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189 records – page 1 of 10.

Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.4
Length
3.5
Width
4.6
Description
GLASS BOTTLE CONTAINING AMBER OIL, WITH CRACKED AND TORN CORK IN TOP OPENING. BOTTLE HAS ROUND NECK, DOMED TOP AND SQUARE BODY; BOTTLE HAS BLUE AND WHITE LABEL ON FRONT. FRONT LABEL BLUE BACKGROUND WITH WHITE CROWN ABOVE WHITE SHIELD WITH RED AND BLUE TEXT; LABEL IS TORN ACROSS SHIELD MAKING RED TEXT INDECIPHERABLE, BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “PURE VANILLA”; SHIELD HAS WHITE DOTS AROUND BASE AND WHITE TEXT BELOW “FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CAMPBELL BROS & WILSON LIMITED, WINNIPEG – CANADA, EST. 1882”. BACK OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “2 FL. OZ”. BASE OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “1, 4818, FDJ” WITH “D” IN A DIAMOND. CORK IS TORN OFF AT THE TOP OF THE BOTTLE NECK; LABEL IS WORN AND DISCOLORED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE GUN OIL, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BASKET OF TEA CUPS AND SAUCERS
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WICKER, PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20110031019
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BASKET OF TEA CUPS AND SAUCERS
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WICKER, PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
100
Height
38.5
Length
36
Width
39
Description
WOVEN WICKER BASKET WITH ROUNDED OPENING AT TOP AND SQUARED BOTTOM. TWO LOOPED HANDLES AT TOP ON OPPOSITE SIDES. INSIDE BASKET ARE AN UNKNOWN QUANTITY OF WHITE PORCELAIN TEA CUPS AND SAUCERS, NESTLED AND STACKED TOGETHER. SOME CUPS HAVE GREEN BORDERS, OTHERS HAVE GEOMETRIC PATTERNS AND CHINESE CHARACTERS IN ORANGE AND GREEN. BASKET IS HALF FULL WITH DISHES. CUPS AND SAUCERS ARE DUSTY WITH PARTICULATE DIRT. OUTSIDE OF BASKET IS DUSTY, WITH SLATS OF WICKER COMING LOOSE IN SOME AREAS. OVERALL FAIR CONDITION. *NOTE* CUPS AND SAUCERS HAVE BEEN LEFT UNDISTURBED TO MAINTAIN INTEGRITY OF THE OBJECT. CUPS AND SAUCERS HAVE NOT BEEN INDIVIDUALLY COUNTED OR NUMBERED.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
CONTAINER
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT COMES FROM INTERVIEWS HELD WITH MAY LEE AND JUDY CHAN, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND JANICE WONG. PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE FOUND BELOW THE ARTIFACT DETAILS AND BELOW THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY BUILDING. RICHARD INDICATES THAT "THIS BASKET IS JUST FOR GENERAL USE, FOR EVERYTHING.” JUDY SAID THAT SHE COULD "REMEMBER THIS BASKET WITH ALL THE CUPS IN IT. THEY USED TO USE THESE BASKETS FOR CARRYING THINGS. THEY’D ADD A STRING, AND THEY’D CARRY THEM ON THEIR BACK.” HONG DIDN'T REMEMBER THIS BASKET: “I DON’T REMEMBER, BUT WE KEEP ALL THOSE CUPS UNDER THE STAIRS. WE HAVE A LITTLE SPACE THERE, WE PUT IT ALL UNDER THERE.” A SERIES OF ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD GIVE BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY AND ITS BUILDING: THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY WAS BUILT IN 1909-1910 IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 2 AVENUE SOUTH AND IT WAS ORIGINALLY A RESTAURANT. BY 1915 IT HAD BECOME THE HEADQUARTERS FOR THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH OF THE KAO MIN TANG (ALTERNATIVE SPELLINGS INCLUDE KUOMINTANG, KUO MIN TANG, GUOMINDANG, AND GUO MIN DANG). THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNATED AS A PROVINCIAL HERITAGE RESOURCE IN 1995 BECAUSE OF ITS VALUE AS A SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CHINESE COMMUNITY. THE BUILDING WAS USED IN A VARIETY OF WAYS BY THE SOCIETY AND INCLUDED, AT VARIOUS TIMES, A RESTAURANT, A SCHOOL, AND LIVING ACCOMODATIONS. IN FEBRUARY 2011 A SECTION OF THE BRICK FAÇADE FELL OFF THE BUILDING AND CITY INSPECTORS DETERMINED THAT THE TIMBER AND RED BRICK STRUCTURE WAS POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE. THE BUILDING WAS TORN DOWN A SHORT TIME LATER. LETHBRIDGE'S CHINATOWN EMERGED IN 1901, A RESULT OF THE CHINESE POPULATION BEING RELEGATED TO A SECTION OF THE CITY BETWEEN GALT GARDENS AND THE COULEES. IN A JANUARY 7, 2002 ARTICLE ALBERT LEONG EXPLAINS THAT NO ONE REALLY WANTED CHINESE PEOPLE AROUND AND THAT “’ THEY WERE TOLD THAT THE ONLY PLACE THEY COULD START BUSINESSES WAS BETWEEN THE COULEES AT THE PARK, BECAUSE THE CITY DIDN’T WANT ANY COMPETITION FOR THE WHITE BUSINESSMEN … BUT ‘GHETTO-IZED’ OR NOT, THE CHINESE WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE FORMED AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE BACKBONE OF THIS CITY, [AND MADE] NOTEWORTHY [CONTRIBUTIONS] TO THE HISTORY OF THIS PLACE.’” BUSINESSES SUCH AS LAUNDRIES, MARKET GARDENS, AND RESTAURANTS WERE OPENED IN CHINATOWN, WITH THE RESIDENTS LIVING IN ROOMS ABOVE THE BUSINESSES. IN 1912 THERE WERE ABOUT 100 PEOPLE LIVING IN CHINATOWN AND BY THE 1930S, IT WAS A BUSTLING COMMUNITY. THE POPULATION OF CHINATOWN DWINDLED FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. JANICE WONG, PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY IN 2015, GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE SOCIETY IN AN INTERVIEW: AS OF 2015, THE SOCIETY EXISTS MORE AS A SOCIAL CLUB AND THE SOCIETY HOLDS THREE CELEBRATORY DINNERS EACH YEAR, USUALLY HELD AT THE NEW DYNASTY RESTAURANT. THE SOCIETY ALSO VISITS THE CEMETERY ON A YEARLY BASIS “TO HONOUR THE ANCESTORS, CLEAN THE TOMBS, BRING FOOD, DO THE USUAL THINGS THAT WE USED TO DO – EAT ON GRAVES, BURN THE INCENSE. WE DO THAT EVERY YEAR STILL TO HONOUR OUR ANCESTORS. IT IS USUALLY IN THE SPRING … IN APRIL.” JANICE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY, INDICATING THAT THERE IS SOME TALK ABOUT RE-BUILDING “BUT THAT INVOLVES A LOT OF PLANNING, AND MONEY, AND FUNDRAISING” AND SHE QUESTIONS WHETHER OR NOT THERE IS ENOUGH OF A MEMBERSHIP BASE TO GO FORWARD WITH RE-BUILDING. SHE ALSO EXPLAINED THAT PREVIOUS CHINESE IMMIGRANTS HAD TENDED TO COME FROM THE SAME GEOGRAPHIC REGION, BUT THAT PRESENTLY IMMIGRANTS ARE COMING FROM ALL OVER CHINA: “THERE’S A LOT OF INFLUX OF PEOPLE FROM CHINA THAT AREN’T FROM THE SAME AREA, BECAUSE TRADITIONALLY, THE PEOPLE WERE ALL FROM THE SAME AREA AND SPOKE THE SAME DIALECT AND HAD THAT SORT OF THING KEEPING THEM TOGETHER AS A COMMUNITY OVERSEAS FROM CHINA.” PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE BELOW: MAY LEE: MAY WAS ACTUALLY BORN IN CANADA AND IS KNOWN AS A GOLD MOUNTAIN GIRL, BECAUSE SHE IS A CANADIAN-BORN CHINESE WOMAN. MAY EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN IN CANADA. I WAS BORN IN NANOOSE BAY. WHEN I WAS 4 YEARS OLD, WE MOVED TO VICTORIA. WHEN I WAS 9 YEARS OLD AND THE WHOLE FAMILY, IN 1930, GO BACK TO CHINA.” DURING THE WAR, THE JAPANESE BOMBED THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN TOCSIN CITY AND MAY’S MOTHER DECIDED TO SEND MAY AND HER BROTHER TO HONG KONG TO START THE PROCESS OF COMING TO CANADA. MAY STARTED ENGLISH SCHOOL IN HONG KONG, BUT OFTEN MISSED CLASSES BECAUSE SHE WAS SICK FROM THE HEAT. SHE SAYS THAT SHE’S LEARNED MOST OF HER ENGLISH FROM HER HUSBAND, HER CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND EVEN GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN. SHE WAS MARRIED TO HOM MEN LEE, AKA JIMMY LEE, ON NOVEMBER 16, 1938 IN VICTORIA, BC. JIMMY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE AT THE GALT HOSPITAL, BUT WAS SENT BACK TO CHINA AS A CHILD FOR HIS EDUCATION. JIMMY’S FAMILY HAD COME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1914 AND OWNED LEE-DUC CLEANERS. THE LEE FAMILY LIVED ABOVE THE SHOP, WHICH WAS ON 13TH STREET NORTH, NEAR HIGA’S JEWELERS. MAY’S MAIN MEMORY OF CHINATOWN: “ALL I REMEMBER IN CHINATOWN, IN SUMMERTIME, LOTS OF OLD GUYS SITTING IN FRONT OF GUOMINDANG. AUNTIE HELEN GREW UP IN CHINATOWN. I THINK SHE KNOWS MORE ABOUT CHINATOWN. IN THE OLDEN DAYS, I HARDLY GO OUT, JUST