEEN UP IN THE HOUSE FOR QUITE A WHILE. THAT’S VERY FAMILIAR TO ME. IT’S CERTAINLY THE STYLE OF [ART] THAT THEY WOULD DO. MOM WAS ALWAYS MENTIONING THE OIL. IT’S THE KIND OF [ART] THEY WOULD HAVE DONE, THAT THEY WOULD HAVE LIKED.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.7
Width
51.3
Description
PENCIL SKETCH ON PAPER INSIDE FRAME WITH METAL EDGES AND GLASS COVERING. SKETCH OF A SMALL CHILD ASLEEP HOLDING A DOLL, WITH A REVOLVER BESIDE THE DOLL. SKETCH UNSIGNED, ATTRIBUTED TO E.E. RIETHMAN. SKETCH INSIDE WHITE MATTE WITH BLACK INNER TRIM, WITH GLASS FRONT TO FRAME. FRAME SILVER METAL WITH FLORAL PATTERNED TRIM AROUND INSIDE. BACK OF FRAME HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH SILVER LOOP-SCREW AT LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES, WITH SILVER METAL WIRES ATTACTED TO SCREWS. BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER “BY E. RIETHMAN” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT LOWER-MIDDLE “OWNED BY H. FLAIG, 3279791, NF5.”. LOWER EDGE OF BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “M.G.M. WALL DÉCOR, 317 – 4TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB, 328-0923” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK ON LABEL “$120.00”. BACKING HAS FOLDED CORNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND TEAR IN PAPER AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. FRONT OF SKETCH HAS GREEN STAINING AT RIGHT EDGE, BLUE-GREY STAIN AT LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND GREY STAINS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF IMAGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE SKETCH BY ERNEST RIETHMAN, FLAIG RECALLED, ““THE BOY AND THE TEDDY BEAR”, I WONDER IF MOM DIDN’T HAVE THAT BECAUSE SHE WAS THINKING OF ME. IT LOOKS A LITTLE BIT LIKE I MIGHT HAVE LOOKED, AS A KID, AND I WOULD HAVE BEEN VERY YOUNG AT THAT TIME I THINK THIS ONE WAS DONE.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MASKINOGE #14"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, PAINT, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190001008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MASKINOGE #14"
Date
2002
Materials
CANVAS, PAINT, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
28
Width
35.6
Description
OIL PAINTING ON CANVAS; PAINTING DEPICTS A LIGHT WHITE, PINK, AND GREY SKY WITH GREY-PINK MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND, PINK, BLUE, GREY, GREEN, AND BROWN HILLS IN THE MIDGROUND, AND WHITE AND RED TREES IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER ON YELLOW, WHITE, AND BROWN GRASS IN THE FOREGROUND. CANVAS PAINTING WRAPS AROUND THE EDGES OF THE FRAME; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER LEFT CORNER, “© KAREN BROWNLEE, 2002 34”. BACK OF PAINTING IS OPEN TO SHOW THE CANVAS WRAPPED AROUND AN UNPAINTED WOOD FRAME; CANVAS IS STAPLED TO THE FRAME AT CORNERS AND ON TOP AND LEFT SIDES. BACK HAS WIRE STRETCHED FROM LEFT EDGE TO THE RIGHT EDGE AND FASTENED WITH HOOKS IN WOOD FRAME. BACK OF CANVAS HAS BLACK MARKER TEXT, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, “OIL ON CANVAS, 11” X 14”, KAREN BROWNLEE EOW #343, 34, MASKINONGE #14”. TOP EDGE OF FRAME HAS A WHITE CARD STAPLED TO THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER, WITH BLACK AND BLUE TEXT, “KAREN M. BROWNLEE, B.A., A.S.A., PUBLISHED, PROFESSIONAL VISUAL ARTIST & ILLUSTRATOR, PH: (403) 327-0519 EMAIL: KAREN@KARENBROWNLEE.COM, WEBSITE: WWW.KARENBROWNLEE.COM”, AND CARD FEATURES TWO IMAGES OF PAINTINGS. BACK OF CANVAS IS STAINED WITH PAINT AND HAS FRAYING EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘MASKINOGE #14’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS OIL WAS PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER, WITH THE FLYING ANTS DESCRIBED IN THE WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR ARTIST STATEMENT.” “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001008
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"BELLY RIVER AREA S.W."
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"BELLY RIVER AREA S.W."
