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Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
103.2
Width
5
Description
BEADED BELT WITH A GEOMETRIC PATTERN SET AGAINST A GREEN BEADED BACKGROUND. PATTERN ALTERNATES BETWEEN TWO MIRRORED BLACK, YELLOW, BLUE TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASES AT EITHER WIDTH END OF THE BELT MEETING IN THE CENTER AT THEIR POINTS AND LARGE RED AND BLUE WITH A GREEN CENTERED TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASE AT ONE WIDTH END AND THEIR POINTS EXTENDED TO THE OPPOSING END. BEADS ARE SEWN INTO A COTTON, CANVAS FABRIC. TWO ANIMAL HIDE TIES (EACH A DIFFERENT LENGTH FROM 6.2 TO 11.8) ON EACH END AT EACH CORNER OF BELT. BACK SIDE IS RAW FABRIC WITH SEAM AT CENTER CONNECTING THE TWO HALVES. ENDS ARE HEMMED WITH TIES SEWN TO THE OUTSIDE. CONDITION: SEVERE DISCOLOURATION TO FABRIC BACKING AND SEVERE WEAR TO ANIMAL HIDE TIES. MANY LOSS THREADS OVER ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK. BEADS AND BEADING IN EXCELLENT CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
UPON THE DONATION OF THIS BELT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, THE DONOR – PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON – EXPLAINED THAT THIS BELT BELONGED TO ALFRED HARDWICH LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO SERVED IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN FORT MACLEOD. HE RANCHED IN THE LUNDBRECK AREA AND SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE MOUNTIES. THE DONOR SAID THAT SHE HAD “NO KNOWLEDGE OF HOW [ALFRED HARDWICK] CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE BELT. A NOTE ON THE INITIAL DOCUMENTATION ATTRIBUTES THE DATE OF THIS BELT TO CA. 1880-1890. THE ACTING CURATOR OF THE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN DEPARTMENT OF THE GLENBOW, JOANNE SCHMIDT, AGREED WITH THE DONOR’S BELIEF THAT THE BELT WAS BLACKFOOT. THROUGH THE COMPARISON OF THE BEADED MOCCASINS AND BELTS IN THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION WITH THIS BELT, SCHMIDT EXPLAINED THAT THE DESIGN ON THE BELT WAS MOSTLY FOUND ON THOSE FROM SIKSIKA, BUT SHE HAS ALSO SEEN THE DESIGN IN PIIKANI AND KAINAI BEADWORK THOUGH THERE ARE NOT MANY EXAMPLES IN THE COLLECTION. ALSO BY USING THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, THE CURATOR BELIEVES THAT THE BELT IS SIMILAR IN APPEARANCE TO THOSE OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO EARLY 20TH-CENTURY MUSEUM HOLDINGS. SCHMIDT ALSO PROVIDED AN EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGN FROM THE CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY. IT STATES, “ONE OF THE EARLIEST DESIGNS USED WAS ‘MIISTA-TSIKA-TUKSIIN,’ OR MOUNTAIN DESIGN. OTHER DESIGNS INCLUDED SQUARES, DIAMONDS, BARS, SLOTTED BARS AND STRIPES… TODAY SUCH DESIGNS ARE CALLED ‘MAAH-TOOHM-MOOWA-KA-NA-SKSIN,’ OR FIRST DESIGNS.” IT WAS FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT A COMPLICATING FACTOR IN IDENTIFYING THE BELT’S ORIGINS IS THE FACT THAT THE BLACKFOOT TENDED TO USE WHITE OR BLUE AS THE BACKGROUND COLOUR, NOT GREEN AS IS PRESENTED IN THE LYNCH-STAUNTON DONATION. ON 19 JANUARY 2017, MUSEUM STAFF FURTHER CONSULTED WITH RYAN HEAVY HEAD, FORMER DIRECTOR OF KAINAI STUDIES AT RED CROW COMMUNITY COLLEGE, REGARDING THE BELT’S DESIGN. HE EXPLAINED, “THE GREEN BACKGROUND IS ATYPICAL OF BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, WHICH IS NORMALLY BLUE. THE ‘MOUNTAIN DESIGN’ [DISPLAYED ON THE BELT] IS A COMMON MOTIF IN BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, BUT AGAIN THE COLOURS ARE NOT TYPICAL IN THIS EXAMPLE.” RYAN SPECULATED THAT DURING THE TIME OF DISEASE (WHEN THIS BELT APPEARS TO HAVE ORIGINATED) THERE WAS SOME DISRUPTION IN TRADITIONAL LIFE AND THAT COULD BE REFLECTED IN THE COLOUR CHOICES. ALTERNATIVELY, THE BELT MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE GROS VENTRES FROM NORTHEAST MONTANA. THE DONOR, PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON, IS THE GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER OF ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON. THIS BELT WAS PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE FAMILY, FIRST FROM A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, F. C. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO HER FATHER, A. G. LYNCH-STAUNTON, FINALLY TO THE DONOR WHO BROUGHT IT TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THE “A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON FAMILY HISTORY” WRITTEN FOR THE MUSEUM USING ONLINE SOURCES, THE GLENBOW ARCHIVES, AND THE BOOK TITLED “HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF PINCHER CREEK AND SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS OF ALBERTA.” “ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1860-1932) WAS BORN IN HAMILTON, ON AND CAME TO FORT MACLEOD IN 1877 TO JOIN THE NWMP. ACCORDING TO THE PINCHER CREEK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HE WAS SENT TO ESTABLISH A HORSE BREEDING FARM AT PINCHER CREEK IN 1878. AFTER RETIRING FROM THE NWMP IN 1880, LYNCH-STAUNTON STATED THE FIRST CATTLE RANCH IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA WITH JAMES BRUNEAU AND ISSAC MAY, AND LATER HOMESTEADED WEST OF TOWN. ALONG WITH HIS RANCH, LYNCH-STAUNTON MARRIED SARAH MARY BLAKE (1864-1933) IN 1890 AND THEY HAVE FIVE CHILDREN: VICTORIA, FRANDA, FRANCIS, JOHN, AND D’ARCY… A.H.’S BROTHER RICHARD LYNCH-STAUNTON (1867-1961) CAME AS FAR WEST AS MEDICINE HAT IN 1883 WITH HIS FATHER, F. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE SURVEY PARTY. RICHARD CAME WEST AGAIN, TO PINCHER CREEK, IN 1885 OR 1886. IN ABOUT 1900, HE ACQUIRED LAND NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON TODD CREEEK, WHICH BECAME THE ANTELOPE BUTTE RANCH. RICHARD AND A. H. WERE IN PARTNERSHIP FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS IN CATTLE-RANCHING AND, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WITH THE BUTCHER SHOP. IN 1901, RICHARD MARRIED ISABELLE MARY WILSON (1868-1971), AND THEIR SON FRANK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1905-1990), ALBERTA’S 11TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM 1979 TO 1985. LYNCH-STAUNTON DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RANCH IN THE LUNDBRECK/PINCHER CREEK AREA.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CORRESPONDENCE WITH DONOR AND PEOPLE CITED IN ABOVE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TEA TOWEL, LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT GUILD OF WEAVERS
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TEA TOWEL, LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT GUILD OF WEAVERS
Date
2014
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
82
Width
39
Description
PLAID, HANDWOVEN TEA TOWEL MADE UP OF VARIOUS PLAID PATTERNS. THE BASE THROUGHOUT THE TOWEL IS A SYMMETRICAL PATTERN OF BANDS (DARK BLUE, LIGHT BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW, ORANGE, RED, PINK, DARK PURPLE, AND LIGHT PURPLE). THERE IS A CARDBOARD TAG ATTACHED THAT READS, “LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT…” PRINTED IN BLACK INK AND “GALT TOWEL… GUILD WEAVERS” HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK. THE REVERSE OF THE CARD HAS CARE INSTRUCTIONS. THE TOWEL IS 82 CM BY 39 CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. CREASED AT THE FOLDS.
Subjects
MAINTENANCE T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
TRADES
History
AN EXHIBITION AT THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES TITLED "WOVEN IN TIME: CELEBRATING 65 YEARS WITH LETHBRIDGE WEAVERS" WAS ORGANIZED BY GALT CURATOR WENDY AITKENS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT GUILD OF WEAVERS. THE EXHIBITION RAN FROM JUNE 7 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 AND DISPLAYED THE HISTORY OF THE GUILD WITHIN THE COMMUNITY SINCE ITS RE-ESTABLISHMENT IN 1949. THE EXHIBITION INCLUDED BOTH HERITAGE AND RECENT WEAVINGS, ARCHIVAL MATERIAL, DEMONSTRATION VIDEOS, AND WEAVERS WHO SAT AT A LOOM IN THE EXHIBIT CREATING 6 COTTON TEA TOWELS. OF THESE TOWELS, ONE WAS CHOSE FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM. THIS TEA TOWEL SHOWS SEVERAL DESIGNS CREATED