Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

1178 records – page 1 of 59.

Other Name
"1910 MILLINERY SHOP" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1910 MILLINERY SHOP" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“1910 MILLINERY SHOP” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (LADIES HAT SHOP), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1992. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A SHOP FRONT, DISPLAYING A MILLINERY STORE FRONT, SHOWCASING HATS ON WOMEN HAT MOUNTS AND PORTRAITS OF WOMEN IN HATS. IN THE FOREGROUND, SHOPPERS MILL IN FRONT OF THE WINDOWS. AT THE TOP OF THE PAINTING RUNS THE SHOP SIGN READING “MILLINERY SHOP”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PINK WASH, MARKING THE INSIDE OF THE SHOP THROUGH WINDOWS. IN THE BOTTOM OF THE RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “1910 MILLINERY SHOP IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1992” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLED EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT TOP CORNER BEARS A PARTIAL WATERMARK. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” OF THE IMAGE TITLED, “1910 MILLINERY SHOP,” MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINED, “THIS [IMAGE] WAS A COMMERCIAL, BECAUSE THAT WAS WOMEN’S HATS.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031004
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MARTIN'S PLAY AUCTION" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARTIN'S PLAY AUCTION" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1990
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (BOY WITH ANIMALS AND TOYS), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1990. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A YARD POPULATED WITH A BOY SURROUNDED BY ANIMALS AND TOYS. IN THE BACKGROUND RUNS A WHITE FENCE, OVER WHICH THE SKY AND TWO FIGURES CAN BE SEEN. SIGNS IN THE PAINTING READ “AUCTION SALE APRIL 2”, “AUCTION SALE MARCH 1”, AND “AUCTION SALE FEBRUARY 9”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PALE BEIGE WASH, MARKING THE YARD, AND THE UNPAINTED PAPER OF THE FENCE, WITH THE COLOUR RED IN THE BOY’S SHIRT AND MOST OF THE TOYS SURROUNDING HIM. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1990 WHEELERVILLE SERIES” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLED EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE TOP AND BOTTOM CORNERS. THE PAPER IS MINIMALLY WARPED, LIFTING AT THE EDGES AND CORNERS RATHER THAN LYING TOTALLY FLAT. THE BACK OF THE PAINTING HAS AN INK DRAWING ON IT, DEPICTING A HOUSE AND THREE FIGURES, ONE ON HORSE CARRIAGE. THE DRAWING IS UNFINISHED AND UNPAINTED.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE WORK TITLED, “MARTIN’S PLAY AUCTION,” MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINED THAT HE DID NOT KNOW THE BOY THE WORK IS TITLED FOR. SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031005
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFE 1890S" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFE 1890S" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1991
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFÉ 1890’S” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (COWBOYS RAIDING), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1991. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A CAFÉ, FOCUSING ON THE FIGURES IN THE BUILDING. CHINESE CAFÉ WORKERS WEAR WHITE AND BLACK, LEAVING THE BUILDING AND TRYING TO ESCAPE THE COWBOYS, DRESSED IN COLOUR, WHO ARE DESTROYING THE FURNITURE AND WINDOWS, AND CUTTING OFF THE HAIR OF THE CHINESE CAFÉ WORKERS. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A PALE YELLOW WASH, MARKING THE FLOOR, AND A PALE BLUE WASH, MARKING THE WALL AND WINDOWS. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “COWBOYS RAID CHINESE CAFÉ 1890’S IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1991” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE, NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE TOP AND BOTTOM CORNERS. THE PAPER IS SLIGHTLY WARPED, LIFTING AT EDGES AND CORNERS RATHER THAN LYING FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS WORK COULD BE ALLUDING TO A REAL EVENT, WHICH TOOK PLACE IN LETHBRIDGE ON CHRISTMAS DAY 1907. ACCORDING TO THE LOCAL HISTORY BOOK, “LETHBRIDGE: A CENTENNIAL HISTORY,” BY ALEX JOHNSTON AND ANDY DEN OTTER (PUBLISHED 1983), A PATRON TO THE COLUMBIA RESTAURANT NAMED HARRY SMITH “QUARRELED WITH A CHINESE WAITER… THE WAITER, GREATLY PROVOKED, ATTACKED SMITH WITH A HAMMER. ALTHOUGH POLICE MANAGED TO END THE MATTER BEFORE ANYONE WAS HURT, THE RUMOR THAT SMITH HAD BEEN KILLED SPREAD LIKE WILDFIRE. A MOB DESCENDED ON THE RESTAURANT AND WRECKED IT. THE RIOTERS WERE ABOUT TO VANDALIZE THE ADJOINING PROPERTY WHEN MAYOR W. S. GALBRAITH ARRIVED AND, WITH THE AID OF MOUNTED POLICE, DISPERSED THEM.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031006
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SHOPPERS" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SHOPPERS" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“SHOPPERS” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – INTERIOR SCENE (FABRIC STORE), DR. IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1996. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHT, ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A FABRIC SHOP, SHOWING SHELVES OF ROLLED FABRIC AND THREE QUILTS HUNG ON THE BACK WALL. HUTTERITE WOMEN SHOP FOR AMONG THE FABRIC ROLLS, WHILE TWO MEN WAIT AT THE FRONT OF THE SHOP. OTHER FIGURES INCLUDE CASHIERS AND A WOMEN IN A PINK DRESS AND HIGH HEELS. SIGNS IN THE PAINTING READ “RODEO QUILT CONTEST”, “BE HAPPY WHILE YOU WORK”, “QUILT CONTEST”, “ODDS + ENDS”, “BARGAINS”, “ELASTIC”, “SCISSORS”, “NEEDLES”, “THREAD”, “THIMBLES”, “TAPE”, “PATTERNS”, “CASH REGISTER”, AND “SMILES ARE FREE”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A YELLOW WASH MARKING THE WALL, AND AN ORANGE-BROWN WASH MARKING THE FLOOR AND DRAWERS. MOST OF THE COLOUR IN THE PIECE IS FOUND IN THE ROLLS OF FABRIC IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PAINTING. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “SHOPPERS DR. IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1996” IN BLACK INK. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND PARTIALLY WATER MARKED “FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT SIDE CORNER. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031007
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"AUNT DIANA'S QUILTING PARTY" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
Catalogue Number
P20160031008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"AUNT DIANA'S QUILTING PARTY" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR
No. Pieces
1
Height
38
Length
56
Description
“AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – “WHEELERVILLE SERIES” (QUILTING PARTY), IRENE MCCAUGHERTY, 1992. AN UNFRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING, ON COTTON PAPER. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THE INTERIOR OF A HOME, SHOWING A RED AND WHITE QUILT SPREAD OVER CHAIRS AND WOMEN WORKING WITH AND AROUND IT. SOME WOMEN WORK ON THE QUILT WHILE OTHERS PLAY PIANO AND SING, POUR TEA, AND EAT AND DRINK AROUND THE ROOM. THE WOMEN SING “IT WAS FROM AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY I WAS SEEING NELLIE HOME”. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY A YELLOW WASH MARKING THE FLOOR OF THE ROOM, A BLUE WASH MARKING THE WALL OF THE ROOM, AND THE RED AND WHITE QUILT. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WHEELERVILLE SERIES 1992” IN PENCIL. THE PAPER IS FACTORY CUT, WITH TWO DECKLE EDGES, AND WATER MARKED “C.M. FABRIANO – 100/100 COTTON” AT THE RIGHT EDGE. THE LEFT EDGE BEARS PARTIAL WATERMARKS AT THE BOTTOM CORNER. THE PAPER LIES ALMOST COMPLETELY FLAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” WHILE LOOKING AT THIS WORK, THE PAINTER’S SON EXPLAINED, “NOW MANY THINGS THAT SHE DID IN HER WORK WERE OUT OF [PROPORTION]. I THINK SHE WOULD CALL THEM A RELATIVE SIZE…THIS ONE HERE (“AUNT DIANA’S QUILTING PARTY”) THAT YOU’VE GOT WITH THE QUILTING; THAT’S ONE MIGHTY BIG BED. I CAN REMEMBER THEM MAKING QUILTS [AND] SEWING THEM TOGETHER. BACK IN HER TIME, YOU DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING… THIS ONE [REFLECTS MY MOTHER’S OWN LIFE, BECAUSE] THAT’S SOMETHING SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN. EVERYBODY MADE QUILTS. THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD ON YOUR BED. YOU TOOK PATCHES AND SEWED THEM TOGETHER.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031008
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RIBBON ARTWORK
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20170020001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RIBBON ARTWORK
Date
2017
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON, PAPER
No. Pieces
2
Height
102
Length
892.8
Description
A. COLLECTION OF 231 MULTI-COLORED RIBBONS TIED TO A PINK TWO-STRAND CORD ( 892.8CM LONG AND 0.5CM DIAMETER) FORMING PENNANT STRING. RIBBONS VARY IN LENGTH AND WIDTH AS: 3.7CM PINK SHEER ORGANZA, 3.8CM WHITE WIRED TAFFETA, 0.9CM PINK SATIN (DOUBLE-FACED), 4.3CM PALE PINK CREPE PAPER, 0.9CM DARK PURPLE SATIN (DOUBLE-FACED), 7.4CM PINK HAND-TORN CLOTH, 3.7CM WHITE WIRED WITH SILVER EDGING, 1.8CM PINK GROSGRAIN RIBBON, AND 3.9CM MINT GREEN POLYESTER RIBBON. EVERY RIBBON IS WRITTEN ON IN BLACK, GREEN, OR RED INK WITH VARIOUS STATEMENTS INCLUDING: “FOR MY DAUGHTER & THE WOMEN WHO CAME BEFORE”, “BECAUSE NO ONE IS FREE WHEN OTHERS ARE OPPRESSED”, “SO YOUNG GIRLS DON’T HAVE TO BE AFRAID” AND MORE. PINK HAND-TORN CLOTH RIBBONS HAVE FRAYING EDGES, AND WHITE WIRED RIBBONS HAVE EXPOSED WIRES AT ENDS. RIBBON PENNANT IS IN OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. DETACHED RIBBON FROM RIBBON PENNANT. DEEP PURPLE WITH BLACK TEXT READING “WOMEN ARE STRENGTH!!!” RIBBON IS 38.5CM LONG AND 1CM WIDE WITH FRAYING AT THE DETACHED END.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
POLITICS
History
