Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE
   MORE
  • All Records

110705 records – page 1 of 5536.

Other Name
GRAFLEX - SPEED GRAPHIC
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160046000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GRAFLEX - SPEED GRAPHIC
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, GLASS
No. Pieces
8
Height
11.5
Length
22
Width
21
Description
A. CAMERA: 22CM LONG X 21CM WIDE X 11.5CM DEEP. BLACK, SIMULATED LEATHER OUTER SHELL WITH CHROME SUPPORTS AND MECHANISMS FOR OPENING AND OPERATING CAMERA; VIEWFINDER AT THE TOP OF CAMERA. CAMERA HAS BELTED STRAP ON LEFT SIDE AND GRAFLEX KALART SYNCHRONIZED RANGE FINDER ATTACHED TO TOP AND RIGHT SIDE WITH PLATE AND INSCRIPTION READING: “FOCUSPOT, MADE IN U.S.A. BY KALART, PATS. #2337463, 2388714, 2397160.” RANGEFINDER HAS WHITE TEXT RUNNING DOWN BODY ON FRONT: “KALART SYNCHRONIZED RANGE FINDER.” BRACE FOR RANGE FINDER HAS A WHITE LABEL PRINTED WITH BLUE INK: “08209.” CAMERA OPENS OUT FRONT; CAMERA IS MISSING LENS. FRONT HAS “GRAFLEX” INSCRIBED ON SILVER PLATE AT TOP EDGE. SERIAL NO. 876128. CAMERA IS WORN ON SIDES AND BACK, AND OUTER SHELL FINISHING IS FLAKING ALONG BOTTOM EDGE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. BOX IS HEAVILY WORN AND STAINED, AND COLOUR IS RUBBED AND FADED FROM LID AND BOTTOM. OVERALL CONDITION FAIR-POOR. B. BOX: INCLUDES LID (22.5CM LONG X 23.6CM WIDE X 9.5CM DEEP), BOTTOM (22.3CM LONG X 23.4CM WIDE X 13.3CM DEEP), AND THREE INSERTS FOR PACKAGING ALL MADE FROM CARDBOARD. TOP IS BLUE WITH PRINTED LABEL: “SPEED GRAPHIC “45” GRAFLEX, MANUFACTURED BY GRAFLEX INC, ROCHESTER 8, NEW YORK, U.S.A.” AND STAMPED ON BOX “162 OPTAR SYNC” AND WRITTEN IN PENCIL “SE 97”. LID HAS TWO TAPED WHITE LABELS WITH BLUE INK ATTACHED READING: “3270” AND “08209”. LID HAS RIGHT SIDE DETACHED AT CORNER. BOTTOM OF BOX IS GOLD. NARROW INSERTS ARE COLOURED PEACH AND ARE TORN AND PUNCTURED. WIDER INSERT (21.4CM LONG X 22.5CM WIDE) HAS TRIANGLE CUT-OUTS FROM LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES, AND TOP IS PRINTED WITH THE TEXT “REMOVE THIS CARD, FILM HOLDER, UNDERNEATH” IN BLANK INK. WIDER INSERT HAS HANDWRITTEN INSCRIPTION IN RED INK: “VERN DECOUX”. C. SLIDE: 18.6CM LONG X 12.1CM WIDE X 1.3CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO SILVER HANDLES TO PULL SLIDE OUT OF HOLDER. SLIDE HAS TWO WHITE SQUARES ALONG TOP EDGE. “RITEWAY 12,” “4 X 5 GRAPHIC FILM HOLDER, NO 1284, U.S. PAT. 2450841. 2497270. 2552905. AND PATS. PEND., MADE IN U.S.A. BY GRAFLEX INC. ROCHESTER, N.Y.” SLIDE FACE HAS LIGHT GRIME, FINGERPRINTS AND DIRT AND MINOR SURFACE SCRATCHES. D. SLIDE: 18.6CM LONG X 12.1CM WIDE X 1.3CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO SILVER HANDLES TO PULL SLIDE OUT OF HOLDER. SLIDE HAS TWO WHITE SQUARES ALONG TOP EDGE. “4 X 5 GRAPHIC FILM HOLDER, NO 1284, U.S. PAT. 2450841. 2497270. 2552905. AND PATS. PEND., MADE IN U.S.A. BY GRAFLEX INC. ROCHESTER, N.Y.” BOTTOM CORNERS ARE WORN WITH COVERING PEELING. SLIDE FACE HAS MINOR SURFACE SCRATCHES AND LIGHT DUST. E. SLIDE: 18.6CM LONG X 12.1CM WIDE X 1.3CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO SILVER HANDLES TO PULL SLIDE OUT OF HOLDER. SLIDE HAS TWO WHITE SQUARES ALONG TOP EDGE AND RED-ORANGE DOT OVER TEXT: “4 X 5 PRESS FILM HOLDER, NO 1284, U.S. PAT. 2450841. 2497270. AND PATS. PEND., MADE IN U.S.A. BY GRAFLEX INC. ROCHESTER, N.Y.” CREAM TAPE FIXED TO CENTER OF BOTTOM EDGE. SLIDE FACE HAS DUST AND GRIME AND SURFACE SCRATCHES. F. FILM HOLDER: 22CM LONG X 12.3CM WIDE X 2CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC AND METAL HOLDER WITH SLIDE INSIDE; BLACK METAL HANDLE AT THE TOP OF HOLDER TO PULL SLIDE OUT. CHROME MECHANISM ALONG TOP EDGE FOR WINDNG FILM. FRONT HAS WHITE LABEL ON SURFACE AND WHITE TEXT ON FRONT PANEL: “GRAFMATIC FILM HOLDER, “45” GRAPHIC, MANUFACTURED BY GRAFLEX INC. ROCHESTER 8, NEW YORK, U.S.A.” BACK HAS TEXT ALONG TOP EDGE READING: “4 X 5 GRAFMATIC U.S.A. PAT. PENDING, MFD. BY GRAFLEX INC. ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S.A.” G. FILM HOLDER: 18CM LONG X 12CM WIDE X 4.2CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC AND METAL. FOR ROLLED FILM WITH A CHAMBER FOR LOADING IN ROLL FILM. RIGHT EDGE HAS SILVER HANDLE FOR PULLING OUT BACK SLIDE FROM HOLDER. TOP HAS CHROME MECHANISM FOR ROLLING FILM. FRONT OF CHAMBER HAS WHITE TEXT “ “23” GRAPHIC” AND INSCRIBED TEXT “GRAFLEX, 120 ROLL HOLDER.” INSIDE CHAMBER HAS WHITE TEXT “GRAFLEX INC., ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S. PAT. 2,588,054, & PAT. PENDING, MADE IN U.S.A.” BACK HAS INSCRIBED TEXT “4X5 GRAPHIC”. H. FLASH: SILVER FLASH ATTACHMENT FOR CAMERA; 43.5CM LONG X 19CM DIAMETER; CHROME REFLECTOR FIXED TO SILVER HANDLE WITH BLACK FITTINGS AT BASE AND CONNECTING TO REFLECTOR. HANDLE HAS TEXT “GRAFLEX” PRINTED IN BLACK AND HAS TEN SQUARE FITTINGS LABELLED: “EXTENSION,” SHUTTER,” “BATTERY,” REMOTE,” “SOLENOID.” BASE HAS TEXT INSCRIBED: “GRAFLEX SYNCHRONIZED BATTERY CASE, MANUFACTURED BY GRAFLEX INC., ROCHESTER 8, N.Y., U.S.A.” BACK OF FLASH HAS YELLOW TAPE ATTACHED TO BASE OF REFLECTOR, AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK, “360”.
