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Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190010002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
43.1
Width
42.1
Description
OLIVE GREEN SILK PILLOWCASE WITH BROWN TRIM AT TOP EDGE; PILLOWCASE HAS STENCILED, PAINTED IMAGE ON FRONT, WITH A WHITE BULLDOG SITTING ON A BLUE, RED, AND WHITE UNITED KINGDOM FLAG ON A RED BANNER WITH WHITE BORDERS AND BLACK TEXT, “CANADA”; IMAGE HAS A BLACK SHIELD IN THE CENTER WITH WHITE PINE NEEDLES AND PINECONES ON THE LEFT SIDE, RED MAPLE LEAVES AND A RED AND BLUE SHIELD WITH A BLUE CROWN ON TOP, AND A BLACK AND RED SHIP ON WHITE AND BLUE WAVES; RIGHT SIDE OF SHIELD HAS CLUSTER OF THREE UNITED KINGDOM FLAGS, GREY AND WHITE PLANE, AND SOLDIER PAINTED IN WHITE AND BLACK BESIDE A WHITE AND RED TANK; INSIDE OF SHIELD IS WHITE PAINTED TEXT, “SWEETHEART, I THOUGHT THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW, THAT SOME ONES THOUGHTS GO WHERE YOU GO, THAT ONE NEVER CAN FORGET, THE HOURS WE SPENT SINCE FIRST WE MET, THAT LIFE IS RICHER SWEETER FAR, FOR SUCH A SWEETHEART AS YOU ARE, AND NOW MY CONSTANT PRAYER WILL BE, THAT GOD MAY KEEP YOU SAFE FOR ME.” PILLOWCASE HAS BROWN BACK LINING; BOTTOM EDGE OF CASE HAS GREEN THREAD STITCHING BACKING TO SILK COVER. TOP SILK EDGE OF CASE IS TORN AND FRAYED; FRONT OF PILLOWCASE IS STAINED AND PAINT IS FADED; BACK OF PILLOWCASE IS STAINED WITH RIPS; FRONT OF PILLOWCASE HAS RIP IN CENTER THAT GOES THROUGH TO THE BACK; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
MILITARY
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON THE PILLOWCASE, DARMODY SHARED, “DAD SENT [THE PILLOWCASE] FROM OVERSEAS, TO MOM…[THE PILLOW CASE] COULD HAVE COME FROM BRITAIN…IT WAS A PILLOW, I THINK, AT ONE TIME…HE DID SEND A FEW THINGS, BUT IT WAS MAINLY THE LETTER-WRITING BACK-AND-FORTH. HE MADE SURE MOM SENT BOXES OF COOKIES, AND DIFFERENT THINGS…MORE PSYCHOLOGICAL, THAN NEEDING THE COOKIES.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR, TOO…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE THE KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND HE WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN HE DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM. ONE GERMAN WOMAN WAS HIT BY ONE OF THE FORCES. SHE WAS OK, BUT HE HAD TO TAKE HER HOME. HE KNEW ENOUGH TO COMMUNICATE IN GERMAN, AND IN DUTCH, WITH THE FAMILY, WHAT HAD HAPPENED. BUT, HE WASN’T A CANADIAN CITIZEN…THEY JUST QUIETLY GAVE HIM HIS PAPERS LIKE, CAME TO HIS HOUSE…I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS…HE JUST NEVER THOUGHT OF IT, AND HE SERVED OVERSEAS. AND, AT THE END, I GUESS, OR MAYBE DURING…THEY FOUND OUT HE WASN’T CANADIAN, SO THEY QUIETLY GAVE HIM THE PAPER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20160022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
73
Width
53
Description
GREEN WINDBREAKER JACKET WITH EMBROIDERED BADGE ON THE CHEST READING “KOREA VETERANS ASSOCIATION CANADA” IN GOLD THREAD, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF DETAILING AND A RED LOGO IN THE CENTER OF THE SHIELD; BADGE ON THE LEFT SHOULDER SHOWS A SHIELD WITH GOLD THREAD EDGING ALONG A FELT SHIELD WITH A BRASS CROWN AND SILVER TEXT “COMMONWEALTH.” RIGHT SHOULDER HAS RED FELT BADGE WITH RED EMBROIDERED EDGING, WITH BRASS-COLOURED LAUREL LEAVES SURROUNDING A MAPLE LEAF INSIDE AND BRASS-COLOURED TEXT “CANADA.” FRONT LEFT BREAST OF JACKET HAS A RED FELT POPPY PINNED WITH A GREEN METAL CENTER. JACKET HAS TWO SILVER SNAPS COVERED IN GREEN PLASTIC AT THE COLLAR. ZIPPER RUNS LENGTH OF JACKET CHEST. SLEEVES AND WAIST ARE ELASTIC. JACKET HAS TWO POCKETS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES AT WAIST LINED WITH WHITE COTTON. INSIDE OF JACKET IS BLACK. JACKET HAS WHITE TAGS INSIDE AT COLLAR IN RED, BLUE AND BLACK TEXT “CORPORATE CLOTHING BY AVON SPORTSWEAR TORONTO, XXL/M,” AND BILINGUAL ENGLISH/FRENCH COLLAR TAG IN BLACK TEXT “#30, OUTER SHELL 100% NYLON, EXCLUSIVE OF TRIMMING, CA 00368, MADE IN CANADA, DRY CLEAN ONLY,” AND TAG ON LOWER LEFT INSIDE WITH BLACK TEXT “C-36.” COLLAR AND INSIDE OF JACKET HAS DIRT STAINING AND SOILING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON OCTOBER 17, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ERIC MORRIS ABOUT HIS ASSOCIATION WITH THE KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, PROMPTED BY THE DONATION OF A KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBER JACKET TO THE MUSEUM BY DWAYNE GOLDIE. THE JACKET ORIGINALLY BELONGED TO BILL RAMAGE OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. MACLEAN ASKED MORRIS ABOUT THE JACKET AND IF HE RECOGNIZED THE GARMENT, AND MORRIS RECALLED, “THIS IS THE GREEN DRESS JACKET THAT WE’RE ALL WEARING IN THE ASSOCIATION…EVERY DAY WEAR SORT OF THING.” “[THE BADGES ARE THE] PHANTOM AND THAT’S CANADA AS WELL. [EVERYONE WOULD HAVE THESE BADGES ON THEIR JACKETS] BASICALLY. BUT NOT THAT COLOUR. [YOU WOULDN’T BUY THE JACKET WITH THE BADGES ON IT] THERE IS A NATIONAL KIT SHOP [TO BUY BADGES]…YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO GET THE BADGES FROM THEM BUT THEY’RE NOT THESE…THAT’S JUST GOT THE CREST. …HE GOT THEM [THE SHOULDER BADGES] IN KOREA. THEY’RE PROBABLY THE FIRST ONES THAT WERE MADE BECAUSE ALL THE REFLECTING IS CANADA.” “[THE] MEDALS ARE STILL AVAILABLE FROM THE KIT SHOP. NOT MUCH ELSE.” “NOT MANY [OF THE LETHBRIDGE GUYS HAD OUTER SHELL JACKETS LIKE THIS]. BASICALLY [JUST] THE BLAZER. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF BILL RAMAGE, MORRIS SHARED, “I DIDN’T SEE TOO MUCH OF HIM [BILL RAMAGE]…HE WAS A MEMBER OF OUR ORGANIZATION. [HE WAS] ACTIVE. SUPPORTIVE. GOOD GUY. I DIDN’T SEE TOO MUCH OF HIM. HE HAD A SENSE OF HUMOUR.” MORRIS SHARED HIS MEMORIES OF HIS OWN TIME IN THE KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “I WAS PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY FOR QUITE A FEW YEARS AND I’M A LIFETIME MEMBER OF KVA…THERE’S MANY KOREAN VETERANS IN THIS PART OF ALBERTA…WE HAD A MEDAL PRESENTATION LAST YEAR, THERE [WERE] ONE HUNDRED AND TEN FROM SOUTHERN ALBERTA WE INVITED TO IT. THAT’S ANYWHERE FROM SOUTHERN ALBERTA A LOT OF THEM ARE MEMBERS BUT NOT MEMBERS OF THE UNIT. THEY’RE MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL SAME AS I AM NOW.” “WE WERE A FAIRLY ACTIVE UNIT…WE HAD OUR PARADES AND CEREMONIES. WE ALSO WORKED AT THE LOCAL BINGO HALL ONCE EVERY YEAR AND FROM THAT WE USED TO GET OVER THIRTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR, WHICH OF COURSE ALL WE GOT OUT OF IT WAS ABOUT