THE WOMEN'S MARCH LETHBRIDGE FIRST OCCURRED ON JANUARY 17, 2017. ORIGINATING IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FOLLOWING THE ELECTION OF PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP, THE WOMEN'S MARCH WAS AN INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT OF PROTESTS AND GATHERINGS IN SUPPORT OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS, HUMAN RIGHTS, LGBTQ+ RIGHTS AND STANDING AGAINST INTOLERANCE AND DISCRIMINATION. THE 2017 WOMEN’S MARCH IN LETHBRIDGE SAW A GATHERING OF 500-600 PARTICIPANTS ALONG MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE SOUTH NEAR THE CORNER OF NINTH AVENUE. SHANNAN LITTLE ACTED AS A FACILITATOR FOR THE GATHERING AND DONATED SIGNAGE AND ACTIVIST ARTWORKS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE WOMEN’S MARCH. ON JUNE 9, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LITTLE REGARDING HER DONATION AND PARTICIPATION IN THE LETHBRIDGE WOMEN’S MARCH. WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE RIBBON PENNANT DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, LITTLE SPOKE ABOUT THE RIBBON PENNANT AS ACTIVIST ART, “PART OF WHAT’S IMPORTANT ABOUT ‘ACTIVISM ART’ IS THE ABILITY TO INCLUDE OTHERS IN IT, SO THAT IS WHY THE RIBBON PROJECT WAS REALLY AMAZING. IT JUST STARTED OUT WITH THIS STRING WITH NO RIBBONS, AND THEN THEY ASKED PEOPLE TO WRITE WHY THEY WERE THERE, WHY MARCH, ON THE RIBBONS. WE WEREN’T SURE IF PEOPLE WOULD GO FOR THAT, BECAUSE IT’S KIND OF A PERSONAL EXPRESSION, AND PEOPLE WERE REALLY EXCITED. WE ENDED UP [WITH] HUNDREDS OF PERSONAL REASONS, AND SO THAT BECAME A COMMUNITY ART PROJECT, AS WELL AS A PLACE TO COLLECT ALL THESE REASONS WHY PEOPLE WERE HERE. IT WAS INCREDIBLY VISUAL; IT WAS QUITE BEAUTIFUL. YOU CAN SEE THERE WERE SO MANY PHOTOS THAT PEOPLE TOOK OF IT. THIS WILL BE…SOMETHING THAT PEOPLE REMEMBER. MY DAUGHTER, WHO IS ONLY FIVE, HAS A RIBBON ON THERE, SO MY MOTHER WROTE THE TEXT OUT. SHE SAID WHY SHE WANTED, WHY SHE WAS HERE, AND IT’S ALSO INCLUDED ON THERE, SO IT’S REALLY SPECIAL.” “FOR ME, THE RIBBON DISPLAY IS INCREDIBLY ICONIC. AS FAR AS I KNOW, WE’RE THE ONLY COMMUNITY THAT DID THIS. THAT’S PART OF…OUR SIZE BUT ALSO THIS COMMUNITY THAT IS UNIQUE IN LETHBRIDGE. OTHER EVENTS WERE A LOT OF JUST TALKING TO PEOPLE, SPEAKERS…SO THIS INTERACTIVE, COMMUNITY-INCLUSIVE PIECE OF PUBLIC ART WAS, FOR ME, VERY ICONIC….I WOULD SAY…THE RIBBON PROJECT STANDS OUT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER INVOLVEMENT IN COMMUNITY ACTIVISM, LITTLE NOTED, ““I’VE BEEN INVOLVED IN ORGANIZING OTHER EVENTS AND RALLIES IN TOWN, BUT NONE THAT HAD THE TURN-OUT AND THE RESPONSE THAT THIS ONE DID. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY REAL EXPECTATIONS ABOUT WHAT THE TURN-OUT WOULD BE. WE KNEW THERE WOULD BE PEOPLE, BUT, WHEN WE SAW THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE THAT CAME OUT, WE WERE EXCITED, BY THE FACT THAT WE HADN’T REALLY - THERE WAS NO AGENDA ON THIS EVENT, OR ANYTHING. IT WAS VERY SPONTANEOUS, AND, THAT IT WORKED IN THIS CITY WAS SIGNIFICANT.” LITTLE SPOKE ABOUT HER DONATION TO THE MUSEUM AND HER FEELINGS ON LEARNING THAT THE MUSEUM WANTED MARCH MATERIAL RECALLING, “…WHEN I FIRST HEARD, I WAS ACTUALLY QUITE EXCITED, BECAUSE…WHEN WE WERE ORGANIZING THE EVENT, WE WANTED TO MAKE SURE THAT IT JUST WASN’T A POINT IN TIME...AND THEN IT WENT AWAY…WHEN WE HEARD THE MUSEUM WAS INTERESTED, WE WERE…ON A PRACTICAL LEVEL, SAYING “WOW, WE CAN PUT THE STUFF SOMEWHERE,”…THERE WAS A LOT OF LABOR AND EFFORT INVOLVED IN MAKING IT, BUT, OTHERWISE, PRESERVING THE STORY, AND THE CONTEXT - WE REALIZED THAT WAS IMPORTANT.” LITTLE RECALLED HOW SHE BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE WOMEN’S MARCH, SAYING, “IT STARTED WHEN I FOUND OUT ABOUT PUSSY HATS…I CROCHETED A FEW OF THOSE TO SEND TO WASHINGTON, AND I POSTED IT ON FACEBOOK, AND THEN A LOT OF MY FACEBOOK CONTACTS SAID, “I WANT ONE.” AND, THEN THE NEXT QUESTION WAS, “WHAT’S GOING ON IN LETHBRIDGE?” IT BECAME APPARENT THAT WE NEEDED TO HAVE SOMETHING IN LETHBRIDGE. A GROUP OF US WHO HAVE DONE SIMILAR THINGS, GOT TOGETHER TO SAY, WELL, WHAT COULD WE DO? WE DIDN’T CALL OURSELVES ORGANIZERS. WE CALLED OURSELVES FACILITATORS. WE FACILITATED THE GATHERING, AND WE USED THAT TERMINOLOGY WITH INTENTION. WE ALSO WERE CLEAR TO PEOPLE THAT EVERYONE WHO CAME TO THE EVENT WAS AN ORGANIZER. IT WAS INTERESTING, BECAUSE ONE OF THE MEDIA STORIES ABOUT THIS, ASKED SOMEONE, “WHO IS THE ORGANIZER?” AND, THE RESPONSE WAS, “WE ARE ALL ORGANIZERS.”” “I THINK IT’S IMPORTANT TO KNOW THAT THIS WASN’T JUST ABOUT ‘WOMEN’S RIGHT’S.’ ‘WOMEN’S RIGHT’S’ IS ‘HUMAN’S RIGHT’S’. IN LETHBRIDGE, WE ORGANIZED TO COME OUT STRONGLY AGAINST DISCRIMINATION OF ANY FORM. WE ALSO WERE MARCHING FOR VERY POLITICAL REASONS, AND THAT IS STATING THAT THE POLITICS OF INTOLERANCE ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE, AND, IN ALBERTA, WE REALLY SEE THAT CURRENTLY. WE ALSO WANTED TO SEE A RETURN TO CIVILITY AND RESPECT IN PUBLIC DISCOURSE. WE SAW SO MUCH MISOGYNY, ESPECIALLY ON SOCIAL MEDIA, SO WE WANTED TO SAY LOUDLY AND STRONGLY THAT THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE IN OUR COMMUNITY.” ON MARCH 31, 2017, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ANNELIES VAN OERS REGARDING HER PARTICIPATION IN THE WOMEN’S MARCH IN LETHBRIDGE ON JANUARY 17, 2017. WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE NATURE AND ORIGINS OF THE WOMEN’S MARCH IN LETHBRIDGE, VAN OERS REMARKED, “WE DIDN’T HAVE A MARCH, WE HAD A GATHERING BECAUSE WE DIDN’T WANT TO GET A PERMIT SO WE HAD A GATHERING. IT WAS VERY ELECTRIC. FOR LETHBRIDGE IT WAS… ROCKING.” “WHAT WAS UNIQUE TO LETHBRIDGE IS THE WAY THAT IT WAS ORGANIZED. IT’S SUPER-GRASSROOTS…AND FAIRLY LOW KEY. THERE’S NOT THIS ORGANIZATIONAL JOCKEYING OR POSITIONING, IT WAS JUST FIVE PEOPLE, “HEY, LET’S DO THIS. OKAY, LET’S DO THIS”. AND THAT’S HOW LETHBRIDGE, QUITE OFTEN, OPERATES…WE JUST GENERICALLY COME TOGETHER BECAUSE WE ALL FEEL PASSIONATE ABOUT ONE THING…THERE’S JUST THIS [SENSE OF], “OKAY, WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE AND WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP”? AND THAT’S WHERE I THINK WE’RE UNIQUELY LETHBRIDGE. IT’S VERY HANDS ON, IT’S VERY QUICK.” “WHAT ELSE IS UNIQUE IN LETHBRIDGE IN TERMS OF THE WOMEN’S MARCH, I THINK, IS ITS RELEVANCE. WE ARE SO FACED WITH MISOGYNY RIGHT NOW IN OUR COMMUNITY. BECAUSE THIS CAME OUT OF A POLITICAL SPHERE THAT’S IN THE UNITED STATES. IT WAS VERY MUCH AN ANSWER TO DONALD TRUMP. THIS IS HOW THIS MARCH STARTED BUT I THINK, FOR US, IT WAS, “YEAH, OKAY, WE REALLY DON’T APPRECIATE IT WHEREVER IT HAPPENS, BUT LOCALLY, WE HAVE SOME REALLY SERIOUS ISSUES.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170020001-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE JANUARY 17, 2017 WOMEN’S MARCH.
Catalogue Number
P20170020001
Acquisition Date
2017-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
175
Width
61.5
Description
GOBELIN TAPESTRY, MACHINE-STITCHED AND WOVEN; SCENE WOVEN DEPICTS FOUR FIGURES IN A HOUSE AROUND A TABLE, THREE ADULTS AND A CHILD; INTERIOR OF HOUSE DEPICTED SHOWS CABINET AND VASES ON CARPET IN FOREGROUND ON LEFT SIDE; BACKGROUND HAS TWO CHAIRS AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING ON WALL AT LEFT, CENTER OF ROOM HAS A FIREPLACE AND COOKING POT WITH SIX PLATES ON MATLEPIECE, RIGHT SIDE OF FIREPLACE SHOWS PODIUM WITH BOOKS STACKED AND CABINET; RIGHT SIDE SHOWS FIGURES IN FOREGROUND AROUND A TABLE SEWING, AND WINDOW ON RIGHT WALL OPEN. SCENE IS WOVEN USING GOLD AND BROWN HUES PRIMARILY, WITH PINK AND GOLD FOR FLOOR. FRONT HAS ORANGE STAINING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON RIGHT, CENTER, AND LEFT SIDES; TAPESTRY SHOWS SIGNS OF FADING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY WITDOUCK REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GOBELIN TAPESTRY. WITDOUCK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN 1955 WITH HER FAMILY, THE BOUWS, AND HAD BEEN GIFTED THE TAPESTRY BY HER MOTHER PRIOR TO IMMIGRATING, HAVING PURCHASED THE TAPESTRY FROM A BELGIAN SALESMAN. ON THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK ELABORATED, “THERE WERE A FEW TAPESTRIES [IN THE FAMILY] BUT THEY WERE NOT GOLDEN. THEY WERE TAPESTRIES [OF] TULIP FIELDS AND THEY WERE MORE VELVETY TYPES WITH BRIGHT COLOURED TULIP FIELDS…IN DIFFERENT COLOURS HERE, DIFFERENT COLOURS THERE. TO ME, THEY WERE NICE AT THE TIME BUT THEY FADED MORE AND THEY WERE JUST NOT LIKE THIS ONE.” WITDOUCK TOLD THE STORY OF HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE TAPESTRY, RECALLING, “IT WAS AROUND THE END OF FEBRUARY IN 1955. I WAS SEVENTEEN YEARS OLD AND WORKED ON MY FATHER’S FARM. OUR FARM WAS SITUATED NEAR THE SMALL TOWN OF ERP IN THE PROVINCE OF NORTH BRABANT, NETHERLANDS. THE ECONOMY IN EUROPE AT THE TIME, DUE TO THE AFTERMATH OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR WAS NOT GOOD AND THAT WAS EXPECTED TO LAST FOR MANY MORE YEARS. LIFE FOR US, MYSELF AND OUR WHOLE FAMILY, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE IN A BIG WAY AS MY PARENTS HAD MADE PLANS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA. THE DAY THAT WE WOULD LEAVE WAS ONLY ABOUT THREE WEEKS AWAY ON MARCH 25TH TO BE EXACT AND LOTS HAD TO BE DONE TO PREPARE FOR THAT DAY. JUST AROUND THAT TIME, A MAN RIDING A TRANSPORT BICYCLE STOPPED BY OUR HOUSE. THE MAN SAID THAT HE WAS SELLING TAPESTRIES AND ASKED MY MOTHER IF HE COULD SHOW THEM TO HER. THE TAPESTRIES WERE GOBELINS AND WERE MADE IN BELGIUM. SEVERAL OF US GIRLS, ALONG WITH MY MOTHER STOOD AROUND THE SALESMAN AS HE SHOWED US THE DIFFERENT ONES. MY MOTHER THEN SAID TO US OLDER GIRLS, “IF YOU LIKE TO HAVE ONE YOU MAY ALL PICK ONE.” WE WERE HAPPY WITH THAT TO GET THESE TAPESTRIES. I DON’T KNOW WHAT MY MOM PAID FOR THEM. WE CAREFULLY WRAPPED THEM AS SOON THESE TAPESTRIES WOULD COME ALONG TO CANADA. AFTER ARRIVING IN CANADA, I WAS NOT ABLE TO SHOW OFF MY TAPESTRY ON THE WALL UNTIL 1965 ABOUT 10 YEARS LATER. RALPH [WITDOUCK] AND I MET AND MARRIED IN 1960, AND CAME TO LIVE ON A FARM IN A SMALL TWO-ROOM HOUSE. [WE] DID NOT HAVE A WALL LARGE ENOUGH TO HANG THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. OUR FAMILY GREW AND FIVE YEARS AND THREE LITTLE ONES LATER, WE MOVED INTO A MUCH LARGER HOME. EVER SINCE THEN, NEARLY FIFTY YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHOW OFF THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. THE REASON WHY THE TAPESTRY ALSO MEANT A LOT TO US IS BECAUSE BELGIUM WAS THE PLACE WHERE RALPH WAS BORN…I STILL REMEMBER MANY OF THE OLDER HOMES IN HOLLAND, THAT HAD THE SAME TYPE OF FURNITURE, FIREPLACE WITH PLATES ON TOP, WINDOWS THAT OPENED FROM THE TOP…AND A DOOR WHERE YOU COULD LEAVE THE TOP HALF OPEN, AND ALSO A BIBLE STAND WITH BIBLE. I ALSO REMEMBER MY GRANDMOTHER BEING DRESSED LIKE THE MOTHER IN THE TAPESTRY. ALSO SEWING AND KNITTING WAS ALL DONE BY HAND.” “IT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE I’VE ALWAYS LIKED OLD PLACES IN EARLIER DAYS. I REALLY LIKED GOING TO MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THINGS WERE SO DIFFERENT THEN. ALREADY [BEFORE 1955]…OUR PLACE WAS A BIT MORE MODERN. I CAN CONNECT WITH LOTS OF THOSE THINGS [IN THE TAPESTRY] BECAUSE I SAT ON THOSE CHAIRS AND I KNOW MY GRANDMA WAS DRESSED SOMETHING LIKE THE LADY IN THERE.” “BELGIUM WOULD HAVE HAD THOSE SAME SCENES IN THOSE DAYS. THEY WERE OLD FARM HOMES…THEY WERE AN AWFUL LOT ALIKE.” “I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED HAVING THIS ON THE WALL. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS EITHER IN THE DINING ROOM OR IN THE LIVING ROOM, EITHER ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD OR [IN FAIRMONT] WE HAD IT IN THE DINING ROOM, THERE WAS A NICE BIG WALL THERE.” “THE FARM THAT WE WERE LIVING ON WHEN I LIVED IN THE TWO-ROOMED HOUSE WAS SE 10-11-20. THEN WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20 AND THERE WAS A TWO-STORY HOUSE ON THERE THAT WAS BUILT IN 1906. IT WAS OLD AND IT WAS COLD. IT WAS ONLY INSULATED WITH NEWSPAPERS BUT WE HAD MUCH MORE ROOM. WE FIXED THINGS UP QUITE A BIT ACTUALLY. WE LIVED THERE UNTIL WE WERE ABLE TO BUILD A NEW HOME ON THAT PLACE [IN 1975]. BUT AS SOON AS WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20, I WAS ABLE TO PUT IT UP.” “AT THAT TIME, IT WAS HANGING ON A ROD. THERE WERE ALSO TASSELS ON THERE…I THINK MY KIDS HAD PROBABLY PULLED ON IT TOO MUCH. THEY WERE ALL LITTLE ONES [AND] BECAUSE IT WAS ALWAYS HANGING ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD AND THE KIDS ARE ON THE CHESTERFIELD [IT WAS DAMAGED]. AFTER THAT, PROBABLY TWENTY YEARS AFTER THAT, WE DECIDED TO FRAME IT. I HAD IT, WE LIVED IN FAIRMONT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS…MAYBE FIFTEEN YEARS…I HAD IT HANGING IN THE DINING ROOM ON A NICE BIG WALL. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ON THE WALL UNTIL WE GOT [IN THIS LETHBRIDGE HOUSE], BECAUSE I KNEW THAT THIS WAS THE LAST PLACE UNTIL WE HAVE TO GO TO…ONE OF THOSE PLACES [SENIORS’ HOMES]. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’LL END UP, BUT NOW WE DECIDED THAT WE SHOULD DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH IT.” WITDOUCK RECALLED THE MOVE HER FAMILY MADE TO CANADA IN 1955, STATING, “WE [THE BOUW FAMILY] LEFT MARCH 25TH, AND WE ARRIVED IN CANADA…AT PIER 21 IN HALIFAX ON APRIL 2ND. WE ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 6TH. MY BIRTHDAY WAS ON JULY 6TH SO I WAS NEARLY 18.” “[MY PARENTS] THOUGHT, WELL ‘MAYBE THIS [TAPESTRY] IS A NICE MEMORY’ AND [MY MOTHER] WANTED TO MAKE US HAPPY BECAUSE WE WERE IMMIGRATING AND WE LEFT OUR FRIENDS BEHIND, FAMILY. MY OLDER SISTER WAS ALREADY IN CANADA BECAUSE SHE GOT MARRIED THE YEAR BEFORE. [THAT WAS] ONE MORE REASON WHY MY PARENTS WANTED TO IMMIGRATE TOO, BECAUSE THEY KNEW THAT THE FAMILY WOULD BE DIVIDED FOREVER IF WE DIDN’T GO. LOTS OF TIMES WITH FAMILIES, SOME WOULD LIKE TO GET MARRIED BUT THERE WAS NO CHANCE IN HOLLAND. AFTER THE WAR, THE ECONOMY WAS REALLY BAD AND PEOPLE COULD NOT BUILD ANY HOMES FOR THEIR CHILDREN WHO [GOT] MARRIED.” “THERE WERE NINE CHILDREN, TEN WITH THE ONE THAT IMMIGRATED TO [CANADA] BEFORE…THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS FIVE, AND MY SISTER WAS 22 BY THEN AND THE NEXT ONE WAS 21. WE SLEPT WITH THREE IN A BED. ON THE FARM, WHEN WE ARRIVED, [THERE WAS] NO RUNNING WATER AND THAT WAS THE NORM FOR ALL NEW IMMIGRANTS.” “MY OLDER SISTER ENDED UP IN SPRING COULEE [WITH] HER HUSBAND, AND NATURALLY WE WANTED TO BE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TOO. BUT IN SPRING COULEE THERE’S NO SUGAR BEETS [AND] WE WANTED TO BE SOMEWHERE WHERE A FARMER WAS GOING TO GIVE US A JOB. THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU COULD COME IS IF YOU HAD A JOB LINED UP FOR A FAMILY LIKE THAT.” “I MISSED MY FRIENDS THE MOST BUT, IN THE MEANTIME, YOU END UP WITH NEW FRIENDS, SLOWLY…WE WERE ONLY [HERE] FOUR DAYS AND I HAD A JOB IN MILK RIVER ALREADY. IN THE MEANTIME, I GOT TO KNOW RALPH. I ONLY GOT TO COME HOME ONCE IN TWO WEEKS FROM MILK RIVER TO PICTURE BUTTE AND WE WENT TO CHURCH. RALPH WAS CATHOLIC TOO AND THIS IS HOW WE GOT TO SEE EACH OTHER AND HE FLIPPED MY HAT OFF. HE WAS KIND OF A FUNNY GUY. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND THEN IF YOU HAVE FRIENDS HERE, YOU DON’T REALLY FORGET THE ONES IN HOLLAND BUT IT BECOMES EASIER.” “I WAS NEVER AGAINST [IMMIGRATING]…WE [SAW] THAT THERE WAS GOING TO BE A FUTURE HERE IN CANADA FOR US. WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED IN CANADA WE COULD SEE THAT ALL THE FARMERS WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH EITHER. THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB BECAUSE THEY NEEDED PEOPLE TO HELP IN THE SUGAR BEETS AND THAT. BUT AT THE SAME TIME WE COULD SEE THAT THEY WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH YET EITHER. THERE WAS THE ODD ONE THAT WAS VERY WELL OFF BUT LOTS OF THEM WERE NOT. BUT THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB. WE ARRIVED IN APRIL [WITH] THE FARMER, BUT WHEN THE BEETS WERE READY TO BE THINNED AND HOED AND HARVESTED…[AFTER THAT] MY DAD WAS OUT OF A JOB. WE COULD STILL LIVE IN THE HOUSE AS LONG AS WE WANTED BUT OF COURSE MY DAD WANTED A JOB AND HE LOOKED AROUND. HE ENDED UP [AT LOURDES FARM].” [MY DAD] WORKED THERE FOR TWO YEARS, BUT HE WANTED TO FARM FOR HIMSELF. THEN HE CAME AND WORKED FOR TIFFIN BUT NOT ON THE DAIRY. HE HAD ANOTHER PLACE, AND TIFFIN’S WERE VERY GOOD FOR US. THEY GAVE US A MILK COW AND THAT MEANT A LOT. WE HAD A YARD AND A LITTLE GARDEN, AND MY DAD RENTED LAND FOR SUGAR BEETS FROM TIFFIN FOR A FEW YEARS THEN HE BOUGHT A FARM IN BOW ISLAND. MY PARENTS MOVED TO BOW ISLAND BUT I NEVER MOVED WITH THEM BECAUSE I HAD A GOOD JOB HERE. THEN RALPH AND I WERE GOING TOGETHER ALREADY AND HE WAS TALKING SOMETIMES ABOUT GETTING MARRIED.” “I THINK [IMMIGRATING] WAS HARDEST ON MY MOTHER, YET SHE WAS THE BIGGEST PUSH BEHIND IMMIGRATING. I THINK IT WAS THE HARDEST ON HER MAINLY BECAUSE, DURING THE DAY WE WERE ALL OUT WORKING IN THE BEETS. IF WE WEREN’T WORKING IN THE BEETS, THE CHILDREN WERE GOING TO SCHOOL. LUCKILY THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS NOT IN SCHOOL YET AND THAT HELPED MY MOM. BUT HE DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ENGLISH YET, MAYBE A LITTLE BIT, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE RADIO WAS SAYING. THEN HER PARENTS IN HOLLAND HAD A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY, AND IN THE EARLIER DAYS NOT TOO OFTEN YOU HEARD ABOUT A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY. NOW IT SEEMS TO BE QUITE OFTEN BECAUSE PEOPLE LIVE LONGER. SHE WENT BACK. THAT WAS TWO AND A HALF YEARS AFTER SHE WAS HERE, SHE WENT BACK TO CELEBRATE HER PARENTS’ ANNIVERSARY. MY DAD DIDN’T GO, MAINLY BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE AND HE PROBABLY NEEDED THE MONEY HERE TO KEEP GOING. WHEN SHE CAME BACK SHE WAS A DIFFERENT PERSON. SHE WAS SO HAPPY TO BE BACK.” ON HER MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK NOTED, “I WANT TO SCALE DOWN. I’M 81 NOW, YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SUDDENLY YOUR LIFE TAKES A TURN; NOT THAT YOU’RE GOING TO DIE RIGHT AWAY BUT MAYBE YOU HAVE TO MOVE ON TO SOMEWHERE ELSE AND THERE WOULDN’T BE ENOUGH ROOM TO HANG IT. THIS IS WHY I WANT TO TAKE CARE OF [THE TAPESTRY] NOW BEFORE IT HAS TO BE DONE IN A HURRY.” “[DONATING THE TAPESTRY] WILL BE OKAY BECAUSE I’LL COME AND LOOK AT IT IN THE MUSEUM.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INLCUDING MARY WITDOUCK’S TYPED STORY, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
Acquisition Date
2018-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Date
2017
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
239
Width
216
Description
QUILT WITH BACKGROUND PRINTED WITH RED NAMES OF CANADIAN TOWNS AND CITIES ON WHITE, AND WITH RED TRIM AROUND EDGES PRINTED WITH WHITE MAPLE LEAVES. QUILT HAS INNER BORDER ON FRONT ALONG LEFT, RIGHT, AND LOWER EDGES; INNER BORDER HAS 13 FABRIC BLOCKS TRANSFER PRINTED ON WHITE WITH THE FLAGS OF ALL CANADIAN PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, THE NAME OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, THE FLOWER OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND THE DATE THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY JOINED CONFEDERATION; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE LEFT SIDE: QUEBEC, ONTARIO, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE: YUKON, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, NUNAVUT, ALBERTA, SASKATCHEWAN; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE: NEW BRUNSWICK, NOVE SCOTIA, MANITOBA, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. CORNERS OF INNER BORDER HAVE TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS HAVE BROWN, WHITE AND BLUE BACKGROUNDS WITH YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA” WITH BLACK SILHOUETTES OF BEAR AND CARIBOU ON SIDES OF TEXT, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF BELOW TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS. CENTER OF QUILT HAS RED FABRIC BLOCK WITH APPLIQUED WHITE MAPLE LEAVES IN UPPER CORNERS, AND WHITE APPLIQUED TEXT IN CENTER “CANADA 150, 1867, 2017”. ABOVE CENTER BLOCK IS SEWN RED AND WHITE CANADA FLAG; LEFT OF FLAG HAS TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK DEPICTING POSTER OF ORANGE, RED, AND BLACK CITYSCAPE WITH RED TEXT “OTTAWA”, AND TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK OF BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] ”ELIZABETH THE SECOND…A PROCLAMATION…” ON THE ADOPTION OF THE 1965 CANADIAN RED AND WHITE MAPLE LEAF FLAG; RIGHT OF CANADA FLAG SHOWS FOUR TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS OF ITIERATIONS OF THE CANADIAN FLAG, STARTING FROM TOP: ROYAL UNION FLAG “USED PRIOR TO 1801”, RED ENSIGN “1871-1921”, CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1921-1957”, AND CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1957-1965”. BELOW CENTER “CANADA 150” BLOCK IS MAP OF CANADA WITH APPLIQUED PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES IN ORANGE, YELLOW, BLUE, AND RED FABRIC WITH WHITE PRINTED TEXT LABELLING THE PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, WHITE STITCHED EDGES AROUND PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, AND WHITE PRINTED IMAGES OF: ORCA AND FISH BESIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA; MOOSE AND TOTEM POLE ON BRITISH COLUMBIA; PUMPJACK AND SKIER ON ALBERTA; WHEAT HEAD ON SASKATCHEWAN; BEAR ON MANITOBA; BEAVER, LEGISLATURE BUILDING, AND CN TOWER ON ONTARIO; FLEUR-DI-LIES AND “SKIDOO” ON QUEBEC; LIGHTHOUSE AND FISH ON NOVA SCOTIA; FISH ON NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; WHALES BESIDE NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; HAWK ON YUKON; DIAMOND ON NORTHWEST TERRITORIES; CARIBOU, BEAR, AND INUKSHUK ON NUNAVUT. PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES HAVE CAPITAL CITIES INDICATED WITH BLACK STARS AND CITY NAMES IN WHITE. UPPER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA”; UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND BLUE TEXT “FROM SEA TO SEA” AND RED AND WHITE CANADIAN FLAG; LOWER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED, WHITE, AND BLUE ROUND COMPASS ROSE WITH “N” LABELLED AT TOP OF COMPASS IN BLACK. CENTER BLOCKS HAVE BORDERS AROUND THEIR PERIMETERS OF CREAM FABRIC PRINTED WITH RED REPEATING TEXT “CANADA 1867-2017”. BACK OF QUILT HAS WHITE LABEL ON TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH RED TEXT “SYDNEY FISHER; LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA; 403-327-5838; QUILT for CANADA’S 150TH; 1867 – 2017.” BACK HAS MINOR STAIN AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON JULY 26, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SYDNEY AND FRANK FISHER REGARDING SYDNEY FISHER’S CREATION OF THE CANADA 150 QUILT DONATED BY VERN NEUFELD. NEUFELD WON THE QUILT IN A RAFFLE AS A FUNDRAISER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN. ACCORDING TO A LETTER SENT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NEUFELD INDICATED THAT HE AND HIS WIFE HAD NO NEED TO KEEP THE QUILT, AND HAD OFFERED THE QUILT BACK TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FOR ANOTHER RAFFLE. BILL GINTHER, CEO OF THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN, DIRECTED THE QUILT TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WITH THE DONATION COMPLETED BY NEUFELD. ON THE CREATION OF THE QUILT, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “AS FAR AS I KNOW, IT’S THE ONLY ONE WITH THAT LAY-OUT THAT I’VE SEEN, ANYWHERE. IT WAS MY ORIGINAL IDEA. I LIKE TO MAKE THEME QUILTS. THE 150TH BIRTHDAY WAS THE IDEAL TIME TO DO IT. SO, I WENT ABOUT COLLECTING ALL THE PIECES, FROM THE INTERNET, AND