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Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
29
Width
11.4
Description
BLUE WEDGE CAP WITH FOLDED EDGE SEWN AROUND CAP; FRONT OF CAP HAS TWO BRASS BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH CROWN OVER EAGLE IN FLIGHT AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS METAL SEAL ON BLACK BACKGROUND; SEAL SHOWS BRASS, RED, AND SILVER CROWN OVER A BRASS FLYING EAGLE OVER FOUR BRASS LEAF FRONDS TIED IN THE CENTER. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH RED SILK AND DISCOLOURED VELVET EDGING; TOP OF INSIDE HAS FOLD IN SILK WITH “MATHESON” WRITTEN ON EITHER SIDE IN BLACK MARKER. INSIDE CAP HAS DISCOLOURED GREY TAG WITH BLUE STITCHED EDGING AND BLUE AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT “THE MUIR BRAND, EST. 1875, MUIR CAP & REGALIA LTD., SI SIMCOE ST. TORONTO”. INSIDE LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS HOLE IN VELVET LINING; INSIDE BACK OF CAP HAS FRAYING ALONG VELVET EDGING; CAP IS FADED ON OUTSIDE AND HAS SOILING ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE WEDGE CAP, MATHESON RECALLED, “[THIS IS THE ORIGINAL] FROM THE R.C.A.F. RIGHT FROM DAY ONE.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE CAP, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
79
Width
47
Description
BLUE COTTON JACKET WITH BLUE SILK LINING; JACKET HAS FIVE POCKETS ON FRONT WITH TWO UPPER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, TWO LOWER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, AND ADDITION POCKET ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH NO COVER FLAP. JACKET HAS FOUR ADDITIONAL BUTTONS FOR FASTENING RUNNING DOWN RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH BUTTON HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SIDE; ALL BUTTONS ON JACKET ARE BRASS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE, OVER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. JACKET SLEEVES HAVE DOUBLE BLACK STRIPES AROUND CENTER BLUE STRIPE ABOVE CUFFS [SECOND LIEUTENANT BARS]; SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE PATCHES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA”. FRONT LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF JACKET HAS BADGE WITH BLUE BACKGROUND SEWN ON; BADGE SHOWS RED AND BRASS CROWN OVER WHITE AND BLACK GLOBE WITH RED LIGHTING BOLT ACROSS FRONT, WITH BRASS WINGS OUTSTRETCHED AND LAUREL LEAVES AROUND GLOBE AT INSIDE OF WINGS [AIRBORNE INTERCEPTOR BADGE]. BACK OF JACKET HAS TWO BLACK BELT LOOPS AT SIDES. INSIDE RIGHT-WEARING SIDE IS POCKET SEWN INTO LINING; OUTSIDE OF POCKET HAS WHITE LABEL WITH STITCHED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING HAS RIP AT TOP OF SPLIT AT BACK; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE JACKET, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE JACKET, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY, ESPECIALLY THIS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
119
Width
48
Description
BLUE WOOL COAT WITH TWO POCKETS ON FRONT AND TWO BRASS BUTTONS ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE AND THREE BRASS BUTTONS ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; BRASS BUTTONS ALL HAVE EMBOSSED CROWN AT TOP WITH FLYING EAGLE UNDER, AND LOWER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SLEEVES HAVE THREE BRASS BUTTONS DOWN CUFFS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE BADGES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA” AND EPAULETS ATTACHED DISPLAYING TWO BLACK STRIPES AND MIDDLE BLUE STRIPE [SECOND LIEUTENANT STRIPES]. INSIDE OF JACKET HAS BLUE SILK LINING; LEFT-WEARING SIDE ON INSIDE HAS A POCKET AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON; TAG SEWN ONTO INSIDE POCKET IS WHITE WITH RED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING IS STAINED GREEN AT COLLAR AND ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; OUTSIDE OF COAT HAS SOILING AND STAINING ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE COAT, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE COAT, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
10
Length
9.5
Width
3.8
Description
FIGURINE OF ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE OFFFICER ON BLACK HORSE; OFFICER IS PAINTED TO WEAR BROWN ROUND-BRIM HAT, RED SERGE JACKET, NAVY BREECHES, AND BROWN BOOTS. HORSE IS PAINTED BLACK WITH GREY AND BROWN SADDLE AND BRIDLE; FIGURINE IS FIXED TO GREY RECTANGULAR BASE WITH TEXT STAMPED ON BOTTOM “LINEOL, GERMANY”. OFFICER IS DETCHABLE AND SECURES TO HORSE WITH METAL PEG. PAINT IS SCRAPED AND PEELED ON FIGURINE; HORSE’S LEGS ALL HAVE CRACKS RUNNING THROUGH; BASE IS CRACKED FROM EDGE TO HORSE’S FRONT LEFT LEG AND HIND RIGHT LEG; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
MILITARY
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RCMP FIGURINE, ALLEN RECALLED, “THESE TWO MOUNTED POLICE ITEMS, THE BANNER AND THE LITTLE STATUETTE…I WAS YOUNG, IN THE PERIOD FROM 1940-1945. LETHBRIDGE WAS A MAJOR BASE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING THING. WE HAD YOUNG BRITISH AIRMEN COME, AND THEY LIVED EVERYWHERE. THEY BOARDED WITH PEOPLE; THEY STAYED ON BASE, BUT WHEN THEY HAD A DAY OFF, IT WAS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PEOPLE OF LETHBRIDGE TO TAKE THEM ON LITTLE JOURNEYS TO PLACES. I CAN REMEMBER GOING WITH THEM…TO FORT MACLEOD, AND THEN TO PINCHER CREEK, AND WE HAD PLUMS AND CHERRIES. I CAN REMEMBER MY MOTHER BRINGING THIS BAG OF FRUIT OUT, AND SAYING TO THE ONE YOUNG FELLOW, “WOULD YOU LIKE A PIECE OF FRUIT?” HE WAS SITTING IN THE FRONT SEAT, TURNED TO MY MOTHER [WHO] WAS DRIVING THE CAR, [THEN] HE TURNED TO HIS BUDDIES IN THE BACKSEAT, AND HE [SAID], “WOULD YOU LIKE A PLUM OR A CHERRY?” WE VISITED THERE, AND THOSE WERE GIFTS FROM THOSE AIRMEN TO ME, AT THAT TIME. I HAD A LITTLE MANTLE IN MY ROOM, DOWNSTAIRS IN CALGARY, AND HAD THEM THERE. WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE, WE HAD NO SPACE AT ALL FOR ANYTHING. OUR FURNITURE HAD TO BE ALL STORED. THE ONLY POSSESSIONS OF OURS THAT WERE IN THAT HOUSE WERE OUR BEDS AND OUR DRESSERS, MAYBE A COUPLE OF CHAIRS…” “[I DISPLAYED THEM] MORE CALGARY, THAN LETHBRIDGE.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
No. Pieces
11
Height
27
Length
38
Width
11.5
Description
A: CASE: GREEN AND OFF-WHITE LEATHER CASE. BLACK PLASTIC/SILVER METAL LABEL THAT READS “CONN” ON FRONT OF CASE. GREEN HANDLE AT TOP WITH TWO METAL LATCHES ON EITHER SIDE. HINGES ON THE BOTTOM OF CASE TO OPEN. FOUR METAL FEET ON BOTTOM. CORK EDGES AROUND THE SIDES, STITCHED ON AND PAINTED OFF-WHITE COLOUR. INSIDE IS LINED WITH A GREEN VELVET. TOP FOLDS DOWN AND IS FASTENED WITH LEATHER STRAP AND METAL SNAP BUTTON. “CONN” LABEL IN TOP LEFT CORNER OF CASE THAT IS GOLD WITH BLACK AND RED PAINT INSIDE. THREE PEOPLE OF A MARCHING BAND IN IMAGE ON LABEL. THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE INSIDE OF CASE HAS EIGHT SECTIONS FOR INSTRUMENT PIECES AND ACCESSORIES. FAIR CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE SURFACE DIRT OVERALL. VARIOUS GREEN STAINS AT TOP OF CASE. METAL COMPONENTS SCUFFED. SOME STITCHING AS SIDES COMING LOOSE. LOSS OF PAINT IN SEVERAL PLACES ALONG CORK EDGE. INSIDE FABRIC WORN. B: BLACK BAKELITE CLARINET BELL WITH SILVER AROUND BOTH EDGES. “CONN DIRECTOR U.S.A.” ETCHED ON OUTER SURFACE. 11 CM LENGTH. 8 CM BELL DIAMETER. C: BLACK BAKELITE LOWER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. CORK EDGE ON BOTTOM AND SILVER RIM AROUND TOP. “721800” ETCHED ON BACK NEAR CORK. PADDED THUMB REST ON BACK OF THIS JOINT. 25.5 CM X 2.5 CM. D: BLACK BAKELITE UPPER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. BOTH ENDS COVERED IN CORK. LOGO WITH THREE MARCHING BAND FIGURES ETCHED ON FRONT NEAR THE TOP. 22.5 CM X 2.3 CM (TOP DIAMETER SLIGHTLY WIDER). E: BLACK BAKELITE BARREL JOINT WITH SILVER EDGES. 6 CM X 3 CM (BOTTOM DIAMETER) 2.8 CM (TOP DIAMETER). F: BLACK BAKELITE MOUTHPIECE WITH CORK AT BOTTOM. METAL LIGATURE WITH ITS TWO SCREWS ATTACHED SECURING A REED TO THE MOUTHPIECE. 9 CM LONG WITH 2.1 CM DIAMETER AT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR B-F: SLIGHT SCUFFS OF SURFACE G: SILVER METAL MARCHING LYRE. CIRCULAR BAND WITH ADJUSTABLE SCREW FOR ATTACHMENT TO INSTRUMENT. THIS SCREWS ONTO A STEM, WHICH EXTENDS TO CONNECT TO A LYRIFORM SPRING CLAMP THAT IS MEANT TO HOLD MUSIC. FAIR CONDITION: SEVERE GREEN STAINING IN MANY AREAS OF SURFACE. METAL SLIGHTLY SCRATCHED OVERALL. H: BLACK PLASTIC REED HOLDER WITH SLOTS FOR TWO REEDS (ONE ON FRONT AND ONE ON). “LAVOZ” ETCHED IN PLASTIC ON FRONT AND BACK AND “USA” ABOVE THAT.7.7 CM X 2 CM. I: CLARINET REED ENCASED IN REED HOLDER (H).”RICO” IN MUSIC STAFF STAMPED ON BACKSIDE AND SIZE “V-2 ½” STAMPED BELOW THE LOGO. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR H-I: SOME WEAR TO SIDE OF REED HOLDER WITH REED. REED SHOWS SIGNS OF USE. J: WHITE ENVELOPE THAT READS, “CONN EXCLUSIVE TUNING RING” WITH TEXT BELOW AND DIAGRAM OF THE TUNING RING PRINTED ALL IN BLACK INK ON THE FRONT OF THE ENVELOPE. THE BACK HAS SCOTCH TAPE SECURING THE RIGHT SIDE ENVELOPE FLAP. CAN FEEL ONE TUNING RING INSIDE ENVELOPE. 