BY THE WEAVERS WHO SAT AT THE LOOM IN THE EXHIBIT. IT WAS CREATED AS A WEAVING DEMONSTRATION WITH AT LEAST SEVEN WEAVERS DESIGNING THE PATTERN AND WORKING ON IT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT GUILD OF WEAVERS HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM TEXTS WRITTEN FOR THE EXHIBITION BY AITKENS: “IN THE PAST, FUNCTIONAL HOUSEHOLD ITEMS SUCH AS CLOTHING, BEDDING AND OTHER NECESSITIES WERE WOVEN BY HAND, ON HOMEMADE LOOMS. WITH THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, MASS PRODUCED WOVEN PRODUCTS EMPLOYED MANY PEOPLE IN FACTORIES MAKING THINGS THAT THEY WOULD HAVE MADE EARLIER AT HOME. AS TIME PASSED THERE WAS A GROWING FEAR THAT THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED TO PRODUCE HANDMADE WOVEN ARTICLES WOULD BE LOST. CONSEQUENTLY, FOLLOWED MOVEMENTS IN BRITAIN, SEVERAL WOMEN IN MONTREAL FORMED THE CANADIAN HANDICRAFTS GUILD [CHG] IN 1905 TO PRESERVE THESE TRADITIONAL ART AND CRAFT SKILLS. … BY THE LATE 1800S, MEN AND WOMEN WERE RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR ADVANCED SKILL IN WEAVING, AND GUILDS WERE ESTABLISHED IN COMMUNITIES ACROSS CANADA, INCLUDING EDMONTON, VANCOUVER, AND WINNIPEG. GUILDS ALSO ENCOURAGED PRODUCTION OF FURNITURE, JEWELRY DESIGN, LEATHER AND IRON WORK, AS WELL AS OTHER ARTISTIC ENDEAVOURS. THE NATIONAL GUILD TRANSFERRED ITS ASSETS TO THE QUEBEC PROVINCIAL BRANCH OF THE CHG IN 1936. "THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH OF THE CHG WAS FOUNDED IN 1935. IT WAS DISCONTINUED DURING WWII BECAUSE RED CROSS PROJECTS, WHICH SUPPORTED SOLDIERS OVERSEAS, WERE THE PRIORITY. AFTER THE WAR IN 1949, ELEVEN LOCAL WOMEN REBUILT THE CHG AND OFFERED COURSES IN NEEDLEWORK, LEATHERWORK, COPPER TOOLING, GLOVE MAKING, POTTERY, ALUMINUM ETCHING, AND OTHER CRAFTS INCLUDING, IN 1951, WEAVING. MEETINGS AND CLASSES WERE HELD IN THE CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY BUILDING [420 – 6 ST. S] AND THE RED CROSS ROOMS [1160 – 7 AVE S] UNTIL 1964 WHEN THE GUILD MOVED TO THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE [811 – 5 AVE. S]. “SINCE 1951, WHEN WEAVING BECAME A POPULAR ACTIVITY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HANDICRAFT GUILD, MEMBERS PRACTICED THEIR ART, TAUGHT OTHERS HOW TO WEAVE, AND SHARED THEIR PIECES WITH THE PUBLIC THROUGH SHOWS AND SALES. INITIALLY, 16 BOX LOOMS WERE PURCHASED FROM EATON’S FOR EVERYONE TO USE. IN 1954, GUILD MEMBERS SAVED LABELS FROM SOUP CANS AND WHEN THEY TURNED THEIR LABELS IN TO THE CAMPBELL COMPANY THEY RECEIVED $165 TO PURCHASE A FLOOR LOOM. TODAY, THE GUILD OWNS MANY LOOMS OF VARYING SIZES. "THE LETHBRIDGE GUILD HAS ALWAYS OPERATED AS A CO-OPERATIVE. ALL THE LOOMS ARE OWNED BY THE GUILD AND THEY ARE SET UP WITH A COMMON WARP (THE LONG THREADS ON THE LOOM) FOR ALL MEMBERS TO USE. GUILD MEMBERS WORK TOGETHER TO PLAN GROUP PROJECTS SUCH AS A FRIENDSHIP BED COVERLET, TEA TOWELS AND PLACE MATS. MEMBERS USE TRADITIONAL FIBRES SUCH AS COTTON, LINEN AND WOOL BUT THEY ALSO EXPERIMENT WITH YARNS MADE FROM YAK, DOG AND POSSUM HAIR. THEY ALSO USED RIBBONS, ZIPPERS AND VHS TAPES TO CREATE IMAGINATIVE WORKS OF ART. "IN THE EARLY 2000S, GUILD MEMBERS ASKED CITY COUNCIL FOR PERMISSION TO DEVELOP AN OFFICIAL TARTAN FOR LETHBRIDGE. MONTHS OF WEAVING SAMPLES, CHOOSING THE PERFECT PATTERN, AND GETTING COUNCIL APPROVAL RESULTED IN A SPECTACULAR TARTAN WHICH WAS UNIQUE IN THE WORLD. THE TARTAN WAS OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED BY THE SCOTTISH TARTAN SOCIETY. "KNOWLEDGEABLE LOCAL WEAVERS TAUGHT ADULTS AND CHILDREN THE ART OF WEAVING, SPINNING, AND DYING. MASTER WEAVERS FROM OUTSIDE LETHBRIDGE HAVE BEEN BROUGHT IN TO EXPAND THE TECHNIQUES AND STYLES OF GUILD MEMBERS. THE GUILD RECEIVED INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION FROM INTERWEAVE PRESS WHEN IT WON THE FIBERHEARTS AWARD IN 2005 FOR ITS UNIQUE MENTORSHIP PROGRAM. THE $500 RECEIVED WITH THE AWARD ALLOWED NOVICE WEAVERS TO LEARN FROM EXPERIENCED WEAVERS.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140037000
Acquisition Date
2014-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail