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Other Name
TOY, STUFFED
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHERETTE, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150013001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TOY, STUFFED
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
LEATHERETTE, LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
21.5
Length
29.5
Width
5.5
Description
A: STUFFED DOG, GREEN LEATHERETTE BODY, RED LEATHERETTE EARS. RED STITCHING AROUND EDGE OF DOG’S BODY. SAME RED THREAD MAKES A SMALL TAIL. BLACK BUTTON EYES. TOY DESIGNED WITH ONLY 2 LEGS, FRONT AND BACK. B: ADJUSTABLE BLACK LEATHER COLLAR WITH SILVER COLOURED METAL BUCKLE. MINOR REPAIRS WITH OFF-WHITE THREAD VISIBLE AT TAIL AND ABOVE LEFT EYE. MINOR REPAIR WITH STAPLES ON FRONT LEFT FOOT. LEATHERETTE RUBBED OFF AT NOSE AREA AND UNDER BUTTON EYES. SEAMS WHERE LEGS MEET BODY ARE WELL-WORN AND LOOSE, SOME STUFFING IS VISIBLE, ESPECIALLY ON RIGHT FRONT LEG.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THIS STUFFED DOG BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013001
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TEDDY BEAR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FAKE FUR, WOOL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TEDDY BEAR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FAKE FUR, WOOL, COTTON
No. Pieces
3
Height
37
Length
31.5
Width
13
Description
A: TEDDY BEAR, MEDIUM BROWN FAKE FUR BODY WITH YELLOW FAKE FUR ON EARS, NOSE, AND PAWS. TWO RED BUTTON EYES. NOSE AND MOUTH ARE BLACK YARN SEWN ONTO YELLOW SNOUT. FAKE FUR HAS RUBBED OFF ON BEAR'S SNOUT AND AROUND SEVERAL SEAMS, ESPECIALLY ON EARS AND FEET. MINOR REPAIRS EVIDENT BELOW SNOUT, ABOVE LEFT EYE, BACK OF NECK, AND BOTTOM OF RIGHT FOOT. B: TEAL GREEN WOOL CARDIGAN WITH 5 GOLD-COLOURED BUTTONS. BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH AIRPLANE FLYING OVER WAVY WATER. C: RED ROMPER PANTS UNDER SWEATER. MATERIAL HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE BOWS WITH NAVY BLUE CENTRES. STRAPS OF PANTS AFFIXED IN FRONT WITH TWO TAN BUTTONS.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THIS TEDDY BEAR BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. UPDATE: ON 26 OCTOBER 2017, DONOR ROBERT SMITH RESPONDED BY EMAIL TO AN ENQUIRY BY MUSEUM STAFF ON THIS OBJECT’S MANUFACTURE, SAYING THAT, “MY MOTHER DID KNIT AND SEW, AND HAD A TREADLE-TYPE SINGER SEWING MACHINE [AND] WHILE I CAN'T BE SURE, IT IS LIKELY THAT SHE MADE THE BEAR'S CLOTHES AND THE BABY BONNET.” IN ANOTHER EMAIL, THE FOLLOWING DAY (27 OCTOBER), HE ADDED, “THE BEAR WAS PROBABLY STORE BOUGHT, AND THE CLOTHES ADDED TO PERSONALIZE IT. [I] DON'T KNOW IF IT WAS A GIFT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013003
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOUND STRIPE
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1969
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160017001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOUND STRIPE
Date Range From
1944
Date Range To
1969
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
3
Length
7.5
Width
4.8
Description
A. COTTON PATCH, 7.5CM LONG X 4.8CM WIDE. GREEN FRONT WITH BLACK BACK, WITH BRASS STRIPE ATTACH IN CENTER. CORNERS OF PATCH ARE CURLING FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS STAINING; EDGES OF PATCH HAVE HOLES BETWEEN THREADS FROM BEING SEWN ON A UNIFORM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BRASS STRIPE, 4.3CM LONG. BRASS STRIPE SECURED TO FRONT OF CLOTH PATCH; STRIPE HAS CHEVRON PATTERN ENGRAVED ON FRONT; BACK HAS HOOK FOR INSERTING INTO PATCH. STRIPE HAS MINOR TARNISHING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. METAL BACKING, 5.5CM LONG X 1.2CM WIDE. SILVER METAL BACKING FOR BRASS STRIPE, WITH ROUNDED ENDS AND HOLES CUT THROUGH ENDS. HOOK ON BACK OF STRIPE IS FASTENED TO HOLE AT THE END OF THE BACKING. METAL SHOWS SIGNS OF WEAR AND MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017001