TO BUY GROCERIES.” JUDY ADDED THAT MAY HAD 8 CHILDREN AND WAS KEPT BUSY AT HOME RAISING THEM. RICHARD LOO: RICHARD ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953, HAVING LEFT THE MAINLAND OF CHINA IN 1949. RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD MOVED TO CANADA IN EITHER LATE 1800S OR THE EARLY 1900S AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE HEAD TAX. HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED AS A COOK IN RESTAURANTS, EITHER IN LETHBRIDGE OR IN TABER (ACCORDING TO RICHARD, HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED THROUGH THE WAR YEARS IN TABER). RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD PLANNED ON MOVING BACK TO CHINA WHEN HE RETIRED, BUT THEN THE COMMUNISTS TOOK OVER, AND HE ELECTED TO STAY. AT THAT TIME, HE INVITED RICHARD TO MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL. RICHARD LEFT HONG KONG, AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 8 MONTHS, ON A FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 2PM LOCAL TIME. HE FINALLY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE SUNDAY AFTERNOON. HE WAS LUCKY IN THAT HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS FLIGHTS ON SALE. NORMALLY A TICKET FROM HONG KONG TO VANCOUVER WOULD HAVE COST $700, BUT RICHARD WAS ABLE TO SECURE A FLIGHT FOR ONLY $500. HE ALSO INDICATED THAT HIS FLIGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WAS ONLY $39.95. ON RECALLING HIS FIRST TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, RICHARD RECOUNTED THE FOLLOWING STORY: “SO, BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE AIRPORT, I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO SAY NOTHING. DIDN’T KNOW – MAYBE COULD SAY ‘GOOD MORNING’ – THAT’S ALL YOU COULD SAY, JUST ANYWAYS HOW TO SAY ‘HELLO’ – SO, ANYWAY, SO IN THE MEANTIME, THE FELLOW AT THE AIRPORT MUST HAVE KNOWN ZEKE, YOU KNOW ZEKE QUAN [OWNER OF] THE LOTUS INN [RESTAURANT], AND HE PHONED HIM UP. HE SAYS, ‘ZEKE.’ I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT – NOTHING. AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘HEY, THIS IS A CHINA BOY HERE. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH HIM?’ SO, ZEKE SAYS, ‘OH, JUST TAKE HIM TO CHINATOWN AND DUMP HIM.’ NOW, I DIDN’T KNOW THOSE, NOT UNTIL LATER ON. ZEKE’S SON GO TO SAME SCHOOL I DID – CENTRAL SCHOOL.” RICHARD INITIALLY LIVED IN THE SOCIETY BUILDING FOR SEVERAL YEARS, OCCUPYING A ROOM THAT HAD BEEN RECENTLY VACATED BY ANOTHER MAN NAMED LOO WHO HAD GONE TO WORK IN PICTURE BUTTE. RICHARD RECALLED THAT THE SOCIETY WAS A GOOD PLACE TO FEEL A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND THAT IT WAS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS, A PLACE WHERE THEY WEREN’T DISCRIMINATED AGAINST. HONG WONG: HONG ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AND WAS INVITED TO THE CITY BY HIS UNCLE SHUEY WONG, WHO WAS ALREADY LIVING HERE. UNCLE SHUEY HAD COME TO CANADA SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE $500 HEAD TAX. HONG TRAVELED WITH HIS BROTHER FROM MAINLAND CHINA TO HONG KONG, IN ORDER TO GO TO THE CANADIAN EMBASSY. ON HIS FERRY RIDE TO HONG KONG, HE WAS SHOT BY BANDITS AND WAS REQUIRED TO STAY IN THE HOSPITAL FOR QUITE SOME TIME TO RECOVER. HIS BROTHER ELECTED TO REMAIN IN HONG KONG, AS HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW LIVED IN THE CITY AND GOT HONG’S BROTHER WORK IN A THEATRE. TO GET TO CANADA, HONG FLEW FROM JAPAN TO GUAM, TO VANCOUVER, AND THEN FINALLY TO LETHBRIDGE. HIS FIRST IMPRESSION OF LETHBRIDGE: COLD. HONG SAID: “’WELL, IN HONG KONG IT WAS AROUND MAYBE 20 SOME 30 ABOVE. AND HERE, AT THAT TIME, MAYBE 20 BELOW, OR 20 SOME BELOW. I DIDN’T HAVE THE EAR MUFFS. I SAID, ‘GEE, I’M NOT SO HAPPY HERE, IT SEEMS SO COLD.’” UNCLE SHUEY TOLD HONG THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE COLDEST WINTERS HE COULD REMEMBER. HONG WORKED FOR HIS UNCLE IN HIS SHOP ON 9TH AVENUE, DOING CHORES AROUND THE STORE, UNTIL HIS ENGLISH HAD IMPROVED ENOUGH SO THAT HE COULD SERVE CUSTOMERS. HE JOINED THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE SOCIETY ALMOST AS SOON AS HE ARRIVED: “WHEN I CAME HERE, I JOINED IN THE SAME YEAR BECAUSE MY UNCLE WAS A MEMBER. SO THAT’S WHY HE GOT ME IN TO BE A MEMBER. OH, AT THAT TIME, I BET, 95% OF THE CHINESE PEOPLE THEY BELONG TO THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, I BELIEVE.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT YOU COULDN’T BE A MEMBER OF BOTH THE SOCIETY AND THE MASONS, AND HE BELIEVES ABOUT 5% OF THE CITY’S CHINESE POPULATION WOULD HAVE BELONGED TO THE MASONS. HE ADDED: “BUT WE ARE STILL FRIENDS, STILL FRIENDS. WE’RE NOT ENEMY OR ANYTHING BUT, IT’S JUST THAT THE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DIFFERENT. THAT’S ALL.” HONG ENJOYED THE CAMARADERIE OF THE SOCIETY. HE SAID: “I REMEMBER, I LIKE IT BECAUSE THEY HAVE THE PARTY AND SO MANY PEOPLE. AND THEN YOU MEET ALL THE CHINESE PEOPLE THERE IN THE ONE GROUP. WELL, ANYWAY, WHEN YOU SEE SO MANY PEOPLE IN ONE PARTY, AND THEN WHEN THEY COME OUT MOSTLY THE PEOPLE THAT PARTY AND IT FEELS LIKE A LOTS OF FRIENDS OR EVEN LIKE THE FAMILY. SO YOU FEEL GOOD, YOU FEEL BETTER, AND THEN, WELL, MY UNCLE BELONGS THERE TOO AND THEN THE OTHERS BELONG THERE TOO, YEAH, EVERYBODY LIKE IN THE BIG FAMILY. YES, NICE, OTHERWISE YOU DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS, YOU DON’T MEET ANYBODY, IF YOU NOT BELONG THERE, I THINK NOT SO FRIENDLY TO YOU.” HONG INDICATED THAT WHEN A SPECIAL MEAL WAS HELD AT THE SOCIETY, IT WAS THE MEN WHO DID THE COOKING: “AT THAT TIME JUST ABOUT EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW TO COOK BECAUSE MOSTLY WE WORK IN THE KITCHEN WHEN THEY CAME HERE.” HE SAID THAT DINERS WOULD PAY A SMALL FEE TO EAT AT THE LEAGUE WHEN SPECIAL MEALS WERE PUT ON. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND FOR INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20110031019
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANISTER "100 CIGARETTEN"
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, TOBACCO, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20110005006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANISTER "100 CIGARETTEN"
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1945
Materials
TIN, TOBACCO, PAPER
No. Pieces
2
Height
7.6
Diameter
9
Description
TWO PIECE TIN. LID AND RIM AT BASE ARE DARKER IN COLOUR. BODY OF TIN IS ALUMINUM WITH NO MARKINGS ON SIDE OR BOTTOM. TOP OF BODY HAS UNBROKEN THIN METAL SEAL. TOP OF LID HAS EMBOSSED CREST IN CENTER WITH TWO LIONS IN CENTER OF SHIELD, CROWN ON TOP, AND TEXT THAT READS, “GREILING DRESEDEN” ON THE BOTTOM. AROUND THE RIM ON TOP IS EMBOSSED TEXT THAT READS, “100 CIGARETTEN, AMATI.”
Subjects
CONTAINER
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
History