FIVE THOUSAND. WE HAD TO DISTRIBUTE THE REMAINDER TO DESERVING ORGANIZATIONS WITHIN OUR IMMEDIATE AREA WHICH WE DID. THE OTHER MEMBERS ARE STILL YOU KNOW, GOING, NOT IN GOOD HEALTH MOST OF THEM BUT THEY’RE STILL GOING. “THE LEGION [IS WHERE WE MET]. EVERYTHING OPERATED OUT OF THERE. THE LEGION DOES SUPPORT THEM [KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATIONS ACROSS CANADA], [AS] MEETING PLACES.” “WE PARADED THERE [CITY HALL] ON REMEMBRANCE DAY. THAT WAS OUR PRIMARY PARADE AND IT WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL TO ALL. [IT WAS] PRETTY HARD TO GET THESE OLD GUYS OUT TO PARADE…A LOT OF THOSE MEMBERS OF THE LOCAL SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATIONS, WHICH WE FUNDED…THE KOREAN COMMUNITY HERE IS A FAIR SIZE, AND THEY SUPPORTED US…AFTER OUR PARADE FOR EXAMPLE, THEY WOULD INVITE US TO THE CHURCH FOR DINNER. OR WHEN WE HAD OUR MEDAL PRESENTATION THEY SET UP THE KITCHEN AND FED EVERYBODY…THEY WERE VERY SUPPORTIVE.” “[THE ORGANIZATION IS] VERY IMPORTANT [TO ME]. IT IS TO ALL THE MEMBERS OF ANY VETERAN’S ORGANIZATION…WHEN YOU SPEAK TO THE LEGION MEMBERS FOR EXAMPLE IT’S IMPORTANT TO THEM THAT YOU BELONG TO A COMRADESHIP…WE WERE STAUNCH MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY…BECAUSE WE VOLUNTEERED…OUR ORGANIZATION IS CLOSED DOWN, AND THE NEXT CLOSEST ONE IS IN CALGARY WHICH WE CAN GO TO ANYTIME. WE CAN GO TO ANY LEGION.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160022000-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING A COPY OF THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20160022000
Acquisition Date
2016-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

BRACELET, IDENTIFICATION

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact13469
Other Name
"LIEUT. R. W. BUCHANAN"
Date Range From
1917
Date Range To
1918
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER
Catalogue Number
P20190007001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LIEUT. R. W. BUCHANAN"
Date Range From
1917
Date Range To
1918
Materials
SILVER
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.4
Width
2
Description
MILITARY IDENTIFICATION BRACELET COMPRISED OF SILVER DISC ATTACHED SILVER LINK-CHAINS THROUGH HOLES AT EDGES. SILVER DISC HAS TEXT ENGRAVED ON FRONT, “LIEUT. R.W. BUCHANAN, 31ST CANADIANS, B.E.F. FRANCE”. DISC HAS TARNISHING AROUND FRONT EDGES AND ON BACK; CHAINS ARE TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
A BIOGRAPHY OF ROY BUCHANAN WAS DEVELOPED USING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, BUCHANAN’S MILITARY RECORD HELD BY THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, THE WAR DIARY FOR THE 31ST CANADIAN INFANTRY BATTALION, OCTOBER 1917-AUGUST 1918, HELD BY THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, AND CANADIAN WAR GRAVES COMMISSION RECORDS. LIEUTENANT ROY WORKMAN BUCHANAN WAS BORN IN NORWOOD, ONTARIO ON NOVEMBER 25, 1890, ACCORDING TO HIS FIRST WORLD WAR ATTESTATION FORM. THE SON OF REVEREND WILLIAM BUCHANAN, AND BROTHER TO W.A. BUCHANAN, M.P., BUCHANAN WORKED FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PRIOR TO ENLISTING IN WORLD WAR 1, AND WAS RECORDED AS PREVIOUSLY SERVING WITH THE 20TH BATTERY LETHBRIDGE ON HIS ATTESTATION FORM. ACCORDING TO HIS MILITARY RECORD HELD BY THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, ROY BUCHANAN ENLISTED IN THE 137TH OVERSEAS BATTALION ON DECEMBER 1ST, 1915 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. BUCHANAN WAS TRANSFERRED OVERSEAS IN MAY 1917 TO SERVE WITH THE 31ST CANADIAN INFANTRY BATTALION IN FRANCE. THE 31ST BATTALION SUPPORTED THE OFFENSIVE ON AMIENS IN AUGUST 1918, AND SERVED AT PASSCHENDAELE IN NOVEMBER 1918. ACCORDING TO THE WAR DIARIES FOR THE 31ST CANADIAN BATTALION, OCTOBER 1917-AUGUST 1918, ON AUGUST 25TH, 1918 THE 31ST BATTALION HAD ORDERS NOT TO MOVE FORWARD, AND WERE HEAVILY SHELLED THROUGHOUT THE DAY BY GERMAN FORCES. AT 10:00PM, THE 31ST BATTALION RECEIVED WORD THAT “SCOTTISH RIFLES” WOULD TAKE THE POSITION OF THEIR “A” COMPANY, AND THE “A” COMPANY WOULD MOVE TO THE “OLD FRONT LINE.” ON AUGUST 26, 1918, THE SECOND BATTLE OF ARRAS BEGAN, WITH THE 31ST BATTALION FIRST ACTING IN SUPPORT, THEN TAKING A POSITION ON THE FRONT ON AUGUST 28, 1918. THE SECOND BATTLE OF ARRAS LASTED AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 3, 1918 AS PART OF THE HUNDRED DAYS OFFENSIVE AND ADVANCE ON THE GERMAN HINDENBURG LINE. ROY BUCHANAN WAS REPORTED KILLED IN ACTION ON AUGUST 25, 1918, AND WAS BURIED IN WAILLY ORCHARD CEMETERY, PAS DES CALAIS, FRANCE. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE ROY BUCHANAN IDENTIFICATION BRACELET, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “I THINK DAD AND I FOUND IT TOGETHER.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, COPIES OF WAR DIARY ENTRIES MENTIONING ROY WORKMAN BUCHANAN, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND ROY BUCHANAN’S MILITARY SERVICE FILE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007001
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MACDIARMID" WW1 SET
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, COPPER, SILK
Catalogue Number
P20190007010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MACDIARMID" WW1 SET
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Materials
SILVER, COPPER, SILK
No. Pieces
1
Length
10.3
Width
7
Description
TWO FIRST WORLD WAR MEDALS MOUNTED TO BLACK FELT-BOARD BACKING. LEFT MEDAL IS THE BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND DISPLAYS THE MEDAL BACK, WITH AN EMBOSSED PROFILE OF KING GEORGE V AND EMBOSSED TEXT AROUND EDGES “GEORGIVS V BRITT: OMN: REX ET IND: IMP:”. MEDAL HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG LOWER RIM, “737170, SJT. J. MACDIARMID. 43-CAN. INF.” RIGHT MEDAL IS THE ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL AND DISPLAYS THE MEDAL FRONT, WITH AN EMBOSSED DEPICTION OF VICTORY AS A WINGED WOMAN; MEDAL HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND LOWER RIM, “737170 SGT. J. MACDIARMID. 43-CAN. INF.” BRITISH WAR MEDAL IS FIXED TO SILK RIBBON WITH SILVER BAR; RIBBON HAS SEVEN BANDS OF COLOUR: BLUE, BLACK, WHITE, ORANGE CENTER, WHITE, BLACK, ORANGE. ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL IS FIXED TO SILK RIBBON WITH BRONZE RING; RIBBON HAS STRIPES IN RAINBOW COLOURS BEGINNING WITH VIOLET AT LEFT EDGE, PROGRESSING TO RED IN CENTER, AND PROGRESSING TO VIOLET AT RIGHT EDGE. BRITISH WAR MEDAL IS SILVER AND HEAVILY TARNISHED; ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL IS COPPER WITH BRONZE LAQUER; VICTORY MEDAL SHOWS WEAR ON FRONT AND AROUND EDGES. VICTORY MEDAL RIBBON HAS WEAR ALONG RIGHT EDGE; FELT BACKING HAS MINOR SOILING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN MACDIARMID ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON AUGUST 22, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH BATTALION ON OCTOBER 8, 1916, AFTER SAILING FROM CANADA OVERSEAS ON SEPTEMBER 25, 1916 WITH HIS UNIT. MACDIARMID WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH WITH THE 43RD CANADIAN RESERVE BATTALION SERVING IN FRANCE ON OCTOBER 27, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS DISCHARGED FROM SERVICE IN MAY 1919. A MEMO RECEIVED AND INCLUDED WITH HIS SERVICE FILE INDICATES THAT JOHN MACDIARMID PASSED AWAY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1968 AT THE SHAUGHNESSY HOSPITAL IN VANCOUVER, B.C. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE MEDALS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS WOULD HAVE THOUGHT THE IMPORTANT OBJECTS WERE] THE THINGS WITH NAMES ATTACHED. HE WOULD LEAVE THE TRAY BECAUSE HE DIDN’T KNOW WHERE THE TRAY CAME FROM; BUT HE WOULD HAVE TAKEN THE MEDAL, BECAUSE IT HAD A NAME ATTACHED TO IT AND IT’S NOT REPLACEABLE. THINGS WITH NAMES ATTACHED LIKE THAT, IT’S NOT LIKE YOU’RE GOING TO FIND THAT GUY’S MEDAL EVER AGAIN.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007010
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190007006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
91
Width
28
Description
BLUE PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF BURGUNDY TIE STRAPS AT HOIST END; PENNANT HAS BURGUNDY BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNANT HAS WHITE, GREEN, AND RED CREST PAINTED ON WITH WHITE SHIELD AND BANNER, RED AND WHITE CROWN AT TOP, GREEN MAPLE LEAF AND THISTLES IN CENTER, AND TEXT AROUND SHIELD, “113 OVERSEAS BATTALION, CANADA, LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS”. PENNANT HAS WHITE TEXT PAINTED ON FRONT, “113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS”. PENNANT HAS DISCOLORATION ON TEXT FROM LIGHT DAMAGE, AND IS FADED ON FRONT; BACK HAS MINOR SOILING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL...” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, 'WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN.' BRETT WOULD SAY, 'I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN.' I’M LIKE, 'WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.' BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, 'WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW.' WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007006
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190007007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
94.7
Width
27
Description
BURGUNDY PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF WHITE AND BURGUNDY TIE STRAPS AT END; PENNANT HAS WHITE BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNANT HAS WHITE TEXT SEWN ONTO FRONT, “43RD BATTALION”. BACK OF PENNANT SHOWS WHITE STITCHING FOR LETTERS AND BAND SEWN AT HOIST. PENNANT IS FADED ON FRONT AND HAS SEVERE LIGHT DAMAGE AT END TIP; LETTERS ON FRONT ARE DISCOLOURED FROM LIGHT DAMAGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL...” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, 'WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN.' BRETT WOULD SAY, 'I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN.' I’M LIKE, 'WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.' BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, 'WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW.' WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE." ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007007
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190007008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"43RD BATTALION"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
11
Length
98
Width
27
Description
ARMY GREEN PENNANT WITH TWO PAIRS OF ORANGE TIE STRAPS SEWN ONTO END; PENNANT HAS ORANGE BAND SEWN ONTO HOIST END. PENNANT HAS ORANGE TEXT SEWN ONTO FRONT, “43RD BATTALION”. BACK OF PENNANT SHOWS ORANGE STITCHING FROM BAND AT HOIST END AND LETTERS. PENNANT FRONT IS FADED AND HAS LIGHT DAMAGE BELOW TEXT; END TIP IS CREASED WITH LOSS IN CENTER; BACK HAS FADING AND LIGHT DAMAGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MACLEAN AND BRETT CLIFTON, CLIFTON ELABORATED THAT “THE PENNANTS [WERE] A LOT TOGETHER SEPARATE FROM THE HATE BELT AND SPORRAN…[A] DEATH PENNY, [THE] MEDALS, AND [A] SCROLL BELONGED WITH THE PENNANTS BUT THE AUCTION WAS PULLED.” THE SALE REFERENCED WAS FOR A LOT CONNECTED WITH PTE. JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG OF THE 43RD BATTALION. ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG WAS A PAINTER AND WIDOWER UPON ENLISTMENT. YOUNG ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON JUNE 17, 1916 IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. YOUNG’S UNIT SAILED FOR EUROPE IN SEPTEMBER 1916, AND IN OCTOBER 1916 YOUNG WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH OVERSEAS BATTALION. YOUNG SERVED IN FRANCE WITH THE 43RD BATTALION WHERE HE WAS GASSED; YOUNG RETURNED TO CANADA IN JUNE 1918 DUE TO THE GASSING AND WAS HOSPITALIZED IN CALGARY. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JOHN DONALDSON YOUNG PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 13, 1929. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE PENNANT, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL...” “THE PENNANTS [WERE FRUSTRATING] BECAUSE THERE WERE MORE TO THE SET AND WE’D JUST GOT ROBBED BY SOMEONE WHO HAD CONVINCED THE GUY TO END THE AUCTION EARLY, SO WE COULDN’T COMPLETE IT. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT MY DAD AND I WERE BOTH EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED OVER.” “[IT] WAS SORT OF A RIDICULOUS THING BECAUSE MY DAD HAD TO STAY UP PROBABLY UNTIL LIKE 2 IN THE MORNING BIDDING ON EACH BATCH THAT WENT IN THE LOT.” CAROL CLIFTON ADDED, “AND WE WERE ALL POOLING OUR MONEY. CHRIS WOULD SAY, 'WELL, I CAN PUT THIS MUCH IN.' BRETT WOULD SAY, 'I’LL PUT THIS MUCH IN.' I’M LIKE, 'WELL I HAVE THIS, SO I’LL SELL THIS ARTIFACT AND THAT WAY YOU CAN HAVE THE MONEY.' BECAUSE WE EXPECTED…YOU’D HAVE TO PROBABLY PAY WAY TOO MUCH, BUT YOU NEEDED TO BRING IT ALL HOME TOGETHER AND THEN SUDDENLY THE GUY JUST ENDED IT. “THE GUY TOOK [THE LOT] APART AND WE PAID WAY TOO MUCH FOR EACH PIECE, BECAUSE WE WANTED THEM BECAUSE THEY BELONGED TO THEM, AND IT WOULD BE DISHONEST TO USE A DIFFERENT PIECE THAT WASN’T HIS. SO, FOR AN ARTIFACT THAT YOU MAYBE COULD BUY FOR ABOUT $10.00, WE PAID $40.00 BECAUSE WE KNEW IT BELONGED TO THAT INDIVIDUAL FROM HERE AND, WE NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT, 'WELL, WE COULD JUST SNEAK IN ONE AND NO ONE WILL KNOW.' WE NEVER WOULD HAVE FAKED AN ARTIFACT. WE SAT AND BID FOR HOURS AND OF COURSE OVERPAID FOR EVERY SINGLE PIECE. THEN WHEN YOU BUY ONE, YOU FEEL YOU HAVE TO BUY THEM ALL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE." ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007008