THE MIDDLE PIECE IS TOTALLY MY OWN. THIS WAS FROM FABRIC STORES…THE MAP.” “I MADE THAT [CENTER PIECE], TOTALLY FROM SCRATCH. I BOUGHT THE TEMPLATES, CUT IT OUT, AND APPLIQUED IT ON. THESE LITTLE THINGS, I MADE UP OUT OF THREE MAPLE LEAFS, JUST STUCK TOGETHER, UP IN THE CORNER. I MADE THE FLAG, AT THE TOP. THIS PIECE [THAT READS “OTTAWA”] WAS FROM A PANEL [OF] MATERIAL.” “[I INCLUDED IT BECAUSE] IT’S THE CAPITAL. BELOW THAT IS THE DECLARATION FROM THE QUEEN THAT SAYS THAT THE MAPLE LEAF BECAME OUR FLAG IN 1965. THAT, WE GOT OFF THE INTERNET ALSO. AND, SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, “YOU CAN’T DO THAT. THAT’S --” I SAID, “IT’S ON THE INTERNET. I CAN SO.” THEN WE ALSO GOT, ON THE UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER, ARE THE FOUR FLAGS THAT [WERE] USED FROM 1867 TO 1965, AND IT’S GOT THE DATES UNDERNEATH EACH ONE OF THEM.” “[THERE ARE] THE FLAGS AND THE FLOWERS, AND THEN THERE’S ALSO THE DATES THAT THEY JOINED CONFEDERATION, WHICH BRINGS THEM DOWN THE QUILT FROM BOTH SIDES. THERE’S THE FOUR ORIGINALS, AND THEN AS THEY JOIN, THEY COME [AROUND THE EDGE], AND NUNAVUT IS RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE, BECAUSE IT WAS THE LAST ONE IN 1999.” “THAT CAME RIGHT OUT OF MY HEAD. IT’S JUST SOMETHING I LIKE TO DO. I LIKE THEME QUILTS, AND IF I HAVE A THEME, I RUN WITH IT. [THE QUILT] HAS MORE MEANING BECAUSE IT IS CANADA. SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, “WELL, IT SHOULD HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH MILITARY.” NO, IT’S CANADA’S BIRTHDAY, IT’S NOT MILITARY! THAT ONE IS A CANADA QUILT…THIS ONE WAS SPECIFICALLY FOR CANADA.” “IT WOULD BE ABOUT MARCH OF 2017 [WHEN I STARTED THIS QUILT]. WHEN I START A QUILT, I FOCUS ON NOTHING ELSE. I HAVE THIS BEAUTIFUL PICTURE IN MY HEAD, AND IT’S GOT TO TURN OUT THAT WAY, OR I DON’T LIKE IT. I JUST KEEP GOING. THE FIRST ONE ENDED UP KING-SIZE BECAUSE I HAD ALL THIS STUFF I WANTED TO GET ON IT…THEN I STARTED NARROWING IT UP A BIT, SO THAT IT WOULD BE A QUEEN-SIZE INSTEAD.” “[THE FIRST QUILT] TOOK ABOUT 120 HOURS, BECAUSE I HAD TO GATHER ALL THE STUFF FOR [IT]. I [HAD] ALL THE PATTERNS FOR THIS, AND THE DOWN-SIZED ONE, SO I CAN PUT IT TOGETHER [FASTER]…BECAUSE I HAVE ALL THE PATTERNS…I WORK USUALLY FROM 7:00 IN THE MORNING TILL 4:00 IN THE AFTERNOON.” “THIS ONE WAS THE SECOND [QUILT] MADE TO SHOW OFF, BECAUSE [THE FIRST] ONE WENT TO ENGLAND. MY PLAN WAS TO MAKE ONE, AND I MADE THE ONE AND HUNG IT IN THE [ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE]. IT WENT OVER SO WELL, I MADE TWO MORE. QUEEN-SIZE. THEN SOMEBODY SAID, “BUT THAT’S SO BIG.” THEN I MADE [ABOUT SIX]…WALL-HANGINGS.” “[THIS QUILT] WENT OVER WELL, EVEN IF THE BIRTHDAY IS OVER. PEOPLE WANT IT. THERE WAS A FELLOW AT THE BANK, HE WANTED THE QUILT BECAUSE HE’S SETTING UP, OUT IN STERLING THEY HAVE A CP RAIL [MUSEUM], BUT THE QUILT WAS TOO BIG. HE ORDERED TWO—ONE FOR HIS HOUSE, AND ONE FOR STERLING, BUT HE WANTED THE CP RAIL ACROSS CANADA, SO THAT ONE HAS THE CP RAIL ACROSS THE BOTTOM.” SYDNEY FISHER ELABORATED ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FUNDRAISER, NOTING, “[THIS KING-SIZED VERSION ENDED UP] IN THE ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MCGRATH. THAT IS MY BANKING BANK, AND I SAID, “WOULD YOU CONSIDER HANGING IT THERE?” BECAUSE THAT WAS THE END OF JUNE…THEY HUNG IT THERE SO THAT THEY COULD HAVE IT THERE FOR THE FIRST OF JULY. [THIS QUEEN-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO THE EXHIBITION WHEN THEY HAD…A CANADA DAY PAVILION, OR CANADA’S 150TH BIRTHDAY. I HUNG ONE OF THE WALL HANGINGS ALONGSIDE OF IT.” “[THE KING-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO ENGLAND…THERE WAS AN ENGLISHMAN CAME INTO THE BANK, AND HE GAVE THE GIRLS HIS PHONE NUMBER, AND SAID, “GET HER TO PHONE ME.” I PHONED HIM, AND HE SAID, “I WANT ONE.” I SAID, “EXCUSE ME?” WELL, HE SAID, “THAT QUILT AT THE BANK…I WANT ONE.” I SAID, “WELL, IT’S A KING-SIZE (IT’S 100X104, OR 108), IT’S $1000.00.” “I’LL TAKE IT.”” “THAT’S WHEN I MADE TWO QUEEN-SIZED ONES. I DONATED [THE QUILT FROM THE PAVILLION] TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. I PUT [THE QUEEN-SIZED QUILTS] ON KIJIJI, AND GOT NO RESPONSE WHATSOEVER. I WOULDN’T PAY $800.00 FOR A QUILT, BECAUSE I COULD MAKE THEM. I BROUGHT THEM BACK HOME, AND I SAID, “YOU KNOW, WE DONATE TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. THEY’RE DOING A BREAKFAST PROGRAM. THEY CAN TAKE IT, AND RAFFLE IT OFF FOR THEIR BREAKFAST PROGRAM.” I [DONATED ONE QUILT TO] NOR-BRIDGE. THEY RAFFLED IT OFF, FOR WHATEVER PROGRAMS THEY NEED.” “WE STARTED TALKING ABOUT IT, AND [THE SOUP KITCHEN STAFF] ALL SAID TO ME, “OH, THAT WOULD BE NICE FOR US TO RAFFLE OFF.” I THOUGHT (THIS WAS BEFORE I PUT THEM ON KIJIJI), “I DON’T KNOW.” WHEN THEY DIDN’T SELL ON KIJIJI, I TOOK IT TO BILL, AND I SAID, “DO YOU STILL WANT IT?” WELL, HE HUNG IT ON THE WALL, AND STARTED SELLING TICKETS…I THINK THESE GUYS GOT $1500.00. I DON’T KNOW ABOUT NOR-BRIDGE…$1500.00 IS WHAT BILL SAID THEY MADE ON THAT QUILT. [TICKETS] WERE $5.00.” “THIS ONE HAD GONE TO SASKATCHEWAN…TO [THE KELVINGTON HERITAGE SHOW]. THE LEGION LADIES SAW IT, AND ASKED MY SISTER HOW MUCH I WANTED FOR IT. OF COURSE, THE LEGION ISN’T AS FLUID AS A LOT OF THINGS, AND $800.00 WAS TOO MUCH. I SAID, “WELL, YOU ASK THEM IF THEY WOULD LIKE A WALL-HANGING.” THE WALL-HANGINGS ARE ONLY $150.00. THAT’S HOW THEY STARTED. THAT, AND LARRY AT THE ROYAL BANK, WHO WANTED A SMALLER ONE FOR STERLING.” ON HER INTEREST IN QUILTING, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “MY MOTHER [FRANCES DICKS, NEE FENNELL] SEWED EVERYTHING, FROM HER OWN BRAS ON UP, AND SHE SEWED FOR EVERYBODY. I WENT HOME TO HER HOUSE, WHEN I WAS IN NURSING, AND SHE SAID, “WELL, DON’T TOUCH THAT.” THERE’S A SHEET IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LIVING ROOM FLOOR; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE. I SAID, “WHAT HAVE YOU GOT IN -?” “WELL, THAT’S THE WEDDING DRESS, AND THESE ARE THE BRIDESMAID DRESSES.” THAT’S HOW SHE SEWED! ON AN OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “PROBABLY ABOUT 10 YEARS AGO I STARTED QUILTING. I WAS PAST DOING CLOTHING, AND TO DO THESE SILLY LITTLE THINGS THAT ARE OF NO USE, OTHER THAN TO COLLECT DUST, I CAN’T BE BOTHERED WITH THAT. I NEED TO HAVE SOMETHING I CAN KIND OF SET MY TEETH IN.” “QUILTING HAS MADE ME EVEN A WORSE HOUSEKEEPER THAN I ALREADY WAS, BECAUSE, WHEN I GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND I HAVE AN IDEA, WELL, “IF YOU DON’T DO THE DISHES, FRANK, THEY AREN’T GOING TO GET DONE, BECAUSE I’M DOING SOMETHING.” I’M NOT A SUPER HOUSEKEEPER, AS IT IS, AND WHEN I HAVE SOMETHING LIKE THIS, EVERYTHING ELSE TAKES A BACK-BURNER.” SYDNEY FISHER NOTED HER THOUGHTS ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE MUSEUM, “IT MEANS EVERYTHING TO ME, BECAUSE I AM A CANADIAN. I WAS BORN IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND THE FURTHEST I’VE GONE IS TO LETHBRIDGE. I’VE BEEN TO TORONTO ONCE, AND WE WENT TO NOVA SCOTIA ONCE. I’VE BEEN TO B.C. ONCE. I LIVED IN WINNIPEG FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. BUT, YOU’RE STILL IN CANADA, AND, AS FAR AS I’M CONCERNED, THERE ISN’T ANY PLACE LIKE IT, EVEN IF IT IS THE DUST BOWL OF THE WORLD…I’M QUITE PROUD THAT IT’S AT THE MUSEUM. I DIDN’T THINK THEY’D EVER GET THAT FAR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETTER FROM VERN NEUFELD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180018000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
23
Height
8.3
Length
13.4
Width
3
Description
A. CARDBOARD BOX, BROWN PRINTED WITH YELLOW BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDERS AND IMAGES, AND BLUE TEXT, 13.4CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 8.3CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX HAS FRONT HAS TEXT “ “SUPER-CLEAN, SMOKELESS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA” PRINTED WITH “C-I-L” LOGO. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF BOX HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BLUE BACKGROUND “TWENTY “DOMINION” .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “SMOKELESS, HIGH VELOCITY, 180 GRAIN BULLET, “SUPER-CLEAN””. BACK OF BOX HAS IMAGE OF BULLET WITH TEXT “DOMINION .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” PRINTED ON IMAGE IN BLUE AND WHITE. FRONT OF BOX HAS TEXT “TWENTY .303 BRITISH, COPPER POINT, HIGH VELOCITY” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND AROUND BULLET. BACK HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “”SUPER-CLEAN”, SMOKELESS, THESE “SUPER-CLEAN” CARTRIDGES ARE GUARANTEED TO BE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY, POWERFUL, ACCURATE TO EXTREME RANGES AND “ALWAYS DEPENDABLE.” ALL “DOMINION” CARTRIDGES HAVE “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-MERCURIC PRIMING AND NON-FOULING BULLETS, WHICH KEEP THE RIFLE BORE IN PERFECT CONDITION. “MADE IN CANADA””. TOP OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, “SUPER-CLEAN, ADAPTED TO, B.S.A., ROSS, LEE-METFORD, GIBBS, GREENER, REMINGTON, LEE-ENFIELD, AND WINCHESTER RIFLES., (WILL NOT INTERCHANGE WITH .303 SAVAGE)”. TOP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE FLAP, “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS CARTON WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IF COMMUNICATING WITH US ON THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. A SPECIAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK OF THESE CARTRIDGES PROTECTS THEM FROM DETERIORATION, ENSURES UNIFORM CRIMPING, GREATER ACCURACY AND LONGER LIFE.” INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK STAMPED TEXT “A.A.H.H.S., IP 51”. INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK RESIDUE FROM CARTRIDGES IN ROWS OF CIRCLES. INSIDE OF BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD AND IS STAINED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED WITH GREY; EDGES OF BOX ARE WORN AND FRAYED. BASE OF BOX HAS TEARS IN CARDBOARD AND CREASES AT CORNERS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. D. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET IS TARNISHED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. F. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. I. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR CORROSION AND TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. J. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. K. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. L. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. M. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. N. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. O. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. P. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. Q. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. R. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. S. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. T. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. U. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; BASE OF SLIT HAS CREASE THAT RUNS DOWN FRONT OF CARDBOARD. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. V. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. W. CARDBOARD INSERT, 14CM LONG X 7.4CM WIDE. TOP OF INSERT HAS 9 SLITS WITH ROUNDED POINTS BETWEEN SLITS. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY ALONG POINTS ON FRONT AND BACK. FRONT HAS CREASE RUNNING FROM SLIT TO LOWER EDGE ON LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