CANISTER WAS LIKELY ACQUIRED AS A WAR SOUVENIR DURING J.B. WATSON’S ACTIVE SERVICE BETWEEN 1944 AND 1945. AS STATED IN AN E-MAIL FROM DONOR BRANDI CAMPISI AT THE TIME OF DONATION, “JOSEPH ‘BARTON’ WATSON GREW UP IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE HE LIVED IN FOREMOST AND SHAUGHNESSY AND SETTLED IN PICTURE BUTTE, ALBERTA JUST OUTSIDE OF LETHBRIDGE. BARTON WAS 28-YEARS OLD WHEN HE ENLISTED IN THE NAVY IN 1944. SINCE HE HAD A FEAR OF HEIGHTS THE AIRFORCE WASN’T AN OPTION, AND LIKE MANY PRAIRIE BOYS HE MAY HAVE HEARD THE HORRIBLE STORIES OF LIFE IN THE TRENCHES FROM THE GREAT WAR. HIS FAMILY BELIEVES THE FINAL FACTOR IN HIS DECISION TO JOIN THE NAVY WAS BECAUSE THE NAVY HAD AN EXCELLENT BASEBALL TEAM. BARTON WAS AN EXCELLENT BASEBALL PLAYER. HE ENLISTED IN CALGARY AND WAS SENT FOR TRAINING TO THE HMCS QUEEN IN REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN. THOUGH HE LIKED THE WATER HE NEVER LEARNED HOW TO SWIM. HIS NOTES FROM TRAINING SHOW HOW UNFAMILIAR A BOAT AND ITS PARTS WERE TO HIM. AFTER BASIC TRAINING IN REGINA, BARTON WAS COMMISSIONED TO THE HMCS THORLOCK AS SUPPLY ASSISTANT. THE THORLOCK SERVED ON THE HIGH SEAS IN THE ATLANTIC ZONE. THE HMCS THORLOCK WAS A CORVETTE OF THE FLOWER CLASS NAMED AFTER THOROLD, ONTARIO. ITS MAIN TASK WAS IN ANTI-SUBMARINE CONVOYS. ON THE FINAL LEG OF THE SHIPS FIVE CROSSINGS OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN, THE THORLOCK WAS DIVERTED ALONG WITH HMCS VICTORIAVILLE TO ACCEPT THE SURRENDER OF THE SUBMARINE U-190 ON MAY 12, 1945. THOUGH CAMERAS WERE OFFICIALLY NOT ALLOWED ON NAVAL VESSELS, BARTON WATSON HAD ONE. HIS PHOTOS DOCUMENT LIFE THROUGH THE EYES OF A SAILOR AND SIGNIFICANTLY, THE CLOSE-KNIT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHIPMATES. MANY PHOTOS DEPICT THE THORLOCK’S CREW POSING PLAYFULLY IN GERMAN UNIFORMS AND NAZI FLAGS AFTER CAPTURING THE SURRENDERED SUBMARINE. BARTON WATSON WAS DEMOBILIZED ON NOVEMBER 7, 1945 AND RETURNED TO PICTURE BUTTE WHERE HE RAN A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS AND WAS EXTREMELY INVOLVED IN COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES.” THE FOLLOWING EXCERPT IS TAKEN FROM THE PICTURE BUTTE PROGRESS PUBLISHED ON JULY 12, 1945. THE ARTICLE IS TITLED “ACCOUNT OF SURRENDER OF U-190, FIRST GERMAN SUBMARINE ESCORTED INTO A NEWFOUNDLAND PORT” AND IS WRITTEN BY: G.B. LAITY, S.B.A., OF THE H.M.C.S. THORLOCK. “IT IS WITH PLEASURE THAT WE ARE PUBLISHING THIS ARTICLE, AS ONE OF THE HOME TOWN BOYS, BARTON WATSON IS ONE OF THE CREW MEMBERS OF THE H.M.C.S. THORLOCK. THE NIGHT OF FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1945 WAS WITNESS TO AN EXCITING EPISODE IN THE CAREER OF ONE OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY’S SHIPS, THE CORVETTE, H.M.C.S. THORLOCK, UNDER THE COMMAND OF LIEUT. J. E. FRANCOIS, R.C.N.R. IT WAS, ROT THAT MATTER A UNIQUE AND QUITE UNCOMMON EXPERIENCE IN THE HISTORY OF ANY OF CANADA’S FIGHTING SHIPS OF THIS WAR, AND EVEN MORE SO FOR THE THORLOCK, AS SHE HAS BEEN IN COMMISSION A MERE SIX MONTHS AND THE CREW, AS A UNIT, HAD BEEN AS YET VIRTUALLY UNTRIED. THIS GALLANT LITTLE CRAFT WAS ON CONVOY ESCORT DUTY, HOMEWARD BOUND FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. HOSTILITIES HAD CEASED IN EUROPE AND SPECULATION WAS HIGH AMONG MEMBERS OF THE CREW AS TO THE POSSIBILITIES OF FURTHER ASSIGNMENTS. JUST BEFORE NOON ON THE DAY OF OUR STORY, THE THORLOCK WAS ORDERED FROM THE CONVOY INCOMPANY WITH A FRIGATE, THE H.M.C.S. VICTORIAVILLE, TO PROCEED TO A CERTAIN LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE FOR RENDEZVOUS WITH A SURRENDERED GERMAN SUBMARINE WHICH HAD REPORTED HER POSITION TO SHORE. WHEELING ABOUT THEIR POSITIONS, THE THORLOCK AND THE VICTORIAVILLE LEFT THE ROUTINE WORK OF THE CONVOY AND SPED OVER A BEAUTIFUL CALM SEA ON THEIR NEW AND UNIQUE ASSIGNMENT. THE NOTATIONS ON THE SHIP’S DECK LOG, OF COURSE RELATE TO THE WHOLE ADVENTURE AS JUST ANOTHER JOB AS INDEED IT WAS. BUT – THE DECK LOG DOES NOT REVEAL THE MOUNTING ALERTNESS OF THE ENTIRE SHIP’S COMPANY. THE UNRELAXED VIGILANCE OF THE LOOKOUTS SHARPENED TO A GREATER KEENNESS AS DID THAT OF THE WHOLE CREW. DURING THE NINE HOUR INTERVAL BETWEEN LEAVING THE CONVOY AND THE ACTUAL CONTACT WITH THE SUBMARINE, THERE WAS MUCH TO DO. IT IS A CREDIT TO THE TRAINED DISCIPLINE OF THE NAVY ON THE WHOLE AND THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE THROLOCK IN PARTICULAR, THAT PREPARATIONS WERE MADE, COMPLETE TO THE LAST DETAIL, IN AN ORDERLY AND EFFICIENT MANNER. THE BOARDING PARTY WAS MUSTERED, GIVEN FINAL INSTRUCTIONS RELEVANT TO THE JOB THEY HAD BEEN CHOSEN AND TRAINED TO DO, AND THEIR ARMS, AMMUNITIONS AND EQUIPMENT WERE CHECKED. THE STOKERS’ MESS WAS CLEAN AND READY FOR OCCUPATION OF THE PRISONERS THAT WOULD BE COMING ABOARD. SHORTLY BEFORE EIGHT O’CLOCK THAT EVENING A STOKER, IN HIS EAGERNESS MOUNTED TO THE BRIDGE TO GAIN A HIGHER VANTAGE POINT FROM WHICH TO SCAN THE OCEAN FOR FIRST POSSIBLE GLIMPSE OF THE NOW HUMBLED ENEMY. AND IT WAS, INDEED THIS VERY STOKER, WHO ACTUALLY GOT THE FIRST GLIMPSE OF THE SUBMARINE. AS HE WAS ABOUT TO LEAVE THE BRIDGE HE NOTICED A LIGHT IN THE DISTANCE AND REPORTED IT TO THE SIGNALMAN ON WATCH, WHO IN RETURN REPORTED IT TO THE OFFICER OF THE WATCH. SO AS THE SHIP’S LOG WOULD RELATE AT 19:57 HOURS, - ACTION STATIONS – ALTERED COURSE TOWARDS SUSPICIOUS LIGHT. THERE WAS MUCH BEHIND THAT TERSE NOTION, HOWEVER, AS HAS BEEN ALREADY TOLD. A SIGNAL WAS THEN SENT BY WIRELESS TO THE H.M.C.S. VICTORIAVILLE THAT THE THORLOCK WAS IN CONTACT WITH THE SUBMARINE THE VICTORIAVILLE HAD, SOME HOURS BEFORE, TAKEN A COURSE OF HER OWN TO CHECK THE BEARING THEY HAD CALCULATED. THIS BEING DIFFERENT FROM THAT OF THE THORLOCK, THEY WERE SOME DISTANCE AWAY WHEN THE THORLOCK GAINED CONTACT. THE NEXT BRIEF NOTATION ON THE LOG WAS ‘SUBMARINE IN SIGHT ON SURFACE – ILLUMINATE WITH SEARCH LIGHT – 2017.’ IT IS NOT HARD TO PICTURE THE MIXED FEELING OF EXCITEMENT AND PRIDE OF THE ENTIRE CREW THAT LAYS BEHIND THAT EXCERPT FROM THE LOG. EVERYBODY WAS CLOSED UP AT HIS ACTION STATION. ALTHOUGH THE SEA WAS STILL CALM, A BLACK MOONLESS NIGHT HAD BLANKETED THE ENTIRE SCENE. DEAD AHEAD LAY THE SUPPOSEDLY HUMBLED GERMANS. THEY WERE AWAITING THE CORVETTE’S ARRIVAL, WITH THEIR NAVIGATION LIGHTS BURNING ACCORDING TO THE CONDITIONS OF SURRENDER. WOULD THEY CARRY OUT ALL THE CONDITIONS OF SURRENDER? WHAT WAS TO STOP THEM FROM BECOMING SUDDENLY ACTIVELY HOSTILE? WITH THESE AND OTHER RELEVANT QUESTIONS BURNING IN THEIR MINDS, THE THORLOCK CLOSED IN WITH ALL GUNS TRAINED ON THE LIGHTS. RECOGNITION SIGNALS WERE THEN SENT OUT IN CHALLENGE, SOME DIFFICULTY BEING EXPRESSED IN UNDERSTANDING THE GERMAN SIGNALS, AT FIRST. THE CAPTAIN THEN GAVE THE ORDER ‘ILLUMINATE THE TARGET.’ THE SHIP’S SEARCH LIGHT PROBED A FINGER OF LIGHT THROUGH THE DARK. THERE SHE LAY, LOOMING LARGE IN THE LIGHT’S BRILLIANT BEAM, FLYING THE BLACK FLAG AGREED UPON AS ANOTHER SURRENDER TOKEN, COMPLETELY SUBMISSIVE, AWAITING THE WILL OF HER CAPTORS. ‘STOP THE ENGINES!’ – ‘AWAY BOARDING PARTY!’ RANG OUT THE CAPTAIN’S VOICE. BRISKLY AND EFFICIENTLY THE BOARDING PARTY MANNED THE SEA BOAT AND WERE LOWERED OVER THE SHIP’S SIDE. WITHIN FIVE MINUTES THEY WERE AT THE SIDE OF THE SUBMARINE, THUS, AT 20:33 HRS. MAY 11, 1945, THE COMMANDER OF THE GERMAN SUBMARINE U-190 SURRENDERED HIMSELF AND HIS CREW TO LIEUT R.O. BLACHFORD, EXECUTIVE OFFICER IN-CHARGE OF THE FIRST CANADIAN NAVAL BOARDING PARTY TO BOARD A SURRENDERED GERMAN SUBMARINE IN THE NORTH-WESTERN ATLANTIC. THE IMPORTANT PART OF THE INCIDENT BEING OVER WITHOUT MISHAP, THE THROLOCK’S CREW BREATHED A SIGH OF RELIEF AND AWAITED THE APPROACH OF THE H.M.C.S. VICTORIAVILLE BEARING THE SENIOR OFFICER TO THE SCENE. AT 20:59 HRS. RADAR REPORTED TO THE BRIDGE, ‘ECHO BEARING 020, BEARING 15,000 YARDS’ AND SOON AFTER, THE VICTORIAVILLE CAME IN TO TAKE OVER DIRECTIONS OF FURTHER OPERATIONS AND TO AUGMENT THE PARTY OF CANADIANS ON THE U-BOAT. THE ROUTINE OF TRANSFERRING THE GERMANS TO THE TWO SHIPS WAS THEN UNDERTAKEN, THE SEA-BOATS BEING USED FOR THIS OPERATION. THE PRISONERS WERE VERY SUBMISSIVE AND, ON THE WHOLE, SEEMED QUITE HAPPY THAT THE WAR WAS OVER. THE RETURN TRIP TO NEWFOUNDLAND WAS UNEVENTFUL. THERE WAS A GREAT DEAL OF CURIOSITY ON THE PART OF THE CANADIAN SAILORS TO OBSERVE THE PRISONERS AT SUCH AN INTIMATE RANGE. POSSIBLY THE POINT OF MOST INTEREST WAS THE ALLERGY OF THE U-BOAT MEN TO THE ROLL OF A ‘CORVETTI’. AS THEY CALLED THE CORVETTE. A VERY SMALL NUMBER OF THEM SUSTAINED ANY INTEREST IN REGULAR MEALS. A FURTHER POINT OF INTEREST WAS THE PLEASURE OF THE GERMANS AT HAVING HOT WATER FOR WASHING AND SHAVING, THIS COMMODITY BEING APPARENTLY UNHEARD OF ABOARD THE SUBMARINE. THE MAJORITY OF THEM HAD BEARDS BUT SOME OF THESE WERE ONLY HAPPY TO SHAVE THEM OFF. BEING THE FIRST GERMAN SUBMARINE TO ENTER NEWFOUNDLAND PORT, THE PRIZE AND ITS ESCORT WERE ACCORDED A GREAT RECEPTION BY NEWSPAPER REPORTERS AND A NUMBER OF CIVILIANS WHO HAD RISEN AT AN EARLY HOUR TO BE WITNESS TO THIS EVENT IN NEWFOUNDLAND’S HISTORY. THEY WERE NOT DISAPPOINTED AT THE DISPLAY, FOR THE NAVY TOO HAD A RECEPTION COMMITTEE READY FOR THE TRIO OF VESSELS. TWO FAIRMILE MOTOR LAUNCHES