14 CM X 7.9 CM. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: PAPER OF ENVELOPE HAS SEVERELY YELLOWED. K-N: TWO IDENTICAL TUBES OF CORK GREASE WITH CAPS. WHITE PLASTIC TUBE THAT READS, “PARAMOUNT MUSIC “PREMIUM” CORK GREASE” AND AN ADDRESS BELOW ALL IN RED FONT. TWISTABLE END TO EXTEND THE GREASE IN TUBE. GREASE STILL PRESENT IN TUBES. RED PLASTIC CAPS. ONE READS “B 7 ETHYL” (K) ON INSIDE OF CAP AND THE OTHER READS “B 87 ETHYL” (N). 6.8 CM X 1,7 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SURFACE DIRT ON LABEL. DISCOLOURING OF PLASTIC AROUND BOTTOM EDGES. GREASE IS CRYSTALIZING. O-P: SMALL, BLACK PLASTIC GREASE CONTAINER IN CUBE WITH GOLD METALLIC LETTERS ON LID “YAMAHA CORK GREASE”. HINGE ATTACHING LID TO CONTAINER, SO LID COMPLETE DETACHES. GREASE INSIDE OF THE CONTAINER. 2.7 CM X 2.7 CM X 2 CM. GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON SURFACE. BROKEN HINGE. Q: CLARINET CLEANING SWAB WAND WITH TWISTED WIRE WAND/HANDLE AND MULTICOLOURED (BLUES AND PINKS), FABRIC SWAB. THE SWAB IS SHAGGED. 29 CM X 2.5 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WIRE IS SLIGHTLY BENT. R: CLOTH CLEANING SWAB WITH NATURAL-COLOURED TAN SUEDE CLOTH (APPROX. 12.5 CM X 6.3 CM) THAT HAS ROUGH EDGES. ONE CORNER OF SUEDE IS PINCHED TOGETHER WITH A SILVER METAL CLASP (TOOTHED), WHICH SECURES IT AROUND A BLACK STRING (57 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A SILVER-COLOURED WEIGHT AT THE END. FAIR CONDITION: STRING IS FRAYING MODERATELY IN ONE PLACE AND SLIGHTLY IN OTHERS. SUEDE FABRIC SHOWS DIRT. WEIGHT’S METAL IS SCUFFED.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS CLARINET WAS PLAYED BY THREE GENERATIONS OF THE DONORS’ FAMILY. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IT WAS PURCHASED BRAND NEW [IN THE] EARLY ‘50S WITH THE INTENT THAT HER FIRST SON, BERNIE (BORN IN 1950) WOULD PLAY THE CLARINET, WHICH HE DID. MOM DID USE IT FOR SOME LATER PERFORMANCES WITH THE ANDERSON SISTERS, BUT IT WAS PURCHASED [FOR HIM]. AND HIS DAUGHTER, CONNIE, ALSO PLAYED THE CLARINET.” SPEAKING OF WHY THEY SELECTED THIS OBJECT TO BE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, RUTH SAID, “WHEN WE WERE GATHERING THINGS TOGETHER, WE THOUGHT [OF] WHAT INSTRUMENTS WE HAD THAT HAVE A CONNECTION. SO IT WAS DECIDED [ON THE CLARINET]. CONNIE WAS QUITE HAPPY TO KNOW THAT IT WAS COMING IN THIS DIRECTION, SINCE IT WAS GRANDMA’S CLARINET, IT SHOULD GO WITH GRANDMA’S THINGS.” OF ALL THE INSTRUMENTS ALICE KNEW HOW TO PLAY, THE CLARINET “WAS THE MAIN ONE,” RUTH CONTINUED, “BUT SHE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AS WELL. AND ALSO TAUGHT PIANO FOR YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS. [ALL THE SISTERS] PLAYED PIANO REALLY WELL. SHE PLAYED OTHER INSTRUMENTS LIKE THE ORGAN, AND THERE WERE ACTUALLY INSTANCES TOO WHERE SOMEONE WOULD CALL ON HER TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY AN INSTRUMENT, AND SHE WOULD TEACH THEM HOW TO PLAY IT WITHOUT KNOWING HOW TO PLAY IT HERSELF, BECAUSE SHE KNEW THE TECHNIQUE [OR] WOULD LEARN THE TECHNIQUE. BUT THE CLARINET WAS HER MAIN THING WITH, AS I SAID, SAXOPHONE AND PIANO PROBABLY THE NEXT CLOSEST IN LINE.” THE SISTERS STATE THAT THEY REMEMBER THEIR MOTHER PLAYING THIS SPECIFIC CLARINET. ELEANOR SAID, “SHE DIDN’T PASS IT [ON] UNTIL CONNIE WANTED TO USE IT, BECAUSE BERNIE DIDN’T TAKE IT WITH HIM [FROM HOME].” RUTH ADDED, “YEAH, THAT’S RIGHT. I THINK IT’S REALLY ALWAYS BEEN HERS.” THE LAST TIME THEY REMEMBER HER PLAYING IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LAST TIME THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA PERFORMED, WHICH WAS A PERFORMANCE FOR THE ELKS IN GRANUM IN THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
History
ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. I WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…AT THE PARTICULAR TIME THAT I STARTED WORK THERE IN 1958, WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE. AND NOW THAT I’M MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE BY THIS FALL I STARTED TO LOOK AROUND A BIT AT THINGS AND I SEEN THIS THING. I KNEW I HAD IT AND THEN I THOUGHT, MAYBE THEY CAN USE IT AT THE MUSEUM. MAYBE THERE’D BE SOME INTEREST AND I THOUGHT, OKAY, SO I’LL BRING IT, RIGHT.” “I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [ABOUT 1972]. FROM THERE ON WE TRIED WALKIE TALKIES AND…AND THEN LATER ON WE TRIED SOME OTHER ONES AND FINALLY WE ENDED UP WITH A SET THAT WAS GOOD AND EVERYBODY CARRIED ONE WITH HIM. WHEN YOU WERE MOVING AROUND AND WHENEVER YOU WANTED TO GET HOLD OF SOMEBODY IT WAS MUCH BETTER WITH THE WALKIE TALKIES.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
15.5
Width
9.1
Diameter
12.2
Description
METAL COW BELL WITH LEATHER STRAP. BELL IS MADE UP OF 2 PIECES OF METAL FUSED TOGETHER AT SIDES WITH TWO NAILS IN EACH SEAM. TOP IS FOLDED TOGETHER WITH THE ENDS FUSED DOWN THE SIDE IN A TRIANGULAR FOLD. FRONT AND BACK OF BELL ARE RELATIVELY FLAT, COMING OUT SLIGHTLY AT EDGE. WELDING OF BELL IS CRUDE. INSIDE OF THE BELL IS THE CLAPPER WITH A BALL END THAT IS 10.5 CM IN CIRCUMFERENCE. BALL IS ATTACHED TO A ROD THAT IS HOOKED TO THE LOOP INSIDE THE TOP OF BELL. FLAT METAL LOOP AT TOP OF BELL ATTACHES THE BELL TO LEATHER STRAP THAT IS 109.4 CM IN LENGTH AND 2.4 CM IN WIDTH. 9 HOLES PUNCHED IN LEATHER FOR STRAP ADJUSTMENT WITH THE BUCKLE GOING THROUGH THE 10TH HOLE PUNCH. STANDARD METAL BUCKLE WITH LEATHER BELT LOOP FOR THE EXCESS LENGTH OF STRAP. FAIR CONDITION: METAL SEVERELY RUSTED IN COLOUR. AT ONE SEAM NEAR THE BASE, THE METAL HAS OXIDIZED TO A GREEN COLOUR. METAL SURFACE INSIDE OF BELL HAS LOST SHINE AND IS RUSTY. STRAP IS SEVERELY WORN AND HAS SCRATCHES AND LOSS OF FINISH OVERALL. END OF THE STRAP OPPOSITE OF BUCKLE IS TORN OFF.
Subjects
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
History
ON 14 JULY, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, AND HER DAUGHTER, KAREN PORTER AT THE GALT MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ELLENNOR’S HUSBAND WAS ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER. HE FOUND THE BELL AS ELLENNOR REMEMBERS, “[I REMEMBER] HIM BRINGING IT IN THE HOUSE… I DON’T KNOW JUST HOW LONG AGO… [AND HIM SAYING], ‘LOOK WHAT I GOT.’ THEN IT WAS JUST EVERYONE WAS SAYING, ‘WOW,’ AND PLAYING AROUND WITH IT… [AFTER THAT] IT WAS PUT IN THE BASEMENT WITH THE REST OF THE THINGS.” KAREN AND ELLENNOR BELIEVE THE BELL WOULD HAVE BEEN FOUND BY MICK IN THE 1950S OR THE 1960S. ELLENNOR CONTINUED, “[HE FOUND IT ON] THE RANCH. HE WAS OUT VISITING HIS RELATIVES OUT THERE. HE HAD AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BURN RANCH. HE’S PROBABLY JUST RE-VISITING THEIR PLACE THAT HAD BEEN SOLD, SO MAYBE IT CAME FROM PINCHER CREEK. IN THAT AREA ANYWAY, LUNDBRECK OR PINCHER CREEK.” “DAD WOULD GO UP SOMETIMES BY HIMSELF,” KAREN ADDED, “I DON’T THINK ANY OF US WERE WITH HIM WHEN HE CAME HOME WITH THAT. I THINK WE WERE AT HOME WHEN HE BROUGHT IT TO THE HOUSE… IT IS ALSO POSSIBLE THAT HIS FATHER AND MOTHER HAD [THE BELL] AT THEIR HOUSE AND GAVE IT TO HIM. THEY WERE FARMERS AT THE WALDRON RANCH – NOW THE WALDRON RANCH – [BUT IT] WAS THE PORTER RANCH. THEY HAD A HOUSE IN PINCHER CREEK, SO THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT’S ALSO WHERE HE WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.” THINKING BACK TO HER LATE HUSBAND’S DAYS IN THE AREA, ELLENNOR EXPLAINED, “[MICK’S] DAD WAS AT THE PORTER/WALDRON RANCH. IT WAS JUST THE PORTER RANCH AND AFTER HE MOVED TO PINCHER, HE SOLD LIKE HIS INTEREST PART OF IT TO WALDRON, SO IT [BECAME] A PARTNERSHIP… THE WALDRON RANCH IS NEAR BLACK MOUNTAIN ON THAT ROAD, TOWARDS THE BAR-U RANCH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BELL, ELLENNOR SAID, “[THIS BELL] BRINGS BACK MEMORIES FROM WAY BACK WHEN WE USED TO LOOK FOR CATTLE BACK IN THE BUSH, AND I IMAGINE THAT’S WHAT MY HUSBAND MUST HAVE THOUGHT TOO… [IT WOULD BE] A REMEMBRANCE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. THEY PROBABLY HAD TO BRING IN THE OLD MILK COW AND SHE WOULD BE WEARING THE BELL. THAT’S WHAT THEY DID. THEY PUT IT ON THE BIG MILK COW, SO THAT WHEN THEY WANTED THEM TO COME IN TO MILK THEY COULD FIND THEM. SOMETIMES THEY’D GO HIDE IN THE BUSH, SO THEY KEPT THE BELL ON THEM SO THEY COULD KEEP TRACK OF WHERE THEY WERE AT.” ELLENNOR FURTHER EXPLAINED, “I HAD NO CONNECTION WITH THAT BELL. WE HAD NO CATTLE. WE WERE GRAIN FARMERS.” KAREN ADDED, “MUM AND DAD WERE WHEAT FARMING ON [THE K-LAZY-A-RANCH]. THERE WERE CATTLE THERE, BUT MUM DOESN’T REMEMBER THERE BEING CATTLE WITH BELLS ON. THEY WERE IN THE FARM YARD… THERE WERE HARDLY ANY TREES. THAT WAS THE RANCH ORIGINALLY AND LATER BECAME A WHEAT FARM. IF THEY KEPT IT AS A RANCH WITH CATTLE AND HORSES, THAT MEANT THEY COULD NEVER EVER LEAVE AND IT WAS PRETTY ISOLATED, SO OVER THE YEARS DAD TALKED THE OWNER INTO LETTING HIM COVERT IT TO WHEAT.” “THERE WAS NO BUSH [THERE FOR THE COWS] TO HIDE IN. SO NO NEED FOR A BELL!” ELLENNOR REMEMBERED. THE DONOR AND HER DAUGHTER REMEMBERED HOW MICK VALUED OBJECTS AND MEMORIES. “HIS EYES WOULD LIGHT UP [AND HE WOULD SAY], ‘LOOK WHAT WE HAVE HERE,’ [WHEN HE SAW SOMETHING ATTACHED TO A MEMORY]. HE HAD ALL KINDS OF MEMORIES OF HIS GROWING UP. SOME WERE NOT TOO HAPPY, SOME WERE VERY HAPPY, BUT HE ALWAYS REALLY LOVED COWS. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHERE WE WENT TRAVELLING IN THE WORLD…[HE ALWAYS] STOPPED AND TOOK SOME PICTURES. ‘OH LOOK AT THE COWS!’ HE’D SAY,” ELLENNOR JUMPED IN, COMPLETING HER DAUGHTER’S SENTENCE. “DAD TOOK THOUSANDS OF PICTURES OF COWS. FOR HIM THERE WAS A REAL CORRELATION,” KAREN FINISHED. “[THE BELL IS A TREASURE] BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN IN OUR HOME FOR SUCH A LONG TIME. WHEN DAD BROUGHT IT HOME, IN HIS PERSPECTIVE, HE WOULD HAVE THE SAME KIND OF MEMORIES MY MUM DOES OF HEARING THE COWS…I CAN REMEMBER THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE ON THE FARM OUT BY SKIFF HEARING COW BELLS OR BEING OUT AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S FARM BY OLDS HEARING COW BELLS… [THIS BRINGS] THE MEMORY OF DAD BEING EXCITED ABOUT [THE BELL] AND TRYING TO WAKE US UP IN THE MORNING RINGING IT, IF WE WERE SLEEPING IN TOO LONG. THAT’S MORE THE MEMORY FOR US… [BUT] I WAS NEVER ON THE RANCH WHEN MY DAD WOULD HAVE FOUND [THIS SPECIFIC] BELL, SO THOSE MEMORIES AREN’T MY MEMORIES, THEY’RE MORE HIS MEMORIES. HE ALWAYS TREASURED IT, HE ALWAYS WANTED IT KEPT AND WE’D LIKE TO HONOUR THAT,” KAREN ADDED. NOTES FROM AN 2008 INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY AND ELEANOR PORTER STATE THE DONOR’S FATHER-IN-LAW, GEORGE ENGLISH PORTER, WAS BORN 1878 IN ORILLIA, ONTARIO AND DIED ON MARCH 16, 1959. HE CAME WEST FROM ONTARIO IN 1896 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. GEORGE PORTER’S FAMILY SETTLED 30 MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON THE EASTERN SLOPES OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY SETTLED ON THE BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH. GEORGE WAS ONE OF FOURTEEN CHILDREN IN THE FAMILY. HER MOTHER-IN-LAW WAS BORN IN EASTERN CANADA BEFORE MOVING TO OREGON. SHE IMMIGRATED TO CANADA WHEN SHE WAS8 YEARS OLD AND WAS RAISED ON THE BURN RANCH NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA. THE NOTES FURTHER STATE THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, WAS BORN IN 1922. THE OBITUARY FOR ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER READS MICK WAS BORN ON MAY 23, 1921 IN COWLEY, ALBERTA. HE ATTENDED SCHOOL IN COWLEY AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL FROM ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL IN PINCHER CREEK. HE JOINED THE RCAF DURING WWII AND UPON AN HONOURABLE DISCHARGE AFTER A HIP INJURY, HE WORKED AS A GRAIN BUYER. HE MARRIED ELLENNOR CHRISTOFFERSEN IN OLDS, ALBERTA. LATER, HE WORKED FOR THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOR 5 YEARS. IN 1953, HE BEGAN FARMING IN THE SKIFF AREA AND RETIRED IN 1984. MICK AND ELLENNOR HAD FIVE CHILDREN: LAWNA ROBART, MICHAEL, RONALD, KAREN PORTER, AND CHRISTOPHER, WHO PASSED AWAY AS AN INFANT. MICK PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 AT THE AGE OF 91 YEARS. HISTORY OF THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH LTD. WAS PUBLISHED IN THE “CANADIAN CATTLEMEN” PUBLICATION IN MARCH OF 1946. IT STATES THE RANCH “COMPRISED ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES OF LAND SITUATED IN SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA. IT WAS SITUATED IN A VALLEY EXTENDING BETWEEN THE PORCUPINE HILLS AND OLD MAN RIVER FOR ABOUT 30 MILES NORTH AND SOUTH AND VARYING FROM THREE TO FIVE MILES IN WIDTH.” THE HISTORY STATES THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH WAS FORMED IN 1883 BY SIR JOHN WALROND WALROND OF BARONET AND LORD CLINTON OF LONDON – BOTH MEN OF ENGLAND. ON JUNE 26TH, 1884, QUEEN VICTORIA GRANTED THE RANCH AN INDENTURE OF LEASE TO SIR WALROND, BARONET. (THE TEXT OF THAT LEASE AGREEMENT WAS PRODUCED AS PART OF THE CATTLEMEN PUBLICATION AND IS ATTACHED TO THE ARTIFACT’S PERMANENT RECORD.) ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, THE FIRST PURCHASE OF CATTLE WAS IN 1883 – 3,125 HEAD FOR $100,000. IN 1897, THE COMPANY WAS INCORPORATED UNDER THE CANADIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANIES ACT, MOVING ITS HEAD OFFICE FROM LONDON, ENGLAND. DUNCAN MCEACHRAN WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH AND DAVID WARNOCK FROM GLASGOW BECAME THE LOCAL MANAGER. AT THE TIME OF THIS TRANSITION, IT IS BELIEVED THE RANCH HAD GROWN TO 12,311, THOUGH THIS WAS A MERE ESTIMATE. MCEACHRAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THE COMPANY FROM ITS BEGINNING IN 1883, WHEN HE STARTED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER. HIS LEADERSHIP GOT THE COMPANY THROUGH “PERIODS OF DEPRESSED CONDITION.” AFTER A HARSH WINTER IN 1906-1907, THE RANCH LOST APPROXIMATELY 5,000 HEAD OF CATTLE DUE TO SEVERE TEMPERATURE CHANGES. AFTER THIS, IN THE SUMMER OF 1908, THE RANCH “DISPOSED OF ALL ITS CATTLE TO PAT BURNS. FOLLOWING THE SALE, THE LAND OF THE WALDRON RANCH, EXCLUDING 1,000 ACRES WAS LEASED FIRST TO W. R. HULL, THEN TO PAT BURNS. C. W. BUCHANAN WAS APPOINTED THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH THAT IN 1923. MCEACHRAN PASSED AWAY IN OCTOBER 1924. ANOTHER HISTORY ON THE RANCH WAS FOUND BY MUSEUM RESEARCHERS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. PUBLISHED ON 1 MAY 1954, THE ARTICLE READS, “AT ONE TIME THE WALDRON LEASE CONSISTED OF BETWEEN 300,000 TO 400,000 ACRES OF LAND, EXTENDING FROM WHAT IS KNOWN AS STOWE TO THE NORTH FORK OF THE OLDMAN RIVER. IN THE NORTH FORK DISTRICT THE LAND WAS DIVIDED INTO FIVE BRANCHES… AT ITS PEAK IN THE SUMMER OF 1906 THE RANCH HAD 20,000 HEAD OF STOCK.” GEORGE PORTER IS LISTED IN THE HISTORY AS ONE OF THE CATTLE MEN EMPLOYED BY THE WALDRON RANCH FROM 1883 TO 1908. ABOUT HIM, THE ARTICLE STATES, “GEORGE PORTER [WAS] A GOOD STOCKMAN, [WHO] LATER BOUGHT 12 SECTIONS OF THE COMPANY’S FREEHOLD AT ITS NORTHERN END AND ADJOINING LAND ALREADY OWNED BY HIM.” “GEORGE PORTER AND SONS HAVE SOLD THEIR RANCH AND CATTLE TO JOHN FRANCIS MILLER… THE PORTER RANCH IS ABOUT THIRTY MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK AND ADJOINS THE 19,000 ACRE WALDRON RANCH WHICH MR. MILLER ALSO OWNS HAVING PURCHASED IT FROM P. BURNS RANCHES LAST FEBRUARY,” THE HISTORY STATES. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE 21 AUGUST 1953 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ANNOUNCED, “TWO OF THE LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS RANCHES IN THE SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA FOOTHILLS ARE BEING OFFERED FOR SALE. THEY ARE THE WALDRON AND PORTER RANCHERS, NORTH OF LUNDBRECK. THESE PROPERTIES ARE OWNED NOW BY JOHN F. MILLER OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA… [THEY] HAVE BEEN OPERATED BY MR. MILLER’S SON, WHO TOOK OVER THE JOB SEVERAL YEARS AGO WHEN THE MILLERS BOUGHT THE WALDRON FROM THE WALDRON RANCHING COMPANY AND THE PORTER RANCH PROPERTY FROM GEORGE PORTER…” THE HISTORY OF GEORGE AND NORA PORTER (NEE BURN)’S MARRIAGE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON JUNE 26, 1954 FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. THE COUPLE WERE MARRIED AT THE BURN RANCH IN JUNE 21 1904. THE COUPLE’S FOURTEEN CHILDREN WERE: MARJORIE ANDERSON, NORMAN PORTER, PHYLLIS ROBBINS, KATHLEEN HAMILTON, WINNIFRED BONERTZ, SANDY PORTER, EILEEN IRONMONGER, JEAN ALCOCK, JOSEPHINE ROBINSON, LILLIAN CHRISTIANSON, ISOBEL SINNOT, MICHAEL PORTER, LAWRENCE PORTER, AND CONNIE PORTER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20080020001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE PORTER AND BURN FAMILIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013016
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.5
Width
43
Description
WHITE, SLEEVELESS TODDLER'S SLIP. NECK LINE AND ARM HOLES FINISHED WITH SIMPLE LACE-LIKE EMBROIDERY IN WHITE. HEM IS SCALLOPED LACE, WITH A SIMPLE FLOWER PATTERN. TWO MOTHER-OF-PEARL BUTTONS ON LEFT SHOULDER. SLIGHT DISCOLOURATION/YELLOWING OF FABRIC. YELLOW STAIN ON BACK AT HEM LINE. LOOSE THREADS AT ARM PIT AREA ON BOTH SIDES. SLIGHT PULL IN FABRIC LEFT SIDE WAIST AREA ON FRONT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-UNDERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS SLIP BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013016
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
UNDERPANTS, LONG
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
JERSEY
Catalogue Number
P20150013021
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
UNDERPANTS, LONG
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
JERSEY
No. Pieces
1
Length
57
Width
29
Description
OFF-WHITE LONG UNDERWEAR, OVERALL STYLE, WITH ATTACHED TANK-TOP. FLAP OPENING IN BACK CLOSES WITH THREE MOTHER-OF-PEARL BUTTONS. DRAWSTRING FOLLOWS NECKLINE, THROUGH THE SHOULDER STRAPS, AND TIES IN THE FRONT, BELOW THE NECK. SHOULDER STRAPS HAVE A SLIGHTLY SCALLOPED EDGE. TAG INSIDE BACK NECK READS "WATSON'S 20 2-4 YEARS" SLIGHT YELLOWING OF FABRIC. SMALL BROWN COLOURED STAIN FRONT LEFT SIDE, NEAR WAIST.
Subjects
CLOTHING-UNDERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THESE LONG UNDERPANTS BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013021
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SOAKER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20150013010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SOAKER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
20
Width
28.5
Description
OFF-WHITE KNITTED DIAPER COVER. ALL ONE PIECE, TWO LEG HOLES, WITH DRAWSTRING WAIST. DIAGONAL SEAMS ON THE FRONT MAKE AN INVERTED "V" POINTING UP TOWARDS THE WAIST BAND FROM THE LEG HOLES. YARN APPEARS TO HAVE YELLOWED OVER THE YEARS. SEVERAL HOLES IN THE STITCHING, INCLUDING ON THE DIAGONAL SEAM ABOVE THE RIGHT LEG HOLE, ON THE BACK RIGHT BACK (HOLES ON THE FRONT AND BACK ALMOST LINE UP), AND ON THE WAISTBAND, ESPECIALLY AT THE BACK. DRAWSTRING STILL IN WAISTBAND, BUT IS NOW IN TWO PIECES. DIAGONAL SEAMING ON THE FRONT SHOWS QUITE A LOT OF TENSION/STRESS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-UNDERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS DIAPER COVER BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013010
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TABLETS, “WATER DECONTAMINATION”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20150012010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TABLETS, “WATER DECONTAMINATION”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
5
Length
16.25
Width
10
Description
CLEAR PLASTIC BOTTLE WITH WHITE CAP, FILLED WITH ROUND WHITE TABLETS AND SEALED IN CLEAR PLASTIC BAG. PRINTED LABEL ON BOTTLE HAS TEXT IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH, READING “WATER DECONTAMINANT – EACH TABLET CONTAINS HALAZONE, N.F. 160 MG. WITH SODIUM BORATE AND SODIUM CHLORIDE. ONE HALAZONE TABLET IS SUFFICIENT FOR 5 GALLONS OF ORDINARY WATER. IF WATER IS GREATLY POLLUTED, USE TWO TABLETS. ALLOW WATER TO STAND FOR 30 MINUTES BEFORE DRINKING.” MINOR SCUFFING ON BAG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS BOTTLE OF WATER DECONTAMINATION TABLETS WAS RECOVERED IN SPRING 2015 FROM A STORAGE AREA IN THE BASEMENT OF THE ENMAX CENTRE SPORTS ARENA, WHERE SUPPLIES RELATING TO LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE AND DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS/RISK MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN STORED FOR AT LEAST 30 YEARS PRIOR. DURING MARCH AND APRIL 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CURRENT AND RETIRED CITY STAFF THAT WERE INVOLVED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SUPPLIES AND DISASTER RESPONSE SERVICES, INCLUDING DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT JESSE KURTZ, RETIRED DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF MIKE ROSS, FORMER CITY DIRECTOR OF DISASTER SERVICES JOE KARL, FORMER CITY EMERGENCY SERVICES CO-ORDINATOR DENNIS JOBE, AND FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER/RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE OFFICER LEO VANDENHEUVAL. PREVIOUS RESEARCH INTO THE LETHBRIDGE CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE WAS CONDUCTED IN 2009, WHEN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROBERT GARDNER, A FORMER C.D. POLICE MEMBER (SEE RECORD P19870044001 FOR MORE INFORMATION). THE AUXILIARY CIVIL DEFENCE POLICE WAS ORGANIZED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AFTER THE PROVINCE APPEALED TO ALBERTA MUNICIPALITIES TO PREPARE DEFENCES IN CASE OF AN ENEMY ATTACK, INCLUDING A NUCLEAR STRIKE. THE C.D. POLICE WERE NOT OFFICIALLY PART OF THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE. THE AUXILIARY VOLUNTEERS DID, HOWEVER, RECEIVE TRAINING FROM THE CITY POLICE AND WHEN CALLED OUT BY THE C.D. DIRECTOR, CAME UNDER THE CONTROL OF CHIEF CONSTABLE JAMES H. CARPENTER.THE C.D. POLICE DISBANDED FOR UNKNOWN REASONS IN 1963. GARDNER WAS 33 WHEN HE JOINED THE C.D. POLICE IN 1960, AND EXPLAINS HIS MOTIVATION TO VOLUNTEER WAS BASED ON HIS PERCEPTION THAT A FUTURE WAR WAS LIKELY TO OCCUR – ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE PERIOD’S EVENTS, WHICH INCLUDED THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. GARDNER REMEMBERED TRAINING UNDER THE POLICE CHIEF AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, BUT MAINTAINED THAT OUTSIDE OF INITIAL TRAINING, C.D. POLICE OPERATIONS WERE NOT DIRECTED BY THE CITY POLICE. GARDNER SAID THAT MOST C.D. POLICE VOLUNTEERS WERE “MIDDLE AGED AND STAYED ON DUE TO THE THREAT OF WAR”. JOE KARL SAID: “[IN] LATE 1972 THE CITY MANAGER… [ASSIGNED ME TO] LOOK AFTER DISASTER SERVICES/CIVIL DEFENCE… IT’S HAD DIFFERENT NAMES AS TIME WENT ON… THIS EQUIPMENT… IS A CASUALTY COLLECTING UNIT, WITH WATER BOTTLES, BOOTS, RAIN GEAR, COVERALLS. THERE WERE STRETCHERS [AND] BLANKETS. THESE WERE ALL STORED AT THE OLD MUSEUM [ORIGINAL GALT MUSEUM BUILDING, BEFORE THE 1985 EXPANSION] NEAR THE BOILER ROOM… THAT’S WHERE I FIRST INHERITED THE STUFF. THERE WAS REALLY NO RECORD KEPT OF ANYTHING… [WHEN] WE FOUND OUT WE COULDN’T PUT [THE SUPPLIES] BACK INTO STORAGE [AT THE MUSEUM], BEING SAFETY OFFICER I KNEW AND SCOUTED ALL THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN THE CITY. THE SPORTSPLEX, DOWN IN THE DEEP BASEMENT, HAD A ROOM THAT WAS DRY AND UNOCCUPIED… SO I PUT THE STUFF DOWN THERE AND THAT’S BASICALLY WHERE IT WOUND UP… AT THAT TIME EACH MUNICIPALITY RECEIVED A MERE PITTANCE OF DOLLARS TOWARDS DISASTER SERVICES… 12-1500 EMPLOYEES AND THE ONLY SAFETY PERSON WAS ME… THEN AS THE MUNICIPAL ACT CHANGED, THE EMPHASIS WAS PUT ON POLITICALLY BY THE PROVINCE TO ESTABLISH A PEACETIME SCENARIO … IN THE BASEMENT OF THE OLD COURTHOUSE, THERE [WAS] A ROOM WHERE AN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE WITH ALL THE COMMUNICATIONS HAD BEEN SET UP… FOR GAS, WATER, SEWER, MAYOR, DEPARTMENT HEADS… [THE STRETCHERS AND BLANKETS] WERE USED IN HOSPITAL EXERCISES… TO SEE HOW PREPARED [STAFF WERE], HOW THEY COULD HANDLE MASS CASUALTIES… WE WOULD DO UP 30/40 KIDS IN BROKEN ARMS, AMNESIA, BURNS, FRACTURES, LOSS OF LIMB… THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS VERY GOOD, [DOING] TRAINING AND MOCK SCENARIOS.” ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD RANGING FROM 1957 TO 2006 DESCRIBE MOCK DISASTER EXERCISES TAKING PLACE ON A SEMI-REGULAR BASIS, TO TEST THE PREPAREDNESS OF FIRE, AMBULANCE, HOSPITAL, AND CITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. DENNIS JOBE SAID: “SHORTLY AFTER THE EDMONTON TORNADO [IN 1987] THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DECREED THAT EVERYONE, COUNTIES, CITIES, SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN… SO THE CITY WAS INSTRUCTED THAT THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT ONE TOGETHER… I WORKED FOR THE CITY MANAGER… WE WERE AWARE… THAT WE HAD TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PREPARATION… SO WE KNEW WHERE [THE SUPPLIES] WERE [AND] COUNTED THINGS… AND WE DID USE IT A COUPLE OF TIMES [WHEN] WE HAD AN EXERCISE.” LEO VANDENHEUVAL SAID: “WE USED TO HAVE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE COURT HOUSE… THE REASON IT WAS THERE IS THAT THEY HAD ROOM [AND] IT WAS QUITE A STRONG, FULL CONCRETE FACILITY THAT COULD PERHAPS WITHSTAND A LOT OF DAMAGE… I WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED BACK IN THOSE DAYS AS WELL FROM THE RISK MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT AND BECAUSE I WAS THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CITY WHENEVER THINGS WENT SIDEWAYS. THE CITY MANAGER WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THAT TEAM [AS WELL AS] THE FIRE CHIEF, POLICE CHIEF, ALL THE DIRECTORS… COMMUNITY SERVICES… ENGINEERING… THE MAYOR… THAT WHOLE TEAM WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED TOGETHER TO WORK TOGETHER IN A DISASTER SITUATION… NOTHING OF [HIGHLY EMERGENT] SIGNIFICANCE HAS EVER HAPPENED IN LETHBRIDGE. WE’VE NEVER HAD TO OPEN UP HOUSING CENTRES LIKE THE CIVIC CENTRE OR THE AREAS TO ACCOMMODATE THAT KIND OF THING BECAUSE WE’VE NEVER HAD A DISASTER THAT BIG… THE BIGGEST ONE THAT COMES TO MIND IS THE 1995 FLOOD… AT THAT TIME THERE WAS SOME TALK THAT WE WOULD GET THE MILITARY INVOLVED… BUT BACK THEN IT REQUIRED APPROVAL FROM OTTAWA, SO IT WAS AWFULLY DIFFICULT TO BRING THE MILITARY IN… TO SOME EXTENT WE KNEW THAT [THE CIVIL DEFENSE] EQUIPMENT EXISTED… [SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT] MIGHT HAVE COME INTO THE SYSTEM IN THE LATE ‘80S WHEN DENNIS JOBE WAS AROUND… BECAUSE HE HAD CERTAIN CONTACTS WITH THE MILITARY, BECAUSE HE WAS A RETIRED ARMY OFFICER… [IT IS IMPORTANT THAT] SOMEBODY WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION [IS] AWARE [AND] THAT IT’S INVENTORIED AND KEPT UP TO DATE.” MIKE ROSS SAID: “WHEN I BECAME DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF IN 1998 [THAT POSITION] WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS… WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE BUDGET AND [ASKED] ‘WHAT’S THIS $1000 WE PAID TO THE ENMAX CENTRE?’ BECAUSE THERE WAS A RENTAL [FEE] THAT NO ONE SEEMED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT… WE DID SOME INVESTIGATION AND THEN WE FOUND OUT THAT THERE WAS ALL THIS MATERIAL THAT WAS STORED IN THE DEEP BASEMENT… WE STARTED TO DO SOME RESEARCH AND FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PART OF A MOBILE HOSPITAL UNIT DATING BACK TO THE COLD WAR… IT [HAD BEEN] BASICALLY FORGOTTEN ABOUT… [IN 2006/2007, HEALTH CANADA] CONTACTED THE CITY AND SAID ‘ON OUR BOOKS THERE IS A [MOBILE] HOSPITAL IN LETHBRIDGE. DOES ANYBODY KNOW WHERE IT IS?’ AND THIS MESSAGE CAME TO ME AS THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CO-ORDINATOR … SUGGESTED THAT [THE SUPPLIES] HAD COME TO THE CITY IN THE ‘50S OR EARLY ‘60S… THE MATERIAL THAT’S THERE NOW IS PROBABLY A THIRD OF WHAT WAS THERE WHEN WE DID THE AUDIT… WE FOUND THINGS LIKE RADIATION BURN DRESSING THAT HAD A ‘BEST BY’ DATE… IV BOTTLES AND IV SOLUTION [THAT] INSTEAD OF BEING CLEAR, WAS CLOUDY… WE KEPT THE STRETCHERS [AND] A BUNCH OF BLANKETS BECAUSE WE FELT THAT… THEY WERE STILL GOOD AND WE COULD USE THEM IN A CURRENT DAY EMERGENCY… SO I REMOVED SOME OF THAT STUFF AND PUT IT OVER [IN] THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE [AT] THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, COPIES OF ORIGINAL EMERGENCY SERVICES SUPPLY INVENTORIES, AND RESEARCH MATERIAL ON LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE. FOR OTHER ARTIFACTS RELATING TO CIVIL DEFENSE IN LETHBRIDGE, SEE RECORDS P19870044001, P19870044002, P19960112110, P19960112111, P19970094001, AND P20090038000.