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1945
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.2
Length
12.2
Width
17.5
Description
WOOD BOX WITH DARK-WOOD TONES AND LIGHTER WOOD BASE; BOX HAS CARVED SCROLL PATTERN ON TOP WITH CARVED TEXT, “MY DARLING IRENE”; BOX HAS CARVED SCROLL PATTERN ON FRONT WITH CARVED TEXT, “HOLLAND 1945”. BOX HAS NAILS IN SIDES AND ATTACHED TO BASE; BOX HAS BRASS HINGES ON BACK. INSIDE OF BOX HAS MINOR RESIDUE AND STAINING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON THE CARVED BOX, DARMODY SHARED, “DAD SENT [THE BOX] FROM OVERSEAS, TO MOM, FROM HOLLAND…HE DID SEND A FEW THINGS, BUT IT WAS MAINLY THE LETTER-WRITING BACK-AND-FORTH. HE MADE SURE MOM SENT BOXES OF COOKIES, AND DIFFERENT THINGS…MORE PSYCHOLOGICAL, THAN NEEDING THE COOKIES.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR, TOO…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE THE KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND HE WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN HE DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM. ONE GERMAN WOMAN WAS HIT BY ONE OF THE FORCES. SHE WAS OK, BUT HE HAD TO TAKE HER HOME. HE KNEW ENOUGH TO COMMUNICATE IN GERMAN, AND IN DUTCH, WITH THE FAMILY, WHAT HAD HAPPENED. BUT, HE WASN’T A CANADIAN CITIZEN…THEY JUST QUIETLY GAVE HIM HIS PAPERS LIKE, CAME TO HIS HOUSE…I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS…HE JUST NEVER THOUGHT OF IT, AND HE SERVED OVERSEAS. AND, AT THE END, I GUESS, OR MAYBE DURING…THEY FOUND OUT HE WASN’T CANADIAN, SO THEY QUIETLY GAVE HIM THE PAPER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1945
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.3
Diameter
30.6
Description
BROWN WOODEN BOWL; BOWL HAS SCALLOPED EDGES; BOWL TAPERS FROM TOP TO BASE; BOWL IS CARVED INWARDS FROM UPPER EDGES. INSIDE OF BOWL HAS CARVED WREATH OF LEAVES WITH TEXT AT THE TOP, “HOLLAND”, AND TEXT AT THE BOTTOM, “1945”, AND CARVED FLOWER IN THE CENTER. BASE HAS A HOLE CARVED IN THE CENTER. BOWL HAS MINOR DUST AND RESIDUE INSIDE; BOWL HAS LIGHT WEAR AND SCRATCHING INSIDE AND ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON THE BOWL, DARMODY SHARED, “DAD SENT [THE BOWL] FROM OVERSEAS, TO MOM, FROM HOLLAND…HE WATCHED THE GUY MAKE THIS [BOWL]…HE DID SEND A FEW THINGS, BUT IT WAS MAINLY THE LETTER-WRITING BACK-AND-FORTH. HE MADE SURE MOM SENT BOXES OF COOKIES, AND DIFFERENT THINGS…MORE PSYCHOLOGICAL, THAN NEEDING THE COOKIES.” “[THE BOWL WAS USED BY MY MOM AS A] JEWELRY BOX—THIS WAS PROBABLY ON THAT TABLE FOREVER.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR, TOO…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE THE KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND HE WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN HE DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM. ONE GERMAN WOMAN WAS HIT BY ONE OF THE FORCES. SHE WAS OK, BUT HE HAD TO TAKE HER HOME. HE KNEW ENOUGH TO COMMUNICATE IN GERMAN, AND IN DUTCH, WITH THE FAMILY, WHAT HAD HAPPENED. BUT, HE WASN’T A CANADIAN CITIZEN…THEY JUST QUIETLY GAVE HIM HIS PAPERS LIKE, CAME TO HIS HOUSE…I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS…HE JUST NEVER THOUGHT OF IT, AND HE SERVED OVERSEAS. AND, AT THE END, I GUESS, OR MAYBE DURING…THEY FOUND OUT HE WASN’T CANADIAN, SO THEY QUIETLY GAVE HIM THE PAPER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010003
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2011
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2011
Materials
POLYESTER, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
26.6
Width
24.1
Description
BLUE BERET WITH BLACK LEATHER TRIM AT OPENING AND BLACK INTERIOR LINING. BERET HAS THREE INSIGNIA BADGES ON FRONT, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: METAL ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS CAP BADGE DEPICTING A CROWN ATOP A BELT SURROUNDED BY MAPLE LEAVES, BELT HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE”, BADGE HAS CUT-OUT CENTER WITH LETTERS “GR VI”, BADGE HAS BANNER AT BOTTOM WITH TEXT “ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS”; EMBROIDERED ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION CREST BADGE, DEPICTS A CROWN ATOP GOLD BADGE WITH RED MAPLE LEAF ON A WHITE BACKGROUND IN CENTER, BADGE HAS TEXT ON GOLD BORDER “MEMORIUM EORUM RETINEBIMUS”, WITH BLUE BANNER AND GOLD TEXT “LEGION” ACROSS BOTTOM ABOVE THREE RED POPPIES ON GOLD; RED FELT POPPY WITH BLACK CENTER AND SILVER PIN ATTACHING IT TO THE BERET. BERET HAS BLACK LACES TIED AT BACK. INSIDE BERET HAS A WHITE TAG WITH BLACK TEXT ON LEFT SIDE, “100% FORTREL POLYESTER, KRYSTAL CAP CO. LTD., 16 PLYMOUTH AVE., TORONTO, CANADA, MEDIUM, MOYEN”. BERET HAS SLIGHT RESIDUE AND GRIME ON INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR, TOO…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE THE KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND HE WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN HE DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM. ONE GERMAN WOMAN WAS HIT BY ONE OF THE FORCES. SHE WAS OK, BUT HE HAD TO TAKE HER HOME. HE KNEW ENOUGH TO COMMUNICATE IN GERMAN, AND IN DUTCH, WITH THE FAMILY, WHAT HAD HAPPENED. BUT, HE WASN’T A CANADIAN CITIZEN…THEY JUST QUIETLY GAVE HIM HIS PAPERS LIKE, CAME TO HIS HOUSE…I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS…HE JUST NEVER THOUGHT OF IT, AND HE SERVED OVERSEAS. AND, AT THE END, I GUESS, OR MAYBE DURING…THEY FOUND OUT HE WASN’T CANADIAN, SO THEY QUIETLY GAVE HIM THE PAPER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010004
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, BRASS, SILK
Catalogue Number
P20190010005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
SILVER, BRASS, SILK
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.7
Width
16.8
Description
FIVE FULL SIZE MOUNTED MEDALS, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: 1939-1945 STAR ON NAVY BLUE, RED, AND LIGHT BLUE RIBBON; THE FRANCE AND GERMANY STAR ON NAVY BLUE, WHITE, AND RED RIBBON; DEFENCE MEDAL ON GREEN, BLACK, AND ORANGE RIBBON; VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL ON GREEN, RED, AND BLUE RIBBON WITH A SILVER BAR WITH MAPLE LEAF IN CENTER; 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL ON RED, NAVY BLUE, AND WHITE RIBBON. MEDAL RIBBONS ARE ATTACHED TO SILVER BACKING BAR, WITH SILVER BAR-PIN ON BACK. MEDALS HAVE TARNISHING ON FRONTS AND BACKS; STARS HAVE TARNISHING ON EDGES. BACKS OF THE WAR MEDAL, VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL, DEFENCE MEDAL, AND FRANCE AND GERMANY STAR HAVE SILVER STAPLES THROUGH RIBBONS. RIBBONS HAVE FRAYING ENDS; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON HER FATHER’S MILITARY MEDALS, DARMODY ELABORATED, “DAD DID VALUE HIS MEDALS AND HE WOULD STRIVE TO ATTEND THE REMEMBRANCE DAY CEREMONIES EACH YEAR. IN 2010 HIS PICTURE WAS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ATTENDING THE EVENT AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS. NOT ONLY DID HE LOSE BUDDIES WHO WERE PART OF THE NORMANDY INVASION, BUT HE ALSO LOST A GOOD FRIEND [MRS. SARKOVICH’S SON] FROM LETHBRIDGE, WHO WAS KILLED DURING THE JAPANESE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOR. OVER THE YEARS DAD WROTE SEVERAL ARTICLES ABOUT HIS WAR EXPERIENCES FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. MY FAVORITE ARTICLES WERE: KINDNESS WARMED A WARTIME CHRISTMAS AND THREE LITTLE PIGS AND THE END OF THE WAR.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR, TOO…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE THE KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND HE WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN HE DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM. ONE GERMAN WOMAN WAS HIT BY ONE OF THE FORCES. SHE WAS OK, BUT HE HAD TO TAKE HER HOME. HE KNEW ENOUGH TO COMMUNICATE IN GERMAN, AND IN DUTCH, WITH THE FAMILY, WHAT HAD HAPPENED. BUT, HE WASN’T A CANADIAN CITIZEN…THEY JUST QUIETLY GAVE HIM HIS PAPERS LIKE, CAME TO HIS HOUSE…I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS…HE JUST NEVER THOUGHT OF IT, AND HE SERVED OVERSEAS. AND, AT THE END, I GUESS, OR MAYBE DURING…THEY FOUND OUT HE WASN’T CANADIAN, SO THEY QUIETLY GAVE HIM THE PAPER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ETERNAL FLAME
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20170036000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ETERNAL FLAME
Date
1966
Materials
STEEL, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
79.5
Width
64
Description
STEEL CYLINDRICAL TORCH ATTACHED TO BASE WITH FOUR LEGS; BASE LEGS SPIRAL IN AT FEET AND HAVE HOLES PUNCHED INTO THE BOTTOM OF FEET FOR FIXING TO A BASE. CYLINDRICAL TORCH BOLTED CLOSED ON SIDE WITH OPEN TOP; INSIDE OF TORCH IS DIVIDED INTO FOUR COMPARTMENTS BY STEEL INSERT WITH STEEL SQUARE ON TOP OF INSERT. TORCH HAS IRON PIPE EXTENDING FROM BASE TO FEET; PIPE HAS ILLEGIBLE EMBOSSED TEXT ON SIDE. LEGS AND FEET OF TORCH ARE WORN; PIPE EXTENDING FROM TORCH IS RUSTED; TORCH IS SEVERELY BLACKENED FROM USE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LIGHTING DEVICE
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
MILITARY
History
THE IMMORTAL FLAME MONUMENT WAS CONSTRUCTED IN 1966 AT MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY AS A MEMORIAL TO LETHBRIDGE AND DISTRICT VETERANS. THE MONUMENT WAS DEDICATED ON DECEMBER 27, 1966, WITH GUEST RETIRED BRIGADIER GENERAL J.S. STEWART LIGHTING THE TORCH. THE IMMORTAL FLAME WAS CONCEIVED AS A DIAMOND JUBILEE PROJECT BY THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH [UNIT 34] OF THE ARMY, NAVY, AND AIR FORCE VETERANS IN CANADA AND THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION GENERAL STEWART BRANCH NO. 4. A 1967 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE NOTED THE PROJECT COST $4,300.00, AND WAS PAID FOR WITH GRANT FUNDING FROM THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, PRIVATE DONATIONS, AND FUNDRAISING BY THE ARMY, NAVY, AND AIR FORCE VETERANS AND THE GENERAL STEWART LEGION BRANCH. THE FLAME WAS PLACED IN THE VETERANS SECTION OF MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY AS THE TOP FOR A 6-FOOT TALL MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENT WITH A PLAQUE. ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 29, 1978, THE IMMORTAL FLAME MONUMENT WAS CONSTRUCTED BY LETHBRIDGE MONUMENTAL. THE GAS-FED FLAME WAS SUSTAINED BY FUNDING FROM THE GENERAL STEWART LEGION BRANCH, THE ARMY, NAVY, AND AIR FORCE VETERANS, AND DONATIONS OF FUEL FROM GAS COMPANIES. THE IMMORTAL FLAME WAS REMOVED FROM MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY IN 2017. AN EMAIL WITH HIROSHI OKUBO, CEMETERY SERVICES MANAGER FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, IN DECEMBER 2018 ELABORATES ON THE REMOVAL OF THE IMMORTAL FLAME, “FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS PRIOR TO 2017, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE CEMETERY SERVICES AND FACILITY SERVICES WERE HAVING A DIFFICULT TIME KEEPING THE IMMORTAL FLAME WORKING DUE TO LIFECYCLE ISSUES (JUST WEAR AND TEAR OF TIME AND PERHAPS THE ORIGINAL DESIGN).” “CEMETERY SERVICES WERE IN DISCUSSION WITH THE LEGION’S GLENN MILLER (SERVICE OFFICER AT THE TIME) TO JOINTLY RENEW/REBUILD [THE IMMORTAL FLAME] DUE TO THE ISSUES WE WERE EXPERIENCING. WITH THE ASSISTANCE FROM CITY FACILITIES, THE LEGION (POPPY FUND GRANT) AND ATCO (WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE CITY MANAGER) WHO BECAME A PART OF THE PROJECT AND WHO DESIGNED THE NEW TORCH, ALL CAME TOGETHER TO REBUILD THE IMMORTAL FLAME.” ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2017 AT MOUNTAI VIEW CEMETERY, A NEW IMMORTAL FLAME WAS RE-DEDICATED. REPRESENTATIVES AT THE CEREMONY INCLUDED CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MAYOR CHRIS SPEARMAN, MLA DAVID SCHNEIDER, AND ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION GENERAL STEWART BRANCH NO. 4 PRESIDENT KENT PERRY. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE IMMORTAL FLAME AND MATERIALS ON THE RE-DEDICATION OF THE IMMORTAL FLAME IN 2017, COURTESY OF HIROSHI OKUBO, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170036000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170036000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
"JAMES HENRY WALLWORK"
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1929