FELL IN AS AN ADDITIONAL ESCORT AND CAPTAIN ‘D’ WAS PRESENT TO QUESTION THE PRISONERS ON THEIR ARRIVAL. THE THORLOCK AND THE VICTORIAVILLE TIED UP ALONGSIDE THE FRIGATE PRESTONIAN TO WHICH THE PRISONERS WERE NOON TRANSFERRED TO THEIR EVENTUAL TRANSPORT TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA. THE NAVAL GUARD FROM ASHORE, HAVING RELIEVED THE THORLOCK AND VICTORIAVILLE OF THEIR RESPONSIBILITY THE LATEST JOB OF THE TWO SHIPS WAS COMPLETED AND THEY STEAMED QUIETLY FROM THE HARBOR FOR THEIR BASE, TO AWAIT ANOTHER ASSIGNMENT ANOTHER ‘JOB’ TO DO.” IN WATSON’S OBITUARY PRINTED BY THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, “WATSON PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 16, 1996 AT THE AGE OF 80 YEARS. WATSON’S RECORD OF SERVICE IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVAL SERVICE REVEALS THAT HE WAS ASSIGNED THE SERVICE NUMBER V-89229. HE ENLISTED ON JUNE 14TH 1944 AT CALGARY ALBERTA. WATSON RECEIVED ONE MONTH DRILL AND SEAMANSHIP TRAINING, ONE MONTH STORE’S ASSISTANT COURSE – ORDERING, STORING, ISSUING, ACCOUNTING FOR NAVAL STORES. WATSON IS DESCRIBED AS HAVING ‘HELD CONSIDERABLE RESPONSIBILITY FOR ORDERING ISSUING AND STORING FOOD SUPPLIES FOR ENTIRE CREW OF A CORVETTE FOR 8 MONTHS – CONSIDERABLE CLERICAL DUTIES INVOLVED.’ WATSON SERVED IN THE H.M.C.S. THORLOCK FROM NOVEMBER 14, 1944 TO JUNE 15, 1945. HE WAS DISCHARGED WHEN HIS UNIT DEMOBILIZED ON NOVEMBER 7, 1945 AT CALGARY ALBERTA. WATSON WAS A RECIPIENT OF THE ATLANTIC STAR, VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL AND CLASP, AND THE 1945 SERVICE MEDAL. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING SERVICE RECORDS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20110005006
Acquisition Date
2011-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COURTHOUSE STEP PATTERN
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1954
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20110035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COURTHOUSE STEP PATTERN
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1954
Materials
SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
172
Length
137.5
Width
0.6
Description
QUILT, COURTHOUSE STEPS PATTERN. TOP OF QUILT HAS SECTIONS OF COLOUR MADE WITH NINE RECTANGULAR PIECES SEWN TOGETHER TO CREATE A SQUARES. THIRTY COLOURED SQUARES ARE RED, BLUE, GREEN, BROWN, WHITE, ORANGE AND PURPLE. BETWEEN COLOURED SQUARES ARE YELLOW SQUARES MADE WITH NINE RECTANGULAR PIECES SEWN TOGETHER. BACK OF QUILT IS SINGLE PIECE OF GREEN FABRIC WITH PATTERNED MOTIF OF GIRL IN BLUE DRESS WITH YELLOW FLOWERS. BACKING WRAPS AROUND EDGE TO CREATE BOARDER ON FRONT. AREAS OF FABRIC LOSS ON WHITE, PURPLE, ORANGE AND YELLOW SECTIONS. HAND QUILTED IN TIGHT DIAMOND PATTERN WITH WHITE THREAD.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
AT TIME OF DONATION ON 30 NOVEMBER 2011, DONOR GERALADINE BUCHANAN STATED THAT SHE ACQUIRED THE QUILTS IN THE EARLY 2000S FROM OWNER SHEILA PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE. “SHE KNEW I WAS A QUILTER” SHE SAID WHEN SHE MADE THE DONATION, “AND SHE KNEW I WOULD TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM. SHE ENTRUSTED ME WITH VERY VALUABLE HERITAGE ITEMS AND I WAS HAPPY TO TAKE ON THE RESPONSIBILITY.” THE QUILTS, THE DONOR SAID, WERE HUNG AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF A SHOW IN 2003 AS WELL AS AT THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE IN 2011. A NOTE, HANDWRITTEN BY THE DONOR AND PROVIDED TO THE GALT AT THE POINT OF DONATION, INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION “THESE QUILTS WERE GIVEN TO ME BY SHELIA PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE, DAUGHTER OF MRS. MAURINE DANIEL AND MR. CHARLES DANIEL. THE QUILTS WERE MADE BY MAURINE IN APPROXIMATELY 1939-1954 AFTER SHE BECAME BLIND. HER SISTER, VIRGINIA TALBOT CUT OUT THE PIECES FOR MAURINE. PIECES ARE ALL HAND SEWN. FABRIC IS SILKS FROM SCRAPS FROM HER DAUGHTERS’ DRESSES. TWO OF THE DAUGHTERS SEWED ALL THE DRESSES FOR THE SIX GIRLS. MOTHER – MAURINE DID NOT SEW CLOTHING. TWO OF MAURINE’S SISTERS – VIRGINIA AND DOROTHY DESIGNED ALL THEIR CLOTHES. QUILTS WERE USED ON TWIN BEDS IN DANIELS FAMILY HOME.” MAURINE DANIEL’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IS DATED NOVEMBER 24, 1954 AND READS, “MRS. MAURINE DANIEL, 73, A PIONEER RESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE DISTRICT AND A MEMBER OF A PROMINENT LETHBRIDGE FARMING FAMILY, DIED TUESDAY NIGHT IN A LOCAL HOSPITAL FOLLOWING A LONG ILLNESS. MRS. DANIEL LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE AREA SINCE 1905, WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND, C.R. DANIEL, FIRST BEGAN FARMING JUST EAST OF THE CITY. BORN IN MACON, MISSOURI, ON JAN. 4, 1881, MRS. DANIEL LEFT HER HOME AT THE AGE OF 18 TO TEACH SCHOOL IN BIG TIMBER, MONT. IN 1903, SHE MARRIED MR. DANIEL IN BILLINGS, MONTANA. TWO YEARS LATER, THE COUPLE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE MR. DANIEL TOOK UP FARMING ON THE SITE OF THEIR PRESENT HOME ON THE COALDALE HIGHWAY JUST OUTSIDE THE CITY. THEY LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE WHILE THEIR FARM HOME WAS BEING BUILT, MOVING OUT TO THE FARM IN 1910. MRS. DANIEL WAS PROMINENT IN MANY CIVIC ACTIVITIES. SHE WAS A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE MATHESIS CLUB AND A MEMBER OF THE WOMEN’S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF SOUTHMINSTER UNITED CHURCH. SHE WAS A MEMBER OF THE UNITED CHURCH. BESIDES HER HUSBAND, MRS. DANIEL IS SURVIVED BY A SON, CHARLES ROLAND, JR., OF LETHBRIDGE; SIX DAUGHTERS, MRS. VIRGINIA L. TALBOTT OF LETHBRIDGE, MRS. DOROTHY Q. SAINTAMOUR OF MILFORD, CONN., MRS. DIXIE D. LEMIEUX OF WENATCHEE, WASH., MRS. VINCENT (ELIZABETH) HONAN OF CORONADA, CALIF., MRS. PATRICIA WALKER CASE OF SEATTLE, WASH., AND MRS. SHEILA LANE PETHERBRIDGE OF LETHBRIDGE; TWO SISTERS, MRS. LEILA LOOMIS OF GLENDALE, CALIF., AND MRS. NELL ALBERS OF HUNTINGTON BEACH CALIF.; FIFTEEN GRANDCHILDREN AND ONE GREAT GRANDCHILD.” IN AN ARTICLE DESCRIBING THE CELEBRATION FOR THE NORLAND’S ONE HUNDREDTH YEAR PUBLISHED JULY 1, 2010, LISA DOERKSEN HAS WRITTEN, “BUILT IN 1910, THE SEVEN-BEDROOM, SEVEN-BATHROOM MANSION WAS THE DREAM HOME OF MISSOURI NATIVE CHARLES RONALD DANIEL AND HIS WIFE MAURINE. THE COUPLE PURCHASED 2,000 ACRES NORTH OF THE JAIL IN LETHBRIDGE, AND BUILT THE 7,500-SQUARE-FOOT, THREE STOREY COLONIAL MANSION. REMINISCENT OF HOMES COMMON IN THE DEEP–SOUTH, THE PRE–FABRICATED HOUSE WAS ORDERED FROM A LUMBERMAN’S CATALOGUE WITH EACH PIECE NUMBERED AND SHIPPED READY FOR ASSEMBLY. DANIEL RAN A DAIRY FARM ON THE PROPERTY WHICH BECAME A POPULAR LOCATION FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO GATHER.” RECORDED IN AN ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED IN 2006, “SHELIA LANE PETHERBRIDGE, LONG TIME MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PASSED AWAY [ON MARCH 22, 2006]. BORN SHELIA DANIELS, SHE WAS ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HISTORY AND NATURE CONSERVATION. HER CHILDHOOD HOME WAS NORLAND, BUILT BY HER FATHER IN THE 1900’S DIRECTLY NORTH OF THE LETHBRIDGE CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTE. SHEILA WAS MARRIED TO DOUGLAS PETHERBRIDGE, WHOM SHE MET DURING WORLD WAR II.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE. UPDATE 16 JUNE 2014: ON 4-5 JUNE 2014, ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM (RAM) CURATOR LUCIE HEINS VISITED THE GALT AS PART OF THE RAM’S INITIATIVE TO DOCUMENT QUILTS IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE COLLECTIONS IN ALBERTA. THE DOCUMENTATION WORK IS KNOWN AS THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT. IN ADDITION TO HEINS’ PROGRAM, THE DATA IS ALSO SUPPOSED TO BE SUBMITTED AS PART OF THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE NORTH AMERICAN QUILT INDEX. THIS QUILT HAS BEEN ASSIGNED NO. “AQP 2-0266” BY THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT.