6.9
Width
3
Description
CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX WITH 49 CARTRIDGES INSIDE. BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD ON THE INSIDE, WITH OUTSIDE PRINTED YELLOW WITH BLUE BORDERS AND TEXT. BOX LID HAS TEXT “.22 LONG, SMOKELESS, DRY LUBRICATED BULLETS” BESIDE IMAGE OF A BULLET WITH “.22 LONG” PRINTED ON IMAGE. TEXT BELOW IMAGE, “SUPER-CLEAN” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, WITH TEXT BELOW “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES HAVE BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “SUPER-CLEAN, .22 LONG, 50 R.F., SMOKELESS” AND “C-I-L” LOGO. FRONT OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “THESE CARTRIDGES ARE PRIMED WITH “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-RUSTING PRIMING. IF THE RIFLE HAS FIRST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED AS “DOMINION” “SUPER-CLEAN” .22’S ARE USED EXCLUSIVELY, THEY WILL NOT RUST OR CORRODE THE BORE.” BACK HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “76, 305” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE “DANGEROUS WITHIN ONE MILE”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND FADED; TOP FLAP HAS TEARS ON RIGHT SIDE, AND HEAVY WEAR AT LOWER EDGE.TOP FLAP IS CREASED ALONG LOWER LEFT CORNER; FRONT OF BOX IS STAINED WITH BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. CARTRIDGES INSIDE BOX ARE COMPRISED OF BRASS JACKET AND GREY POINT. JACKET HAS ENGRAVED “D” ON BASE; POINT OF CARTRIDGES HAVE THREE RINGS ENGRAVED ABOVE JACKET. CARTRIDGES OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
13
Height
11.6
Length
10.8
Width
6.6
Description
A. CARDOARD TOP, 10.3CM LONG X 6.3CM WIDE. TOP FLAP OF CARDBOARD BOX; BROWN INSIDE WITH RED, YELLOW, AND BLACK TEXT AND BACKGROUND PRINTED ON TOP. TOP HAS RED BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT BELOW “12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHOT SHELLS”. TOP HAS RED “C-I-L” LOGO PRINTED. TEXT BELOW PRINTED IN BOXES WITH BLACK BORDERS, FIRST BOX HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE TEXT “HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT INSIDE NEXT THREE BOXES, “OZ SHOT 1 1/8”, “SIZE OF SHOT, 5 HS”, “CODE DN, IA H6XX”. FRONT FLAP HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS BOX WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IS COMMUNICATING WITH US CONCERNING THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. 128 P63”. BACK OF CARDBOARD HAS LOSS IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; FLAP IS CREASED FRONT AND BACK AND WORN AT EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX, 10.8CM LONG X 6.6CM WIDE X 11.6CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX PRINTED WITH RED AND BLACK IMAGE OF A SHOTGUN SHELL, AND RED BORDER ALOG TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD”; FRONT HAS BLACK TEXT BESIDE IMAGE “2 5/8 12 GAUGE, “SUPER-CLEAN”, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION” WITH RED “C-I-L- PRINTED; LOWER EDGE OF FRONT HAS RED BORDER WITH WHITE TEXT “WATERPROOFED, FINISHED IN “DUCO””. LEFT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS, TEXT “”DOMINION”, BACKED BY MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY OF EXPERIENCE IN MANUFACTURING AMMUNITION FOR CANADIAN SPORTSMEN…” WITH COMPANY STATEMENT ON QUALITY. RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, 12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, HEAVY LOAD SHOT SHELLS, CHOICE OF SHOT SIZES 2,4,5,6, 7 1/2, BB…” WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHOT SIZES AND PURPOSES, AND “CAUTION, DO NOT USE THESE SHELLS EXCEPT IN GUNS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH MODERN HEAVY LOAD SMOKELESS POWDER SHOT SHELLS…” AND STORING INSTRUCTIONS. BACK OF BOX HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED IN BOX WITH RED BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, CANADA’S MOST POPULAR SHOT SHELL, IDEAL FOR THE SPORTSMAN WHO DESIRES A MODERATELY-PRICED “ALL-PURPOSE” SHOT SHELL, THE “CANUCK” HAS BEEN CANADA’S FAVOURITE FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS…” WITH DETAILS ON FEATURES OF THE SHELLS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE WITH FIREARMS. BASE OF BOX HAS RED BORDER ALONG TOP WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED “CNUCK HEAVY LOAD”; BASE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “12 GAUGE 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHELL SHOTS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAPS OVER BOX OPENING PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT; LEFT FLAP HAS TEXT “WARNING: IT IS DANGEROUS TO PLACE: 16 GAUGE SHELLS IN 10 GAUGE GUNS, 20 GAUGE SHELLS IN 12 GAUGE GUNS, 28 GAUGE SHELLS IN 16 OR 20 GAUGE GUNS.”; RIGHT FLAP HAS TEXT “BECAUSE: THE SMALLER SHELL WILL PASS THROUGH THE CHAMBER AND LODGE IN THE BARREL. IF, WITH THE BARREL THUS OBSTRUCTED, ANOTHER SHELL IS FIRED IN IT, THE BARREL MAY BURST WITH POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY TO THE SHOOTER AND BY-STANDERS. BEFORE LOADING YOUR GUN MAKE SURE THE BARREL IS NOT OBSTRUCTED.” INSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY; FRONT OF BOX HAS GREY SQUARE PENCIL DRAWINGS; RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “20347.5, 20230, 117”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. E. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. J. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. K. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. L. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. M. CARDBOARD FLAP, 3.4CM LONG X 2CM WIDE. FLAP DETACHED FROM BOX; FLAP HAS FLAT EDGE AT BASE AND ROUNDED TOP. EDGES ARE WORN AND FLAP HAS CREASE ACROSS THE MIDDLE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.2
Width
48.4
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN BROWN WOODEN FRAME. PAINTING DEPICTS TWO CLUSTERS OF TREES WITH GREEN AND YELLOW-ORANGE LEAVES, WITH A BROWN FOREGROUND AND BLUE BACKGROUND. BACKGROUND HAS TWO TONES OF BLUE DEPICTING HILLS AND SKY. FOREGROUND HAS RED AND GOLD TONES. BRUSH STROKES ARE DISTINCT SHOWING GRASS IN FOREROUND; PAINTING HAS PAINT APPLIED HEAVILY TO YELLOW-ORANGE TREE LEAVES. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLUE IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF CANVAS “M. PISKO”. FRAME AROUND CANVAS IS BROWN WITH DOUBLE-CIRCLES ENGRAVED BETWEEN DOUBLE LINES ALONG TRIM; FRAME HAS FOUR SCREWS LOCATED AT UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. BACK OF FRAME HAS CARDBOARD BACKING SECURED TO WOODEN FRAME WITH SILVER TAPE. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL ON LEFT SIDE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “MIKE PISKO, 1998 $100.00”; CARDBOARD BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL IN UPPER LEFT CORNER “TRUCK [UNDERLINED], 01 0066”. FRONT OF CANVAS HAS YELLOW DISCOLORATION AND STAINING IN UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. FRONT OF FRAME HAS MINOR CHIPPING AND DENTS ALONG OUTER EDGES. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS BROWN AND BLUE STAINING; BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE STAINING ALONG LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND BLUE STAINING AT UPPER LEFT EDGE; UPPER RIGHT EDGE OF FRAME IS SPLITTING ALONG SEAM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING PISKO OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’S. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” “MOM AND DAD RAISED US AS SORT OF ‘FREE RANGE’ KIDS, AND THAT CARRIED ON OUT ON THAT FIVE ACRE LITTLE FARM-ETTE. WE COULD PRETTY MUCH DO ANYTHING, AND EXPERIMENT. WE ALWAYS HAD WOODWORKING TOOLS, AND TOOLS OF ALL KINDS IN THE BASEMENT ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND LOTS TO MESS AROUND WITH. IF IT WASN’T ASTRONOMY, IT WAS POETRY, IT WAS WRITING, IT WAS ART, IT WAS BUILDING SOMETHING, OR FIXING SOMETHING UP THERE. IT WAS A STYLE OF LIFE THAT, IN REFLECTION, IT WAS QUITE A GIFT, QUITE A LEGACY TO US CHILDREN.” “THEY [BUILT] THE HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, I THINK IT WAS THE SECOND OR THIRD HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. ACROSS THE STREET WAS BALD PRAIRIE AT THE TIME, SO WE COULD JUST RUN AROUND.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD, MORE OR LESS, AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH AGE-RELATED DISEASE, AND BECOMING FORGETFUL, AND THEY HAD TO MOVE INTO TOWN. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” “IF I HAD A BIGGER HOUSE, IF I HAD MORE ROOM, IF I WAS A VISUAL ARTIST, THEN THERE’D BE NO QUESTION THEY’D BE UP SOMEWHERE, NO MATTER WHO SAID WHAT. I HAVE A FAIR NUMBER ALREADY ON THE WALLS AT HOME, AND AS THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME, ARRAIGNED WITH MY YOUTH, AND WITH MY PARENTS BEING ARTISTS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IF DON’T BRING THEM HERE. WE JUST WON’T KEEP THEM, AND NOBODY IN MY FAMILY IS INTERESTED IN THEM. SO, NOT DOING ART, I GUESS IT’S GOOD THAT THEY’RE HERE. WHAT AM I GOING TO DO, JUST STACK THEM UP AGAINST THE WALL? THEY EVENTUALLY WILL PERISH.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
34.2
Length
49.3
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN WHITE WOODEN FRAME. IMAGE OF TREES AND HOUSES IN SNOW, WITH SIDE OF BUILDING AT LEFT EDGE AND HOUSE PILLAR AT RIGHT EDGE; HOUSES WHITE WITH RED-BROWN ROOFS IN BACKGROUND, AND TREES IN FOREGROUND. SNOW COMPRISED OF BLUE AND WHITE PAINT; TREES COMPLETED IN BLACK, GREEN, BROWN AND ORANGE TONES; HOUSE PILLAR AND SIDING IN BROWN AND GREEN. PAINTING SIGNED IN RED IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “E.E. RIETHMAN”. MID-GROUND HAS BROWN FENCE BETWEEN TREES AND BUILDINGS IN BACKGROUND. FRONT OF FRAME HAS WHITE TRIM ALONG FRONT OF CANVAS, WITH GOLD TRIM ABOVE WHITE TRIM; FRAME PAINTED OFF-WHITE. BACK OF PAINTING HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH TWO BLACK METAL SCREW ON UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, WITH WHITE CORD FASTENED TO SCREWS. LEFT EDGE OF BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER “OWNED BY H. FLAIG 3279791, NF5”; BACKING HAS STAMPED TEXT IN FADED INK ALONG LOWER EDGE “GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, 310 – 7TH ST. SOUTH – LETHBRIDGE”. BACKING HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL AT UPPER EDGE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “$20.00 /1970”; BACKING HAS PRINTED ARTICLE IN CENTER ON WHITE PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT “ERNEST E. RIETHMAN, EXHIBITION APRIL 25 – MAY 31 ORGANIZED BY THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY WITH FUNDING ASSISTANCE FROM THE ALBERTA ART FOUNDATION…” WITH BIOGRAPHY ON ERNEST E. RIETHMAN BY “BRENT LAYCOCK, GUEST CURATOR” AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO “WATERTON LAKE, C.1958, OIL ON PANEL, 56 X 86 CM, COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. DON AND JUDY NILSSON, PHOTO: DON CORMAN”. PAPER BACKING HAS TEARS BESIDE SCREWS; BACKING HAS YELLOWED MASKING TAPE ALONG LOWER EDGE OF PAPER ARTICLE; ARTICLE EDGES STAINED YELLOW FROM ADHESIVE RESIDUE. BACK OF FRAME HAS PAIRS OF METAL NAILS IN UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS, WITH NAILS HEADS COVERED WITH BROWN PAINT. BACK OF FRAME IS STAINED AND CHIPPED AT EDGES AND CORNERS; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BROWN AND WHITE STAINING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “ “VIEW FROM THE PORCH” WOULD HAVE BEEN UP IN THE HOUSE FOR QUITE A WHILE. THAT’S VERY FAMILIAR TO ME. IT’S CERTAINLY THE STYLE OF [ART] THAT THEY WOULD DO. MOM WAS ALWAYS MENTIONING THE OIL. IT’S THE KIND OF [ART] THEY WOULD HAVE DONE, THAT THEY WOULD HAVE LIKED.