Subjects
PHOTOGRAPHIC T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
IN 2017, BRUCE VERNON DECOUX OFFERED FOR DONATION A GRAFLEX CAMERA AND ACCESSORIES THAT HAD BEEN USED BY HIS FATHER, VERNON DECOUX, A WELL-KNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER FROM CROWSNEST PASS. ON MAY 23, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BRUCE VERNON DECOUX ABOUT HIS FATHER’S GRAFLEX CAMERA AND CAREER AS A PHOTOGRAPHER. DECOUX SPOKE TO HIS FATHER’S ACQUISITION OF THE GRAFLEX CAMERA, STATING, “…THIS WAS THE CAMERA THAT HE USED CONSISTENTLY, OVER MANY DECADES. THIS CAMERA WENT WITH HIM, TO PLACES THAT MOST PEOPLE WOULDN’T WANT TO GO, AND TO PLACES THAT PEOPLE ENJOYED GOING TO.” “I REMEMBER, WHEN HE PURCHASED THIS CAMERA, THIS WAS A VERY BIG ISSUE IN OUR FAMILY. MONEY WAS TIGHT. HE WAS TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER, WORKING FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. TO PURCHASE A CAMERA LIKE THIS WAS LIKE BUYING A BIG TRUCK…WHEN THIS CAMERA ARRIVED, IT WAS JUST A GREAT DAY IN THE FAMILY. HE TOOK THE CAMERA OUT AND HE STUDIED IT. I CAN REMEMBER HIM HAVING IT ON THE KITCHEN TABLE, AND APPROACHING IT VERY CAUTIOUSLY, BECAUSE IT WAS SOMETHING HE HAD NEVER HAD ANYTHING TO DO WITH – THIS WAS A DIFFERENT CONCEPT. THIS WASN’T ROLL FILM; THIS WAS SLIDES – 4 X 5.” “IT CAME FROM TORONTO. HE HAD TO BUY [IT] OUT OF TORONTO…I REMEMBER BEING FASCINATED BY THE QUALITY OF THE BOX THAT IT CAME IN. I HAD NEVER SEEN SUCH A STURDY-LOOKING BOX WITH A CAMERA. I DO REMEMBER WHEN HE TOOK THAT APART, IT WAS ALL WRAPPED UP IN PLASTIC; DIDN’T HAVE THE FOAM INSERT THAT CAMERAS NOWADAYS HAVE THAT YOU SET IT IN SO THEY ARE [STABLE]– IT WAS VERY HEAVILY WRAPPED, AND, AT THE TIME, HE DIDN’T HAVE A FLASH FOR IT. THAT WAS AN ATTACHMENT HE BOUGHT LATER...THEN HE BOUGHT DIFFERENT LENSES FOR IT – WIDE-ANGLE LENS…THE CAMERA WAS RARELY CLOSED. IT WAS ALWAYS LEFT OPEN. ONE OF THE REASONS HE LIKED THE CAMERA…[WAS] BECAUSE IT SIGNIFIED…WHAT HE WAS DOING. WHEN HE WOULD GO PLACES, AND PEOPLE WOULD SEE THAT CAMERA, IT WAS IMPOSING, AND IMPRESSIVE…PEOPLE WOULD SEE THAT AND SAY, “THAT’S A PHOTOGRAPHER THERE. I WONDER WHAT HE’S TAKING A PICTURE OF?” AND, SOMETIMES THEY WOULD GATHER AROUND, JUST TO SEE WHAT HE WAS GOING TO TAKE A PICTURE OF.” ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, HIS CROWSNEST PASS-BASED FATHER VERNON DEVELOPED AN ENTHUSIASM FOR PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE YEARS AFTER THE SECOND WORLD WAR. ACCORDING TO SON BRUCE, “I REMEMBER, WHEN MY FATHER DECIDED TO STOP WORKING, BECAUSE HE DID WORK AT THE MINE…BUT, HE HAD THIS OPPORTUNITY, BECAUSE HE COULD WRITE QUITE WELL…THIS OPPORTUNITY CAME TO WORK, WITH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND IT WAS THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THAT REALLY GAVE HIM HIS START. HE WORKED WITH THEM, AND HE ALSO ACTED, OVER TIME…AS THE CIRCULATION MANAGER, WHICH MEANT HE MANAGED ALL THE PAPERBOYS IN THE COMMUNITY…HE MADE SURE THE PAPERS WERE DELIVERED. HE DID PRINTING – WENT TO THE LOCAL BUSINESSES IN TOWN, AND SOLICITED PRINTING FROM THEM, FOR THEIR BUSINESSES, SO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS REALLY A THREE-PRONGED THING. THERE WAS THE PRINTING; THERE WAS THE NEWS, AND PHOTOGRAPHY; AND THERE WAS THE CIRCULATION ASPECT…THE PHOTOGRAPHY JUST EVOLVED, AS TIME WENT ON. HE KNEW HE HAD TO EVOLVE THAT…” “HE FIRST STARTED OUT [WHEN] HE BOUGHT A SMALL SECOND-HAND ROLIFLEX, 2 ¼ X 2 ¼. HE TOOK PICTURES WITH THAT, AND THAT WAS A ROLL CAMERA (ROLL FILM). HE’D TAKE IT DOWN TO A LOCAL FELLOW WHO WOULD DEVELOP THEM…HE MOVED TO LEARNING HOW TO DEVELOP HIS OWN, AND HE FOUND THAT AWKWARD, DEVELOPING THOSE SMALL FILMS….HE BUILT HIMSELF, IN THIS NEW HOUSE…A DARK-ROOM. SLOWLY HE PURCHASED THE CHEMICALS, AND LEARNED HOW TO DO THIS, FROM THE FELLOW DOWNTOWN. THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS. HE ALSO SPOKE TO ANOTHER FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE – [THOMAS] GUSHUL. HE JUST LIVED…3 BLOCKS DOWN. HE GOT INFORMATION FROM HIM, AND THEY TALKED BACK AND FORTH.” “HE STARTED HIS PHOTOGRAPHY BUSINESS IN THE EARLY ‘50S…HE STARTED TAKING WEDDING PICTURES, AND HE QUICKLY REALIZED THAT THE FORMAT OF THE 2 ¼ X 2 ¼, RELATIVE TO THE LENGTH OF THE ROOM, DIDN’T WORK FOR LARGE WEDDINGS… ALMOST SIMULTANEOUSLY PEOPLE BEGAN TO REQUEST THAT HE TAKE THEIR WEDDING RECEPTION, COMMUNION, GRADUATION, BABY PICTURES AS WELL AS COMMERCIAL MINING, POLICE AND PASSPORT PICTURES.” “HE STARTED USING THAT [GRAFLEX] CAMERA…FIRST FOR WEDDINGS, BUT HE QUICKLY LEARNED THAT THAT WAS THE CAMERA TO USE FOR TAKING PICTURES OF LOCAL DISASTERS, AND WE HAD MANY OF THEM. THE RCMP AND HIM FORMED A COALITION. WHENEVER THERE WAS AN ACCIDENT, HE’D GET A PHONE CALL, SOMETIMES 3 O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING, BECAUSE, IN THOSE DAYS, THE RCMP AND THE LOCAL POLICE…DIDN’T HAVE THE SKILLS, OR THE EQUIPMENT, TO TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS. SOME OF THEM MAY HAVE HAD A SMALL 35, BUT A SMALL 35 IN THE MIDDLE OF A RAINY NIGHT, AT 3 IN THE MORNING, DOESN’T DO YOU MUCH GOOD FOR EVIDENTIAL PICTURES, SO THEY WOULD CALL HIM. HE WOULD GO WITH THIS CAMERA, BECAUSE IT PACKED THE POWER…ON A 4 X 5 NEGATIVE, [THE IMAGES] WERE ABSOLUTELY SHARP. THOSE PICTURES COULD BE BLOWN UP 10 TIMES, AND THEY WERE CRYSTAL-CLEAR…HE REALLY STROVE TO TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS THAT WERE ABSOLUTELY SHARP.” “HIS INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY WAS SPURRED BY HIS ASSOCIATION WITH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THEY NEEDED PICTURES, BECAUSE, AT THAT TIME, THIS WAS A THRIVING, BOOMING AREA, AND THERE WERE MANY PHOTOGRAPHS TO BE TAKEN – TRAIN DERAILMENTS, TRUCK ACCIDENTS, MINE ACCIDENTS, AND THE AREA WAS BOOMING…THERE WAS A LOT OF BUILDING GOING ON…THIS WAS ALL FODDER FOR A WEEKLY COLUMN THAT HE WROTE FOR…ALMOST 30 YEARS, FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, CALLED ‘THE PASS WORDS’, OR THE ‘CROWSNEST PASS BUREAU’, AND HE NEEDED PHOTOGRAPHS TO BACK THAT UP.” “THAT FALLS OFF [IN THE 1970S]. HE NO LONGER WRITES HIS COLUMN, AND HE NO LONGER DOES THE PAPERBOYS. THEY ACTUALLY STATIONED A PERSON RIGHT HERE IN THE PASS TO LOOK AFTER THAT, AND THEN, AFTERWARDS, THEY STOPPED DELIVERING THE PAPER. THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD JUST KIND OF FADED OUT IN THE PASS. HIS COLUMN – A LOT OF PEOPLE DIDN’T READ IT ANYMORE, BECAUSE…THERE WERE 2 PAPERS. YOU COULD READ THE PASS HERALD, WHICH IS STILL RUNNING, OR YOU COULD READ THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD…PEOPLE BOUGHT BOTH, BECAUSE THEY WERE BOTH ABOUT THE SAME PRICE. THEY READ THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD FOR THAT COLUMN ‘THE CROWSNEST PASS BUREAU’ TO FIND OUT WHAT WAS HAPPENING HERE. AS A REPORTER, HIS CONCEPT WAS, “YOU REPORT WHAT IS NEW.” I REMEMBER HIM ALWAYS TELLING ME, “YOUR OWN OPINION HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH WHAT YOU ARE REPORTING. YOU REPORT THE FACTS.”” “HE NEVER GOT PAID FOR THE PASS HERALD. HE…REGARDED THAT AS HIS, “THIS IS OUR LOCAL PAPER”…THEY HAD A LACK OF PHOTOGRAPHERS, TOO, AND A LACK OF PEOPLE TO CONTRIBUTE, SO HE WOULD HELP OUT BY GIVING THEM…A PICTURE A WEEK TO THE PASS HERALD, SOMETHING HE HAD TAKEN A PICTURE OF…IT WAS CALLED ‘PAST MEMORIES’ – JUST PICK OUT AN ODD NEGATIVE; GIVE IT TO THEM; AND THEY’D PRINT IT IN THE PASS HERALD. EVERY WEEK FOR 20 YEARS…HE NEVER RAN OUT OF THINGS TO GIVE THEM.” “THE BUSINESS JUST GREW AND GREW. THE CAMERA WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF IT BECAUSE, EVEN AT THE FESTIVAL PICTURES, HE WOULD BE THERE WITH THAT BIG CAMERA, AND PEOPLE SAW THE CAMERA, AND THEY IMMEDIATELY WOULD REACT TO IT. “OH, HE’S GOING TO TAKE A PICTURE. LET’S GET OUT OF HERE.” ALL HE’D HAVE TO DO WAS BRING THE PICTURE UP, AND PEOPLE WOULD CLEAR AWAY, WHATEVER HE WANTED TO TAKE THE PICTURE OF. HE OFTEN COMMENTED ON THAT. IT’S A SYMBOL THAT BUSINESS IS BEING DONE HERE – WE’RE TAKING A PHOTOGRAPH FOR POSTERITY HERE. GET OUT OF THE WAY, OR GET IN IT!” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS OWN CONNECTIONS AND MEMORIES OF THE CAMERA, BRUCE DECOUX RECALLED, “THE CAMERA WAS A MILESTONE INSTRUMENT THAT IMPACTED OUR FAMILY. THAT CAMERA MADE A LIVING FOR OUR FAMILY…HE TOOK A BIG CHANCE BUYING IT. IT NEVER BROKE DOWN. HE NEVER HAD A PROBLEM WITH IT…I THINK IT WAS THE QUALITY OF THE CAMERA, AND HE WAS METICULOUS ABOUT HIS [CARE FOT IT]…KEPT EVERYTHING PERFECTLY CLEAN. IT WAS A FINE INSTRUMENT. IT’S OFTEN REFERRED TO AS ‘THE WORKHORSE.’ I STILL THINK BACK, IF I’M WATCHING A NEW MOVIE MADE TO LOOK LIKE AN OLD MOVIE, OR AN OLD MOVIE, IF YOU SEE THE PHOTOGRAPHERS IN IT, WITH THEIR BIG FLASH, I REMEMBER MY DAD DOING THE SAME THING TAKING THOSE PICTURES.” “I WAS WITH HIM AFTER THE MICHEL MINE EXPLOSION, WHEN THOSE MINERS HAD BEEN TRAPPED UNDERGROUND FOR A FEW DAYS…WHEN THEY RESCUED THEM – WHEN THEY CAME OUT OF THERE – HE TOOK A PICTURE WITH THAT CAMERA, AND IT WAS QUITE A WELL-KNOWN PICTURE.” “I WOULD HAVE LIKED TO HAVE KEPT ALL OF HIS CAMERAS, BECAUSE HE CHERISHED THEM ALL; BUT YOU CAN ONLY KEEP SO MUCH…THAT CAMERA RECORDED A SIGNIFICANT TWO OR THREE DECADES OF HISTORY IN THE CROWSNEST PASS, AND THE AREA…HE’S TAKEN PICTURES, WITH THAT CAMERA, OF PIERRE TRUDEAU – TRUDEAU WAS HERE; CAME OVER TO THE HOUSE; HAD SUPPER WITH MY MOM AND DAD. THEY TALKED CAMERAS…LEICA CAMERAS. TRUDEAU LIKED LEICA’S. HE’S TAKEN PICTURES OF PETER LOUGHEED, WITH THAT CAMERA. HE’S TAKEN PICTURES OF STOMPIN’ TOM CONNORS, WITH THAT CAMERA. I CAN REMEMBER ONE TIME HE WENT TO THE UKRAINIAN DANCE FESTIVAL, AND, IN COLEMAN, THEY USED TO HAVE THESE DANCE FESTIVALS IN THE POLISH HALL, AND…HE WAS…A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH GOVERNMENT, AND MY DAD TOOK PICTURES OF HIM, AND HE REALLY WANTED PICTURES OF HIM AND THOSE DANCERS. HE TOOK IT WITH THAT [GRAFLEX] CAMERA, AND I CAN REMEMBER MY DAD WORKING LATE THAT NIGHT; COMING HOME; DEVELOPING THE NEGATIVES, AND MAKING CONTACT PRINTS, AND A COUPLE OF ENLARGED PRINTS FOR THIS FELLOW…MY DAD TOLD HIM, “PICTURES WILL BE READY FOR YOU TOMORROW AT 10:00,”…THE FELLOW…CAME INTO THE HOUSE, AND MY DAD HAD THE PICTURES READY; HE HAD A CUP OF COFFEE, AND THEN HE LEFT. HE GAVE MY DAD A GIFT WHEN HE LEFT. AFTER MY MOM AND DAD PASSED AWAY, I WAS CLEANING OUT THE BASEMENT, AND HERE’S THIS BOTTLE OF BRANDY THIS FELLOW GAVE HIM – PEACH BRANDY – AND, IT WAS OLD WHEN HE GAVE IT TO HIM…I FIGURED OUT THAT IT MUST BE CLOSE TO 100 YEARS OLD. I STILL HAVE IT DOWNSTAIRS HERE IN THE ORIGINAL BOX THAT HE GAVE IT TO HIM…THE CAMERA WAS THERE WHENEVER.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170046000-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS.
Catalogue Number
P20160046000
Acquisition Date
2016-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LAERDAL FAMILY TRAINING KIT
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160032000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LAERDAL FAMILY TRAINING KIT
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
9
Length
61.5
Width
32.7
Diameter
16
Description
A. CARDBOARD AND PLASTIC CPR TRAINING MANNEQUIN: 44CM LONG X 12CM WIDE X 22.5CM DEEP. MANNEQUIN FOR SIMULATING CPR TRAINING; PEACH CARDBOARD BASE WITH PINK PLASTIC MODELED FACE AT ONE END, A WHITE PLASTIC BAG IN THE CENTER BELOW THE “NECK” AND A WHITE PLASTIC ROUND BELLOW WITH A BLACK CIRCLE ON SURFACE AT THE END. PLASTIC FACE IS FIXED TO CARDBOARD WITH OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC FITTINGS. CARDBOARD NECK HAS PERFORATED ARROWS ON SIDES TO INDICATE RAISING THE CARDBOARD PIECE INTO THE NECK. BOTTOM OF BELLOW HAS GREY PLASTIC DIAL TO TURN TO “ON” AND “OFF” POSITIONS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CARDBOARD BOX: 61.5CM LONG X 32.7CM WIDE X 16 CM DEEP. PALE WHITE/CREAM CARDBOARD BOX WITH BLACK AND RED TEXT ALONG SIDES READING “LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER.” BOTTOM EDGE HAS TEXT “OPEN OTHER END” PRINTED IN BLACK; TOP EDGE HAS TEXT “CONTENTS: 1 FAMILY CPR TRAINER AND ACCESS, 1 VIDEO TAPE: “AN INTRODUCTION TO LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER”, 1 INTRODUCTION SHEET, RECOMMENDED FOR USE DURING OR AFTER AN AUTHORIZED CPR TRAINING PROGRAM. LAERDAL MEDICAL CORPORATION, ONE LABRIOLA COURT, ARMONK, NY 10504, 800-648-1851.” FRONT SIDES HAVE GREYSCALE IMAGES OF A WOMAN LEANING OVER A LAERDAL CPR TRAINING MANNEQUIN. YELLOW AND WHITE TAPE ALONG TOP AND BOTTOM SIDES. FRONT SIDE HAS TEXT WRITTEN ON IN BLUE INK “BONNIE WILLIAMS”. BOX IS OPEN AT ONE END; BOX IS CREASED ALONG BOTTOM EDGE AND IS DISCOLORED AND FADED. BOX IS IN OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. C. MANUAL, “LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER”: 28.2CM LONG X 43CM WIDE. INSTRUCTION SHEET FOR ASSEMBLING “LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER.” WHITE PAPER WITH BLACK AND RED TEXT AND IMAGES FOR INSTRUCTIONS, DOUBLE-SIDED. FRONT HAS “LAERDAL” LOGO IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. TEXT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE READS, “LCI PART NO. FT2338, REV 12/15/92, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] 1992, LAERDAL MEDICAL CORP., P.O. BOX 190, ONE LABRIOLA COURT, ARMONK, NY 10504, CUSTOMER SERVICE: 800-648-1851, LAERDAL MEDICAL CANADA LTD., 50 IRONSIDE CRES. UNIT NO. 1, SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, M1X1G4, CUSTOMER SERVICE: 800-265-9987, PATENT PENDING.” INSTRUCTION SHEET IS SEVERELY FOLDED, AND BENT IN AT CORNERS; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. D. PLASTIC BAG: 12.5CM LONG X 12.3CM WIDE X 2.5CM DEEP. WHITE PLASTIC BAG (“LUNG”) CONTAINED IN UNOPENED PLASTIC PACKAGING. PLASTIC PACKAGING HAS BLACK TEXT “LAERDAL, HELPING SAVE LIVES” AND IMAGE OF TWO FIGURES, ONE BEING BANDAGED (“LAERDAL” LOGO). INSIDE PACKAGING ON SURFACE OF BAG INSIDE ARE FIVE SMALL, CIRCULAR WHITE COTTON PADS. PLASTIC PACKAGING IS UNOPENED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. E. DISINFECTANT WIPES, “RESUSCI”: 16CM WIDE X 8.8CM LONG. WIPES CONTAINED IN PACKETS WITHIN PLASTIC CASING; PLASTIC CASING IS RIPPED AT TOP RIGHT CORNER AND DOWN RIGHT SIDE; FOUR WIPES PACKETS ARE CONTAINED. PACKETS HAVE RED AND BLACK LABELS WITH THE IMAGE OF A WIPE CLEANING A MANNEQUIN MOUTH AND TEXT “RESUSCI MANIKIN WIPE, CONTAINS 1 PAD SOAKED IN 70% ETHYL ALCOHOL, CAT. NO.: 15 24 00, 50 EA., CAT. NO.: 15 24 01, 1200 EA.” BACKS OF PACKETS HAVE 4-STEP DIRECTIONS TO CLEAN MANNEQUIN; LAERDAL LOGO PRINTED IN BLACK IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER OF THE PACKET, TEXT ALONG TOP LEFT EDGE READING “MADE IN NORWAY”. RIGHT PACKETS ARE BENT IN AT TOP RIGHT CORNER WHERE PLASTIC PACKAGING IS OPENED; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. G. VIDEO CASSETTE TAPE: 18.8CM LONG X 10.3CM WIDE X 2.5CM DEEP. BLACK PLASTIC VIDEO CASSETTE TAPE; FRONT HAS TWO CLEAR PANELS TO SEE BLACK RIBBON ON WHITE PLASTIC SPOOL; FRONT HAS WHITE LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “AN INTRODUCTION TO YOUR LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER, APPROXIMATE RUNNING TIME: 13 MINUTES, COPYRIGHT 1992, LAERDAL MEDICAL CORPORATION, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, PATENT PENDING, ONE LABRIOLA COURT ARMONK, N.Y. 10504, 1 (800) 431-1055” WITH BLACK AND RED “LAERDAL” LOGO IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. FRONT HAS TEXT INSCRIBED ALONG TOP EDGE OF CASSETTE: “INSERT THIS SIDE INTO RECORDER, DO NOT TOUCH THE TAPE INSIDE, VHS.” BACK HAS TWO WHITE PLASTIC SPOOLS EMBEDDED. TAPE IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. F. CASE FOR VIDEO CASSETTE TAPE: 19CM LONG X 10.6CM WIDE X 2.7CM DEEP. WHITE CARDBOARD PACKAGING; FRONT HAS BLACK AND RED TEXT READING “AN INTRODUCTION TO YOUR LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER” AND IMAGES OF PEOPLE GATHERED AROUND USING THE CPR TRAINERS; SIDES HAVE BLACK AND WHITE TEXT READING “AN INTRODUCTION TO YOUR LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER” AND A RED AND BLACK LAERDAL COMPANY LOGO WITH MOTTO “HELPING SAVE LIVES”; BACK HAS TEXT IN BLACK “THIS VIDEO CONTAINS SOLOR CODED SECTIONS ON THE FOLLOWING:” AND RED, BLUE AND YELLOW BANNERS WITH BLACK TEXT READING: ASSEMBLY, PRACTICING CPR, TAKING CARE OF YOUR LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER”, WITH BLACK TEXT BELOW: “CPR CAN HELP SAVE THE LIFE OF SOMEONE YOU LOVE. FREQUENT PRACTICE OF THESE SKILLS WILL KEEP YOU PREPARED JUST IN CASE. THIS VIDEO IS DESIGNED TO HELP YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF THE LAERDAL FAMILY CPR TRAINER. PRACTICE OFTEN AND ENCOURAGE FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO LEARN CPR TOO. THIS VIDEO DOES NOT TAKE THE PLACE OF A FORMAL CPR TRAINING COURSE.” BACK HAS BLACK TEXT IN BOTTOM LEFT CORNER “[COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] 1992 LAERDAL MEDICAL CORPORATION, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED” WITH RED AND BLACK “LAERDAL” LOGO IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. CASE IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION AND SHOWS MINOR WEAR. H. PLASTIC BAG: 59CM LONG X 32CM WIDE. CLEAR PLASTIC BAG WITH OPENING AT ONE END. BAG IS CRINKLED AND CREASED. BAG IN OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. I. CARDBOARD BODY FOR CPR TRAINING MANNEQUIN: 39CM LONG X 32.7CM WIDE X 12.7CM DEEP. PEACH CARDBOARD TORSO; “LAERDAL” LOGO PRINTED IN BLACK INK ON THE FRONT LEFT SIDE; OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC STRAP ON FRONT LEFT SIDE. FRONT OF THE TORSO HAS OUTLINE OF RIBS AND PRINTED PURPLE CIRCLES FOR NIPPLES, AND PERFORATED EDGE TO FOLD BENEATH OUTLINED RIBCAGE. CARDBOARD TORSO HAS AN OPENING AT THE BASE, OPENING AT THE TOP BETWEEN CARDBOARD TO FORM NECK AND SHOULDERS, AND AN OPENING AT THE BACK. CARDBOARD SHOWS MINOR SIGN OF WEAR; BACK HAS GRIME SPOT LOWER RIGHT OF OPENING; FRONT AND SIDES HAVE GRIME AND INK STAINS ON SURFACE, AND FRONT SHOWS SIGNS OF WORN PAINT ON CARDBOARD AROUND RIBS AND LOWER EDGE. CARDBOARD AT BACK OF THE NECK OPENING IS FOLDED BACK ALONG UPPER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
ON OCTOBER 19, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWED BONNIE JAMES ABOUT HER DONATION OF A CPR TRAINING KIT TO THE MUSEUM. JAMES WORKED AS A LIFEGUARD, A FIRST AID INSTRUCTOR WITH ST. JOHN’S AMBULANCE, AND AT LETHBRIDGE EMS. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE CRP TRAINER, JAMES RECALLED, “I USED TO TEACH FOR ST. JOHN AMBULANCE. THAT WAS THE BEGINNING OF MY CAREER PATH…WE HAD A CONTEST…OF SOME SORT - AND THIS WAS ONE OF THE ITEMS THAT WAS GIVEN AWAY, AND SO, AS AN INSTRUCTOR, I WAS IN THE CONTEST – SO, THAT WAS MY PRIZE FROM THEM.” “[THE CONTEST] WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘90S…SOMEWHERE BETWEEN ‘90 TO ’93-ISH.” “THIS IS ST. JOHN AMBULANCE FROM LETHBRIDGE. THEY USED TO BE UP ON 2ND AVENUE NORTH IN THE HOMESTEAD VILLAGE MALL BUILDING THERE, AND THAT’S WHERE WE FIRST STARTED TAKING CLASSES, AND WHERE I TOOK MY INSTRUCTOR COURSE.” “I USED IT A FEW TIMES…MORE LIKE A RE-CERTIFICATION FOR SOME FRIENDS THAT NEEDED, WHO SAID “I NEED MY CPR REDONE. CAN YOU DO IT?” WE USED IT MORE AS THAT HANDS-ON SIMULATOR. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE USED TO TEACH WAS THAT, PEOPLE, EVEN IN THE TIME THAT WE WERE DOING MOUTH-TO-MOUTH TYPE THING, PEOPLE DIDN’T FEEL COMFORTABLE IN THE CLASS, YOU’D JUST SAY “OH, JUST SIMULATE”. YOU’D JUST LEAN DOWN BESIDE THEM AND SAY “BLOW” INSTEAD OF ACTUALLY BLOWING INTO THE MOUTH OF THE DOLL. THIS ONE WAS USED MORE IN THAT CONTEXT. IT WAS NEVER A FULL-USE DUMMY, I GUESS YOU’D CALL IT.” JAMES SPOKE ABOUT THE CHANGE IN THE RESUSCITATION TRAINING KITS, NOTING, “WE HAD SOME DIFFERENT TOOLS, JUST BECAUSE THIS ONE IS MORE…LIGHT USE. THEY CALLED IT A FAMILY TRAINER. THERE’S…CARDBOARD IN THE FACE DEFINITELY. THEY WERE CALLED ‘RESUSCI-ANNIE’S’ BACK THEN. THE FACE WAS MADE AFTER A GIRL NAMED ‘ANNIE,’ AND THEY ALL LOOKED THE SAME…A LOT OF THEM WERE FULL-BODY DOLLS… THEN THEY WERE COMING OUT WITH, TOWARDS THE END, WHEN I WAS TEACHING, THEY WERE CALLED ACTAR’S, AND THEY WERE THESE PLASTIC, ROBOTIC-LOOKING GENERIC THINGS THAT WEREN’T NEARLY AS REALISTIC-LOOKING. FOR DURABILITY AND COST, THEY FELT THEY GOT THE SAME TRAINING VALUE OUT OF IT, BUT THEY KIND OF GOT AWAY. THE OTHER REASON THAT THEY CHANGED WAS BECAUSE EVERY TIME THEY USED ‘ANNIE’S’ FACE, THEY HAD TO PAY AN HONORARIUM BACK…BECAUSE THEY WERE USING HER LIKENESS.” “THAT BECAME ONE OF THE OTHER THINGS, IN THE DAY AND AGE OF TALKING ABOUT COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, AND WORRIES ABOUT STERILIZATION…BECAUSE THESE DOLLS – THIS HAS A PLASTIC FACE, BUT YOU WOULD HAVE TO HAVE IT ALL CLEANED OFF. WE WERE CHANGING LUNGS…THE ACTAR’S WERE JUST HARD PLASTIC. YOU JUST CHUCKED THEM IN THE BLEACH, AND THEY WERE CLEAN, AND YOU WENT ON…THEY CAME IN WHAT THEY CALLED SQUADRONS. A SQUADRON WAS A BAG OF EIGHT, SO EVERYBODY IN THE CLASS HAD THEIR OWN DOLL, BECAUSE, BACK THEN, WE DID MOUTH-TO-MOUTH, AND THEY HAD TO ACTUALLY BLOW INTO THE DOLL, SO IT WAS CONTAMINATED BY THAT PERSON. AT THE END OF THE CLASS, AT THE END OF THE DAY, US INSTRUCTORS WOULD JUST GO AND CLEAN THEM ALL…IF YOU ARE ACTUALLY GOING TO USE [THIS DOLL]…YOU CAN SIMULATE…BUT IF IT WAS, SAY, A FAMILY, OR SOMEBODY THAT YOU WEREN’T WORRIED ABOUT CONTAMINATION, IT WASN’T AS BIG A DEAL TO HAVE TO GENTLY CLEAN, INSTEAD OF HAVING TO KIND OF DO THE DEEP CLEAN.” MACLEAN ASKED JAMES WHY SHE HAD CHOSEN TO RETAIN AND DONATE THE TRAINING KIT TO THE MUSEUM, AND JAMES ELABORATED, “IT’S SOMEWHAT, WHAT WE CALL ARCHAIC NOW. WE HAVE EVERYTHING THAT IS ELECTRONIC…AND THIS IS A SIMPLE MODEL. CPR HAS BEEN EFFECTIVE FOR YEARS…AND THIS IS JUST A WAY THAT THEY HAD PUT OUT FOR TEACHING CPR, AND PRACTICING CPR, TO THE PUBLIC SO, JUST THINKING OF THE HISTORY OF THE MUSEUM AS THE HOSPITAL, THAT KIND OF TRAINING – THAT IT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT FOR KIDS TO SEE IT, IN THE ELECTRONIC AGE, THAT’S WHAT WE USED TO DO; THAT’S HOW WE USED TO PRACTICE AND LEARN THINGS,” “I’M TOO MUCH OF A COLLECTOR. SOME OF IT JUST DIDN’T SEEM LIKE IT SHOULD BE JUST THROWN AWAY. IT WAS NEAT; IT WAS PART OF SOMETHING THAT I DID…IT WAS PART OF MY PAST. I GUESS I THOUGHT, MAYBE I’LL USE IT AGAIN. I TAUGHT UNTIL…IT’S PROBABLY BEEN 7 OR 8 YEARS SINCE I’VE TAUGHT, SO UNTIL THAT POINT…THE IDEA [WITH THE LAERDAL TRAINING KITS WAS]…IF PEOPLE HAVE THEM AT HOME, THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE MORE OFTEN, INSTEAD OF THE JUST ONCE A YEAR THEY COME TO DO THE COURSE.” “I JUST THOUGHT, THIS IS A PART OF HOW THINGS WERE, WHEN I WAS A YOUNG ADULT. THEY ARE SO DIFFERENT NOW, AND THEY WILL BE SO MUCH MORE DIFFERENT IN ANOTHER 15-20-30 YEARS…NOW WE KNOW THAT CPR IS MORE EFFECTIVE THAN ANYTHING. CPR IS MORE EFFECTIVE THAN THE DRUGS THAT WE GIVE AT WORK, SO WHEN IT COMES TO SAVING SOMEONE’S LIFE, WHO IS IN ARREST, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING THAT CAN BE DONE…THE SKILL IS SOMETHING THAT HAS KIND OF STOOD THE TEST OF TIME. IT’S GONE IN AND OUT OF FAVOR, BUT IT’S NICE NOW, WITH ALL THE SCIENCE-BASED STUFF THAT WE HAVE, AND THE COMMUNICATION WORLD-WIDE, AND THE INTERACTION, THAT THEY CAN NOW GO BACK NOW AND SAY “YEAH, WE KNOW THIS WORKS.” THIS IS THE #1 THING THAT WORKS, SO THIS IS STILL REALLY IMPORTANT FOR EVERYONE TO LEARN, OR AS MANY PEOPLE AS WE CAN, TO TRY TO GET TO LEARN HOW TO DO THIS. BECAUSE THIS IS KIND OF THE “BE ALL: END ALL”…ALL OUR FANCY MACHINES AND EVERYTHING HELP, BUT THE SIMPLE ACT OF ONE PERSON PUSHING ON ANOTHER PERSON’S CHEST, TO MOVE SOME BLOOD, IS THE BEST THING.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160032000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160032000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20160022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
NYLON, POLYESTER, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
73
Width
53
Description
GREEN WINDBREAKER JACKET WITH EMBROIDERED BADGE ON THE CHEST READING “KOREA VETERANS ASSOCIATION CANADA” IN GOLD THREAD, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF DETAILING AND A RED LOGO IN THE CENTER OF THE SHIELD; BADGE ON THE LEFT SHOULDER SHOWS A SHIELD WITH GOLD THREAD EDGING ALONG A FELT SHIELD WITH A BRASS CROWN AND SILVER TEXT “COMMONWEALTH.” RIGHT SHOULDER HAS RED FELT BADGE WITH RED EMBROIDERED EDGING, WITH BRASS-COLOURED LAUREL LEAVES SURROUNDING A MAPLE LEAF INSIDE AND BRASS-COLOURED TEXT “CANADA.” FRONT LEFT BREAST OF JACKET HAS A RED FELT POPPY PINNED WITH A GREEN METAL CENTER. JACKET HAS TWO SILVER SNAPS COVERED IN GREEN PLASTIC AT THE COLLAR. ZIPPER RUNS LENGTH OF JACKET CHEST. SLEEVES AND WAIST ARE ELASTIC. JACKET HAS TWO POCKETS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES AT WAIST LINED WITH WHITE COTTON. INSIDE OF JACKET IS BLACK. JACKET HAS WHITE TAGS INSIDE AT COLLAR IN RED, BLUE AND BLACK TEXT “CORPORATE CLOTHING BY AVON SPORTSWEAR TORONTO, XXL/M,” AND BILINGUAL ENGLISH/FRENCH COLLAR TAG IN BLACK TEXT “#30, OUTER SHELL 100% NYLON, EXCLUSIVE OF TRIMMING, CA 00368, MADE IN CANADA, DRY CLEAN ONLY,” AND TAG ON LOWER LEFT INSIDE WITH BLACK TEXT “C-36.” COLLAR AND INSIDE OF JACKET HAS DIRT STAINING AND SOILING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON OCTOBER 17, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ERIC MORRIS ABOUT HIS ASSOCIATION WITH THE KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, PROMPTED BY THE DONATION OF A KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBER JACKET TO THE MUSEUM BY DWAYNE GOLDIE. THE JACKET ORIGINALLY BELONGED TO BILL RAMAGE OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. MACLEAN ASKED MORRIS ABOUT THE JACKET AND IF HE RECOGNIZED THE GARMENT, AND MORRIS RECALLED, “THIS IS THE GREEN DRESS JACKET THAT WE’RE ALL WEARING IN THE ASSOCIATION…EVERY DAY WEAR SORT OF THING.” “[THE BADGES ARE THE] PHANTOM AND THAT’S CANADA AS WELL. [EVERYONE WOULD HAVE THESE BADGES ON THEIR JACKETS] BASICALLY. BUT NOT THAT COLOUR. [YOU WOULDN’T BUY THE JACKET WITH THE BADGES ON IT] THERE IS A NATIONAL KIT SHOP [TO BUY BADGES]…YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO GET THE BADGES FROM THEM BUT THEY’RE NOT THESE…THAT’S JUST GOT THE CREST. …HE GOT THEM [THE SHOULDER BADGES] IN KOREA. THEY’RE PROBABLY THE FIRST ONES THAT WERE MADE BECAUSE ALL THE REFLECTING IS CANADA.” “[THE] MEDALS ARE STILL AVAILABLE FROM THE KIT SHOP. NOT MUCH ELSE.” “NOT MANY [OF THE LETHBRIDGE GUYS HAD OUTER SHELL JACKETS LIKE THIS]. BASICALLY [JUST] THE BLAZER. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF BILL RAMAGE, MORRIS SHARED, “I DIDN’T SEE TOO MUCH OF HIM [BILL RAMAGE]…HE WAS A MEMBER OF OUR ORGANIZATION. [HE WAS] ACTIVE. SUPPORTIVE. GOOD GUY. I DIDN’T SEE TOO MUCH OF HIM. HE HAD A SENSE OF HUMOUR.” MORRIS SHARED HIS MEMORIES OF HIS OWN TIME IN THE KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “I WAS PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY FOR QUITE A FEW YEARS AND I’M A LIFETIME MEMBER OF KVA…THERE’S MANY KOREAN VETERANS IN THIS PART OF ALBERTA…WE HAD A MEDAL PRESENTATION LAST YEAR, THERE [WERE] ONE HUNDRED AND TEN FROM SOUTHERN ALBERTA WE INVITED TO IT. THAT’S ANYWHERE FROM SOUTHERN ALBERTA A LOT OF THEM ARE MEMBERS BUT NOT MEMBERS OF THE UNIT. THEY’RE MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL SAME AS I AM NOW.” “WE WERE A FAIRLY ACTIVE UNIT…WE HAD OUR PARADES AND CEREMONIES. WE ALSO WORKED AT THE LOCAL BINGO HALL ONCE EVERY YEAR AND FROM THAT WE USED TO GET OVER THIRTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR, WHICH OF COURSE ALL WE GOT OUT OF IT WAS ABOUT FIVE THOUSAND. WE HAD TO DISTRIBUTE THE REMAINDER TO DESERVING ORGANIZATIONS WITHIN OUR IMMEDIATE AREA WHICH WE DID. THE OTHER MEMBERS ARE STILL YOU KNOW, GOING, NOT IN GOOD HEALTH MOST OF THEM BUT THEY’RE STILL GOING. “THE LEGION [IS WHERE WE MET]. EVERYTHING OPERATED OUT OF THERE. THE LEGION DOES SUPPORT THEM [KOREA VETERAN’S ASSOCIATIONS ACROSS CANADA], [AS] MEETING PLACES.” “WE PARADED THERE [CITY HALL] ON REMEMBRANCE DAY. THAT WAS OUR PRIMARY PARADE AND IT WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL TO ALL. [IT WAS] PRETTY HARD TO GET THESE OLD GUYS OUT TO PARADE…A LOT OF THOSE MEMBERS OF THE LOCAL SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATIONS, WHICH WE FUNDED…THE KOREAN COMMUNITY HERE IS A FAIR SIZE, AND THEY SUPPORTED US…AFTER OUR PARADE FOR EXAMPLE, THEY WOULD INVITE US TO THE CHURCH FOR DINNER. OR WHEN WE HAD OUR MEDAL PRESENTATION THEY SET UP THE KITCHEN AND FED EVERYBODY…THEY WERE VERY SUPPORTIVE.” “[THE ORGANIZATION IS] VERY IMPORTANT [TO ME]. IT IS TO ALL THE MEMBERS OF ANY VETERAN’S ORGANIZATION…WHEN YOU SPEAK TO THE LEGION MEMBERS FOR EXAMPLE IT’S IMPORTANT TO THEM THAT YOU BELONG TO A COMRADESHIP…WE WERE STAUNCH MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY…BECAUSE WE VOLUNTEERED…OUR ORGANIZATION IS CLOSED DOWN, AND THE NEXT CLOSEST ONE IS IN CALGARY WHICH WE CAN GO TO ANYTIME. WE CAN GO TO ANY LEGION.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160022000-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING A COPY OF THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20160022000
Acquisition Date
2016-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120038002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.9
Diameter
38.1
Description
SILVER METAL REEL; 10 METAL RODS CONNECT FROM OUTER METAL RING TO INNER SPOKE; REEL HAS TWO PARALLEL SETS OF RODS CONNECTING TO INNER SPOKE. INNER SPOKE IS SURROUNDED BY METAL CIRCULAR CASING IN FIVE PIECES WITH HOLES CUT OUT OF METAL. INNER SPOKE, CASING, AND METAL RODS ARE RUSTED; CASING PIECE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “MADE IN U.S.A.” OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTON THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CLOSED, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE FILM REEL IN THE THEATRE, STATING, “[THIS WIRE REEL] IS A PROJECTION ROOM REEL, AND A GOOD, WELL-EQUIPPED PROJECTION ROOM WOULD HAVE A FULL SET OF THESE, AND WOULD NEVER USE THESE IN A PROJECTOR, BECAUSE THEY ARE USUALLY BENT UP, AND NOT IN VERY GOOD SHAPE. “[WE WOULD TAKE THE SHIPPING REEL, WITH THE FILM ON IT, AND THEN] WIND IT ON TO THE WIRE. IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THEM…YOU COULD USE THE SHIPPING REELS. A LOT OF THEATRES ENDED UP RUNNING OFF SHIPPING REELS, ULTIMATELY, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY BECAME PLASTIC, BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T BANG UP SO BAD.” THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038002
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20120038003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
TIN, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Diameter
38.3
Description
SILVER METAL REEL WITH BRASS SPOKE IN CENTER; REEL IS COMPRISED OF TWO CIRCULAR METAL PIECES FIXED TO BRASS SPOKE; SURFACES OF METAL SIDES HAVE FOUR LARGE HOLES CUT-OUT, FOUR MEDIUM HOLES CUT-OUT, AND FOUR SMALL HOLES CUT-OUT. CIRCULAR SCRATCHES RING CENTER OF BOTH SIDES OF REEL. BOTH SIDES OF REEL ARE SCRATCHED FROM WEAR. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTON THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CLOSED, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE FILM REEL IN THE THEATRE, STATING, “[THIS IS A] SHIPPING REEL. WHEN FILMS WERE SHIPPED IN THE FILM BALLS TO THE THEATRES, THIS IS THE KIND OF REEL THEY CAME ON.” “[WE WOULD TAKE THE SHIPPING REEL, WITH THE FILM ON IT, AND THEN] WIND IT ON TO THE [WIRE REEL]. IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THEM…YOU COULD USE THE SHIPPING REELS. A LOT OF THEATRES ENDED UP RUNNING OFF SHIPPING REELS, ULTIMATELY, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY BECAME PLASTIC, BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T BANG UP SO BAD.” THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038003
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
Metal
Catalogue Number
P20120038004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
Metal
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Diameter
25.3
Description
TARNISHED METAL REEL; TWO CIRCULAR METAL SIDES ATTACHED WITH A CENTRAL SPOKE; BOTH CIRCULAR PIECES HAVE FIVE LARGE HOLES CUT-OUT. FIVE HOOKS CONNECT THE CENTRAL SPOKE TO BOTH SIDES. TEXT ENGRAVED ON THE SURFACE OF BOTTOM SIDE READS “WARNER BROS., TAYLOREEL CORP., ROCHESTER, N.Y.” TEXT ENGRAVED ON THE SURFACE OF THE TOP SIDE READS “TAYLOREEL CORP., ROCHESTER, N.Y.” SIDES AND CENTRAL SPOKE ARE RUSTED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTAN THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CAME TO A CLOSE, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE FILM REEL IN THE THEATRE, STATING, “[THIS IS A] SHIPPING REEL. WHEN FILMS WERE SHIPPED IN THE FILM BALLS TO THE THEATRES, THIS IS THE KIND OF REEL THEY CAME ON.” “[WE WOULD TAKE THE SHIPPING REEL, WITH THE FILM ON IT, AND THEN] WIND IT ON TO THE [WIRE REEL]. IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THEM…YOU COULD USE THE SHIPPING REELS. A LOT OF THEATRES ENDED UP RUNNING OFF SHIPPING REELS, ULTIMATELY, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY BECAME PLASTIC, BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T BANG UP SO BAD.” THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038004
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20120038005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
15.7
Length
18.6
Width
21
Description
SILVER FILM SPLICER WITH BLACK HANDLE; HANDLE LOWERS TO PRESS ON TABLE WITH SPLICERS; SILVER AND BLUE LABEL ON HANDLE READS, “GENERAL SOUND AND THEATRE EQUIPMENT LIMITED”. SPLICER HAS TAPE DISPENSER BELOW HANDLE WITH DISCOLOURED/YELLOWED CLEAR TAPE; BLUE TEXT BENEATH TAPE REPEATS “GENERAL SOUND” WITH A BLACK DIAL BESIDE THE TAPE ROLL FOR TURNING TAPE ON DISPENSER. TEXT ON TOP OF SPLICER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER READS “COSTRUZIONE INCOLLATRICI RAPIDE – ROMA”; TEXT ON TOP OF SPLICER AT UPPER RIGHT CORNER READS “M.2 – 35M/M, MADE IN ITALY, PATENTED”. SPLICER HAS A DOUBLE KNIFE ON RIGHT SIDE, WITH ONE STRAIGHT CUT AND ONE DIAGONAL CUT FOR FILM. SILVER LABEL ON INSIDE OF SPLICER READS “RENTED FROM, CANADIAN MOTION PICTURE EQUIPMENT RENTALS LTD., 33 GRANBY ST., TORONTO M5B 1H8, 977-7113”. SILVER LABEL ON BOTTOM OF SPLICER READS “MADE IN ITALY, OFFICINE MECCANICHE, DR. LEO CATOZZO, 00050 SANTA SEVERA (ROMA), TEL 0766 /740008-740181”. TEXT EMBOSSED ON BOTTOM OF SPLICER READS “USA PATENTS N.3075572, N.4002522, COSTRUZIONE INCOLLATRICI RAPIDE ROMA, 2575”. SPLICER HANDLE IS WORN AT EDGES; SPLICER HAS DIRT AND RUST UNDER HANDLE. SPLICER IS IN OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION AND SHOWS MINOR SIGNS OF WEAR.
Subjects
PHOTOGRAPHIC T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTON THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CLOSED, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE SPLICER IN THE THEATRE, STATING, “WHEN I STARTED WORKING WITH [THE SPLICER], WHEN WE WERE USING THE ACETATE FILM, THIS SPLICER WAS USED PRIMARILY TO SPLICE THE MYLAR FILM STOCKS. THE ACETATE FILM STOCKS THAT I LEARNED TO SPLICE ON, YOU ACTUALLY GLUED THE SPLICES TOGETHER.” “A FILM FRAME HAS 4 PERFORATIONS ON IT SO, TO MAKE A GLUE SPLICE, YOU WOULD CUT A ‘PIE’ PERFORATION PIECE, AND OVERLAP ONE [PERFORATION] AND ACTUALLY PUT IT TOGETHER. THAT WAS A BIT OF AN ART. “I USED THAT SPLICER, SINCE PROBABLY ABOUT 1980. THE…SPLICER WOULD HAVE BEEN OBSOLETE, SHORTLY AFTER I STARTED WORKING, BUT WE USED TO DO ALL THE CURLERS ON IT.” THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038005
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PROJECTOR LENS
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20120038006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PROJECTOR LENS
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
GLASS, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
26
Diameter
6.8
Description
PROJECTOR LENS; NARROW BRASS “MIN” LENS WITH INSCRIBED TEXT “KOLLMORGEN OPTICAL CORP. NORTHHAMPTON, MASS., MADE IN U.S.A., BX 241, F: 1.9, 3 ¼ IN., E.F. 65992”; SILVER CENTER RING WITH TWO BRASS-COLOURED ENGRAVED RINGS RUNNING AROUND WIDTH OF LENS AND TEXT “SUPER SNAPLITE”; WIDE “MAG” LENS IS BLACK WITH WHITE PRINTED TEXT “MAG, MAGNA – COM 65, 9122176, ISCO – GOTTINGEN, MADE IN GERMANY, MIN”. LENS BODY HAS SURFACE SCRATCHES AND CHIPPING, LENS GLASS HAS DUST AND DIRT SPOTS, AND BRASS FINISHING ON SILVER CENTER RING IS WORN AWAY. LENSES AND BODY IN OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTON THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CLOSED, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE LENS IN USE WITH PROJECTOR EQUIPMENT, STATING, “FILM WAS STILL AVAILABLE IN BOTH FORMATS, AND WHEN IT CAME IN, WE HAD TO KNOW WHICH FORMAT IT WAS, BECAUSE THEN WE WOULD USE THE APPROPRIATE LENS. [THE LENS] WAS STILL IN USE. PRODUCTION COSTS WERE PROBABLY…A LITTLE HIGHER IF THEY WERE SHOOTING IN THE CINEMASCOPE. I THINK THE FLAT LENS, THE 185 ASPECT RATIO WAS A BETTER RATIO FOR TELEVISION. I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT, IF THEY THOUGHT THAT THE MOVIE WAS GOING TO HAVE A SHORT RUN IN THEATRES, AND THEN A BROADER AUDIENCE ON TELEVISION, THEN THAT FORMAT [185 ASPECT RATIO] WAS MORE SUITABLE. WE REPLACED [THE ORIGINAL LENSES]. THE LENSES ARE…A COMPOSITE OF GLASS, AND THE ADHESIVES IN THEM DO BREAK DOWN AFTER A WHILE, ESPECIALLY WITH THE HEAT, SO LENSES HAVE TO BE REPLACED PERIODICALLY. [THE LENS WAS] FROM THE EARLY ‘90S. THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038006
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

Postcard Views of Downtown Lethbridge

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95999
Date Range
1920-1940
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191057
Physical Description
3 postcards
Scope and Content
Three sepia postcards showing downtown Lethbridge: - Lethbridge Post Office - Marquis Hotel - 4th Avenue South looking east, with the Eaton's building and the post office in the background.
Date Range
1920-1940
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 postcards
Scope and Content
Three sepia postcards showing downtown Lethbridge: - Lethbridge Post Office - Marquis Hotel - 4th Avenue South looking east, with the Eaton's building and the post office in the background.
Accession No.
20191057
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1910-1921
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191049
Physical Description
2 hardcover books
Scope and Content
Key of Heaven, or Manual of Prayer, by the Rt. Rev. J. Milner, D.D. New Edition. Winnipeg: Winnipeg Church Goods, Ltd., 1921. The Alexandra Readers Primer, by W.A. McIntyre, B.A., LL.D. and John C. Saul, M.A. Toronto: Morang Educational Company Limited, 1910.
Date Range
1910-1921
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
2 hardcover books
Custodial History
The books belonged to the donor's mother and grandmother who lived in the Vauxhall, Alberta area.
Scope and Content
Key of Heaven, or Manual of Prayer, by the Rt. Rev. J. Milner, D.D. New Edition. Winnipeg: Winnipeg Church Goods, Ltd., 1921. The Alexandra Readers Primer, by W.A. McIntyre, B.A., LL.D. and John C. Saul, M.A. Toronto: Morang Educational Company Limited, 1910.
Accession No.
20191049
Collection
Archive
Less detail

School Photographs - Fleetwood and Bowman Schools.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96001
Date Range
1946-1951
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056
Physical Description
6 black and white photographic prints.
Scope and Content
Group photographs of students and teachers: Bowman School, Grade 2, 1946; Grade 3, 1947; Grade 4, 1948; Grade 5, 1949; Grade 6, 1951. Fleetwood School, Grade 6, 1949.
Date Range
1946-1951
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
6 black and white photographic prints.
Scope and Content
Group photographs of students and teachers: Bowman School, Grade 2, 1946; Grade 3, 1947; Grade 4, 1948; Grade 5, 1949; Grade 6, 1951. Fleetwood School, Grade 6, 1949.
Accession No.