Catalogue Number
P20110035000
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20130009001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1946
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
78
Width
53.5
Description
WHITE LINEN PILLOWCASE, HAND EMBROIDERED WITH TULIP DESIGN IN PURPLE, YELLOW AND GREEN ALONG FRONT OPEN EDGE. OPEN EDGE HAS WHITE CROCHETED BORDER IN CURVED BUTTERFLY DESIGN. GENERAL CREASING.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS PILLOWCASE SET WAS EMBROIDERED BY THE DONOR, JUNE MANCHAK, AT APPROXIMATELY AGE TWELVE, AS A GIFT FOR HER SISTER MERLIN’S WEDDING IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA, IN 1946. THE DONOR’S MOTHER ADDED THE CROCHETED BORDER. ON JUNE 12, 2013, GALT MUSEUM COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MANCHAK ABOUT THIS PILLOWCASE, AS WELL AS ANOTHER (P2013009002-GA) AND A DECORATIVE CUSHION TOP (P20130009003-GA), AND HER FAMILY’S LIFE IN CARDSTON. MANCHAK SAID: “I WAS GIVEN THESE OBJECTS BACK TO ME, OR SOME OF THEM, ANYWAY, BACK TO ME AFTER MY SISTER, MERLIN, PASSED AWAY. HER DAUGHTER RETURNED THEM TO ME… I HAD MADE… DONE THE EMBROIDERY ON THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES, BUT I WAS UNABLE TO CROCHET AT THE TIME, AND SO MY MOTHER DID THE CROCHETING ON THEM AT THAT TIME… ALL THESE PRETTY LITTLE BUTTERFLIES. AND THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES WENT, TRAVELLED QUITE A BIT. THEY WENT TO WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, AND THEN, WHEN MY SISTER DIED, HER DAUGHTER TOOK THEM BACK TO LAS VEGAS, AND WHEN SHE DECIDED THAT PROBABLY THEY SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ME, SO THEY WERE. AND WHEN ONE OF HER DAUGHTERS MARRIED, I GAVE ONE PAIR TO THAT DAUGHTER. AND SO THEY RETURNED FROM PHOENIX, THEN TO LAS VEGAS, AND NOW THEY ARE SITTING HERE IN LETHBRIDGE… WE MADE THEM FOR A WEDDING GIFT OR MY WEDDING GIFT FOR MY SISTER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… IT JUST CAME NATURALLY, I DON’T KNOW, MAKING DOLL CLOTHES… YOU WENT TO THE RAG DRAWER AND GOT OUT WHATEVER WAS AVAILABLE IN MATERIAL, AND GOT SOME THREAD, AND YOU MADE DOLL CLOTHES, AND THEN IT PROGRESSED… AND I ALWAYS LIKED WORKING WITH MY HANDS… I THINK THAT EVERYONE DID A LOT OF NEEDLWORK AND THINGS BACK THEN. IT WAS A GOOD WAY TO FILL YOUR TIME. YOU LISTENED TO THE RADIO AND YOU WORKED WITH YOUR HANDS… YOU DON’T REALLY LEARN. I MEAN YOU LEARN THROUGH DOING. AND, AH, LIKE ALMOST ANY OTHER SKILL, THE MORE YOU WORK AT IT, THE BETTER YOU GET… YOU ALWAYS DID IT IN THE EVENINGS WHEN YOU WERE BABYSITTING… JUST WHEN YOU HAD TIME... I LEFT HOME AT EIGHTEEN, WHEN I WENT TO CALGARY TO THE BUSINESS COLLEGE THERE. AND THEN I MARRIED, WHEN I WAS NINETEEN, AND STARTED RAISING A FAMILY WHEN I WAS TWENTY… I STILL DID A LOT OF NEEDLEWORK AND WORKED WITH MY HANDS, BUT I DID A LOT OF SEWING, AND I WAS MAKING MY OWN CLOTHES WHEN I WAS TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN. MADE MY OWN GRADUATION DRESS; MADE MY OWN WEDDING DRESS… I NEEDED A PAIR OF SHORTS TO GO TO BEEHIVE CAMP AND SO MY ELDEST SISTER BROUGHT HOME A PATTERN AND SOME MATERIAL, AND SHE SAYS, “HERE YOU ARE, JUNE.” AND SO I GOT OUT THE INSTRUCTIONS AND LEARNED.” MANCHAK SAID THE FOLLOWING OF HER MOTHER: "MY MOTHER TAUGHT HERSELF TO CROCHET BY LOOKING AT OTHER CROCHETING. I TAUGHT MYSELF EVENTUALLY TO CROCHET FROM AN INSTRUCTION BOOK… [THE EMBROIDERED LINEN] IS PART OF MY MOTHER. AND SHE ALWAYS LOVED PRETTY, BEAUTIFUL THINGS. AND BEING A PIONEER MOTHER, RAISING ELEVEN CHILDREN, SHE DID NOT HAVE VERY MUCH. AND SO, EVERY LITTLE THING SHE CHERISHED… WHERE I USED THREE THREADS AT THE BORDER, WHICH WAS DIVIDING IT IN HALF, MY MOTHER USED… DIVIDED IT IN THIRDS, TO SAVE ON THE THREAD… [MY MOTHER] WAS EXCITED ABOUT EVERYTHING IN LIFE. I MEAN THE LITTLE BIT OF TRAVELLING SHE WAS ABLE TO DO, AND SO APPRECIATIVE OF EVERYTHING… [MY MOTHER] WAS BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA, AND SHE CAME UP HERE WITH HER PARENTS… HER DAD WAS A COAL MINER… BUT HE DIDN’T LIKE IT, BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH DIRTY WORK… AND HE AND HIS WIFE CAME UP WITH THEIR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER, WHICH WAS MY MOTHER. AND STARTED A RANCH OUT BY BEAZER... [AND] I’M THE BABY OF ELEVEN." FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20130009001
Acquisition Date
2013-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20130009002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAND EMBROIDERED
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
1955
Materials
LINEN, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.25
Length
78
Width
52
Description
WHITE LINEN PILLOWCASE, HAND EMBROIDERED WITH BUTTERFLY DESIGN IN BLUE, YELLOW, BLACK, WHITE AND GREEN ALONG FRONT OPEN EDGE. OPEN EDGE HAS WHITE CROCHETED BORDER IN SCALLOPED DESIGN. GENERAL CREASING.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS PILLOWCASE WAS EMBROIDERED BY THE MOTHER OF THE DONOR, JUNE MANCHAK. ON JUNE 12, 2013, GALT MUSEUM COLLECTIONS TECH KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MANCHAK ABOUT THIS PILLOWCASE, AS WELL AS ANOTHER (P2013009001-GA) AND A DECORATIVE CUSHION TOP (P20130009003-GA), AND HER FAMILY’S LIFE IN CARDSTON. MANCHAK SAID: “I WAS GIVEN THESE OBJECTS BACK TO ME, OR SOME OF THEM, ANYWAY, BACK TO ME AFTER MY SISTER, MERLIN, PASSED AWAY. HER DAUGHTER RETURNED THEM TO ME… I HAD MADE… DONE THE EMBROIDERY ON THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES, BUT I WAS UNABLE TO CROCHET AT THE TIME, AND SO MY MOTHER DID THE CROCHETING ON THEM AT THAT TIME… ALL THESE PRETTY LITTLE BUTTERFLIES. AND THESE TWO SETS OF PILLOWCASES WENT, TRAVELLED QUITE A BIT. THEY WENT TO WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, AND THEN, WHEN MY SISTER DIED, HER DAUGHTER TOOK THEM BACK TO LAS VEGAS, AND WHEN SHE DECIDED THAT PROBABLY THEY SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ME, SO THEY WERE. AND WHEN ONE OF HER DAUGHTERS MARRIED, I GAVE ONE PAIR TO THAT DAUGHTER. AND SO THEY RETURNED FROM PHOENIX, THEN TO LAS VEGAS, AND NOW THEY ARE SITTING HERE IN LETHBRIDGE… WE MADE THEM FOR A WEDDING GIFT OR MY WEDDING GIFT FOR MY SISTER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… IT JUST CAME NATURALLY, I DON’T KNOW, MAKING DOLL CLOTHES… YOU WENT TO THE RAG DRAWER AND GOT OUT WHATEVER WAS AVAILABLE IN MATERIAL, AND GOT SOME THREAD, AND YOU MADE DOLL CLOTHES, AND THEN IT PROGRESSED… AND I ALWAYS LIKED WORKING WITH MY HANDS… I THINK THAT EVERYONE DID A LOT OF NEEDLWORK AND THINGS BACK THEN. IT WAS A GOOD WAY TO FILL YOUR TIME. YOU LISTENED TO THE RADIO AND YOU WORKED WITH YOUR HANDS… YOU DON’T REALLY LEARN. I MEAN YOU LEARN THROUGH DOING. AND, AH, LIKE ALMOST ANY OTHER SKILL, THE MORE YOU WORK AT IT, THE BETTER YOU GET… YOU ALWAYS DID IT IN THE EVENINGS WHEN YOU WERE BABYSITTING… JUST WHEN YOU HAD TIME... I LEFT HOME AT EIGHTEEN, WHEN I WENT TO CALGARY TO THE BUSINESS COLLEGE THERE. AND THEN I MARRIED, WHEN I WAS NINETEEN, AND STARTED RAISING A FAMILY WHEN I WAS TWENTY… I STILL DID A LOT OF NEEDLEWORK AND WORKED WITH MY HANDS, BUT I DID A LOT OF SEWING, AND I WAS MAKING MY OWN CLOTHES WHEN I WAS TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN. MADE MY OWN GRADUATION DRESS; MADE MY OWN WEDDING DRESS… I NEEDED A PAIR OF SHORTS TO GO TO BEEHIVE CAMP AND SO MY ELDEST SISTER BROUGHT HOME A PATTERN AND SOME MATERIAL, AND SHE SAYS, “HERE YOU ARE, JUNE.” AND SO I GOT OUT THE INSTRUCTIONS AND LEARNED.” MANCHAK SAID THE FOLLOWING OF HER MOTHER: "MY MOTHER TAUGHT HERSELF TO CROCHET BY LOOKING AT OTHER CROCHETING. I TAUGHT MYSELF EVENTUALLY TO CROCHET FROM AN INSTRUCTION BOOK… [THE EMBROIDERED LINEN] IS PART OF MY MOTHER. AND SHE ALWAYS LOVED PRETTY, BEAUTIFUL THINGS. AND BEING A PIONEER MOTHER, RAISING ELEVEN CHILDREN, SHE DID NOT HAVE VERY MUCH. AND SO, EVERY LITTLE THING SHE CHERISHED… WHERE I USED THREE THREADS AT THE BORDER, WHICH WAS DIVIDING IT IN HALF, MY MOTHER USED… DIVIDED IT IN THIRDS, TO SAVE ON THE THREAD… [MY MOTHER] WAS EXCITED ABOUT EVERYTHING IN LIFE. I MEAN THE LITTLE BIT OF TRAVELLING SHE WAS ABLE TO DO, AND SO APPRECIATIVE OF EVERYTHING… [MY MOTHER] WAS BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA, AND SHE CAME UP HERE WITH HER PARENTS… HER DAD WAS A COAL MINER… BUT HE DIDN’T LIKE IT, BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH DIRTY WORK… AND HE AND HIS WIFE CAME UP WITH THEIR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER, WHICH WAS MY MOTHER. AND STARTED A RANCH OUT BY BEAZER... [AND] I’M THE BABY OF ELEVEN." FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20130009002
Acquisition Date
2013-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1904
Date Range To
2007
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20070009000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1904
Date Range To
2007
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
18.4
Diameter
15.7
Description
BROWN CERAMIC JUG WITH SPOUT AND HANDLE. GLAZE HAS CHIPPED ALONG RIM. BOTTOM SURFACE OF JUG UNGLAZED.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
JUG WAS ORIGINALLY USED BY DONOR'S GRANDMOTHER, CATHERINE COOK WELLS, TO STORE VINEGAR. IN THE PAST, VINEGAR WAS SOLD IN BULK AND CUSTOMERS PROVIDED THEIR OWN CONTAINERS. DONOR RECALLED HAVING THE JUG FILLED IN ISLAY, ALBERTA, AND THE CHINESE MAN WHO RAN THE STORE WAS EXCITED TO SEE A JUG THAT CLOSELY RESEMBLED THOSE USED IN CHINA. DONOR ESTIMATES THAT THE JUG HAS BEEN IN USE BY HER FAMILY FOR AT LEAST 80 YEARS. DONOR SUSPECTS THAT JUG WAS MADE BY A SKILLED PIONEER, BUT SHE CANNOT TRACE ITS HISTORY BACK FARTHER THAN HER GRANDMOTHER. IN 1904, CATHERINE WELLS AND HER HUSBAND MOVED FROM ONTARIO TO SETTLE 11 MILES SOUTH OF FORT MACLEOD. DURING THE MOVE, MANY ARTICLES WERE BROUGHT OVER FROM ONTARIO TO ESTABLISH A HOME AND FARMSTEAD. THE JUG WAS ONE SUCH ARTICLE. IN 1928, WHEN HER HUSBAND PASSED AWAY, CATHERINE WELLS PURCHASED A FURNISHED HOME IN FORT MACLEOD. SHE MOVED INTO THE HOME, BRINGING THE JUG WITH HER. JEAN WELLS RECALLS HER MOTHER, ISABELLA ROLLINS WELLS (CATHERINE WELLS DAUGHTER), USING THE JUG TO STORE VINEGAR. JEAN WELLS TREATED THE JUG LIKE AN ORNAMENT, STORING IT IN HER CHINA CABINET. ***28 MAY 2014 UPDATE: MERRI-ANN FORD, CATHERINE COOK WELLS’ GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER, PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: ON APRIL 19, 1906 HOMESTEAD ENTRY WAS MADE BY GEORGE WELLS ON THE NE ¼, SECTION 16, RANGE 25, WEST 4TH MERIDIAN. THE LAND IS LOCATED 4.5 MILES (7.24 KM) SOUTH OF HWY 3 ON RANGE ROAD 254. THE ORIGINAL 1/4 SECTION IS LOCATED TO THE SW OF THE GRAVEL ROAD AND EAST WEST FENCE LINE. ON JULY 11, 1908 HIS WIFE CATHERINE WELLS AND THE YOUNGER CHILDREN MOVED ONTO THE HOMESTEAD. MANY ITEMS WERE BROUGHT FROM MARMORA, ONTARIO TO ESTABLISH THE HOME. THE JUG WAS ONE SUCH ARTICLE. GEORGE WELLS PASSED AWAY IN 1927 AND IN 1928 CATHERINE MOVED INTO A FURNISHED HOME IN FORT MACLEOD. THE PARISH HALL, OF HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC CHURCH, NOW STANDS ON THE SITE OF HER FORMER HOME. ONE OF THE ITEMS SHE BROUGHT WITH HER TO HER NEW HOME WAS THE JUG. AFTER CATHERINE’S DEATH THE JUG CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF BEATRICE ISABELLA ROLLINS WELLS (CATHERINE’S DAUGHTER). AT THAT TIME ISABELLA’S FAMILY WAS LIVING 4 ½ MILES SOUTH AND ½ MILE EAST OF FORT MACLEOD. THIS LAND WAS SOLD AND ISABELLA’S FAMILY MOVED TO THE AREA AROUND ISLAY, ALBERTA TAKING THE JUG WITH THEM. JEAN WELLS, ISABELLA’S DAUGHTER, RECALLS HER MOTHER USING THE JUG TO STORE VINEGAR. EVENTUALLY THE JUG CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF JEAN WELLS. SHE TREATED IT LIKE AN ORNAMENT, STORING IT IN HER CHINA CABINET. FOR INFORMATION SUBMITTED BY JUG DONOR JEAN WELLS AND WELLS’ DESCENDANT MERRI-ANN FORD, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD.