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GRANITE
Catalogue Number
P20150039000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"JAMES HENRY WALLWORK"
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1929
Materials
GRANITE
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.5
Width
15
Description
GRANITE UPRIGHT GRAVE MARKER, GREY WITH BLACK FLECKS; BASE OF MARKER IS STAINED BROWN AND WHITE. MARKER IS RECTANGULAR WITH ROUNDED TOP AND JAGGED/BROKEN BASE. FRONT OF MARKER HAS ENGRAVED CIRCLE AT TOP WITH CARVED MAPLE LEAF IN CENTER; TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW CIRCLE READS “331862 GUNNER, JAMES H. WALLWORK, C.F.A. C.E.F., 22ND APRIL 1919”; MARKER HAS CROSS ENGRAVED BELOW TEXT. TEXT AND ENGRAVINGS SEVERELY WORN AND ERODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FUNERARY OBJECT
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
MILITARY
History
THE GRAVE MARKER FOR GUNNER JAMES H. WALLWORK WAS GRANTED ON TEMPORARY LOAN BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE COMMONWEALTH GRAVES WAR COMMISSION IN JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016. THE GRAVE MARKER, OWNED BY THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION, WAS PREVIOUSLY LOCATED IN LETHBRIDGE’S MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY AND WAS SCHEDULED FOR REPLACEMENT IN 2015. UPON THE GRAVE MARKER’S REPLACEMENT, IT WAS SUBSEQUENTLY REQUESTED BY THE GALT MUSEUM. ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, JAMES HENRY WALLWORK WAS BORN IN RADCLIFFE, ENGLAND ON MAY 23, 1881 TO JAMES AND HARRIET WALLWORK. JAMES HENRY WALLWORK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA AND RESIDED IN LETHBRIDGE WITH HIS WIFE, ANNIE, AND DAUGHTER, WINNIFRED, WORKING AS A FURNACE MAN AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. GUNNER JAMES H. WALLWORK ENLISTED WITH THE 61ST BATTERY, 15TH BRIGADE, CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY, C.E.F. ON APRIL 11, 1916. ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1916 DETAILED THE FORMATION OF THE 61ST BATTERY, WITH RECRUITMENT BEGINNING APRIL 3, 1916 IN LETHBRIDGE. THE 61ST BATTERY WAS FORMED UNDER THE 15TH ARTILLERY BRIGADE. UNDER CAPTAIN COLLIN H. COLLINSON, THE 61ST CLOSED RECRUITMENT IN MAY AND REMAINED STATIONED AT BARRACKS AT HENDERSON PARK UNTIL LEAVING LETHBRIDGE MAY 27-29, 1916 FOR TRAINING IN PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. THE 61ST BATTERY WAS THE THIRD COMPLETE BATTERY TO BE RECRUITED AND LEAVE FROM LETHBRIDGE DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR. UPON LEAVING FOR ENGLAND, CAPTAIN COLLINSON WAS COMMANDING OFFICER FOR THE 61ST BATTERY, AND COLONEL OGILVIE WAS COMMANDING OFFICER OF THE 15TH ARTILLERY BRIGADE. THE 61ST BATTERY PROCEEDED FROM PETAWAWA TO WITLEY CAMP, SURREY, ENGLAND IN 1916. ACCORDING TO THE WAR DIARIES OF THE 14TH BRIGADE CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY, AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, AT WITLEY CAMP THE 15TH BRIGADE OF THE CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY WAS REORGANIZED “…WITH TWO BATTERIES AND HALF THE 14TH COMBINED AND CALLED LEFT GROUP 4TH C.D.A…TWO DAYS AFTER WERE THE 14TH [BRIGADE C.F.A.].” ON AUGUST 22ND, 1917, THE 14TH BRIGADE ARRIVED IN FRANCE. THE 14TH BRIGADE PROCEEDED TO CARENCY, FRANCE IN SEPTEMBER 1917, SETTING UP WAGON LINES ON SEPTEMBER 4-5, 1916. THE 61ST BATTERY OPERATED IN NORTHERN FRANCE IN 1918 UNTIL THE ARMISTICE AND RETURNING TO CANADA. LIEUTENANT ABNER GLADSTONE VIRTUE OF LETHBRIDGE SERVED WITH THE 61ST BATTERY AND REMAINED WITH THE BATTERY THROUGH ITS DEMOBILIZATION. WALLWORK’S MILITARY SERVICE FILE, ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, INDICATES THAT HE RETURNED TO CANADA ON JANUARY 17, 1919 AND WAS DISCHARGED ON FEBRUARY 24, 1919 FOR “DEMOBILIZATION” AND BEING MEDICALLY UNFIT. MEDICAL RECORDS IN HIS SERVICE FILE INDICATE THAT WALLWORK SUFFERED FROM MYALGIA UPON HIS DISCHARGE. WALLWORK RETURNED TO CANADA, AND ON APRIL 22, 1919 DIED “AFTER BEING REMOVED FROM THE AMBULANCE IN WHICH HE WAS CONVEYED TO THE GALT HOSPITAL,” AS STATED IN A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM APRIL 23, 1919. A PREVIOUS ITERATION OF ITS WEBSITE NOTES THAT THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION [CWGC] WAS CONTRACTED IN 2003 BY VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA TO “PLAN AND DEVELOP A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO LOCATE GRAVE MARKERS FOR WHICH THE MINISTER OF VETERANS AFFAIRS HAS RESPONSIBILITY…IN 2011, AN M.O.U. [MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING] WAS SIGNED BETWEEN VAC [VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA] AND THE CWGC TO CONDUCT A TWELVE-YEAR CYCLICAL INSPECTION PROGRAMME OF VETERANS’ MARKERS INSTALLED AT THE EXPENSE OF CANADA.” ON ITS CURRENT WEBSITE, THE CWGC NOTES, “THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION (CWGC) HONOURS THE 1.7 MILLION MEN AND WOMEN WHO DIED IN THE ARMED FORCES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE DURING THE FIRST AND SECOND WORLD WARS, AND ENSURES THEY WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN. OUR WORK BEGAN WITH BUILDING, AND NOW MAINTAINING, CEMETERIES AND MEMORIALS AT 23,000 LOCATIONS IN MORE THAN 150 COUNTRIES AND TERRITORIES, AND MANAGING THE OFFICIAL CASUALTY DATABASE ARCHIVES FOR OUR MEMBER NATIONS.” FOR INFORMATION ON THE LOAN STATUS AND TERMS OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF THE GRAVE COMMISSION HEADSTONE, COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND WALLWORK’S SERVICE FILE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20150039000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20150039000
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
29
Width
11.4
Description
BLUE WEDGE CAP WITH FOLDED EDGE SEWN AROUND CAP; FRONT OF CAP HAS TWO BRASS BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH CROWN OVER EAGLE IN FLIGHT AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS METAL SEAL ON BLACK BACKGROUND; SEAL SHOWS BRASS, RED, AND SILVER CROWN OVER A BRASS FLYING EAGLE OVER FOUR BRASS LEAF FRONDS TIED IN THE CENTER. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH RED SILK AND DISCOLOURED VELVET EDGING; TOP OF INSIDE HAS FOLD IN SILK WITH “MATHESON” WRITTEN ON EITHER SIDE IN BLACK MARKER. INSIDE CAP HAS DISCOLOURED GREY TAG WITH BLUE STITCHED EDGING AND BLUE AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT “THE MUIR BRAND, EST. 1875, MUIR CAP & REGALIA LTD., SI SIMCOE ST. TORONTO”. INSIDE LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS HOLE IN VELVET LINING; INSIDE BACK OF CAP HAS FRAYING ALONG VELVET EDGING; CAP IS FADED ON OUTSIDE AND HAS SOILING ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE WEDGE CAP, MATHESON RECALLED, “[THIS IS THE ORIGINAL] FROM THE R.C.A.F. RIGHT FROM DAY ONE.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE CAP, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
79
Width
47
Description
BLUE COTTON JACKET WITH BLUE SILK LINING; JACKET HAS FIVE POCKETS ON FRONT WITH TWO UPPER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, TWO LOWER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, AND ADDITION POCKET ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH NO COVER FLAP. JACKET HAS FOUR ADDITIONAL BUTTONS FOR FASTENING RUNNING DOWN RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH BUTTON HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SIDE; ALL BUTTONS ON JACKET ARE BRASS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE, OVER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. JACKET SLEEVES HAVE DOUBLE BLACK STRIPES AROUND CENTER BLUE STRIPE ABOVE CUFFS [SECOND LIEUTENANT BARS]; SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE PATCHES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA”. FRONT LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF JACKET HAS BADGE WITH BLUE BACKGROUND SEWN ON; BADGE SHOWS RED AND BRASS CROWN OVER WHITE AND BLACK GLOBE WITH RED LIGHTING BOLT ACROSS FRONT, WITH BRASS WINGS OUTSTRETCHED AND LAUREL LEAVES AROUND GLOBE AT INSIDE OF WINGS [AIRBORNE INTERCEPTOR BADGE]. BACK OF JACKET HAS TWO BLACK BELT LOOPS AT SIDES. INSIDE RIGHT-WEARING SIDE IS POCKET SEWN INTO LINING; OUTSIDE OF POCKET HAS WHITE LABEL WITH STITCHED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING HAS RIP AT TOP OF SPLIT AT BACK; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE JACKET, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE JACKET, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY, ESPECIALLY THIS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
119
Width
48
Description
BLUE WOOL COAT WITH TWO POCKETS ON FRONT AND TWO BRASS BUTTONS ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE AND THREE BRASS BUTTONS ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; BRASS BUTTONS ALL HAVE EMBOSSED CROWN AT TOP WITH FLYING EAGLE UNDER, AND LOWER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SLEEVES HAVE THREE BRASS BUTTONS DOWN CUFFS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE BADGES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA” AND EPAULETS ATTACHED DISPLAYING TWO BLACK STRIPES AND MIDDLE BLUE STRIPE [SECOND LIEUTENANT STRIPES]. INSIDE OF JACKET HAS BLUE SILK LINING; LEFT-WEARING SIDE ON INSIDE HAS A POCKET AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON; TAG SEWN ONTO INSIDE POCKET IS WHITE WITH RED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING IS STAINED GREEN AT COLLAR AND ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; OUTSIDE OF COAT HAS SOILING AND STAINING ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE COAT, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE COAT, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
10
Length
9.5
Width
3.8
Description
FIGURINE OF ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE OFFFICER ON BLACK HORSE; OFFICER IS PAINTED TO WEAR BROWN ROUND-BRIM HAT, RED SERGE JACKET, NAVY BREECHES, AND BROWN BOOTS. HORSE IS PAINTED BLACK WITH GREY AND BROWN SADDLE AND BRIDLE; FIGURINE IS FIXED TO GREY RECTANGULAR BASE WITH TEXT STAMPED ON BOTTOM “LINEOL, GERMANY”. OFFICER IS DETCHABLE AND SECURES TO HORSE WITH METAL PEG. PAINT IS SCRAPED AND PEELED ON FIGURINE; HORSE’S LEGS ALL HAVE CRACKS RUNNING THROUGH; BASE IS CRACKED FROM EDGE TO HORSE’S FRONT LEFT LEG AND HIND RIGHT LEG; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RCMP FIGURINE, ALLEN RECALLED, “THESE TWO MOUNTED POLICE ITEMS, THE BANNER AND THE LITTLE STATUETTE…I WAS YOUNG, IN THE [HOMEFRONT] PERIOD FROM 1940-1945. LETHBRIDGE WAS A MAJOR BASE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING THING. WE HAD YOUNG BRITISH AIRMEN COME, AND THEY LIVED EVERYWHERE. THEY BOARDED WITH PEOPLE; THEY STAYED ON BASE, BUT WHEN THEY HAD A DAY OFF, IT WAS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PEOPLE OF LETHBRIDGE TO TAKE THEM ON LITTLE JOURNEYS TO PLACES. I CAN REMEMBER GOING WITH THEM…TO FORT MACLEOD, AND THEN TO PINCHER CREEK, AND WE HAD PLUMS AND CHERRIES. I CAN REMEMBER MY MOTHER BRINGING THIS BAG OF FRUIT OUT, AND SAYING TO THE ONE YOUNG FELLOW, “WOULD YOU LIKE A PIECE OF FRUIT?” HE WAS SITTING IN THE FRONT SEAT, TURNED TO MY MOTHER [WHO] WAS DRIVING THE CAR, [THEN] HE TURNED TO HIS BUDDIES IN THE BACKSEAT, AND HE [SAID], “WOULD YOU LIKE A PLUM OR A CHERRY?” WE VISITED THERE, AND THOSE WERE GIFTS FROM THOSE AIRMEN TO ME, AT THAT TIME. I HAD A LITTLE MANTLE IN MY ROOM, DOWNSTAIRS IN CALGARY, AND HAD THEM THERE. WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE, WE HAD NO SPACE AT ALL FOR ANYTHING. OUR FURNITURE HAD TO BE ALL STORED. THE ONLY POSSESSIONS OF OURS THAT WERE IN THAT HOUSE WERE OUR BEDS AND OUR DRESSERS, MAYBE A COUPLE OF CHAIRS…” “[I DISPLAYED THEM] MORE CALGARY, THAN LETHBRIDGE.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1940
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.4
Width
2.4
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACLET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SPRINGRING CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT COMPRISED ON BLUE TEXT “RCAF” SURROUNDED BY LAUREL LEAVES, WITH A CROWN ABOVE AND OUTSTRETCHED WINGS ON SIDES. “RCAF” CREST ABOVE INSCRIPTION “PERLEY-MARTIN T.H., 4309A, J3513”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “NO.5 E.F.T.S., LETHBRIDGE ALTA., CLASS NO.1, 22.7.40 TO 3.10.40, SIRKS, STRELING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC WITH METAL LOOPS ON SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE IDENTIFICATION BRACELET BELONGED TO FLYING OFFICER THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN, AND WAS FASHIONED AS AN IDENTIFER FOR THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. INFORMATION COMPILED ON THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AND OTHER FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOLS WAS SOURCED FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA’S WEBSITE SECTION ON THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN. AT