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’S. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” “MOM AND DAD RAISED US AS SORT OF ‘FREE RANGE’ KIDS, AND THAT CARRIED ON OUT ON THAT FIVE ACRE LITTLE FARM-ETTE. WE COULD PRETTY MUCH DO ANYTHING, AND EXPERIMENT. WE ALWAYS HAD WOODWORKING TOOLS, AND TOOLS OF ALL KINDS IN THE BASEMENT ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND LOTS TO MESS AROUND WITH. IF IT WASN’T ASTRONOMY, IT WAS POETRY, IT WAS WRITING, IT WAS ART, IT WAS BUILDING SOMETHING, OR FIXING SOMETHING UP THERE. IT WAS A STYLE OF LIFE THAT, IN REFLECTION, IT WAS QUITE A GIFT, QUITE A LEGACY TO US CHILDREN.” “THEY [BUILT] THE HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, I THINK IT WAS THE SECOND OR THIRD HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. ACROSS THE STREET WAS BALD PRAIRIE AT THE TIME, SO WE COULD JUST RUN AROUND.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD, MORE OR LESS, AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH AGE-RELATED DISEASE, AND BECOMING FORGETFUL, AND THEY HAD TO MOVE INTO TOWN. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” “IF I HAD A BIGGER HOUSE, IF I HAD MORE ROOM, IF I WAS A VISUAL ARTIST, THEN THERE’D BE NO QUESTION THEY’D BE UP SOMEWHERE, NO MATTER WHO SAID WHAT. I HAVE A FAIR NUMBER ALREADY ON THE WALLS AT HOME, AND AS THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME, ARRAIGNED WITH MY YOUTH, AND WITH MY PARENTS BEING ARTISTS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IF DON’T BRING THEM HERE. WE JUST WON’T KEEP THEM, AND NOBODY IN MY FAMILY IS INTERESTED IN THEM. SO, NOT DOING ART, I GUESS IT’S GOOD THAT THEY’RE HERE. WHAT AM I GOING TO DO, JUST STACK THEM UP AGAINST THE WALL? THEY EVENTUALLY WILL PERISH.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.7
Width
51.3
Description
PENCIL SKETCH ON PAPER INSIDE FRAME WITH METAL EDGES AND GLASS COVERING. SKETCH OF A SMALL CHILD ASLEEP HOLDING A DOLL, WITH A REVOLVER BESIDE THE DOLL. SKETCH UNSIGNED, ATTRIBUTED TO E.E. RIETHMAN. SKETCH INSIDE WHITE MATTE WITH BLACK INNER TRIM, WITH GLASS FRONT TO FRAME. FRAME SILVER METAL WITH FLORAL PATTERNED TRIM AROUND INSIDE. BACK OF FRAME HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH SILVER LOOP-SCREW AT LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES, WITH SILVER METAL WIRES ATTACTED TO SCREWS. BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER “BY E. RIETHMAN” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT LOWER-MIDDLE “OWNED BY H. FLAIG, 3279791, NF5.”. LOWER EDGE OF BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “M.G.M. WALL DÉCOR, 317 – 4TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB, 328-0923” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK ON LABEL “$120.00”. BACKING HAS FOLDED CORNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND TEAR IN PAPER AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. FRONT OF SKETCH HAS GREEN STAINING AT RIGHT EDGE, BLUE-GREY STAIN AT LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND GREY STAINS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF IMAGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE SKETCH BY ERNEST RIETHMAN, FLAIG RECALLED, ““THE BOY AND THE TEDDY BEAR”, I WONDER IF MOM DIDN’T HAVE THAT BECAUSE SHE WAS THINKING OF ME. IT LOOKS A LITTLE BIT LIKE I MIGHT HAVE LOOKED, AS A KID, AND I WOULD HAVE BEEN VERY YOUNG AT THAT TIME I THINK THIS ONE WAS DONE.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’S. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” “MOM AND DAD RAISED US AS SORT OF ‘FREE RANGE’ KIDS, AND THAT CARRIED ON OUT ON THAT FIVE ACRE LITTLE FARM-ETTE. WE COULD PRETTY MUCH DO ANYTHING, AND EXPERIMENT. WE ALWAYS HAD WOODWORKING TOOLS, AND TOOLS OF ALL KINDS IN THE BASEMENT ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND LOTS TO MESS AROUND WITH. IF IT WASN’T ASTRONOMY, IT WAS POETRY, IT WAS WRITING, IT WAS ART, IT WAS BUILDING SOMETHING, OR FIXING SOMETHING UP THERE. IT WAS A STYLE OF LIFE THAT, IN REFLECTION, IT WAS QUITE A GIFT, QUITE A LEGACY TO US CHILDREN.” “THEY [BUILT] THE HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, I THINK IT WAS THE SECOND OR THIRD HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. ACROSS THE STREET WAS BALD PRAIRIE AT THE TIME, SO WE COULD JUST RUN AROUND.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD, MORE OR LESS, AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH AGE-RELATED DISEASE, AND BECOMING FORGETFUL, AND THEY HAD TO MOVE INTO TOWN. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” “IF I HAD A BIGGER HOUSE, IF I HAD MORE ROOM, IF I WAS A VISUAL ARTIST, THEN THERE’D BE NO QUESTION THEY’D BE UP SOMEWHERE, NO MATTER WHO SAID WHAT. I HAVE A FAIR NUMBER ALREADY ON THE WALLS AT HOME, AND AS THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME, ARRAIGNED WITH MY YOUTH, AND WITH MY PARENTS BEING ARTISTS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IF DON’T BRING THEM HERE. WE JUST WON’T KEEP THEM, AND NOBODY IN MY FAMILY IS INTERESTED IN THEM. SO, NOT DOING ART, I GUESS IT’S GOOD THAT THEY’RE HERE. WHAT AM I GOING TO DO, JUST STACK THEM UP AGAINST THE WALL? THEY EVENTUALLY WILL PERISH.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Date
1945
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
214
Width
168.5
Description
BLUE AND PINK QUILT WITH PATTERN OF 56 PINK DIAMONDS INTERLAID WITH BLUE DIAMONDS; PINK FABRIC DIAMONDS HAVE NAMES EMBROIDERED IN BLUE THREAD, LISTED BELOW. BLUE DIAMONDS HAVE AN EMBROIDERED FOUR PETAL DESIGN STITCHED IN FABRIC. QUILT HAS BLUE EMBROIDERED TEXT ON TWO CENTER DIAMONDS, “1945” AND “RED CROSS”. QUILT HAS FINISHED EDGES WITH PINK BORDERS. QUILT HAS FRAYING AND LOSS ON UPPER RIGHT EDGE; FABRIC AND EMBROIDERED TEXT IS FADED; QUILT HAS MINOR BROWN STAIN ON BACK AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. EMBROIDERED NAMES ON FRONT OF QUILT [ALPHABETICAL]: ANNAND, ASHMAN, BAILEY, BAKER, BARNES, BELL, BURNS, CARLSON, CARNELL, CHAMBERS, CHRISTIANSEN, CYNCH, DAYMON, DELANY, DEVEBER, DICKSON, DILATUSH, FALLON, FOSTER, GAIRNS, GIDDIE, GLADSTONE, GOBLE, GOING, GREGORY, HAGGLUND, HARRISON, HARWOOD, HATFIELD, HAUG, HINTON, HOLROYD, KEMMIS, KLOPPENBORG, MATKIN, MCEWEN, MCKENZIE, O’BRAY, PITTAWAY, PRESLEY, RACKETTE, REEVES, ROPER, SHERMAN, STEWART, STRATE, THOMAS, UDELL, WACHER, ZORN.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
THE WATERTON PARK RED CROSS QUILT WAS CREATED BY WATERTON FAMILIES IN WORLD WAR 2 AND WAS EMBROIDERED WITH THE SURNAMES OF WATERTON RESIDENTS LIVING IN THE PARK DURING WORLD WAR 2. THE QUILT FEATURES 50 NAMES EMBROIDERED ON THE SURFACE, ALL SURNAMES OF WATERTON FAMILIES IN THE COMMUNITY DURING WORLD WAR 2 ACCORDING TO BERT PITTAWAY IN A LETTER TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION. THE QUILT WAS PART OF A RED CROSS SOCIETY INITIATIVE THAT SAW GLOBAL AND CANADIAN COMMUNITIES CREATE QUITS FOR SENDING OVERSEAS AND FOR RAISING FUNDS FOR THE RED CROSS. ACCORDING TO ONLINE INFORMATION FROM HALIFAX WOMEN’S HISTORY [HTTP://HALIFAXWOMENSHISTORY.CA/CANADIAN-COMFORT-QUILTS] AND ACTIVE HISTORY [HTTP://ACTIVEHISTORY.CA/2017/07/RED-CROSSES-AND-WHITE-COTTON-MEMORY-AND-MEANING-IN-FIRST-WORLD-WAR-QUILTS/], RED CROSS QUILTS WERE COMMONLY CREATED BY CANADIAN COMMUNITIES AS CIVILIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO WAR EFFORTS DURING BOTH WORLD WARS. THE QUILTS WERE SENT TO THE RED CROSS FOR DISTRIBUTION TO FAMILIES DISPLACED BY THE WAR OVERSEAS AND TO REFUGEES; QUILTS WERE ALSO RAFFLED PUBLICLY IN COMMUNITIES TO RAISE FUNDS FOR QUILTING GROUPS AND THE RED CROSS. THE WATERTON QUILT WAS RAFFLED IN 1945 AND WAS WON BY THE MARY PITTAWAY OF WATERTON. BERT PITTAWAY DONATED THE QUILT TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION FOR DISPLAY AT THE WATERTON HERITAGE CENTRE IN THE 1980S, IN MEMORY OF BERT’S PARENTS MARY AND JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY. JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY, FATHER OF JACK, BERTRAM, AND DENNIS PITTAWAY, BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER AS AN ARMY TRUMPETER IN AN IRISH MILITIA UNIT. J.E. PITTAWAY JOINED THE REGULAR ARMY IN NOVEMBER 1893, SERVING IN WORLD WAR 1 AND WORLD WAR 2, IN WORLD WAR 2 ACHIEIVING THE RANK OF BATTERY SERGEANT MAJOR. J.E. PITTAWAY MOVED TO WATERTON IN 1927 FROM IRELAND. J.E. PITTAWAY WORKED FOR THE PARKS DEPARTMENT AS A GARDENER AND THEN AS A CAMPGROUND CARETAKER. J.E. PITTAWAY DIED MARCH 13, 1956, WITH HIS FINAL TRIBUTE IN CALGARY ON MARCH 17, 1956. ACCORDING TO THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, MEMORY OF THE WARS WERE “…INSCRIBED ON LANDFORMS IN PLACE NAMES…AND THE CELEBRATION OF PEACE WAS GIVEN SYMBOLIC FORM IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK IN 1932.” WATERTON NATIONAL PARK FEATURES LAKES, RIDGES, AND PEAKS NAMED WITH REFERENCES TO THE WORLD WARS, INCLUDING AVION RIDGE, FESTUBERT MOUNTAIN, AND MOUNT ALDERSON. IN 2017, THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION DISSOLVED AND REPRESENTATIVES FROM WATERTON LAKES PARK FACILITATED THE TRANSFER OF THE COLLECTIONS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS. THE 1945 WATERTON QUILT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AS PART OF THE EFFORTS TO RE-HOME THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION’S COLLECTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE LETTER FROM BERT PITTAWAY, DONATION NOTES FROM THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION, INFORMATION FROM THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON LAKES PARK, AND NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON THE PITTAWAY FAMILY, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170035000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Date
2011
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
65
Width
42
Description