Catalogue Number
P20070009000
Acquisition Date
2007-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLORAL HOLDER
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
2003
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20060021010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLORAL HOLDER
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
2003
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
31.5
Length
13
Width
9.5
Description
BRASS WALL MOUNTED FLORAL HOLDER. OVAL IN SHAPE LARGER AT OPENING COMES TO A ROUNDED POINT AT END. FRONT OF HOLDER STAMPED WITH TEXT THAT READS "TO THE GLORY OF GOD", "TO HONOR THOSE WHO DIED- 1914-1918", " THE GIFT OF MARGARET SWINGLER FEBRUARY 1927".
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
CONTAINER
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
FLOWER VASE WAS LOCATED IN THE ST. MARY'S CHURCH BELOW A WORLD WAR I MEMORIAL PLAQUE AND ABOVE THE FLOWER TABLE HOLDING THE WOODEN CROSS ( SEE P20060021009). ST MARY’S ANGLICAN CHURCH BEGAN EARLY IN THE 1900S. THE EARLIEST ARCHIVAL RECORD IS A STATEMENT MADE IN JANUARY, 1906 THAT A GROUP OF PROMINENT MEMBERS OF ST. AUGUSTIN’S PARISHIONERS AGREED TO COVER A DEFICIT IN THE OPERATION OF ST. MARY’S MISSION UP TO $300. APPARENTLY, ST. MARY’S EXISTED BEFORE THIS DECISION, BUT IT IS UNKNOWN FOR HOW LONG. A FORMAL ORGANIZATION MEETING FOR ST. MARY’S MISSION WAS HELD ON APRIL 20. 1908. THE SEPARATE PARISH OF ST. MARY’S WAS ESTABLISHED ON FEBRUARY 1, 1910. THE “NEW” CHURCH WAS BUILT IN 1912, AND USED BY THE PARISH UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 2003. THE NORTH SIDE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP THEN RENTED THE BUILDING UNTIL 2006, WHEN THE PROPERTY WAS SOLD TO A PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL. THERE WERE AT LEAST EIGHT RECTORS (PRIESTS) AT ST MARY’S BETWEEN 1910 AND 1944, INCLUDING SOME PERIODS OF TIME WHEN NO PRIEST WAS AVAILABLE (OR AFFORDABLE). IN 1944, ROBERT COWAN ARRIVED AND SERVED ST. MARY’S FOR THE NEXT 37 YEARS UNTIL 1981, A TERM UNPARALLELED IN THE ANGLICAN DIOCESE OF CALGARY. IT WAS DURING THIS TIME THAT ST. MARY’S BECAME KNOWN HAS ST. MARY THE VIRGIN. CANON COWAN RETURNED TO ST MARY’S AS A PARISHIONER FOR A FEW YEARS LATER, AND REMAINED UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1999. MICHAEL EBSWORTH SERVED AS RECTOR FROM 1981 UNTIL 1994, WHEN HE RESIGNED DUE TO HEALTH REASONS. FATHER EBSWORTH REMAINED A RESIDENT OF LETHBRIDGE, OFTEN SERVING AS A “VISITING” PRIEST, AND HE TOOK PART IN THE FINAL SERVICE AT ST. MARY’S HELD ON AUGUST 14, 2003. IN THE FINAL DECADE OF ST MARY’S EXISTENCE, FIVE OTHER PRIESTS SERVED THE PARISH, INCLUDING TWO FEMALE PRIESTS WHICH SOME FOUND SURPRISING DUE TO ST. MARY’S TRADITIONAL LITURGICAL PRACTICES. THE CHURCH CLOSED AND AMALGAMATED WITH THE ANGLICAN PARISH OF ST. AUGUSTINE. OTHER OBJECTS AND ARCHIVAL MATERIALS ASSOCIATED WITH ST. MARY'S OPERATION WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE ANGLICAN DIOCESE OF CALGARY. AT THE TIME OF ITS CLOSURE, ST MARY'S WAS THE LONGEST OPERATING OF ANY LETHBRIDGE CHURCH IN THE CURRENT PREMISES. FOR COMPLETE HISTORY SEE PERMANENT FILE P20060021001.
Catalogue Number
P20060021010
Acquisition Date
2006-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"M. THO. BROWN
Date Range From
1912
Date Range To
1955
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20060021021
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"M. THO. BROWN
Date Range From
1912
Date Range To
1955
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
80.5
Width
42.5
Description
WOOD TRUNK COVERED IN LEATHER. TRUNK FEATURES METAL EDGING ON THE TOP AND SIDES WITH METAL STUDS. BACK IS MISSING MOST OF ITS LEATHER COVERING WITH METAL HINGES. BOTH SIDES FEATURE METAL HANDLES AND FRONT HAS A METAL KEY HOLE. A BRASS PLATE IS ATTACHED TO TOP LID OF TRUNK AND READS "M. THO. BRONN".
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
RELIGION
History
TRUNK WAS FOUND WITH TEXTILES(P20060021011 TO P20060021018 AND P20060021020) WHEN PARISHONERS CLEANED OUT ST. MARY'S CHURCH IN PREPERATION FOR ITS FUTURE SALE. NO ONE FROM THE CHURCH AT THE TIME OF THE DONATION COULD RECALL ANY INFORMATION ABOUT THE TRUNK OR ITS CONTENTS. THE ALTER FRONTALS DID NOT FIT THE ALTER WHICH BEGAN ITS USED IN 1955. IT IS ASSUMED THAT THE TEXTILES WERE USED IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE PARISH'S EXISTENCE. ST MARY’S ANGLICAN CHURCH BEGAN EARLY IN THE 1900S. THE EARLIEST ARCHIVAL RECORD IS A STATEMENT MADE IN JANUARY, 1906 THAT A GROUP OF PROMINENT MEMBERS OF ST. AUGUSTIN’S PARISHIONERS AGREED TO COVER A DEFICIT IN THE OPERATION OF ST. MARY’S MISSION UP TO $300. APPARENTLY, ST. MARY’S EXISTED BEFORE THIS DECISION, BUT IT IS UNKNOWN FOR HOW LONG. A FORMAL ORGANIZATION MEETING FOR ST. MARY’S MISSION WAS HELD ON APRIL 20. 1908. THE SEPARATE PARISH OF ST. MARY’S WAS ESTABLISHED ON FEBRUARY 1, 1910. THE “NEW” CHURCH WAS BUILT IN 1912, AND USED BY THE PARISH UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 2003. THE NORTH SIDE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP THEN RENTED THE BUILDING UNTIL 2006, WHEN THE PROPERTY WAS SOLD TO A PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL. THERE WERE AT LEAST EIGHT RECTORS (PRIESTS) AT ST MARY’S BETWEEN 1910 AND 1944, INCLUDING SOME PERIODS OF TIME WHEN NO PRIEST WAS AVAILABLE (OR AFFORDABLE). IN 1944, ROBERT COWAN ARRIVED AND SERVED ST. MARY’S FOR THE NEXT 37 YEARS UNTIL 1981, A TERM UNPARALLELED IN THE ANGLICAN DIOCESE OF CALGARY. IT WAS DURING THIS TIME THAT ST. MARY’S BECAME KNOWN HAS ST. MARY THE VIRGIN. CANON COWAN RETURNED TO ST MARY’S AS A PARISHIONER FOR A FEW YEARS LATER, AND REMAINED UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1999. MICHAEL EBSWORTH SERVED AS RECTOR FROM 1981 UNTIL 1994, WHEN HE RESIGNED DUE TO HEALTH REASONS. FATHER EBSWORTH REMAINED A RESIDENT OF LETHBRIDGE, OFTEN SERVING AS A “VISITING” PRIEST, AND HE TOOK PART IN THE FINAL SERVICE AT ST. MARY’S HELD ON AUGUST 14, 2003. IN THE FINAL DECADE OF ST MARY’S EXISTENCE, FIVE OTHER PRIESTS SERVED THE PARISH, INCLUDING TWO FEMALE PRIESTS WHICH SOME FOUND SURPRISING DUE TO ST. MARY’S TRADITIONAL LITURGICAL PRACTICES. THE CHURCH CLOSED AND AMALGAMATED WITH THE ANGLICAN PARISH OF ST. AUGUSTINE. OTHER OBJECTS AND ARCHIVAL MATERIALS ASSOCIATED WITH ST. MARY'S OPERATION WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE ANGLICAN DIOCESE OF CALGARY. AT THE TIME OF ITS CLOSURE, ST MARY'S WAS THE LONGEST OPERATING OF ANY LETHBRIDGE CHURCH IN THE CURRENT PREMISES. FOR COMPLETE HISTORY SEE PERMANENT FILE P20060021001.