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
4.9
Length
7
Description
A: BRASS WORLD WAR II ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE. BADGE DEPICTS THE ARTILLERY’S CREST WITH A FIELD GUN IN THE CENTER. UNDERNEATH A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE IS THE WORD “UBIQUE” EMBOSSED IN BANNER IN BRASS. BELOW THE FIELD GUN IS A BANNER THAT READS “QUO PAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BACKSIDE HAS TWO PARALLEL RINGS HORIZONTALLY IN THE BOTTOM HALF FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS CAP BADGE PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING AT ONE END WITH A LOOP AND THEN EXTENDING OUTWARD. OUTER ENDS ARE BENT AWAY FROM EACH OTHER TO FORM A WIDER V. PIN DIMENSIONS: 6.1 X 1.7 CM CONDITION: FINISH HAS DARKENED WITH MINOR WEAR TO SURFACE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS UNCLEAR IF THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER OR UNCLE. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS IN THE CALGARY HIGHLANDERS AS A GUNNER. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF THE YOUNGER VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE RECORD, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
5.5
Length
4.8
Description
A: BRONZE WORLD WAR II CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE. WREATH OF THISTLE IN BRONZE WITH ST. ANDREW’S CROSS (AN X) MAKES UP OVERALL SHAPE OF BADGE. ON THE CENTRE OF THE CROSS, THERE IS A BEAVER ON A LOG ENCIRCLED BY A WREATH OF MAPLE LEAVES. BEAVER AND LOG ARE IN A DARKER METAL THAN REST OF BRONZE DESIGN. ON THE WREATH, BELOW THE BEAVER, IS A SCROLL OF THISTLES AND BELOW THAT IS A WHITE METAL SCROLL INSCRIBED WITH “CALGARY HIGHLANDERS”. THE CROWN IN AT THE TOP CENTER OF THE BADGE. BACK SIDE HAS A LOOP ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE, PARALLEL FROM EACH OTHER, FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS-COLOURED PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING ON ONE END IN A LOOP AND COMING OUT FROM THAT, AWAY FROM EACH OTHER, LIKE A “V”. PIN DIMENSIONS: 5.2 X 1.1 CM. CONDITION: SLIGHT TARNISHING OF METAL OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS UNCLEAR IF THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER OR UNCLE. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS IN THE CALGARY HIGHLANDERS AS A GUNNER. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF THE YOUNGER VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
6.4
Description
CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE; BADGE DEPICTS A CROWN OVER “CANADA” BANNER, OVER AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN ABOVE BANNER WITH TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BADGE HAS MINOR TARNISHING ON FRONT AND BACK, WITH GREEN RESIDUE LEFT FROM OXIDATION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017011
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
4.5
Width
3
Description
A – B: WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HAS “CANADIAN MEDICAL CORPS” STAMPED BRONZE-COLOURED WITH REMOVABLE PIN. THE BADGE DEPICTS A MAPLE LEAF WREATH WITH A SNAKE AROUND THE SWORD AT THE CENTER. THERE IS A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE. GOOD CONDITION. THE METAL HAS DULLED AND DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON NOVEMBER 25, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A PHONE INTERVIEW WITH MIKE LEVIN OF OTTAWA, ONTARIO TO DISCUSS A WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE BADGE BELONGED TO HIS GRANDFATHER, DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, WHO WAS A MEDICAL PHYSICIAN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND A WORLD WAR I VETERAN. LEVIN HAS BEEN IN POSSESSION OF THE BADGE SINCE 2009-2010 