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY IN MATTE AND FRAME. EMBROIDERY COMPLETED IN BROWN ON WHITE FABRIC, AND SHOWS THE 1910 GALT HOSPITAL FRONT. EMBROIDERY INSIDE BROWN AND GREY MATTE AND BROWN WOOD FRAME WITH GLASS OVER. FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK ENGRAVED PLAQUE ON BOTTOM EDGE READING “GALT HOSPITAL/MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, 1910, DESIGNED AND STITCHED, 2011, BELINDA CROWSON”. BACK OF FRAME COVERED IN BROWN PAPER WITH SILVER WIRE ATTACHED FOR HANGING. BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE LABEL WITH TEXT “LA GALLERY CUSTOM FRAMING & ART, 421-5TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB T1J 2B6, PH. 380.4556, FAX 380.4562, WEBSITE WWW.THELAGALLERY.COM, EMAIL INFO@THELAGALLERY.COM, W/O # H0761, ASSEMBLED BY CM”” WITH CHECK BOXES ON LABEL FOR “MOUNTING METHOD” AND “GLASS”, “NON-GLARE GLASS” CHECKED. FRAME HAS CHIPS ON FRONT EDGES; BACK HAS TEARS IN PAPER BACKING. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON NOVEMBER 16, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BELINDA CROWSON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN SIGN AND BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY PIECE. CROWSON WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE GALT MUSEUM AS THE MUSEUM EDUCATOR, WITH A REPUTATION AS A RENOWNED LOCAL HISTORIAN, UNTIL HER ELECTION TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017. ON THE BLACK EMBROIDERY PIECE, CROWSON RECALLED, “SHARING [THIS] WAS HARD, BECAUSE THIS WAS THE FIRST [PIECE] I DESIGNED…AND I VERY MUCH KNOW THE MEANING. IT WAS HANGING IN THE CLASSROOM [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] FOR YEARS, BUT IT WAS VERY HARD [TO GIVE UP], BECAUSE I DESIGNED IT; I STITCHED IT; AND IT’S A PIECE OF MYSELF.” “IT IS SOMETHING THAT I ACTUALLY DESIGNED, AND I HAD NEVER DESIGNED A PIECE BEFORE. I HAD TO LEARN HOW TO DESIGN IT, SO I ACTUALLY HAD A PICTURE AND GRAPH PAPER. I LEARNED HOW TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH, AND TURN IT INTO BLACKWORK STITCHES, EVEN THOUGH, OF COURSE, IT’S DONE IN BROWN, AND NOT BLACK. THE NAME DOESN’T ACTUALLY MEAN THE COLOR.” “BLACKWORK COMES FROM THE ELIZABETHAN TIME, AND IT WAS DONE WHEN LACE WAS REALLY EXPENSIVE. THEY WOULD TAKE BLACK THREAD ON WHITE MATERIAL. IF YOU DO BLACKWORK PROPERLY, IT’S ABSOLUTELY REVERSIBLE. IF YOU DID IT ON CUFFS OR COLLARS IT WOULD ALMOST LOOK LIKE LACE, AND BE REVERSIBLE FROM BOTH SIDES. IT’S A TYPE OF EMBROIDERY THAT USES PRIMARILY STRAIGHT LINES. I TAUGHT A CLASS TO PEOPLE AT THE GALT MUSEUM [ON] HOW TO DO BLACKWORK. I ACTUALLY TAUGHT AN EMBROIDERY CLASS IN THIS DESIGN, WHICH IS A VERY SIMPLE TYPE OF EMBROIDERY TO DO, BUT CAN CREATE INCREDIBLY ELABORATE DESIGNS.” “I COMPLETED [THIS PIECE] IN 2011 AND HAD IT FRAMED THAT SAME YEAR. IT’S SUEDE AROUND THE PICTURE MATTE.” “SOMETHING LIKE THIS SIZE OF PICTURE, IN BLACKWORK, PROBABLY ONLY TOOK ME ABOUT 2 WEEKS TO STITCH. IT’S A VERY QUICK DESIGN, BUT IT FILLS IN – AND, IF I WAS TO REDO IT AGAIN, I’D FILL IN MORE OF THE BLANK SPACES. [BLACKWORK IS] SUPPOSED TO LOOK AS COMPLETE AS POSSIBLE, BUT I WANTED TO MAKE THE COLUMNS STICK OUT, SO IT MAY HAVE WORKED IN THAT REGARD.” CROWSON ELABORATED ON HER BACKGROUND DOING EMBROIDERY, NOTING, “I HAVE BEEN DOING EMBROIDERY SINCE [I WAS] A KID. IT’S SOMETHING MY GRANDMOTHER KNEW; MY MOTHER KNEW; IT’S SOMETHING I WAS TAUGHT, AND, OF MY SIBLINGS, I’M THE ONLY ONE WHO DOES IT. THE OTHERS LIKE TO DO MORE STITCHING WITH MACHINES. I LOVE THE HAND-STITCHING, AND I HAVE LONG BEEN THINKING ABOUT DESIGNING. I ALSO HAVE A PASSION FOR HISTORIC BUILDINGS. I HAD DONE A BLACKWORK PIECE, WHICH WAS A PATTERN THAT I HAD BOUGHT AND I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT. IT’S A REALLY NICE WAY OF DOING EMBROIDERY, SO I THOUGHT “THERE’S A WAY OF CAPTURING HISTORIC BUILDINGS IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY.” I MADE MYSELF A CHALLENGE OF FIGURING IT OUT, AND, OF COURSE, THE WAY I DO MANY THINGS, I DIDN’T ACTUALLY RESEARCH HOW TO DESIGN. I JUST TAUGHT MYSELF, AND IT TOOK ME A WEEKEND. I THREW AWAY ABOUT 3 DESIGNS, UNTIL I REALIZED YOU’VE GOT TO START IN THE CENTER AND WORK OUT. THE NICE THING ABOUT THE GALT HOSPITAL—BECAUSE I DID THE FAÇADE OF THE HOSPITAL [IN THIS PIECE]—IS THAT IT IS SO BEAUTIFULLY SYMMETRICAL, IT MADE IT EASIER. I HAD…THE VARIEGATED THREAD, AND THE MATERIAL TO STITCH ON. THEN IT WAS A MATTER OF ACTUALLY CREATING IT. THE PATTERN HAD A LOT OF ERASING DONE ON IT, AS I CHANGED THINGS. I’M VERY PROUD OF THE WINDOWS…MY GOODNESS, THAT BUILDING HAS A LOT OF WINDOWS! IT WAS FUN, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST ONE [I MADE]. SINCE THEN I HAVE DONE GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN, AND THE POST OFFICE. THE GALBRAITH SCHOOL IS HANGING AT GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN IS IN MY HOUSE, AND THE POST OFFICE WAS RAFFLED OFF TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR CHINATOWN.” “I REMEMBER, AS A KID, I WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO, BUT I WENT THROUGH ONE OF MY MOM’S JEWELRY BOXES. IN THERE WAS THE WORK SHE HAD DONE AS A KID. SHE HAD BEEN PRACTICING HER STITCHES. THAT STUCK WITH ME, AND I REMEMBER HER TALKING ABOUT HOW SHE HAD BEEN TAUGHT FROM HER MOM. MY GRANDMOTHER KEPT CROSS-STITCHING EMBROIDERY UNTIL HER ARTHRITIS GOT TOO BAD. WHEN I DO IT, I REALLY DO FEEL I AM PART OF THAT CHAIN, BECAUSE I DO HAVE EMBROIDERY THAT BOTH MY MOM AND MY GRANDMOTHER HAVE DONE. IT IS INTERESTING BECAUSE, FROM THE MENNONITE TRADITION ESPECIALLY, A LOT OF THE STITCHES I HAVE COME FROM THAT TRADITION, SO IT’S VERY MUCH A PART OF THAT. I WOULD LIKE TO SIT DOWN, ONE DAY WHEN I GET TIME, WITH MY MOM’S COUSIN, WHO DOES WHAT’S CALLED 3-D EMBROIDERING. IN MY FAMILY, PEOPLE ACTUALLY HAVE THE ORDERED EVERY DAY TEA TOWELS, THEY HAVE THE BED TOWELS. IT’S SUCH A PART OF THE SOUTHERN ART, SO MY [WORKS ARE] A LITTLE MORE MODERN INTERPRETATION OF SOME OF THAT. MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WOULD HAVE SAT IN RUSSIA, DOING THE SAME STITCHES.” “I DON’T KNOW [HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE REGION ARE DOING BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY]. I TAUGHT THE CLASS IN … EMBROIDERY, BUT I DON’T THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE PICKING UP BLACKWORK. IT’S INTERESTING, WHEN I MENTION THIS, TALKING TO SOME PEOPLE ONLINE, ONE OF MY FRIENDS WHO HAS A HISTORIC HOUSE IS LIKE, “COULD I PAY YOU TO DESIGN MY HOUSE?” [BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY] IS A FUN WAY FOR ME TO TAKE THOSE TWO IDEAS I LOVE-–OF STITCHING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS-–BECAUSE PHOTOGRAPHY, WITH WHAT PEOPLE HAVE TODAY, IS RELATIVELY EASY. YOU CAN TAKE POINT-AND-SHOOT. SOME PEOPLE ARE MUCH BETTER AT IT--THEY’RE ARTISTIC-–BUT THIS IS A WAY OF CAPTURING A BUILDING. YOU HAVE TO, VERY PERSONALLY, SIT THERE, AND BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO MEASURE EVERYTHING OUT, EVEN TO DESIGN IT, YOUR APPRECIATION OF THE ARCHITECTURE IS VERY DIFFERENT THAN A POINT-AND-SHOOT CAMERA.” “I’VE DONE FIVE BUILDINGS NOW, AND I HAVE SEEN EACH ONE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. I REMEMBER THINKING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, WHEN YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT THE HEIGHT OF THE CLOCK TOWER COMPARED TO THE BASE OF THE BUILDING, [YOU SEE THE] PHENOMENAL ARCHITECTURE, [BUT] IT’S ONLY WHEN YOU ARE STITCHING IT THAT YOU REALIZE THAT THE BASE OF THAT BUILDING ISN’T STRAIGHT. THE BUILDING GOES WITH THE SLANT OF THE SIDEWALK, AND I HAD TO TAKE AN ARTISTIC EYE, AND MAKE THE BOTTOM OF THE BUILDING STRAIGHT FROM THE FRONT. THE OTHER THING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, THERE’S ALMOST NO HISTORIC [PHOTOGRAPHS] OF IT STRAIGHT-ON; IT’S ALWAYS ON THE CORNER, BECAUSE THAT’S EASIER. I CAN’T CROSS-STITCH MY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, SO I HAD TO ACTUALLY TAKE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS, INSTEAD OF HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS. THIS HAS REALLY GIVEN ME A NEW APPRECIATION OF THE BUILDINGS, BECAUSE I HAD TO LOOK AT THEM SO CAREFULLY. WITH THE BOWMAN—WITH ALL THESE BUILDINGS--YOU HAD TO THINK WHAT TIME PERIOD YOU WANTED TO DISPLAY. SO THE ONE OF THE BOWMAN, I HAVE THE UNION JACK FLYING [IN] THE PICTURE, BECAUSE I WANTED [TO CAPTURE] IT BACK WHEN IT WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED.” “IT’S AN ADDICTION. YOU SIT IN FRONT OF THE TELEVISION, AND SOMETIMES A WEEKEND PASSES AND YOU HAVEN’T DONE MUCH. WHEN YOU’RE WORKING ON A PROJECT, FOR MYSELF, IT’S LIKE, “I’M GOING TO GET IT DONE.” THEN YOU TAKE A BREAK BEFORE YOU PICK UP THE NEXT PROJECT, SO YOU CAN DO ALL THE OTHER STUFF. TRYING TO PUT [AN ESTIMATE OF TIME SPENT CREATING] IT, I WOULDN’T HAVE A CLUE.” “I THINK EVERYBODY [HAS] MULTI-FACETS IN THEIR BRAINS, AND I USE DIFFERENT PARTS OF IT. IT’S ALWAYS FUN TO CHALLENGE, TO TRY NEW THINGS. ONE OF THE THINGS I’D LIKE TO DO…I’VE SEEN PEOPLE WHO ARE CROSS-STITCHING ON METAL [PUTTING HOLES IN]. IN THE SPRING, I WILL BE DOING A CROSS-STITCH PATTERN ON ‘PAGE WIRE’, THAT [ATTACHES] TO A FENCE, SO IT WILL BE OUTDOOR CROSS-STITCH. I LOVE WORKING WITH MY SILKS, AND MY REALLY DELICATE STUFF, BUT THE BEAUTIFUL THING ABOUT EMBROIDERY IS YOU CAN TAKE IT DIFFERENT WAYS. WHY SHOULD KNITTERS HAVE ALL THE FUN WHEN THEY GO ‘YARN-BOMBING’? WE CAN DO ‘CROSS-STITCH BOMBING’, TOO. IT’S ONE OF THOSE THINGS WHERE YOU CAN TAKE A VERY OLD FORM, AND MAKE IT VERY MODERN.” “IT WAS A HARD DECISION [TO DONATE IT]. I HAVE THE PATTERN. I CAN ALWAYS RECREATE IT. IT WOULD NEVER BE THE SAME. I DON’T CARE IF YOU RECREATE SOMETHING, IT’S NEVER THE SAME THING. BUT I HAD TO LET THE LOGICAL PART OF MY BRAIN HANDLE THIS DECISION, BECAUSE IT DID HANG IN THE CLASSROOM AND YOU POINTED TO THIS THING A LOT WHEN WE DISCUSSED THE BUILDING. FOR A LOT OF STUDENTS THIS WAS THE PICTURE OF THE BUILDING THAT THEY REMEMBER SEEING, SO THE CONNECTION TO MY JOB JUST MADE IT SUCH A STRONG [POINT]. THE OTHER THING IS, AS AN ARTIST…I GET TO SAY I’M AN ART-PIECE IN A MUSEUM. THAT’S QUITE THE HONOR. IT WASN’T CHOSEN AS AN ART-PIECE, BUT STILL I CAN MAKE THAT WORK. [I SPENT] PROBABLY A WEEK TALKING TO FAMILY MEMBERS AS WELL, BECAUSE I HAVE A LOT OF CROSS-STITCH IN MY HOUSE, FROM PATTERNS AND DIFFERENT THINGS. I REMIND THEM I’M NOT GOING TO DIE SOON, BUT SOME OF MY NIECES HAVE TOLD ME WHICH ONES THEY WANT WHEN I’M DEAD. SO I ALSO NEEDED TO TALK TO FAMILY, AND MAKE SURE THAT NOBODY WAS GOING TO BE CRINGING TO FIND IT WAS GONE. IT IS INTERESTING HOW THINGS THAT YOU CREATE [HAVE] A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP FOR OTHER PEOPLE TOO, SO I HAD TO DOUBLE CHECK WITH OTHER PEOPLE TOO.” “IT WAS JULY OR AUGUST OF 2000, WHEN I WAS INTERVIEWED BY WILMA WOODS, AND I WAS BETWEEN TEACHING [JOBS]…AND GETTING CLOSE TO THE START OF SCHOOL. I DIDN’T REALLY WANT TO SUB, AND IT WAS A TEMPORARY SIX MONTH POSITION. I APPLIED, AND WILMA INTERVIEWED ME ON THE MAIN FLOOR, IN THE HALF OF WHAT’S NOW THE FRIEND’S BOARDROOM. THAT IS WHERE HER OFFICE WAS, AND WHERE SHE DID THE INTERVIEW. I PREPPED. I WENT TO B. MACCABEE’S BOOKSTORE AND BOUGHT THE CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND READ THE ENTIRE BOOK…BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. I WASN’T REALLY THINK ABOUT WHETHER I’D GET THE JOB, SO I GAVE REFERENCES TO HER AND REALIZED I HADN’T ACTUALLY LET THE REFERENCES KNOW. I CALLED THEM AFTER I GOT HOME, WHICH WAS GOOD, BECAUSE I GUESS SHE CALLED FIVE MINUTES AFTERWARDS BECAUSE SHE WAS PRETTY QUICK. I STARTED [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] SEPTEMBER 1, 2000, WITH THE EXHIBIT ON THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT AND ITS CENTENNIAL. IT WAS A SIX MONTH GRANT POSITION. I WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A TEMPORARY POSITION, BECAUSE AT THAT POINT THE E. TEAM HAD GEARED DOWN ON STAFF AT THE MUSEUM. SO I STARTED THERE, AND…JANUARY AND FEBRUARY OF THE YEAR, THEY WENT TO CITY COUNCIL AND ASKED FOR IT TO BE MADE A FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION. IT HAD TO BE POSTED, BUT I APPLIED AND GOT THE FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION IN MARCH 2001. I MADE THE DECISION, BUT WITHOUT REALLY THINKING ABOUT IT, THAT TEMPORARY POSITION TURNED INTO A SEVENTEEN YEAR JOB.” “[OF THE WORKS I’VE DONE] IT’S DEFINITELY ONE OF THE BIG ONES. THERE [WERE] A FEW OTHER THINGS I TOOK OUT OF MY OFFICE THAT HAVE BEEN WITH ME FROM THE BEGINNING…THE REASON I STITCHED THIS BUILDING WAS MY CONNECTION TO THE BUILDING. IT’S NOT ONLY A PHENOMENAL BUILDING, BUT THIS WAS ‘HOME’ FOR 17 YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170033001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