Catalogue Number
P20060021021
Acquisition Date
2006-08
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20060036002
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1997
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
32
Width
24.5
Description
RECTANGULAR WHT AND GLD PLASTIC BAG. BOTH SIDES ARE THE SAME. GLD BAG WITH WHT BORDER. BLK LABEL READS "LEO SINGER LTD." "MEN'S AND BOY'S WEAR". ONE SIDE DISPLAYS MANUFACTURE MARK "MAYERS PACKING WINNIPEG, MANITOBA."
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
CONTAINER
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
DONATED MATERIALS WERE COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE STORE IN NOV. 2006 BY THE GALT MUSEUM TECH, KEVIN MACLEAN. MACLEAN WAS CALLED TO THE STORE BY THE DONOR AFTER THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER PHYLLIS SINGER. DONOR WAS CLEANING OUT THE STORE IN ORDER TO LEASE. STORE HAD NOT BEEN CLEANED- OUT FOLLOWING THE PASSING OF HER FATHER, LEO SINGER, IN 1997. SEE P20060036001- GA FOR COMPLETE HISTORY OF LEO SINGER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20060036002
Acquisition Date
2006-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20060036003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1997
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Description
CLEAR PLASTIC GARMENT BAG. GLD, WHT AND BRWN LABEL ON FRONT. BAG ALSO DISPLAYS IMAGE OF A BUILDING IN GLD. TEXT IN GLD AND WHT READS "PROGRESS BRAND CLOTHES". WHT RECTANGLE FEATURES LOGO " LEO SINGER MEN'S AND BOY'S WEAR", "214 - 5TH STREET SOUTH - LETHBRIDGE, ALTA." SIDES ARE FOLDED INWARD TOP TO BOTTOM TO ALLOW EXPANSION.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
CONTAINER
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
DONATED MATERIALS WERE COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE STORE IN NOV. 2006 BY THE GALT MUSEUM TECH, KEVIN MACLEAN. MACLEAN WAS CALLED TO THE STORE BY THE DONOR AFTER THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER PHYLLIS SINGER. DONOR WAS CLEANING OUT THE STORE IN ORDER TO LEASE. STORE HAD NOT BEEN CLEANED- OUT FOLLOWING THE PASSING OF HER FATHER, LEO SINGER, IN 1997. SEE P20060036001- GA FOR COMPLETE HISTORY OF LEO SINGER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20060036003
Acquisition Date
2006-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20060036005
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1997
Materials
PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
45
Width
43
Description
OFF WHT PAPER SHOPPING BAG THAT DISPLAYS MAN AND WOMEN IN CAR. BAG HAS TWO PAPER HANDLES. CARTOON ILLUSTRATION ON FRONT DEPICTS A CAR THAT IS GRN WITH A RD FRONT GRILL. MAN IN CAR HAS ON RD COAT, GRN POKE-A-DOT BOW TIE AND A BLK BOWLER HAT. MAN HAS LARGE RD NOSE. WOMEN DRESSED IN GRN WITH RD SCARF TIED AROUND HER HEAD. BOXES IN CAR ARE RD, GRN AND WHT. TEXT FOUND IN BLK READS "WE'VE COME FROM". RD TEXT READS "LEO SINGER MEN'S AND BOY'S WEAR". RD AND BLK BOXED LETTERS DISPLAYED UNDER ILLUSTRATION WHICH READS "ARROW".
Subjects
CONTAINER
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
DONATED MATERIALS WERE COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE STORE IN NOV. 2006 BY THE GALT MUSEUM TECH, KEVIN MACLEAN. MACLEAN WAS CALLED TO THE STORE BY THE DONOR AFTER THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER PHYLLIS SINGER. DONOR WAS CLEANING OUT THE STORE IN ORDER TO LEASE. STORE HAD NOT BEEN CLEANED- OUT FOLLOWING THE PASSING OF HER FATHER, LEO SINGER, IN 1997. SEE P20060036001- GA FOR COMPLETE HISTORY OF LEO SINGER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20060036005
Acquisition Date
2006-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20060036011
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LEO SINGER
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1990
Materials
CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Length
68
Width
31
Description
DARK GRN FLATTENED CARDBOARD CLOTHING BOX. GLD TEXT ON TOP HALF OF BOX READS "LEO SINGER LIMITED MEN'S AND BOY'S WEAR LETHBRIDGE ALBERTA". BOTTOM HALF OF BOX IS DARK GRN AND HAS NO MARKINGS.
Subjects
CONTAINER
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
DONATED MATERIALS WERE COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE STORE IN NOV. 2006 BY THE GALT MUSEUM TECH, KEVIN MACLEAN. MACLEAN WAS CALLED TO THE STORE BY THE DONOR AFTER THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER PHYLLIS SINGER. DONOR WAS CLEANING OUT THE STORE IN ORDER TO LEASE. STORE HAD NOT BEEN CLEANED- OUT FOLLOWING THE PASSING OF HER FATHER, LEO SINGER, IN 1997. SEE P20060036001- GA FOR COMPLETE HISTORY OF LEO SINGER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20060036011
Acquisition Date
2006-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20030063003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
23.5
Length
12.5
Width
12.5
Description
CLEAR GLASS JAR. BODY OF JAR IS SQUARE, WITH ROUNDED EDGES. OPENING OF JAR IS SLIGHTLY RECESSED AND IS ROUND. HAS A LIP THAT EXTENDS OUTWARD. BOTTOM OF JAR IS SLIGHTLY CONCAVE. EMBOSSED ON BOTTOM OF JAR IS A DIAMOND WITH "L" IN THE CENTER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S PARENTS KICHIZO AND KIMI TAKAGUCHI. USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH P20030063001-4-GA. KICHIZO CAME FROM JAPAN IN 1916, AND KIMI IN 1924, BECAUSE THEY FELT THEY WOULD FARE BETTER IN CANADA. THEY SETTLED IN RAYMOND AND HAD 4 CHILDREN THERE (INCLUDING DONOR). FOR MORE INFORMATION, REFER TO BATHTUB'S HISTORY IN P20030063001.
Catalogue Number
P20030063003
Acquisition Date
2004-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OPTICAL LENS TESTER C/W TRIAL LENSES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20030026000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OPTICAL LENS TESTER C/W TRIAL LENSES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, GLASS, STEEL
No. Pieces
309
Height
10.0
Length
54.0
Width
31.5
Description
1. CASE. ABOVE DIMENSIONS. 2 PIECES. MADE OF WOOD, EXTERIOR OF CASE IS PAINTED BROWN. EACH CORNER OF CASE HAS CHROME PLATED BRASS REINFORCEMENTS (MOST OF CHROME HAS WORN OFF), THAT ARE ATTACHED WITH THREE SCREWS. FRONT OF CASE HAS TWO LATCHES AND A LOCK. THERE IS ALSO A BLACK LEATHER HANDLE ATTACHED AT FRONT THAT IS REMOVABLE. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK BURGUNDY VELVET. A FLAP INSIDE LID OF CASE OPENS TO REVEAL A COMPARTMENT FOR 2 DIMENSIONAL ITEMS. TOP LAYER OF CASE IS MADE OF WOOD AND COMPARTMENTALIZED. EACH COMPARTMENT IS MADE TO FIT VARIOUS SIZES OF LENSES AND OTHER EQUIPMENT. FOUR OF THE COMPARTMENTS ARE LABELLED AS FOLLOWS: "SPHERICAL CONCAVE", "CYLINDRICAL CONCAVE", "CYLINDRICAL CONVEX" AND "SPHERICAL CONVEX". A COMPARTMENT AT THE FRONT OF CASE HAS LABEL THAT READS "IMPERIAL OPTICAL CO. MANUFACTURING OPTICIANS TORONTO, WIINIPEG LONDON AND OTTAWA.". TOP LAYER OF CASE LIFTS OUT TO REVEAL BOTTOM LAYER WHICH IS ALSO DIVIDED INTO 7 RECTANGULAR COMPARTMENTS. 2. OPTICAL LENSES. 258 PIECES. LENSES ARE STORED IN TOP LAYER OF CASE. ALL LENSES HAVE A CHROME FRAME WITH A SMALL HANDLE TO ONE SIDE (WITH EITHER - OR + SHAPE CUT OUT) WITH A NUMBER ETCHED INTO IT (WHICH DILINEATES STRENGTH OF LENS). THERE ARE 70 "SPHERICAL CONCAVE" LENSES, 69 "SPHERICAL CONVEX" LENSES, 42 "CYLINDRICAL CONCAVE" LENSES, AND 42 "CYLINDRICAL CONVEX" LENSES. ADDITIONALLY, THERE ARE ANOTHER 35 LENSES IN CASE (5 IN ONE COMPARTMENT 30 IN ANOTHER). OF THESE 35 LENSES SOME ARE TINTED DIFFERENT COLOURS, OTHERS ARE OPAQUE WITH SLITS OR HOLES IN THEM, OTHERS ARE CLEAR WITH LINES ON THEM, AND OTHERS ARE THICKER ALONG ONE EDGE; THERE IS ONE FRAME WITH NO GLASS LENS IN IT. 3. OPTHALMOSCOPE BULBS. 1.5 X 5.6 X 3.6. 5 PIECES. RECTANGULAR, CLEAR PLASTIC CASE WITH YELLOW SPONGE INSERT. INSERT HAS 4 HOLES CUT OUT, 2 OF WHICH HOLD SMALL CHROME AND GLASS BULBS. LID OF CASE IS REMOVABLE (ONE SIDE OF LID IS BROKEN OFF). A PIECE OF PAPER TAPED TO LID READS "MEDELUX OPTHALMOSCOPE BULBS 250". CASE IS HELD TOGETHER BY ELASTIC BAND. 4. LENS TESTER. 17.2(L) X 5.6(W). METAL, MOSTLY PAINTED BLACK. ENDS OF ARMS ARE COVERED IN IVORY BAKELITE; NOSE PIECE IS WHITE BAKELITE. THERE IS A CIRCULAR GAUGE AROUND EACH EYEPIECE AND A STRAIGHT GAUGE ACROSS TOP. ON BACKSIDE OF STRAIGHT GAUGE IS "MADE IN U.S.A. PAT. PEND. AMERICAN OPTICAL COMPANY PAT. NO'S. 1,550,582 1,794,571". THERE ARE MULTIPLE ADJUSTING KNOBS THROUGHOUT. 5. BOTTLE. 3.0 X 1.5 X 1.5. 37 PIECES. SMALL CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE WITH SCREW-ON ALUMINUM CAP. EMBOSSED ON CAP IS "A" WITHIN A CIRCLE INSIDE A "C". EMBOSSED ON SIDES OF BOTTLE IS "70" AND "A. O. CO.". BOTTLE CONTAINS 35 SMALL SCREWS AND NUTS. 6. EYE CHART. 0.1 X 13.7 X 11.6. PAPER SHEET ENCASED IN PLASTIC. EDGES OF PLASTIC ARE WORN AND DIRTY. EGES OF PAPER YELLOWED. 6 PARAGRAPHS OF PROGRESSIVELY LARGER PRINT. EACH PARAGRAPH READS DIFFERENTLY. FIRST PARAGRAPH BEGINS "IF YOU GATHER APPLES IN THE SUNSHINE" . . . . 7. EYE CHART. 0.1 X 15.8 X 14.6. PAPER SHEET SEALED IN HARD PLASTIC. OBVERSE READS "UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO SCHOOL OF OPTOMETRY CARD DESIGNED FOR 16" WORKING DISTANCE". FOLLOWED BY 6 PARAGRAPHS OF PROGESSIVELY LARGER PRINT. THERE IS A LARGE HOLE THROUGH CARD ON RIGHT SIDE. REVERSE OF CARD HAS VARIOUS SYMBOLS ON IT. 8. EYE CHART. 0.1 X 58.0 X 28.3. OBVERSE CONSISTS OF 7 ROWS OF THE LETTER "E" IN VARIOUS POSITIONS IN PROGRESSIVELY SMALLER PRINT. AT BOTTOM IS "6" AND AT TOP IS A LINEAR GRAPHIC REPRESENTATIVE OF A RISING (OR SETTING) SUN. THERE IS ALSO A GREEN AND A RED HORIZONTAL LINE MADE WITH CRAYON. ON REVERSE OF CHART WEAVED THREAD IS VISIBLE. TOP AND BOTTOM OF CHART HAVE A BLACK METAL BAND ACROSS THEM. CHART IS WORN AND DIRTY WITH MULTIPLE HOLES ALONG EDGES. 9. EYE CHART. 0.3 X 71.0 X 25.2. 3 PIECES. MADE OF 2 PIECES OF HEAVY CARD, MASKING TAPED AT CENTER. AT TOP READS "TEST CHART- LLEN RATING". BELOW IS A LINEAR GRAPHIC REPRESENTATIVE OF A RISING (OR SETTING) SUN. BELOW THIS ARE 8 ROWS OF LETTERS IN PROGRESSIVELY SMALLER PRINT. THERE IS ALSO A GREEN AND A RED HORIZONTAL LINE ON CHART. AT BOTTOM OF CHART READS "THE ABOVE CHARACTERS SUBTEND THE VISUAL ANGLE OF 5' AT THE DESIGNATED DISTANCE IN FEET IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE SNELLEN NOTATION OF VISUAL ACUITY. BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL COMPANY". THERE IS ALSO A SMALL PAPER ENVELOPE CLIPPED TO BOTTOM WHICH READS "CHECK EYES". TOP OF CHART HAS A HOLE WITH A COPPER WIRE THROUGH IT.