THE OUTBREAK OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CANADA AND ADDITIONAL COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES, CREATED THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN TO ENHANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR ROYAL AIR FORCE OFFICERS. THE PLAN ESTABLISHED THAT COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES WOULD BUILD FLIGHT SCHOOLS TO TRAIN OFFICERS FOR THE ROYAL AIR FORCE OR COMMONWEALTH AIR FORCES TO SERVE ALONGSIDE THE ROYAL AIR FORCE, INCLUDING THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. OFFICERS WOULD TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM TO A COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY, OR ENLISTED FROM THE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY. CANADA ESTABLISHED 196 TRAINING FACILITIES AND RELIEF FIELDS, AND GRADUATED 72,835 STUDENTS, ACCORDING TO STATISTICS FROM THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S WEBSITE ON THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. IN THE SPRING OF 1940, THE ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL NO. 5 IN LETHBRIDGE OPENED, SEEING ITS FIRST RECRUITS FOR THE R.C.A.F. ENROLL AND ARRIVE ON JULY 22, 1940 FROM REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN. THE FLIGHT SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELDS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CITY. STUDENTS WERE TAUGHT TO FLY IN 7 WEEKS, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 5 WEEK EXTENSION COURSE IN MORE ADVANCED FLYING. OF THE FIRST CLASS, GRADUATING OCTOBER 1940, WAS THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS BORN ON JANUARY 9, 1921 IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA. PERLEY-MARTIN SERVED IN THE QUEEN’S OWN HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA CADETS FROM 1935-38, AND ENLISTED IN THE NON-PERMANENT ACTIVE AIR FORCE OF THE R.C.A.F. IN 1938. PERLEY-MARTIN UNDERTOOK INITIAL FLIGHT TRAINING IN TORONTO, ONTARIO, GRADUATING TO ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. GRADUATES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE E.F.T.S. WERE GIVEN, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, '…AN ENGRAVED IDENTIFICATION DISC BY THE SCHOOL', AS STATED BY DENNIS YORATH, MANAGER AT NO. 5 E.F.T.S. IT IS ONLY SPECULATION THAT THE DISC DESCRIBED BY THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IS THE ONE AFFIXED TO THE BRACELET. IN DECEMBER 1940-JANUARY 1941, THE NO. 5 E.F.T.S. WAS RELOCATED TO HIGH RIVER, ALBERTA, AND THE NO. 8 BOMBER AND GUNNERY SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELD, LETHBRIDGE, OPENING IN OCTOBER 1941. UPON COMPLETING HIS E.F.T.S. TRAINING, PERLEY-MARTIN WENT ON TO COMPLETE HIS INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED TRAINING AT THE NO. 1 SERVICE FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AT CAMP BORDEN, ONTARIO. REPORTS FROM THE SERVICE FILE OF T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN INDICATE THAT IN 1941, FOLLOWING HIS TRAINING IN CANADA, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS STATIONED IN OLD SARUM, ENGLAND. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR FLYING OR OTHER DUTIES IN 1941 FOLLOWING FLYING OFFENSES AND OUTSTANDING DEBTS, WITH THE OFFENSES RESULTING IN PERLEY-MARTIN BEING COURT MARTIALED AND TRIED. IN MARCH 1942, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS RETIRED FROM SERVICE, AND IN AUGUST 1942 HE BECAME A PILOT GENERAL WITH THE #122 SQN. ON JANUARY 7, 1945, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS KILLED DURING FLYING OPERATIONS IN JARVIS, ONTARIO, WHERE HE WAS AN INSTRUCTOR, WHILE ATTEMPTING TO LAND AN ANSON AIRCRAFT #7013 IN POOR VISIBILITY. ACCORDING TO A MEMORIAL WRITTEN ON PERLEY-MARTIN, HE WAS BURIED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. WHILE IN ENGLAND IN 1941, PERLEY-MARTIN MARRIED OLIVE CYNTHIA ROBERTS. THE COUPLE HAD ONE SON, BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. OLIVE AND BARRY RETURNED TO ENGLAND FOLLOWING THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN’S DEATH, ACCORDING TO AN EMAIL FROM MARY PERLEY-MARTIN, THE WIFE OF THE LATE BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. THE BRACELET WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM IN DECEMBER 2017 FROM T.M. SAUNDERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE FLIGHT SCHOOLS AND WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARTICLES ON T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170037000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
Acquisition Date
2017-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.7
Width
2
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACELET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SNAP LOCK CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT OF AN EAGLE WITH OUTSTRETCHED WINGS HOLDING A CIRCLE IN ITS FEET, WITH SWASTIKA IN CENTER OF CIRCLE; FRONT HAS INSCRIPTION ON SIDES CREST “CAMP 133”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “R.J. BORLAND, M2598, STERLING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC THROUGH HOLES IN SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC ARE TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE BRACELET WAS CREATED AT CAMP 133, THE LETHBRIDGE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. THE CURATOR OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM’S MILITARY AND POLITICAL HISTORY DEPARTMENT NOTED IN AN EMAIL, ON THE BRACELET, THAT THE EAGLE DID NOT APPEAR TO BE AN OFFICIAL MILITARY SYMBOL. THE EAGLE WAS POSSIBLY FASHIONED BY HAND, OR CAST AS A COPY. HISTORIAN ROBERT HENDERSON ELABORATED, “NO DOUBT A PRIVATE PURCHASE BY THE GUARD—PROBABLY [BY] ROBERT BORLAND [WHO] SAW SERVICE AT LETHBRIDGE. THE NAZI SYMBOL REPRESENTS EARLY [1933+ ERA] NAZI STYLE SYMBOL, PROBABLY OBTAINED FROM A POW IN TRADE OR FRIENDSHIP. THE LETTERING ON IT [WAS] NO DOUBT DONE BY A JEWELLER WITH APPROPRIATE EQUIPMENT, NOT BY A POW WITHIN THE CAMP. WRIST BRACELETS WERE POPULAR ITEMS TO BE GIVEN TO THE GUARDS BY FAMILY OR SWEETHEARTS, OR BY FRIENDS WHEN THE GUARD WAS POSTED AWAY FROM HOME.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING A COPY OF THE OBITUARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON LETHBRIDGE CAMP 133, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20150021000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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