74.8
Width
67
Description
WATERCOLOUR AND PASTEL PAINTING DEPICTING A TREE IN THE FOREGROUND IN BLACK PASTEL ON GREEN, PURPLE, PINK AND BLUE BLENDED WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUND. TREE AND GROUND OUTLINES ARE DONE IN PASTEL WITH ABSTRACT WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUNDS FOR LEAVES AND LANDSCAPE. PAINTING SIGNED IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK INK, "MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING BACK IS STAINED, AND HAS INSCRIPTION IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK LEAD "PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING WAS DONATED IN A LAVENDER MATTE AND SILVER METAL FRAME. FRAME HAD WHITE COROPLAST BACKING WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE MARKER ON LEFT SIDE "MELISSA AFTER CALGARY". MATTE CONSISTED OF A FRONT BOARD WITH THE PAINTING SECURED BY MASKING TAPE ALONG FOUR EDGES. A TREATMENT WAS CONDUCTED ON OCTOBER 24, 2019 BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM TO REMOVE THE MASKING TAPE FROM THE BACK OF THE PAINTING, AND TO SECURE HOLLYTEX TO THE REMAINING ADHESIVE ON THE PAINTING. PAINTING HAS TWO PINHOLES AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER, AND SMALL TEARS ALONG RIGHT EDGE [REVEALED DURING TREATMENT TO REMOVE TAPE]. PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE RESIDUE ALONG FRONT EDGES FROM PREVIOUS MATTING OR FRAMING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. FOR FURTHER CONDITION DETAILS AND THE COMPLETE TREATMENT REPORT BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWEED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS, FLAIG RECALLED, “MY BROTHERS AND I HAD MET [MELISSA MALKAS]. WE THOUGHT HIGHLY OF HER AS AN ARTIST, [AND] AS A PERSON. I BELIEVE SHE’S NOT AROUND IN TOWN ANY MORE, BUT SHE WAS PART OF THAT RURAL SCENE, WHERE YOU HAD A GREAT AMOUNT OF FREEDOM.” “I JUST [HAD], I BELIEVE, TWO OF MELISSA’S PIECES, THE PAINTING [WAS ONE], WHICH IS VERY BIG, BEAUTIFUL, AND PRETTY. ON THE BACK IT SAYS ‘AFTER CALGARY’. I’M NOT SURE WHAT THAT MEANS.” “[WE MET THE MALKAS’S] ONCE WE MOVED OUT TO BROXBURN. I DON’T KNOW IF THEY MOVED IN BEFOREHAND. THEY WERE [OUR] NEIGHBORS. MOM WAS RAISED ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND [MY PARENTS] KNEW HOW TO REACH OUT TO THE NEIGHBORS, AND MAKE FRIENDS, AND TAKE FOOD OVER AND VISIT…THEY WERE ALWAYS OUT VISITING.” “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’S. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” “MOM AND DAD RAISED US AS SORT OF ‘FREE RANGE’ KIDS, AND THAT CARRIED ON OUT ON THAT FIVE ACRE LITTLE FARM-ETTE. WE COULD PRETTY MUCH DO ANYTHING, AND EXPERIMENT. WE ALWAYS HAD WOODWORKING TOOLS, AND TOOLS OF ALL KINDS IN THE BASEMENT ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND LOTS TO MESS AROUND WITH. IF IT WASN’T ASTRONOMY, IT WAS POETRY, IT WAS WRITING, IT WAS ART, IT WAS BUILDING SOMETHING, OR FIXING SOMETHING UP THERE. IT WAS A STYLE OF LIFE THAT, IN REFLECTION, IT WAS QUITE A GIFT, QUITE A LEGACY TO US CHILDREN.” “THEY [BUILT] THE HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, I THINK IT WAS THE SECOND OR THIRD HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. ACROSS THE STREET WAS BALD PRAIRIE AT THE TIME, SO WE COULD JUST RUN AROUND.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD, MORE OR LESS, AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH AGE-RELATED DISEASE, AND BECOMING FORGETFUL, AND THEY HAD TO MOVE INTO TOWN. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” “IF I HAD A BIGGER HOUSE, IF I HAD MORE ROOM, IF I WAS A VISUAL ARTIST, THEN THERE’D BE NO QUESTION THEY’D BE UP SOMEWHERE, NO MATTER WHO SAID WHAT. I HAVE A FAIR NUMBER ALREADY ON THE WALLS AT HOME, AND AS THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME, ARRAIGNED WITH MY YOUTH, AND WITH MY PARENTS BEING ARTISTS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IF DON’T BRING THEM HERE. WE JUST WON’T KEEP THEM, AND NOBODY IN MY FAMILY IS INTERESTED IN THEM. SO, NOT DOING ART, I GUESS IT’S GOOD THAT THEY’RE HERE. WHAT AM I GOING TO DO, JUST STACK THEM UP AGAINST THE WALL? THEY EVENTUALLY WILL PERISH.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, MELISSA MALKAS WAS A SECOND GENERATION LETHBRIDGE ARTIST, THE DAUGHTER OF IRMA MALKAS (RODOWITZ) AND EGON MALKAS. MELISSA MALKAS GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY IN 1986 WITH A DEGREE IN FINE ARTS, AND ALSO ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. DURING HER CAREER, MALKAS EXHIBITED AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE WITH THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF LETHBRIDGE. MELISSA MALKAS EXHIBITED AS A SOLO ARTIST, AND WITH HER MOTHER IN 1996 AND 2003 AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE. MALKAS WAS AN INSTRUCTOR AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE ARTISTS CLUB IN 2005 AND 2010, TEACHING COURSES IN MIXED MEDIA WATERCOLOUR AND OILS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"FRANK... DOMINION AVE. FRANK SLIDE 1903" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"FRANK... DOMINION AVE. FRANK SLIDE 1903" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1984
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
29.6
Length
57.8
Width
2.1
Description
“FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – LANDSCAPE (RECEDING ROAD/MOUNTIAN), “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY”, 1984. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHT, UNDER A MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 4.6 CM LENGTH AND 16.5 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A RECEDING ROAD, LINED ON BOTH SIDES WITH BUILDINGS, FIGURES LOOKING OUT THE TOP WINDOWS. IN THE BACKGROUND LIES MOUNTAINS AND A ROCKSLIDE WHILE IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND TWO FIGURES RUN ACROSS THE ROAD. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY GREY WASHES, PALE GREEN, BLUE, YELLOW, AND ORANGE USED IN THE BUILDINGS. IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903 IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1984” IN BLACK INK, THE WORDS “FRANK SLIDE” WRITTEN WITH A THICKER PEN. THE FRAME IS A THIN SILVER METAL WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE MAT IS GREY, WITH A CUT OUT FRAME MEASURING 1.9CM WIDE AROUND THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING. THE PAINTING HAS CREASES THROUGH ITS CENTER, LIKELY FROM BEING FOLDED IN HALF BEFORE FRAMING.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” “[THIS PAINTING OF THE] FRANK SLIDE,” MCCAUGHERTY SAID – WHILE LOOKING AT THE PAINTING TITLED, “FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903,” “[IS ONE] I’M SURPRISED DIDN’T GO SOONER, BECAUSE IT’S A PART OF HISTORY AND QUITE A WELL-KNOWN PART.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031001
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE ARCH, SPRING CHINOOK" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE ARCH, SPRING CHINOOK" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1989
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
36.2
Length
47.7
Width
1.8
Description
“THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK - LANDSCAPE (SNOW BALL FIGHT), “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY”, 1989. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHTS, UNDER A TWO LAYERED MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 26.7 CM LENGTH AND 13.9 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THREE HOUSES UNDERNEATH A LAYER OF SNOW, WITH FIGURES IN THE FOREGROUND CREATING SNOWMEN AND HAVING A SNOWBALL FIGHT. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY BARE WHITE PAPER, WITH A BLUE, GREY WASH OF THE SKY. THE THREE HOUSES ARE YELLOW, PINK, AND BLUE, THE FIGURES PRIMARILY RED AND BLACK. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1989” IN BLACK INK. THE FRAME IS A THIN SILVER METAL WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE TOP MAT IS WHITE, WITH A YELLOW EDGE AND THE BOTTOM MAT PALE BLUE WITH A YELLOW EDGE. THE GLASS OF THE FRAME IS SCRATCHED, ABOVE THE MAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” “NOW THIS IS SOMETHING,” MCCAUGHERTY EXCLAIMED AS HE LOOKED AT THE WORK TITLED, “THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK,” “KIDS PLAYING OUT IN THE SNOW. [IT REMINDS ME OF] WHERE I WENT TO A SMALL SCHOOL. WE WENT OUTSIDE AND PLAYED IN THE SNOW. IT WAS EXPECTED THAT THAT WAS WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO. SCHOOLS WEREN’T THAT BIG. THIS WOULD BE GRADES ONE TO GRADE NINES IN THE SAME SCHOOL.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031002
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"EASTER SUNDAY 1907" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"EASTER SUNDAY 1907" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1982
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
40.5
Length
74
Width
2.7
Description
“EASTER SUNDAY 1907” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – LANDSCAPE (HOUSES/HORSE CARRIAGES), “IRENE E. MCCAUGHERTY”, 1982. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING, UNDER A TWO LAYERED MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 53.8 CM LENGTH AND 19 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A STREET, FRAMED BY SIDEWALKS, WITH A COLLECTION OF HOUSES IN THE BACKGROUND WITH A CHURCH WITHIN THEM. THE SCENE IS FULL OF FIGURES, MEN IN BLACK, WOMEN IN COLOURED DRESSES, AND FIVE HORSE CARRIAGES TRAVELLING THE ROAD. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY GREY AND GREEN-BLUE WASHES, WITH GREEN, YELLOW, BLUE, AND BROWN COLOURS IN THE LINE OF HOUSES IN THE MIDDLE. IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “EASTER SUNDAY 1907 IRENE E MCCAUGHERTY 1982” IN BLACK INK. THE WOODEN FRAME IS GREY AND A REDDISH-BROWN WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE MAT MIRRORS THE COLOUR SCHEME OF THE FRAME, PALE GREY ON THE TOP LEVEL, PALE REDDISH-BROWN ON THE BOTTOM. THE TWO PIECES OF THE FRAME THAT MEET AT THE TOP RIGHT HAND CORNER ARE SPLIT FROM EACH OTHER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” ONE WORK INCLUDED IN THE COLLECTION IS TITLED, “EASTER SUNDAY 1907.” OF THE PAINTING, MCCAUGHERTY DESCRIBED, “THIS IS AN EASTER SUNDAY [SCENE AND I IMAGINE IS TYPICAL OF] WHAT IT WAS ON THAT SUNDAY. PEOPLE DIDN’T HAVE CARS, SO IT WAS BUGGIES…” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031003
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

1178 records – page 1 of 59.