Subjects
CONTAINER
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
ORIGINALLY BELONGED TO DR. A.A. MARSHALL FROM CALGARY, WHO OWNED A PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE WHERE DR. CLIFF PALMER (DONOR'S HUSBAND) WORKED. IN 19??, SIX MONTHS AFTER HE BEGAN WORKING THERE, CLIFF PALMER BOUGHT THE PRACTICE FROM MARSHALL AND THE LENSES CAME WITH. THE LENSES WERE USED AS TRIAL LENSES BUT BECAME OBSOLETE WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW EQUIPMENT THAT HAD THE VARIOUS TYPES OF LENSES INSIDE. THESE LENSES WERE THEN USED BY DR. PALMER WHEN HE DID EXAMINATIONS ON INDIGENOUS RESERVES AS A BACKUP. ORIGINALLY THE CASE WAS BLACK BUT WAS PAINTED BROWN BY CLIFF PALMER. CLIFF PALMER WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1916, AND WENT TO OPTOMETRIC COLLEGE IN TORONTO. HE GRADUATED FROM OPTOMETRY SCHOOL IN 1937. THIS COLLEGE EVENTUALLY MOVED TO WATERLOO AND IS CURRENTLY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO. HE THEN STARTED PRACTICING IN WINNIPEG AT THE HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY. AFTER WINNIPEG, HE BEGAN A POSITION WITH DR. A. ASHDOWN MARSHALL IN CALGARY. DR. MARSHALL HAD AN OFFICE IN LETHBRIDGE AND TRANSFERRED CLIFF THERE IN 1938. WITHIN SIX MONTHS CLIFF PALMER PURCHASED THE PRACTICE AND REMAINED IN PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1976. CLIFF WAS ACTIVE IN THE OPTOMETRIC ASSOCIATION, SERVING AS PRESIDENT OF THE ALBERTA CHAPTER FROM 1947-1949 AND PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN OPTOMETRIC ASSOCIATION FROM 1951-1953. CLIFF PALMER'S PARENTS, JOSEPH AND MABEL PALMER, ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM NOTTINGHAM ENGLAND IN 1913. THEY WERE LOOKING FOR A NEW LIFE IN CANADA. CLIFF'S OLDER BROTHER, EARL, WAS BORN IN 1914. CLIFF'S FATHER JOE WORKED AS AN ENGINEER FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AT THE LETHBRIDGE POWER HOUSE UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1952. MABEL WAS A HOMEMAKER WHO WAS ACTIVE IN HER COMMUNITY THROUGH THE UNITED CHURCH AND RED CROSS.
Catalogue Number
P20030026000
Acquisition Date
2004-03
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
SPICE TINS
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN
Catalogue Number
P19990059014
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPICE TINS
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Materials
TIN
No. Pieces
4
Height
9.2
Length
7.8
Width
4.0
Description
1. OVAL, METAL TIN. PAINTED ON LABEL CONSISTS OF A WIDE RED STRIPE, BETWEEN TWO THIN BROWN STRIPES. PICTURED ON FRONT OF TIN IS A WOMAN WITH A FRYING PAN IN ONE HAND AND A TIN OF SPICE IN THE OTHER. FRONT READS "HORNE'S GRANULAR GRAVY POWDER NET WEIGHT 3 1/2 OZS. ADDS COLOR AND FLAVOR TO ALL GRAVY, SOUPS AND STEWS". BACK OF TIN HAS A WHITE RECTANGLE WITH "DIRECTIONS" IN ENGLISH & FRENCH. BELOW THIS ARE INGREDIENTS AND "HARRY HORNE FOODS LIMITED TORONTO... CANADA". TIN HAS SEPERATE LID. LIGHT GOLD COLOURED, AND READS "3 1/2 OZS. NET WEIGHT HORNE'S GRANULAR GRAVY WHEN PACKED". HAS HALF A PRICE STICKER ON LID FROM "SAFEWAY". 2. SAME AS ABOVE, EXCEPT HAS NO PRICE STICKER, AND WRITTEN ON FRONT OF TIN IN BLACK FELT MARKER IS "PA EY".
Subjects
CONTAINER
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S GRANDMOTHER. SEE P19990059001-GA FOR DONOR HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19990059014
Acquisition Date
1999-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
GATTUSO, PURE OLIVE OIL
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, TIN
Catalogue Number
P19990057009
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GATTUSO, PURE OLIVE OIL
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1960
Materials
GLASS, TIN
No. Pieces
2
Height
19.8
Diameter
5.3
Description
ROUND, CLEAR GLASS JAR. THE BOTTOM OF JAR IS BULBOUS. ABOVE THIS, VERTICAL RIDGES ENCIRCLE JAR. ABOVE THIS JAR AGAIN BULGES, SLIGHTLY. EMBOSSED ON BOTTOM BULGE IS "GATTUSO OLIVE OIL CORP. MONTREAL" "PURE OLIVE OIL 4 FLUID OZS.". EMBOSSED ON BOTTOM OF JAR IS "GATTUSO OLIVE OIL CORP.". EMBOSSED ON UPPER BULGE IS "GATTUSO". JAR HAS A METAL, GREEN PAINTED LID, WITH WHITE WRITING; READS "OLIVE GATTUSO OIL". THERE IS SOME RUSTING ALONG BOTTOM EDGE OF LID. THERE IS SOME RESIDUE INSIDE BOTTLE.
Subjects
CONTAINER
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
BELONGED TO DONOR'S PARENTS, WILFRED AND JENNIE REED. ITEMS FOUND WHILE CLEANING OUT HOUSE BEFORE THEY SOLD IT. THE TWO LIVED IN BARONS AFTER MARRYING, AND THEY FARMED THERE. SEE P19990057001-GA FOR MORE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P19990057009
Acquisition Date
1999-10
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
PARFLECHE
Date Range From
1860
Date Range To
1900
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAWHIDE
Catalogue Number
P19641151000
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PARFLECHE
Date Range From
1860
Date Range To
1900
Materials
RAWHIDE
No. Pieces
1
Length
55.3
Width
33.0
Description
PAINTED GEOMETRIC DESIGNS, BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, RED. BRITTLE RAWHIDE. SEE CONSERVATION REPORT
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
CONTAINER
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
NORTHERN PLAINS INDIGENOUS, PROBABLY OF BLACKFOOT ORIGIN. USED FOR STORAGE. *UPDATE* IN 2015 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON ASKED TWO FORMER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, PHIL EDMUNDSON AND PAUL RUSZNAK, ABOUT THE FIRST NATIONS ARTIFACTS THAT THE GROUP DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM IN 1964, 1969, AND 1973. NEITHER RECALLED HOW THE JAYCEES CAME INTO OWNERSHIP OF THE ARTIFACTS, AS THEIR ACQUISITION PREDATED BOTH EDMUNDSON AND RUSZNAK’S MEMBERSHIP IN THE CHAMBER. RESEARCH CONDUCTED INTO LETHBRIDGE’S GURNEY MUSEUM FOUND A CONNECTION BETWEEN ITS PROPRIETOR, WALTER GURNEY, AND THE JAYCEES, WHO ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE FROM THE APRIL 16, 1946 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ADVOCATED ON GURNEY’S BEHALF FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO BE MADE TO THE FORMER BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING WHERE THE MUSEUM WAS HOUSED. AN ARTICLE FROM THE JULY 13, 1948 ISSUE OF THE HERALD DESCRIBES SOME OF THE FIRST NATIONS ARTIFACTS ON DISPLAY IN THE MUSEUM: “TOMAHAWKS, ARROW HEADS, PEACE PIPES, BEAD AND LEATHER WORK, CLOTHING AND WOODCRAFT”. UPON THE CLOSURE OF THE MUSEUM AND SALE OF GURNEY’S COLLECTION TO BELMORE SCHULTZ OF THE ALTAMONT MUSEUM IN COUTTS, MENTION WAS MADE IN A HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 16, 1961 OF “HISTORICAL INDIAN RELICS THAT BELONG TO THE JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HAVE BEEN RETAINED IN THE CITY AND WILL BE AVAILABLE WHEN PROPER DISPLAY FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE”. IT IS POSSIBLE THAT THE ARTIFACTS WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE JAYCEES BY GURNEY DURING THE DISSOLUTION OF HIS MUSEUM, BUT NO FURTHER CONFIRMATION WAS FOUND. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE GURNEY MUSEUM AND ITS COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19890044001.
UPDATE 16 AUGUST 2017: ON 25 JULY 2017, MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT FOUND EVIDENCE TO CONNECT THE INDIGENOUS COLLECTION DONATED BY THE LETHBRIDGE JAYCEES (AKA. JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE) WITH FORMER LETHBRIDGE RESIDENTS THE LATE FRED BOTSFORD AND HIS LATE DAUGHTER DOROTHY CLARK. NOTES MADE BY AIMEE ON THE DISCOVERY AS WELL AS RELEVANT CLIPPINGS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD CAN BE FOUND ATTACHED TO THE PERMANENT FILE OF P19641140000.
Catalogue Number
P19641151000
Acquisition Date
1964-07
Collection
Museum
Less detail

189 records – page 1 of 10.