20191056
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Fleetwood School, Grade 6.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96002
Date Range
1949
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056001
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 6, Fleetwood School, 1949: Fourth row: Clifford Firth, Naomi Charles, Marlene Earl, Dorothy Flak, Pat Boyles, Isabelle Gillespie, Sheila Roberts, Joyce Strome, Rosalind Eritsland, Robert Powell. Third row: Jimmie Edgar, Donna Glock, Marlene Archibald, June Morrison, Douglas Oland, Jon Tolle…
Date Range
1949
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 6, Fleetwood School, 1949: Fourth row: Clifford Firth, Naomi Charles, Marlene Earl, Dorothy Flak, Pat Boyles, Isabelle Gillespie, Sheila Roberts, Joyce Strome, Rosalind Eritsland, Robert Powell. Third row: Jimmie Edgar, Donna Glock, Marlene Archibald, June Morrison, Douglas Oland, Jon Tollestrup, Dennis Wyatt, Jack Randal, Terry Dafoe. Second row: Gerald Court, Ronald Napper, Marie Whitehorn, Larry Steakly, Grant Hopp, Barbara Wood, Joan Larson, George Baxter, Alvin Deal, Carlton Stewart. Front row: Joe Kabayama, Jerald Johansen, George Draffin, Dawn Bodard, Gloria Fargo, Marjorie Baxter, Frances Graham, Jacqueline Bolen, Joliene Ferguson, Sheila Price. Identifications provided by Gerald Court, Grant Hopp, Marjorie (Baxter) Molle, Carlton Stewart.
Notes
Digital copy available on the L:\ drive.
Accession No.
20191056001
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1946
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056002
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 2, Bowman School, 1946: Third row: Dennis Jones, Gordon Holland, Bobby _____, Ronnie Crighton, Wayne Wurzer, Bruce _____, Harry Seredinski, Miss Stott. Second row: Mervin Bishop, Ivan Hopp, Murray Olson, David Leong, Ted Ellis, Dale Cuthbertson, Jerry Malacko, Allyn Mills, ?, Gordon _____, …
Date Range
1946
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 2, Bowman School, 1946: Third row: Dennis Jones, Gordon Holland, Bobby _____, Ronnie Crighton, Wayne Wurzer, Bruce _____, Harry Seredinski, Miss Stott. Second row: Mervin Bishop, Ivan Hopp, Murray Olson, David Leong, Ted Ellis, Dale Cuthbertson, Jerry Malacko, Allyn Mills, ?, Gordon _____, Wayne Neidig?, Bobby Leong. Front row: Barry Cuell, Barbara _____, Marie James, Loreen Schawalder, Barbara Cuell, Joyce _____, Sandra Somerville, Beverly Mehew, Bernice _____, Jean Olsen, Marlene Yackulic, Lynn Evans, Bobby Rothe.
Notes
Digital copy available on the L:\ drive.
Accession No.
20191056002
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1947
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056003
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Grade 3, Bowman School, 1947: Fourth row: May Burnett, Lynn Evans, Bernice _____, Arlene Corenblum, ?, ?, Wayne Wurzer, Gordon _____, Buck (Lawrence) McNeely, ?, ?. Third row: Gordon Holland, Harry Seredinski, Eddie Dixon, Sandra Somerville, Joyce _____, Loreen Schawalder, Ronnie Crighton. Second…
Date Range
1947
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Grade 3, Bowman School, 1947: Fourth row: May Burnett, Lynn Evans, Bernice _____, Arlene Corenblum, ?, ?, Wayne Wurzer, Gordon _____, Buck (Lawrence) McNeely, ?, ?. Third row: Gordon Holland, Harry Seredinski, Eddie Dixon, Sandra Somerville, Joyce _____, Loreen Schawalder, Ronnie Crighton. Second row: Ted Ellis (face hidden), ?, ?, Jack Graham, David Leong, Robert Scott, Dennis Jones, Allyn Mills, ?, ?, Beverly Mehew. Front row: Murray Olson, Barry Cuell, Ivan Hopp, Jean Olsen, Marie James, Barbara Cuell, Marlene Yackulic, Pat Murphy, Bobby Rothe.
Notes
Digital copy available on the L:\ drive.
Accession No.
20191056003
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1948
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056004
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 4, Bowman School, 1948: Third row: Miss Watkins, Katherine W_____, Loreen Schawalder, ?, ?, Loreen _____, ?, ?, Emma Orosg, Suzette Jacobson, ?, ?, Arlene Corenblum, Doreen Rudd, Charlene Dawson. Second row: Jerry McLaughlin, Peter Grant?, Wayne Neidig, Eddie Dixon, David Leong, Harry Sered…
Date Range
1948
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 4, Bowman School, 1948: Third row: Miss Watkins, Katherine W_____, Loreen Schawalder, ?, ?, Loreen _____, ?, ?, Emma Orosg, Suzette Jacobson, ?, ?, Arlene Corenblum, Doreen Rudd, Charlene Dawson. Second row: Jerry McLaughlin, Peter Grant?, Wayne Neidig, Eddie Dixon, David Leong, Harry Seredinski,Gordon _____, ?, ?, Dale Cuthbertson, Barry Gavin, ?, ?, Sandy Cameron?, Harry Blacker, Gordon Morris, Barry Bergthorsen. Front row: Ted Ellis, ?, ?, Marlene Yackulic, Jean Olsen, Deanna Wilson, Barbara Cuell, Beryl Schellhorn, Irene Grunewald, ?, ?, Normajean Kew, Barry Cuell, _____David?, ?, Ivan Hopp, ?. ?. Bobby Rothe. Other names on reverse, unidentified in photograph: Howard S., Gloria O.
Notes
Digitall copy available on the L:\ drive.
Accession No.
20191056004
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1949
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056005
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 5, Bowman School, 1949: Fourth row: Harry Seredinski, Morris Hunt, Harry Blacker, John Guild?, Philip Mudge, Wayne Wurzer, Emma Orosg, Marguerite Amos. Third row: Wayne Neidig, Barry Bergthorsen, Ronnie Spafford?, Ted Ellis, ?, ?, Murray Olson, David Leong, Gordon S_____, Buck (Lawrence) Mc…
Date Range
1949
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Grade 5, Bowman School, 1949: Fourth row: Harry Seredinski, Morris Hunt, Harry Blacker, John Guild?, Philip Mudge, Wayne Wurzer, Emma Orosg, Marguerite Amos. Third row: Wayne Neidig, Barry Bergthorsen, Ronnie Spafford?, Ted Ellis, ?, ?, Murray Olson, David Leong, Gordon S_____, Buck (Lawrence) McNeely, Miss Nimmons. Second row: ?, ?, Donnie Cunningham, ?, ?, Barry Gavin, Jean Olsen, Doreen Rudd, May Burnett, Loreen Schawalder, Allyn Mills. Front row: Gordon Holland, Ivan Hopp, Johnny Loewen, Barry Cuell, Bobby Rothe, Dale Cuthbertson, Marlene Yackulic, Barbara Cuell, Charlene Dawson, Arlene Corenblum. Other names on reverse of photograph, but unidentified: Jimmie Poulsen, Earl w_____, Morris Hunt, Pat Harris.
Notes
Digital copy available on the L:\ drive.
Accession No.
20191056005
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1951
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056006
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Grade 6, Bowman School, 1951: Fourth row: Ron Crighton, Jim Chow, Eric Neville, Donald Sullivan, Marguerite _____?, Sharon Geiger, Bill Asplund. Third row: Warren Elliott, Beryl Schellhorn, Joan Shreeve, Arlene _____?, Rita Nakagama, Dennis Jones, Miss Davidson. Second row: ?, ?, Jim Poulson?, D…
Date Range
1951
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Grade 6, Bowman School, 1951: Fourth row: Ron Crighton, Jim Chow, Eric Neville, Donald Sullivan, Marguerite _____?, Sharon Geiger, Bill Asplund. Third row: Warren Elliott, Beryl Schellhorn, Joan Shreeve, Arlene _____?, Rita Nakagama, Dennis Jones, Miss Davidson. Second row: ?, ?, Jim Poulson?, Dick Malacko, ?, ?, Shirley Moscovich, ?, ?, Joyce Fairbairn, Barbara Pratt. Front row: Bobby Leong, Irvine Tillotson, Geraldine Rothe, Lydia Huber, Ione Grunewald, Barbara Cuell, Barry Cuell, Jerry Seaman.
Accession No.
20191056006
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1965
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191056
Physical Description
1 softcover book.
Scope and Content
Echoes of Willow Creek, published by the Willow Creek Historical Society, Granum, Alberta, 1965.
Date Range
1965
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 softcover book.
Scope and Content
Echoes of Willow Creek, published by the Willow Creek Historical Society, Granum, Alberta, 1965.
Accession No.
20191056
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
July 1, 1971
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
1991107617630
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Scope and Content
Activities for young people during summer vacation.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
July 1, 1971
Description Level
Item
Creator
The Lethbridge Herald
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
Activities for young people during summer vacation.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
1991107617630
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Date Range
July 1, 1971
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
1991107617631
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Scope and Content
Activities for young people during summer vacation.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
July 1, 1971
Description Level
Item
Creator
The Lethbridge Herald
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
Activities for young people during summer vacation.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
1991107617631
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

110705 records – page 1 of 5536.