Catalogue Number
P20150012010
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“CANADA CD HEALTH”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150012003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“CANADA CD HEALTH”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.75
Length
16
Width
9.5
Description
KHAKI-COLOURED CANVAS ARMBAND WITH BUCKLED STRAP. PRINTED DESIGN ON FRONT IS YELLOW CIRCLE WITH BLUE LOGO READING “CANADA CD HEALTH”. TEXT STAMPED ON BACK READS “FINNIGANS LTD. Y.A. 5.000”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS ARMBAND WAS RECOVERED IN SPRING 2015 FROM A STORAGE AREA IN THE BASEMENT OF THE ENMAX CENTRE SPORTS ARENA, WHERE SUPPLIES RELATING TO LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE AND DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS/RISK MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN STORED FOR AT LEAST 30 YEARS PRIOR. DURING MARCH AND APRIL 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CURRENT AND RETIRED CITY STAFF THAT WERE INVOLVED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SUPPLIES AND DISASTER RESPONSE SERVICES, INCLUDING DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT JESSE KURTZ, RETIRED DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF MIKE ROSS, FORMER CITY DIRECTOR OF DISASTER SERVICES JOE KARL, FORMER CITY EMERGENCY SERVICES CO-ORDINATOR DENNIS JOBE, AND FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER/RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE OFFICER LEO VANDENHEUVAL. PREVIOUS RESEARCH INTO THE LETHBRIDGE CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE WAS CONDUCTED IN 2009, WHEN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROBERT GARDNER, A FORMER C.D. POLICE MEMBER (SEE RECORD P19870044001 FOR MORE INFORMATION). THE AUXILIARY CIVIL DEFENCE POLICE WAS ORGANIZED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AFTER THE PROVINCE APPEALED TO ALBERTA MUNICIPALITIES TO PREPARE DEFENCES IN CASE OF AN ENEMY ATTACK, INCLUDING A NUCLEAR STRIKE. THE C.D. POLICE WERE NOT OFFICIALLY PART OF THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE. THE AUXILIARY VOLUNTEERS DID, HOWEVER, RECEIVE TRAINING FROM THE CITY POLICE AND WHEN CALLED OUT BY THE C.D. DIRECTOR, CAME UNDER THE CONTROL OF CHIEF CONSTABLE JAMES H. CARPENTER.THE C.D. POLICE DISBANDED FOR UNKNOWN REASONS IN 1963. GARDNER WAS 33 WHEN HE JOINED THE C.D. POLICE IN 1960, AND EXPLAINS HIS MOTIVATION TO VOLUNTEER WAS BASED ON HIS PERCEPTION THAT A FUTURE WAR WAS LIKELY TO OCCUR – ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE PERIOD’S EVENTS, WHICH INCLUDED THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. GARDNER REMEMBERED TRAINING UNDER THE POLICE CHIEF AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, BUT MAINTAINED THAT OUTSIDE OF INITIAL TRAINING, C.D. POLICE OPERATIONS WERE NOT DIRECTED BY THE CITY POLICE. GARDNER SAID THAT MOST C.D. POLICE VOLUNTEERS WERE “MIDDLE AGED AND STAYED ON DUE TO THE THREAT OF WAR”. JOE KARL SAID: “[IN] LATE 1972 THE CITY MANAGER… [ASSIGNED ME TO] LOOK AFTER DISASTER SERVICES/CIVIL DEFENCE… IT’S HAD DIFFERENT NAMES AS TIME WENT ON… THIS EQUIPMENT… IS A CASUALTY COLLECTING UNIT, WITH WATER BOTTLES, BOOTS, RAIN GEAR, COVERALLS. THERE WERE STRETCHERS [AND] BLANKETS. THESE WERE ALL STORED AT THE OLD MUSEUM [ORIGINAL GALT MUSEUM BUILDING, BEFORE THE 1985 EXPANSION] NEAR THE BOILER ROOM… THAT’S WHERE I FIRST INHERITED THE STUFF. THERE WAS REALLY NO RECORD KEPT OF ANYTHING… [WHEN] WE FOUND OUT WE COULDN’T PUT [THE SUPPLIES] BACK INTO STORAGE [AT THE MUSEUM], BEING SAFETY OFFICER I KNEW AND SCOUTED ALL THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN THE CITY. THE SPORTSPLEX, DOWN IN THE DEEP BASEMENT, HAD A ROOM THAT WAS DRY AND UNOCCUPIED… SO I PUT THE STUFF DOWN THERE AND THAT’S BASICALLY WHERE IT WOUND UP… AT THAT TIME EACH MUNICIPALITY RECEIVED A MERE PITTANCE OF DOLLARS TOWARDS DISASTER SERVICES… 12-1500 EMPLOYEES AND THE ONLY SAFETY PERSON WAS ME… THEN AS THE MUNICIPAL ACT CHANGED, THE EMPHASIS WAS PUT ON POLITICALLY BY THE PROVINCE TO ESTABLISH A PEACETIME SCENARIO … IN THE BASEMENT OF THE OLD COURTHOUSE, THERE [WAS] A ROOM WHERE AN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE WITH ALL THE COMMUNICATIONS HAD BEEN SET UP… FOR GAS, WATER, SEWER, MAYOR, DEPARTMENT HEADS… [THE STRETCHERS AND BLANKETS] WERE USED IN HOSPITAL EXERCISES… TO SEE HOW PREPARED [STAFF WERE], HOW THEY COULD HANDLE MASS CASUALTIES… WE WOULD DO UP 30/40 KIDS IN BROKEN ARMS, AMNESIA, BURNS, FRACTURES, LOSS OF LIMB… THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS VERY GOOD, [DOING] TRAINING AND MOCK SCENARIOS.” ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD RANGING FROM 1957 TO 2006 DESCRIBE MOCK DISASTER EXERCISES TAKING PLACE ON A SEMI-REGULAR BASIS, TO TEST THE PREPAREDNESS OF FIRE, AMBULANCE, HOSPITAL, AND CITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. DENNIS JOBE SAID: “SHORTLY AFTER THE EDMONTON TORNADO [IN 1987] THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DECREED THAT EVERYONE, COUNTIES, CITIES, SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN… SO THE CITY WAS INSTRUCTED THAT THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT ONE TOGETHER… I WORKED FOR THE CITY MANAGER… WE WERE AWARE… THAT WE HAD TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PREPARATION… SO WE KNEW WHERE [THE SUPPLIES] WERE [AND] COUNTED THINGS… AND WE DID USE IT A COUPLE OF TIMES [WHEN] WE HAD AN EXERCISE.” LEO VANDENHEUVAL SAID: “WE USED TO HAVE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE COURT HOUSE… THE REASON IT WAS THERE IS THAT THEY HAD ROOM [AND] IT WAS QUITE A STRONG, FULL CONCRETE FACILITY THAT COULD PERHAPS WITHSTAND A LOT OF DAMAGE… I WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED BACK IN THOSE DAYS AS WELL FROM THE RISK MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT AND BECAUSE I WAS THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CITY WHENEVER THINGS WENT SIDEWAYS. THE CITY MANAGER WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THAT TEAM [AS WELL AS] THE FIRE CHIEF, POLICE CHIEF, ALL THE DIRECTORS… COMMUNITY SERVICES… ENGINEERING… THE MAYOR… THAT WHOLE TEAM WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED TOGETHER TO WORK TOGETHER IN A DISASTER SITUATION… NOTHING OF [HIGHLY EMERGENT] SIGNIFICANCE HAS EVER HAPPENED IN LETHBRIDGE. WE’VE NEVER HAD TO OPEN UP HOUSING CENTRES LIKE THE CIVIC CENTRE OR THE AREAS TO ACCOMMODATE THAT KIND OF THING BECAUSE WE’VE NEVER HAD A DISASTER THAT BIG… THE BIGGEST ONE THAT COMES TO MIND IS THE 1995 FLOOD… AT THAT TIME THERE WAS SOME TALK THAT WE WOULD GET THE MILITARY INVOLVED… BUT BACK THEN IT REQUIRED APPROVAL FROM OTTAWA, SO IT WAS AWFULLY DIFFICULT TO BRING THE MILITARY IN… TO SOME EXTENT WE KNEW THAT [THE CIVIL DEFENSE] EQUIPMENT EXISTED… [SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT] MIGHT HAVE COME INTO THE SYSTEM IN THE LATE ‘80S WHEN DENNIS JOBE WAS AROUND… BECAUSE HE HAD CERTAIN CONTACTS WITH THE MILITARY, BECAUSE HE WAS A RETIRED ARMY OFFICER… [IT IS IMPORTANT THAT] SOMEBODY WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION [IS] AWARE [AND] THAT IT’S INVENTORIED AND KEPT UP TO DATE.” MIKE ROSS SAID: “WHEN I BECAME DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF IN 1998 [THAT POSITION] WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS… WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE BUDGET AND [ASKED] ‘WHAT’S THIS $1000 WE PAID TO THE ENMAX CENTRE?’ BECAUSE THERE WAS A RENTAL [FEE] THAT NO ONE SEEMED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT… WE DID SOME INVESTIGATION AND THEN WE FOUND OUT THAT THERE WAS ALL THIS MATERIAL THAT WAS STORED IN THE DEEP BASEMENT… WE STARTED TO DO SOME RESEARCH AND FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PART OF A MOBILE HOSPITAL UNIT DATING BACK TO THE COLD WAR… IT [HAD BEEN] BASICALLY FORGOTTEN ABOUT… [IN 2006/2007, HEALTH CANADA] CONTACTED THE CITY AND SAID ‘ON OUR BOOKS THERE IS A [MOBILE] HOSPITAL IN LETHBRIDGE. DOES ANYBODY KNOW WHERE IT IS?’ AND THIS MESSAGE CAME TO ME AS THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CO-ORDINATOR … SUGGESTED THAT [THE SUPPLIES] HAD COME TO THE CITY IN THE ‘50S OR EARLY ‘60S… THE MATERIAL THAT’S THERE NOW IS PROBABLY A THIRD OF WHAT WAS THERE WHEN WE DID THE AUDIT… WE FOUND THINGS LIKE RADIATION BURN DRESSING THAT HAD A ‘BEST BY’ DATE… IV BOTTLES AND IV SOLUTION [THAT] INSTEAD OF BEING CLEAR, WAS CLOUDY… WE KEPT THE STRETCHERS [AND] A BUNCH OF BLANKETS BECAUSE WE FELT THAT… THEY WERE STILL GOOD AND WE COULD USE THEM IN A CURRENT DAY EMERGENCY… SO I REMOVED SOME OF THAT STUFF AND PUT IT OVER [IN] THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE [AT] THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, COPIES OF ORIGINAL EMERGENCY SERVICES SUPPLY INVENTORIES, AND RESEARCH MATERIAL ON LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE. FOR OTHER ARTIFACTS RELATING TO CIVIL DEFENSE IN LETHBRIDGE, SEE RECORDS P19870044001, P19870044002, P19960112110, P19960112111, P19970094001, AND P20090038000.