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.3
Width
57.7
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A BLUE, YELLOW, AND PINK SKY IN THE BACKGROUND, WITH RED-BROWN AND GREEN HILLS, GREEN TREES AND HILLS IN THE MIDGROUND, AND YELLOW, ORANGE, RED, AND BROWN TREES ON GREEN GRASS IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “KAREN BROWNLEE 1996 ©, BELLY RIVER AREA S.W. NO #1”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA S.W. AD 41, 1996 © KAREN BROWNLEE IMAGE SIZE 12” X 18”, WINSOR & NEWTON WATERCOLOR A+AA, ON 300LB ARCHES, PAINTED ON LOCATION, EOW #220”. BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE AT CORNERS; FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING AT LOWER LEFT CORNER; LEFT, UPPER, AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; PAPER HAS STAMP IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER, “ARCHES”; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘BELLY RIVER AREA S.W.’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS PAINTING IS STARTED ON SITE, JUST OFF THE HIGHWAY THAT LEADS TO THE U.S. AUTUMN BELLY RIVER AREA WAS FINISHED IN THE STUDIO. IT WAS THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. THE COLORS WERE GREAT. THE SNOW HAD YET TO FALL. THE WIND HAD NOT BLOWN OFF THE BEAUTIFULLY COLORED LEAVES. “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES"
Date
2007
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
57.8
Width
76.7
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A BLUE SKY WITH CLOUDS AND GREEN TREES IN BACKGROUND, GREEN AND WHITE BUILDING IN MIDGROUND WITH RED AND WHITE SIGN “SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL” AND BLACK AND WHITE SIGN “ROOMS FOR RENT $250/MO JAM SESSIONS $3 COVER” AND MEN GATHERED OUTSIDE BESIDE PARKED MOTORCYCLES, AND FOREGROUND SHOWING A MAN KNEELING BESIDE A MOTORCYCLE ON A DIRT STREET, WITH TWO BROWN-BLACK RABBITS IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT LOWER RIGHT EDGE, “© KAREN BROWNLEE 2007, SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES”. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING HAS INVERTED STAMP IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, “AQUARELLE ARCHES”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS MINOR STAINING; EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; FRONT HAS MINOR PAINT LOSS AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BIKERS AND BUNNIES’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “MY MOTHER’S SISTER AND HER HUSBAND (DOT “DOC” AND HELEN PETERSON) OPERATED THE GARAGE NORTH OF THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. IT WAS A VERY FAMILIAR PLACE TO ME BECAUSE MY AUNTY HELEN FREQUENTLY BABYSAT ME. I REMEMBER GETTING GAS AT THE STATION, AND ASKING MY PARENTS/AUNTY HELEN FOR CHOCOLATE BARS AND OTHER TREATS.” “THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL AND GARAGE SHARED THE SAME GRAVEL PARKING AREA. THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL WAS A LANDMARK, IT ANSWERED THE CHILDHOOD QUESTION OF ‘WHEN ARE WE GOING TO GET THERE.’ THE PLACE WAS FULL OF CARS, MOTORCYCLES, AND PEOPLE COMING AND GOING. SOMETIMES THEY’D COME TO MY UNCLE’S GARAGE FOR GAS.” “I HAD ALWAYS MEANT TO STOP AND PHOTOGRAPH THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. ONE SUNDAY, WHILE DRIVING OUR SON, LOGAN, TO A HOCKEY GAME IN PICTURE BUTTE: WE WERE EARLY ENOUGH FOR ME TO STOP, AMIDST THE BOYS COMPLAINTS. HOW DOES A PARENT COMPARE TO A FUN HOCKEY DRESSING ROOM FULL OF BOYS?” “THERE WAS NO ONE AROUND THE HOTEL. IT WAS STILL EARLY AUTUMN, OCTOBER 2006 AND THE TREES HAD FOLIAGE. I COMPOSED A FEW POINT AND SHOOT SHOTS, AND OFF TO THE RINK WE WENT.” “JAN. 9, 2007 THE SEVENTY YEAR OLD SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL BURNED TO THE GROUND. I FELT COMPELLED TO PAINT THE HOTEL, AND MADE A TRIP OUT TO THE GENERAL STORE ACROSS THE STREET—WHICH HAD COFFEE AND TABLES FOR PEOPLE TO SIT DOWN AND CHEW THE FAT. THAT’S WHAT I DID. AND LEARNED HOW THE TOWN WAS OVERRUN WITH RABBITS—FROM A FEW DOMESTICATED ONES THAT FOUND FREEDOM SEVERAL YEARS AGO.” “THAT IS HOW I CAME TO PAINT MOTORCYCLES, PEOPLE, AND RABBITS IN THE FOREGROUND OF THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. THE FOREGROUND OF THE PAINTING DID NOT EXIST IN MY PHOTOGRAPHS. I ADDED PEOPLE, MOTORCYCLES AND RABBIT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CAMERON LAKE IN FALL"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190001003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CAMERON LAKE IN FALL"
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
57.4
Width
76.2
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER; PAINTING DONE IN POINTILLISM STYLE DEPICTING A BLUE SKY AND BLUE-GREEN HILLS IN BACKGROUND, WITH GREEN, ORANGE, AND BLUE TREES ON GRASS ABOVE A BLUE LAKE IN THE MIDGROUND, AND GREEN, ORANGE, YELLOW, PURPLE, AND PINK TREES ON GRASS ABOVE THE LAKE IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “CAMERON LAKE IN FALL, © KAREN BROWNLEE, 1992”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG THE LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “IMAGE SIZE 21” X 28”, WATERCOLOR + GOUACHE ON 300LB FABRIANO, CAMERON LAKE IN FALL, K. BROWNLEE, 1992 ©, EOW #163”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS MINOR LOSS IN PAPER AT LOWER LEFT CORNER; BACK HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE ALONG EDGES AND CORNERS; UPPER AND LOWER EDGES OF THE PAINTING ARE WORN; UPPER EDGE OF PAINTING HAS MINOR LOSS IN PAPER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘CAMERON LAKE IN FALL’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS PAINTING WAS STARTED ON LOCATION EN PLEIN AIR. THE LIGHT QUICKLY CHANGED, FORCING ME TO FINISH IT IN THE STUDIO.” “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001003
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

1697 records – page 1 of 85.