Catalogue Number
P20150012003
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FIRST AID HAVERSACK, “CANADA CD”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150012005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIRST AID HAVERSACK, “CANADA CD”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1965
Materials
CANVAS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
37
Length
29
Width
11
Description
GREEN CANVAS BAG WITH TOP FLAP SECURED BY TWO BUCKLED CANVAS STRAPS. LONGER LOOPED CARRYING STRAP IS SEWN TO BACK OF BAG AND HAS TWO BUCKLES TO ADJUST LENGTH. MAIN BODY OF BAG IS DIVIDED INTO TWO CAVITIES, AND EACH SIDE HAS OUTER POCKET WITH SNAP CLOSURE. PRINTED DESIGN ON TOP FLAP IS YELLOW CIRCLE WITH BLUE LOGO READING “CANADA CD”. TEXT PRINTED IN BLUE ON LOWER BODY OF BAG READS “FIRST AID”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. *NOTE* BAG IS FULL WITH FIRST AID SUPPLIES BUT HAS NOT BEEN OPENED TO MAINTAIN INTEGRITY. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ORIGINAL CATALOGUE DOCUMENT LISTING 8-850 FIRST AID HAVERSACK CONTENTS, PRODUCED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS FIRST AID BACKPACK WAS RECOVERED IN SPRING 2015 FROM A STORAGE AREA IN THE BASEMENT OF THE ENMAX CENTRE SPORTS ARENA, WHERE SUPPLIES RELATING TO LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE AND DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS/RISK MANAGEMENT HAD BEEN STORED FOR AT LEAST 30 YEARS PRIOR. DURING MARCH AND APRIL 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CURRENT AND RETIRED CITY STAFF THAT WERE INVOLVED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SUPPLIES AND DISASTER RESPONSE SERVICES, INCLUDING DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT JESSE KURTZ, RETIRED DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF MIKE ROSS, FORMER CITY DIRECTOR OF DISASTER SERVICES JOE KARL, FORMER CITY EMERGENCY SERVICES CO-ORDINATOR DENNIS JOBE, AND FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER/RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE OFFICER LEO VANDENHEUVAL. PREVIOUS RESEARCH INTO THE LETHBRIDGE CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE WAS CONDUCTED IN 2009, WHEN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROBERT GARDNER, A FORMER C.D. POLICE MEMBER (SEE RECORD P19870044001 FOR MORE INFORMATION). THE AUXILIARY CIVIL DEFENCE POLICE WAS ORGANIZED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AFTER THE PROVINCE APPEALED TO ALBERTA MUNICIPALITIES TO PREPARE DEFENCES IN CASE OF AN ENEMY ATTACK, INCLUDING A NUCLEAR STRIKE. THE C.D. POLICE WERE NOT OFFICIALLY PART OF THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE. THE AUXILIARY VOLUNTEERS DID, HOWEVER, RECEIVE TRAINING FROM THE CITY POLICE AND WHEN CALLED OUT BY THE C.D. DIRECTOR, CAME UNDER THE CONTROL OF CHIEF CONSTABLE JAMES H. CARPENTER.THE C.D. POLICE DISBANDED FOR UNKNOWN REASONS IN 1963. GARDNER WAS 33 WHEN HE JOINED THE C.D. POLICE IN 1960, AND EXPLAINS HIS MOTIVATION TO VOLUNTEER WAS BASED ON HIS PERCEPTION THAT A FUTURE WAR WAS LIKELY TO OCCUR – ESPECIALLY GIVEN THE PERIOD’S EVENTS, WHICH INCLUDED THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. GARDNER REMEMBERED TRAINING UNDER THE POLICE CHIEF AND SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, BUT MAINTAINED THAT OUTSIDE OF INITIAL TRAINING, C.D. POLICE OPERATIONS WERE NOT DIRECTED BY THE CITY POLICE. GARDNER SAID THAT MOST C.D. POLICE VOLUNTEERS WERE “MIDDLE AGED AND STAYED ON DUE TO THE THREAT OF WAR”. JOE KARL SAID: “[IN] LATE 1972 THE CITY MANAGER… [ASSIGNED ME TO] LOOK AFTER DISASTER SERVICES/CIVIL DEFENCE… IT’S HAD DIFFERENT NAMES AS TIME WENT ON… THIS EQUIPMENT… IS A CASUALTY COLLECTING UNIT, WITH WATER BOTTLES, BOOTS, RAIN GEAR, COVERALLS. THERE WERE STRETCHERS [AND] BLANKETS. THESE WERE ALL STORED AT THE OLD MUSEUM [ORIGINAL GALT MUSEUM BUILDING, BEFORE THE 1985 EXPANSION] NEAR THE BOILER ROOM… THAT’S WHERE I FIRST INHERITED THE STUFF. THERE WAS REALLY NO RECORD KEPT OF ANYTHING… [WHEN] WE FOUND OUT WE COULDN’T PUT [THE SUPPLIES] BACK INTO STORAGE [AT THE MUSEUM], BEING SAFETY OFFICER I KNEW AND SCOUTED ALL THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN THE CITY. THE SPORTSPLEX, DOWN IN THE DEEP BASEMENT, HAD A ROOM THAT WAS DRY AND UNOCCUPIED… SO I PUT THE STUFF DOWN THERE AND THAT’S BASICALLY WHERE IT WOUND UP… AT THAT TIME EACH MUNICIPALITY RECEIVED A MERE PITTANCE OF DOLLARS TOWARDS DISASTER SERVICES… 12-1500 EMPLOYEES AND THE ONLY SAFETY PERSON WAS ME… THEN AS THE MUNICIPAL ACT CHANGED, THE EMPHASIS WAS PUT ON POLITICALLY BY THE PROVINCE TO ESTABLISH A PEACETIME SCENARIO … IN THE BASEMENT OF THE OLD COURTHOUSE, THERE [WAS] A ROOM WHERE AN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE WITH ALL THE COMMUNICATIONS HAD BEEN SET UP… FOR GAS, WATER, SEWER, MAYOR, DEPARTMENT HEADS… [THE STRETCHERS AND BLANKETS] WERE USED IN HOSPITAL EXERCISES… TO SEE HOW PREPARED [STAFF WERE], HOW THEY COULD HANDLE MASS CASUALTIES… WE WOULD DO UP 30/40 KIDS IN BROKEN ARMS, AMNESIA, BURNS, FRACTURES, LOSS OF LIMB… THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS VERY GOOD, [DOING] TRAINING AND MOCK SCENARIOS.” ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD RANGING FROM 1957 TO 2006 DESCRIBE MOCK DISASTER EXERCISES TAKING PLACE ON A SEMI-REGULAR BASIS, TO TEST THE PREPAREDNESS OF FIRE, AMBULANCE, HOSPITAL, AND CITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF. DENNIS JOBE SAID: “SHORTLY AFTER THE EDMONTON TORNADO [IN 1987] THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DECREED THAT EVERYONE, COUNTIES, CITIES, SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN… SO THE CITY WAS INSTRUCTED THAT THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT ONE TOGETHER… I WORKED FOR THE CITY MANAGER… WE WERE AWARE… THAT WE HAD TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PREPARATION… SO WE KNEW WHERE [THE SUPPLIES] WERE [AND] COUNTED THINGS… AND WE DID USE IT A COUPLE OF TIMES [WHEN] WE HAD AN EXERCISE.” LEO VANDENHEUVAL SAID: “WE USED TO HAVE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE COURT HOUSE… THE REASON IT WAS THERE IS THAT THEY HAD ROOM [AND] IT WAS QUITE A STRONG, FULL CONCRETE FACILITY THAT COULD PERHAPS WITHSTAND A LOT OF DAMAGE… I WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED BACK IN THOSE DAYS AS WELL FROM THE RISK MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT AND BECAUSE I WAS THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE CITY WHENEVER THINGS WENT SIDEWAYS. THE CITY MANAGER WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THAT TEAM [AS WELL AS] THE FIRE CHIEF, POLICE CHIEF, ALL THE DIRECTORS… COMMUNITY SERVICES… ENGINEERING… THE MAYOR… THAT WHOLE TEAM WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED TOGETHER TO WORK TOGETHER IN A DISASTER SITUATION… NOTHING OF [HIGHLY EMERGENT] SIGNIFICANCE HAS EVER HAPPENED IN LETHBRIDGE. WE’VE NEVER HAD TO OPEN UP HOUSING CENTRES LIKE THE CIVIC CENTRE OR THE AREAS TO ACCOMMODATE THAT KIND OF THING BECAUSE WE’VE NEVER HAD A DISASTER THAT BIG… THE BIGGEST ONE THAT COMES TO MIND IS THE 1995 FLOOD… AT THAT TIME THERE WAS SOME TALK THAT WE WOULD GET THE MILITARY INVOLVED… BUT BACK THEN IT REQUIRED APPROVAL FROM OTTAWA, SO IT WAS AWFULLY DIFFICULT TO BRING THE MILITARY IN… TO SOME EXTENT WE KNEW THAT [THE CIVIL DEFENSE] EQUIPMENT EXISTED… [SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT] MIGHT HAVE COME INTO THE SYSTEM IN THE LATE ‘80S WHEN DENNIS JOBE WAS AROUND… BECAUSE HE HAD CERTAIN CONTACTS WITH THE MILITARY, BECAUSE HE WAS A RETIRED ARMY OFFICER… [IT IS IMPORTANT THAT] SOMEBODY WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION [IS] AWARE [AND] THAT IT’S INVENTORIED AND KEPT UP TO DATE.” MIKE ROSS SAID: “WHEN I BECAME DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF IN 1998 [THAT POSITION] WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS… WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE BUDGET AND [ASKED] ‘WHAT’S THIS $1000 WE PAID TO THE ENMAX CENTRE?’ BECAUSE THERE WAS A RENTAL [FEE] THAT NO ONE SEEMED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT… WE DID SOME INVESTIGATION AND THEN WE FOUND OUT THAT THERE WAS ALL THIS MATERIAL THAT WAS STORED IN THE DEEP BASEMENT… WE STARTED TO DO SOME RESEARCH AND FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PART OF A MOBILE HOSPITAL UNIT DATING BACK TO THE COLD WAR… IT [HAD BEEN] BASICALLY FORGOTTEN ABOUT… [IN 2006/2007, HEALTH CANADA] CONTACTED THE CITY AND SAID ‘ON OUR BOOKS THERE IS A [MOBILE] HOSPITAL IN LETHBRIDGE. DOES ANYBODY KNOW WHERE IT IS?’ AND THIS MESSAGE CAME TO ME AS THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CO-ORDINATOR … SUGGESTED THAT [THE SUPPLIES] HAD COME TO THE CITY IN THE ‘50S OR EARLY ‘60S… THE MATERIAL THAT’S THERE NOW IS PROBABLY A THIRD OF WHAT WAS THERE WHEN WE DID THE AUDIT… WE FOUND THINGS LIKE RADIATION BURN DRESSING THAT HAD A ‘BEST BY’ DATE… IV BOTTLES AND IV SOLUTION [THAT] INSTEAD OF BEING CLEAR, WAS CLOUDY… WE KEPT THE STRETCHERS [AND] A BUNCH OF BLANKETS BECAUSE WE FELT THAT… THEY WERE STILL GOOD AND WE COULD USE THEM IN A CURRENT DAY EMERGENCY… SO I REMOVED SOME OF THAT STUFF AND PUT IT OVER [IN] THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE [AT] THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, COPIES OF ORIGINAL EMERGENCY SERVICES SUPPLY INVENTORIES, AND RESEARCH MATERIAL ON LETHBRIDGE’S CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE. FOR OTHER ARTIFACTS RELATING TO CIVIL DEFENSE IN LETHBRIDGE, SEE RECORDS P19870044001, P19870044002, P19960112110, P19960112111, P19970094001, AND P20090038000.
Catalogue Number
P20150012005
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“CALOREX, UNITED DRUG CO.” THERMOS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINIUM
Catalogue Number
P20130004008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“CALOREX, UNITED DRUG CO.” THERMOS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
ALUMINIUM
No. Pieces
3
Height
35
Diameter
30
Description
ALUMINIUM VACUUM BOTTLE WITH TWIST-OFF LID AND “SNAP TITE” HINGED STOPPER. EMBOSSED ON BOTTOM WITH BRAND LOGO AND TEXT READING “CALOREX, UNITED DRUG CO., BOSTON – ST. LOUIS, U.S.A.” MINOR SCUFFS AND DENTS OVERALL.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
AGRICULTURE
LEISURE
History
THE COLLECTION OF OBJECTS BELONGING TO THE MEISSER FAMILY WAS DONATED BY JUDY WRIGHT, NIECE OF LOWELL MEISSER, WHO OPERATED A FARM OUTSIDE WARNER WITH HIS BROTHER ROME AS THE ‘MEISSER BROS’ FROM 1929 TO 1946. JUDY’S MOTHER WAS THE SISTER OF LOWELL’S WIFE ELINOR, AND SHE SPENT MUCH OF HER CHILDHOOD LIVING WITH THEM AND ROME MEISSER, DUE TO HER MOTHER BEING UNWELL. IN HER LATER ADULT LIFE, JUDY TOOK CARE OF “UNC” ROME AT HIS WATERTON RESIDENCE, AND BECAUSE ROME AND HIS BROTHER LOWELL DID NOT HAVE ANY LIVING DIRECT DESCENDANTS, JUDY WAS LEFT THE FAMILY BELONGINGS WHEN ROME DIED IN 2004. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT WAS EXTRACTED FROM AN INTERVIEW CONDUCTED WITH THE DONOR BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON NOVEMBER 14, 2013, AS WELL AS FROM A DOCUMENT WRITTEN BY HER AT THE TIME OF THE DONATION. WRIGHT SAID: “THIS THERMOS BOTTLE WENT OUT TO THE FIELD WHEN ROME WENT TO SEED OR HARVEST AND I RMEMBER THE MEALS THAT THE COOK TOOK OUT TO THE MEN SO THAT THEY DID NOT HAVE TO MISS MORE THAN A HALF HOUR OF HARVESTING. THOSE WERE THE BEST MEALS IN THE WORLD… WE WOULD GO OUT TO CHECK THE CROPS AND HE’D TAKE THE THERMOS… I CAN PICTURE HIM GOING INTO THE KITCHEN… AND HAVING IT FILLED WITH COFFEE BEFORE HE WOULD GO DO ANYTHING… [THE BOTTLE] WENT ALONG FOR ALL DAY FISHING TRIPS AND ON HUNTING EXCURSIONS. IT PROBABLY WENT ON THE LONG ROAD TO ARIZONA EVERY WINTER.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF FAMILY HISTORY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM ROME MEISSER’S MANUSCRIPT ‘THE MEISSER’S AND OTHER RAMBLINGS’ AND DONATIONS OF FAMILY PAPERS MADE BY WRIGHT TO THE GALT ARCHIVES. THE MEISSER FAMILY PATRIARCH, MICHAEL MEISSER, WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1830 AND IMMIGRATED TO ALMA, WISCONSIN IN 1846. HIS SON, JOHN LUTZI MEISSER MARRIED MARIE KINDSCHI ON APRIL 30, 1898 AND THEY MOVED TO WARNER, ALBERTA TO FARM IN 1910, LOOKING FOR A DRIER CLIMATE FOR MARIE, WHO SUFFERED FROM TUBERCULOSIS. THE COUPLE HAD FIVE CHILDREN: ORMA, LOWELL, JOHN (WHO DIED AT AGE TWO OF PNEUMONIA), ROME, AND MARIE. IN 1912, MOTHER MARIE DIED IN A TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC IN SALT LAKE CITY, AND FIVE YEARS LATER FATHER JOHN DIED FROM HEAD TRAUMA SUSTAINED IN A GRAIN ELEVATOR ACCIDENT. ONE OF THE CHILDREN’S PATERNAL AUNTS, FRENA, CAME TO WARNER TO HELP THEM WITH SCHOOLING AND RUNNING THE FARM. IN 1920, ORMA MARRIED LEE TENNEY AND IN 1926 LOWELL MARRIED ELINOR TENNEY, AND THE TWO COUPLES LOOKED AFTER THE TWO YOUNGER SIBLINGS UNTIL ORMA AND LEE MOVED TO CALIFORNIA IN 1931. THE YOUNGEST SISTER, MARIE, LATER JOINED THEM WITH HER SON JIM. LOWELL AND ROME FARMED TOGETHER FROM THE SEASON FOLLOWING THEIR FATHER’S DEATH (WHEN THEY WERE 17 AND 13 YEARS OLD, RESPECTIVELY) UNTIL 1945 WHEN THEIR LAND WAS DIVIDED FOR TAX BENEFIT. ROME NEVER MARRIED, AND IN 1928 HAD A SHORT STINT IN PILOT’S TRAINING BEFORE RETURNING TO FARMING PERMANENTLY. LOWELL AND ELINOR’S SON JERALD WAS BORN IN 1929. BY 1957 THE MEISSERS RETIRED FROM FARMING AND LEASED OUT THEIR LAND, AND IN 1958 THE FAMILY BOUGHT A CABIN IN WATERTON PARK, WHERE THEY SPENT ALL FOLLOWING SUMMERS. LOWELL AND ELINOR’S SON JERALD SPLIT HIS TIME BETWEEN FARMING IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND VARIOUS PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES. HE ENROLLED IN THE CATHOLIC SEMINARY IN SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, BUT PASSED AWAY IN 1990 BEFORE HE COULD BE ORDAINED. LOWELL DIED IN 1988, ELINOR FOLLOWED IN 1992, AND ROME PASSED AWAY IN 2004. THE FOLLOWING REMEMBRANCES OF ROME ‘UNC’ MEISSER WERE EXCERPTED FROM THE NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INTERVIEW. WRIGHT SAID: “I LIVED WITH THEM AND WENT OUT TO THE FARM ALL SUMMER LONG EVERY YEAR FROM THE TIME I WAS FIVE OR SIX YEARS OLD… I JUST HONESTLY THINK THAT I AM WHO I AM TODAY BECAUSE OF MY UNCLE ROME. MY DAD WAS A STAUNCH OLD ENGLISHMAN AND HE COULDN’T RELATE TO ME. HE WAS 45 YEARS OLD WHEN I WAS BORN BUT HE COULDN’T RELATE TO ME. SO, MY UNCLE COULD… HE SHOULD HAVE BEEN MARRIED WITH AT LEAST A DOZEN CHILDREN. IN HIS EARLY NINETIES, WHEN I FIRST GOT THERE [TO WATERTON] WE’D GO GROCERY SHOPPING. I’D HAVE TO WAIT WHILE HE STOPPED AND CHATTED WITH ALL THE CHILDREN HE’D COME ACROSS. HE SHOULD HAVE HAD LOTS OF KIDS. HE JUST LOVED KIDS AND I WAS A LITTLE KID… I WAS THERE FROM PRACTICALLY BIRTH AND LIVED MONTHS AT A TIME WITH HIM… HE COULD AFFORD TO LOOK AFTER THE COMMUNITY AS WELL… HE GAVE GENEROUSLY TO [COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS]. HE GAVE TO THE MILK RIVER HOSPITAL. HE DONATED $200,000 FOR THE HOCKEY GIRLS’ RESIDENCE. THEY HAD NO MONEY AND THAT’S WHY WE NOW HAVE A HOCKEY GIRLS’ RESIDENCE THAT HAS A HUGE KITCHEN AND HOUSES UP TO 25 GIRLS, AND KEEPS OUR WARNER SCHOOL OPEN. SO THAT IS A VERY BIG GIFT, HIS DONATIONS. THEY ALSO STARTED A MEISSER SCHOLARSHIP IN 1967 AND TWO WEEKS AGO I WENT OUT AND GAVE THE TROPHY AND THE MONEY TO THE LAST GIRL THAT WON IT. AND IT WILL GO ON INDEFINITELY AS LONG AS THERE’S A SCHOOL…HE WAS VERY SUPPORTIVE OF CHILDREN AND EDUCATION. THE SCHOLARSHIP, THE HOCKEY GIRLS, KEEPING THE WARNER SCHOOL OPEN - BIG FOCUS FOR HIM – WAS EDUCATION AND CHILDREN… HE WAS ONE OF THOSE KIND OF PRACTICALLY ANONYMOUS DONORS IN THE PAST. HOWEVER, AS HE GOT A LITTLE OLDER, I THINK HE ENJOYED THE ATTENTION. THEY MADE A BIG DEAL ABOUT THE HOCKEY SCHOOL. THE RESIDENCE HAS GOT, HUGE, IT HAS HIS NAME ON IT BUT I DON’T THINK HE SAW THAT. AND THEY HAD HIM RIDE IN THE PARADE ONE YEAR, THE COMMUNITY RECOGNIZED HIM AS MUCH AS HE’D LET THEM RECOGNIZE HIM.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR A FULL TRANSCIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, WRITTEN DOCUMENTATION ON THE MEISSER FAMILY BY JUDY WRIGHT AND ROME MEISSER, OBITUARIES AND PHOTOGRAPHS OF FAMILY MEMBERS, AND FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT EACH ARTIFACT COMPRISING THE DONATION.
Catalogue Number
P20130004008
Acquisition Date
2013-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY WEB BELT, ENGINEERS
Date Range From
1954
Date Range To
1957
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20110007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY WEB BELT, ENGINEERS
Date Range From
1954
Date Range To
1957
Materials
CANVAS, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.2
Length
95.9
Width
8.2
Description
CANVAS GREEN BELT WITH BRASS CLASP. CLASP READS, “ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS”. OUTSIDE OF BELT IS RUBBERIZED. VARIOUS STAINS INSIDE BELT. WRITING ON BACK READS, “M478286 C.R.S.”. ADJUSTABLE BY REPOSITIONING THE HOOKS THAT WRAP AROUND INSIDE BELT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
CARLTON (CARLY) ROSS STEWART JOINED THE 33RD FIELD PARK SQUADRON ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS (RESERVE) IN 1954. STEWART WAS ISSUED A “BATTLE DRESS” UNIFORM WITH BOOTS, CAP, PUTTIES AND OTHER ARTICLES INCLUDING THE BELT WITH THE SERIAL NUMBER “M478286 C.R.S.”. THE ‘M’ IN THE NUMBER INDICATED ALBERTA. AT THE TIME OF DONATION STEWART SAID, “LATER A NEW BELT BUCKLE/CLASP WAS ISSUED TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE SQUADRON COMMEMORATING OR INDICATING QUEEN ELIZABETH II ON IT (THIS ONE). A FEW OF WE YOUNGER FELLOWS GROUND OR POLISHED OFF THE CENTRE CIRCULAR PART OF THE BRASS CLASP WHICH HAD THE QUEEN’S INSIGNIA ON IT. WE THEN PROCEEDED TO POLISH IT TO A HIGH DEGREE OF LUSTER. WE DID NOT MEAN ANY DISRESPECT OF THE QUEEN OR MILITARY DRESS, WE JUST THOUGHT IT LOOKED MUCH SHARPER. ANYWAYS, WE WERE TOLD SHORTLY THEREAFTER BY OUR MILITARY SUPERIORS THAT WE HAD DEFACED GOVERNMENT PROPERTY AND WE COULD BE CHARGED. NOTHING BECAME OF THE SITUATION. UPON MY NORMAL DISCHARGE FROM THE SQUADRON IN LATE 1957, I HAD TO TURN IN MY UNIFORM AND BOOTS TO THE QUARTERMASTER STORES. WE WERE ALLOWED TO KEEP ONLY OUR WEB BELT AND BRASS BUCKLE.” IN THE 1960S THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT CUT BACK ON MILITARY UNITS, THE 33RD FIELD PARK SQUADRON ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS WAS ONE OF THE LOCAL CUTBACKS. THE 33RD HAD AN ENROLLMENT OF OVER 400+ RESERVE MEN IN THE MID 1950S. IT HAD BEEN HEADQUARTERED AT THE SW CORNER OF 5TH AVENUE AT MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE NORTH IN THE OLD AIRPORT HANGER AND OTHER BUILDINGS OF THE PRE-1939 LETHBRIDGE AIRFIELD. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON STEWART'S MILITIA ACTIVITIES AND MEMORIES, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20110007000
Acquisition Date
2010-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SECURITY BAND, “ELLISON MILLING”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140013000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SECURITY BAND, “ELLISON MILLING”
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1975
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.15
Length
1.5
Width
22
Description
FLAT METAL BAND, SILVER IN COLOUR, WITH ONE WIDER END THAT HAS SMALL NOTCHES ALONG THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES. THE OPPOSITE END IS THIN AND HAS ONE ROUND HOLE AND ONE PERFORATED TAB. RAISED LETTERING STAMPED ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE BAND READS “ELLISON MILLING, 30342”. OVERALL CONDITION EXCELLENT – SLIGHT ARCHING BEND THROUGHOUT LENGTH OF BAND.
Subjects
RAIL TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
History
THE DONOR, CHRIS MORRISON, RECEIVED THIS RAILCAR SECURITY BAND FROM E.L. HILL ON MARCH 26, 2014. HILL WAS CLOSING HIS STORE, HILL’S PANTRY, THAT HAD OPERATED AT 1270 2 AVENUE NORTH SINCE THE 1980S. PRIOR TO OPERATING AT THAT LOCATION, HILL OWNED AND OPERATED THE BUSINESS OUT OF THE BUILDING ACROSS THE STREET, AT 1269 2 AVENUE NORTH. HILL HAD PURCHASED THAT BUILDING FROM REED ELLISON OF ELLISON MILLING COMPANY, AND FOUND APPROXIMATELY 50 UNUSED BANDS STAMPED WITH “ELLISON MILLS”, AND A BOOK OF CORPORATE MINUTES RELATED TO CARDSTON MILLING LTD. WHEN HILL MOVED HIS BUSINESS ACROSS THE STREET HE TOOK THE BANDS AND BOOK WITH HIM ALONG WITH THE OTHER CONTENTS OF THE BUILDING. IN AN EMAIL TO COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE DONOR WROTE “MR. HILL TOLD ME THE BANDS WERE TIED TO THE DOOR OF THE BOX CARS LOADED WITH ELLISON PRODUCTS TO ENSURE THE CAR WAS NOT OPENED AND THE CONTENTS DISTURBED. IF THE BAND WERE BROKEN, IT WOULD BE AN INDICATION OF ENTRY. IT WAS AN INEXPENSIVE SECURITY DEVICE. IT WAS GIVEN TO ME BECAUSE I KNOW MR. HILL WELL AND HE KNOWS I’M INTERESTED IN HISTORY AND MIGHT FIND AN APPROPRIATE HOME FOR THESE TWO THINGS [THE BOOK OF CARDSTON MILLING CORPORATE MINUTES WAS DONATED TO THE GALT ARCHIVES - SEE RECORD 20141027].” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF ELLISON MILLING COMPANY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM AN ARTICLE PRINTED IN THE AUGUST 8, 2005 ISSUE OF THE CALGARY HERALD. EPHRAIM PETER ELLISON ARRIVED IN RAYMOND, ALBERTA IN 1902 AND BEGAN CONSTRUCTION OF THE RAYMOND MILLING AND ELEVATOR COMPANY’S FIRST GRAIN ELEVATOR THAT YEAR. HE HAD A BACKGROUND IN MILLING AND CONSTRUCTED A FLOUR MILL WEST OF THE ELEVATOR. AFTER JUST SIX MONTHS OF OPERATION, MORE THAN 50,000 BUSHELS OF WHEAT FROM LOCAL CROPS HAD BEEN RECEIVED AT THE ELEVATOR. PRODUCTS OF THE MILL WERE EXPORTED ACROSS CANADA, EUROPE, AND ASIA. WITH THE BUMPER WHEAT CROP OF 1906, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE BECAME INTERESTED IN ESTABLISHING A FLOUR MILL AND OFFERED ELLISON INCENTIVES TO RELOCATE HIS OPERATION TO THE CITY. HIS NEW COMPANY, ELLISON MILLING AND ELEVATOR, WAS FORMED AND REGISTERED UNDER THE LAWS OF THE NEWLY FORMED PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. THE ELLISON MILLING COMPANY WAS OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE ELLISON FAMILY UNTIL 1975 WHEN IT WAS SOLD TO PARRISH & HEIMBECKER LTD, A PRIVATELY-OWNED CANADIAN GRAIN COMPANY. AS OF 2014, THE COMPANY CONTINUES TO OPERATE AT ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION ON 2 AVENUE AND 13 STREET SOUTH, AND IS THE LAST LARGE WHOLLY CANADIAN-OWNED MILLING COMPANY IN THE PROVINCE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF CORRESPONDANCE FROM THE DONOR AND THE CALGARY HERALD ARTICLE ON ELLISON MILLING COMPANY.
Catalogue Number
P20140013000
Acquisition Date
2014-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ASTROGRAPH AND CASE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120001000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ASTROGRAPH AND CASE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, METAL
No. Pieces
5
Height
16.1
Length
43.7
Width
25.6
Description
1) ASTROGRAPH. TIN PAINTED BLACK WITH GLASS PANEL. UNDER GLASS ARE TWO SPOOLS CONTAINING STAR MAPS PRINTED ON CLEAR PLASTIC. TOP HAS TWO KNOBS WHICH FEED MAPS ON AND OFF SPOOLS. TOP HAS FLIP SWITCH. RIGHT AND BOTTOM HAVE REMOVABLE PLUGS WITH LIGHT BULBS ATTACHED INSIDE. BEHIND PLUG AT BOTTOM IS TIN LABEL THAT IS ENGRAVED, “CANADA, ASTROGRAPH MK.IA, REF. NO 6B/I82, SER. NO 3697/44.” LABEL ALSO HAS GENERAL ELECTRIC SYMBOL. LEFT SIDE HAS TWO FORKS WITH NUTS AND BOLTS FED THROUGH. RIGHT SIDE HAS ONE FORK WITH NUT AND BOLT. BOTTOM HAS RED RUBBER CAP ATTACHED TO BRASS CHAIN. 2) CASE, WOOD PAINTED SLATE BLUE WITH ALUMINUM HARDWARE. WHITE PAINTED LETTERING ON TOP READS, “CANADA, ASTROGRAPH MKIA, REF. NO. 6B/I82, SERIAL NO. 3697/43.” WITH LETTERING IS PAINTED GENERAL ELECTRIC SYMBOL. LEFT HINGE IS BROKEN. FRONT CENTER OF CASE HAS HANDLE WITH LEATHER STRAP. INSIDE HAS WOODEN DIVIDERS WITH THREE COMPARTMENTS ON RIGHT SIDE. WOODEN SPACERS AND MOUNTS ON LEFT SIDE COVERED WITH WHITE FELT IN SOME AREAS. 3) CAN, TIN. ORANGE RESIDUE AROUND LIP AT RIM. WHITE PAPER LABEL ON FRONT READS, “CANADA, R.C.A.F. 6B/98, 60N – 41N, R.A.F. 6B/193, SW157.” WRITTEN IN PINK HIGHLIGHTER AT TOP RIGHT CORNER OF LABEL IS, “8.” 4) SPARE PLASTIC PLUG WITH GLASS LIGHT BULB. 5) ONE ROUND HEAD BOLT WITH FLATHEAD SLOT AT TOP AND ONE HOMOLOGOUS SIX-SIDED NUT.
Subjects
ASTRONOMICAL T&E
TOOLS & EQUIPMENT FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
EDUCATION
History
DONOR DOUG PATCHING CAME INTO POSSESSION OF ASTROGRAPH AT THE TIME OF HIS FATHER DEL PATCHING’S PASSING ON FEBRUARY 4, 2004. THE ASTROGRAPH WAS LOCATED IN HIS FATHER’S HOME, BUT DONOR DOUG PATCHING RECALLS THE OBJECT, “MOVING AROUND WITH US.” DOUG PATCHING’S EARLIEST RECOLLECTION OF THE ASTROGRAPH’S EXISTENCE WAS WHILE HIS FATHER WAS, “WORKING AT THE LETHBRIDGE AIRPORT, HELPING TO DISMANTLE THE CF-100S. HE WOULD GO OUT DURING THE WINTER AND BRING HOME BUCKETS OF BOLTS.” DEL PATCHING LIVED ON A FARM SOUTH-EAST OF TOWN ON THE NORTH-EAST QUARTER “720 WEST OF THE 4TH NEAR WILSON SIDING.” AT THE TIME OF DONATION, DOUG PATCHING RELATED THAT, “AS A KID, IT WAS KINDA NEAT TO SEE STARS PROJECTED AND EVER SINCE THAT TIME I BOUGHT STAR MAPS. I WAS INSPIRED BY THIS THING.” THE ASTROGRAPH GIVES LONGITUDE, LATITUDE, STAR NAMES AND LOCATION. DOUG PATCHING SAID, “I THINK IT WAS MEMORABILIA, I’VE GOT HIS LOG BOOK WHEN HE WAS IN THE RCAF.” DEL PATCHING SERVED IN 1941/42 TO 1945 IN HALIFAX AS A NAVIGATOR. THE ASTROGRAPH’S LAST KNOWN USE WAS IN THE 1970S/80S AND, “MAY HAVE MADE IT TO WILSON JR. HIGH AS A TEACHER. HE HAD THE FIRST HAND-HELD CALCULATOR OF ANYONE IN SCHOOL.” HE TAUGHT SCIENCE BETWEEN 1970 AND 1980. ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, “DEL PATCHING WAS BORN IN ETZIKOM ALBERTA IN 1918. HE GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA WITH A B.SC (AGRICULTURE) IN 1939. FROM 1942 TO 1945 HE SERVED IN THE R.C.A.F. AS A NAVIGATOR WITH THE RANK OF FLIGHT SERGEANT, MAINLY FLYING NIGHTTIME IN HALIFAX BOMBING MISSIONS TO WESTERN EUROPE. FOLLOWING DISCHARGE, DEL PATCHING WORKED AT THE LETHBRIDGE AGRICULTURAL STATION IN 1945. IN 1946 HE MOVED TO THE FAMILY FARM NEAR WILSON SIDING WHERE HE FARMED FOR 26 YEARS. IN 1970, PATCHING COMPLETED A DEGREE IN EDUCATION AND LEFT FARMING TO TAKE UP A CAREER AS A TEACHER AT WILSON JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1980 WHEN HE RETIRED. DEL PATCHING PASSED AWAY ON FEBRUARY 5, 2004 “ FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20120001000
Acquisition Date
2012-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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