AFTER THE PASSING OF HIS UNCLE, ROBERT G. WRAY, WHO HAD INHERITED IT FROM HIS FATHER, DR. J. S. WRAY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE BADGE HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT PHONE INTERVIEW: “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY DIDN’T TALK ABOUT THEMSELVES AT ALL… [W]HEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED BEFORE I WAS BORN. I LIVED OUT OF THE COUNTRY FOR A LONG TIME AND WHEN I CAME BACK, I RE-ACQUAINTED MYSELF WITH MY UNCLE BOB. HE’S THE ONE WHO DONATED SOME STUFF TO THE GALT BEFORE..." THE DONOR’S UNCLE BOB (ROBERT G. WRAY) PASSED AWAY IN EDMONTON. ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, THIS MILITARY BADGE IS THE ONLY OBJECT THAT EXISTS WITHIN THE FAMILY FROM DR. JOHN S. WRAY’S MILITARY SERVICE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT DR. JOHN S. WRAY COMES FROM A HISTORY FOUND IN A 1924 PUBLICATION TITLED, ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT, BY JOHN BLUE: “DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, A WORLD WAR VETERAN WHO, SINCE JUNE 1919, HAS ENGAGED IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AT LETHBRIDGE, WAS BORN IN LINWOOD, ONTARIO, OCTOBER 28, 1882, A SON OF GEORGE AND ANN (ALLINGHAM) WRAY, BOTH OF WHOM WERE NATIVES OF IRELAND...” “JOHN STANLEY WRAY IS THE YOUNGEST OF A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN. HE WAS EDUCATED IN PUBLIC SCHOOL NO. 21 IN WELLESLEY TOWNSHIP, WATERLOO DISTRICT, ONTARIO, AND LATER HE ATTENDED THE KITCHENER HIGH SCHOOL AND THE EDMONTON HIGH SCHOOL. HE THERE ACQUIRED A LICENSE TO TEACH AND DEVOTED ABOUT THREE YEARS TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING IN AND NEAR EDMONTON BUT REGARDED THIS MERELY AS AN INITIAL STEP TO OTHER PROFESSIONAL LABOR. HE THEN ENTERED THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO IN TORONTO, CANADA, IN 1905, AND BY REASON OF THE STEADY PROGRESS THAT HE MADE IN HIS STUDIES WAS THERE GRADUATED IN 1909. HE THEN LOCATED FOR PRACTICE AT RAYMOND, ALBERTA, WHERE HE CONTINUED FOR SIX YEARS, WHEN THE NEED FOR AID IN CONNECTION WITH THE WORLD WAR LED HIM TO JOIN THE ARMY AS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ARMY MEDICAL CORPS, WITH THE RANK OF CAPTAIN. HE SERVED IN CALGARY UNTIL MARCH, 1917, WHEN HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIRST BATTALION IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT AND WENT OVERSEAS. HE SERVED IN ENGLAND WITH RESERVE BATTALIONS AND IN HOSPITALS AND WAS FOR A TIME A MEMBER OF A TRAVELING MEDICAL BOARD, THUS CONTINUING IN ACTIVE DUTY UNTIL MAY, 1918, WHEN HE WENT TO FRANCE AND WAS ATTACHED TO THE THIRD CANADIAN AMBULANCE CORPS. LATER HE WAS IDENTIFIED WITH THE FIRST CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY AND WAS IN THE BATTLE OF AMIENS IN AUGUST, 1918. LATER HE RETURNED TO ENGLAND WITH A BROKEN ARM AND WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE CANADIAN ARMY ON THE 27TH OF APRIL, 1919. AT THE BREAKING OF THE HINDENBURG LINE ON THE 1ST AND 2ND OF SEPTEMBER, 1918, HE WAS ON DUTY WITH THE THIRD FIELD AMBULANCE. FOLLOWING HIS RETURN HOME HE LOCATED AT LETHBRIDGE FOR THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN JUNE, 1919, AND HAS HERE REMAINED.” ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT DR. WRAY’S SERVICE IN WORLD WAR I COMES FROM HIS SERVICE RECORDS OBTAINED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA’S ONLINE DATABASE. ACCORDING TO THE RECORDS, DR. WRAY ENLISTED ON JUNE 13, 1916 IN THE SARCEE CAMP IN CALGARY. DR. WRAY AND MARION WRAY HAD THREE CHILDREN: MARGARET ALICE LEWIS, PHYLISS NEILSON LEVIN, AND ROBERT G. WRAY. DR. WRAY PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE DURING 1952 AT THE AGE OF 69 YEARS. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, FULL ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT ARTICLE, AND SERVICE RECORDS.
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.7
Length
2.8
Width
2.8
Description
THIS IS A COLLAR BADGE THAT ACCORDING TO RESEARCH IS EITHER MADE OF COPPER OR BRASS. THE BADGE IS THE SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE CENTER AND “CANADA” ACROSS THE BOTTOM. THERE IS ONE LOOP ATTACHED TO BOTH THE BOTTOM AND THE TOP OF THE BACK OF THE BADGE. CONDITION: THE METAL IS BROWNING. THE TOP POINT OF THE MAPLE LEAF IS BENT INWARDS. THE LOOPS ON THE BACK OF THE BADGE ARE BENT TOWARDS THE TOP OF THE BADGE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
3.7
Width
3.7
Description
A: COLLAR BADGE MADE OF EITHER BRASS OR COPPER. BADGE IN SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE TOP OF THE LEAF. IN THE CENTER IS THE NUMBER “52” WITH A CIRCULAR BORDER AROUND IT CONTAINING THE WORDS “NEW ONTARIO”. AT THE BASE OF THE LEAF READS, “CANADA”. THERE IS A SHINE TO THE METAL’S VARNISH. ON THE BACK SIDE IS TWO METAL LOOPS, ONE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZONTALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 4.2 CM IN LENGTH. CONDITION: MINOR WEAR TO VARNISH.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
4.4
Width
2.9
Description
A: A PRINCESS PATRICIA CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY COLLAR BADGE. THE DESIGN IS A FLOWER ENCLOSED IN A CIRCLE, WHICH READS “PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY”. AT THE TOP OF THE CIRCLE IS A CROWN AND THERE IS A SMALL DESIGN EXTENDING FROM THE BOTTOM. ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE BADGE ARE TWO LOOPS – ONE AT EITHER SIDE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZIONALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 3.9 CM IN LENGTH. OVERALL CONDITION: METAL HAS DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
24.3
Length
51.5
Width
38.7
Description
RECTANGULAR, UNPAINTED WICKER PICNIC BASKET. TWO ADJUSTABLE HANDLES, ATTACHED TO BASKET WITH WICKER. HINGED LID, CLOSES WITH SIMPLE HOOK AND EYE CLOSURE. THERE ARE TWO THIN LEATHER STRIPS, WITH METAL BUCKLES, ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE LID. THESE STRAPS CONTINUE INTO THE BASKET AND HOLD A WOODEN ORGANIZATION INSERT TO THE UNDERSIDE THE INSIDE OF THE LID. INSERT HAS LEATHER STRAPS FOR PLATES AND CUTLERY. TWO PIECES OF LEATHER, AT EITHER END OF BASKET, ATTACH LID TO BASE. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD/EXCELLENT CONDITION. FRONT LEFT HANDLE ATTACHED WITH LEATHER STRING, RATHER THAN WICKER. BACK RIGHT HANDLE HAS A FEW SPOTS OF WHITE PAINT. LEATHER STRAPS HAVE A FEW MOISTURE STAINS.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS PICNIC BASKET WAS USED TO HOLD ALL OF THE GLASSES, DISHES, TABLECLOTH, ETC. NECESSARY FOR A PICNIC. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “WE DIDN’T HAVE THIS WHEN WE WERE KIDS … THEY ACQUIRED THAT, I THINK, WHEN WE STARTED HAVING FAMILY PICNICS IN THE ‘70s, ‘80s.” IN A SHORT NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB EXPLAIND THAT "I DON'T HAVE AS MANY MEMORIES OF THE PICNIC BASKET, AS I THINK THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ACQUIRED AFTER I LEFT HOME. IN MY CHILDHOOD, OUR PLATES AND OTHER SUPPLIES WERE SIMPLY PACKED IN A CARDBOARD BOX." THESE PICNIC ITEMS WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
90.2
Width
5.7
Description
GREY BELT WITH BRASS AND COPPER CLASP BUCKLE; BUCKLE HAS EMBOSSED CREST ON FRONT SHOWING A CROWN ABOVE AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN, WITH A BANNER AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”; BUCKLE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED ON BACK, “TOP, R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY (SP), R.C.A.”. BELT HAS BRASS AND COPPER CAPS ON ENDS WITH PAIRS OF METAL PRONGS EXTENDING FROM ENDS OF CAPS; BELT HAS TWO BRASS AND COPPER ADJUSTABLE LOOPS. INSIDE OF BELT HAS BLACK HAND-WRITTEN TEXT, “MAJOR R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY.” INSIDE OF BELT IS STAINED WITH WHITE AND YELLOW; INSIDE OF BELT IS WORN AND FRAYED BELOW PRONGS FROM ENDS; BUCKLE HAS WHITE AND GREEN RESIDUE FROM OXIDATION AT BASE OF CLASP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TROPHY BELT
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, SILVER
Catalogue Number
P20190007009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TROPHY BELT
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, SILVER
No. Pieces
1
Length
101.3
Width
7.8
Description
LEATHER BELT WITH PINS AND BUTTONS FIXED; BELT HAS SILVER BUCKLE AT RIGHT END AND BUCKLE STRAP AT LEFT END; LEATHER IS STAMPED AT LEFT END WITH TEXT “[ILLEGIBLE] & COGGSHALL MILES [ILLEGIBLE]”. BELT HAS 22 PINS ATTACHED; PINS DISPLAYED INCLUDE: BRASS BAR WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “CANADA” [3 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS BUTTON WITH LION IN CENTER AND TEXT AROUND EDGES “43 CAMERON HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA” [11 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS MAPLE LEAF PIN WITH CROWN ABOVE TEXT “43 CAMERONS, CANADA” [2 ON BELT]; BRASS PIN DEPICTING OVAL SHIELD WITH CROWN AT TOP, MAPLE LEAF AND THISTLES AROUND BANNER, AND TEXT EMBOSSED ON OVAL BORDERS AND BANNER “OVERSEAS BATTALION, 113 CANADA, LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS” [3 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS PIN DEPICTING “C” ABOVE A BAR AND “43” BELOW BAR [2 ON BELT]; SILVER PIN DEPICTING ROUND SHIELD WITH CROWN AT TOP, MAPLE LEAVES DECORATING LEFT EDGE AND THISTLES DECORATING RIGHT EDGE, WITH AN “X” IN CENTER WITH A LION OVERLAID, AND TEXT EMBOSSED OVER INSIDE BORDER, “43 CAMERON HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA” AND TEXT EMBOSSED AT BASE, “BATTN. C.E.F., WINNIPEG” [1 ON BELT]. LEATHER IS CRACKED AND WORN; BELT SHOWS SLIGHT GREEN RESIDUE AROUND PINS AND BELT BUCKLE HOLES FROM COPPER OXIDATION; BUTTONS, PINS, AND BELT BUCKLE ARE TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE HATE BELT, BRETT CLIFTEN NOTED, “THE ONES [I FIND IMPORTANT], AFTER MY BREAK- IN, THERE WERE SOME OTHER THINGS THAT WERE TOTALLY IRREPLACEABLE TO ME…SOME OF THE THINGS TOO THAT I CHOSE, THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL FOR ME TO HAVE AND THEY’RE AWESOME TO SIT IN MY BASEMENT AND I CAN GO LOOK AT THEM ANY TIME I WANT, BUT NO ONE ELSE GETS TO SEE THEM. THERE’S A BROADER STORY TO BE TOLD IN A MORE, COMMUNITY APPRECIATION, I THINK, THAN JUST SITTING IN MY BASEMENT, IN MY MAN CAVE, LOOKING AT IT.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY SO IT’S NO BIG DEAL, WE’LL DO ANYTHING WE CAN AFFORD TO GET THE STUFF.’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT. HE WORRIED ABOUT [IT] LATER, “WELL, GEE, SHOULD I HAVE BOUGHT IT OR NOT? YEAH, OF COURSE I SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT IT.” IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE BUT HIS CREDIT CARD COMPANY AND HIM. IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT AND ASKED QUESTIONS LATER. [HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’S DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’S RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN BRETT [CLIFTON] DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE. THE SECOND REASON IS THAT BRETT HAD AN UNFORTUNATE BREAK-IN AT HIS HOUSE LAST FATHER’S DAY, AND MANY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS OF THINGS WERE TAKEN, BUT VERY LUCKILY, NONE OF THE LOCAL HISTORY ITEMS OR THE MILITARY ITEMS WERE TOUCHED. THEY WERE FAR MORE VALUABLE THAN THE THINGS THAT WERE TAKEN, BUT WERE NOT TOUCHED, AND WE BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT WE’RE ONE BREAK-IN AWAY FROM LOSING A LOT OF HISTORY.” ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN MACDIARMID ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON AUGUST 22, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH BATTALION ON OCTOBER 8, 1916, AFTER SAILING FROM CANADA OVERSEAS ON SEPTEMBER 25, 1916 WITH HIS UNIT. MACDIARMID WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH WITH THE 43RD CANADIAN RESERVE BATTALION SERVING IN FRANCE ON OCTOBER 27, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS DISCHARGED FROM SERVICE IN MAY 1919. A MEMO RECEIVED AND INCLUDED WITH HIS SERVICE FILE INDICATES THAT JOHN MACDIARMID PASSED AWAY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1918 AT THE SHAUGHNESSY HOSPITAL IN VANCOUVER, B.C. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007009
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160017006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Diameter
26.5
Description
BLACK BERET WITH RED PATCH ON FRONT WITH ATTACHED GOLD CANADIAN ARTILLERY BADGE DEPICTING A CROWN ABOVE AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN, WITH TEXT ON BANNER BELOW CROWN “UBIQUE” AND TEXT ON BANNER BELOW GUN “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BERET HAS TWO HOLES IN RIGHT SIDE LINED WITH PLASTIC. BERET HAS LEATHER RIM AROUND BASE OPENING; BERET IS LINED WITH BLACK COTTON WITH A PRINTED WHITE STAMP OF A DIAMOND, WITH A SMALL DIAMOND INSIDE AND TEXT, “GENUINE, FLEUR DE LIS, BASQUE BERET, 7 1/8 – 1952, DOROTHEA KNITTING MILLS, LIMITED, TORONTO”. INSIDE FRONT OF BERET HAS BRASS BAR FOR SECURING BADGE, WITH WHITE PAPER TAG WITH RED BORDERS AND BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “107” SLID UNDER BAR. BERET TOP AND FRONT ARE LIGHTLY FADED, WITH MINOR SOILING; OVERALL LEXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017006
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
28.5
Length
30.5
Description
A-B: RED COWBOY BOOTS (LEFT AND RIGHT BOOT). THE LEATHER BOOT BODIES ARE RED WITH GOLD ACCENTS AND GOLD OPENING TRIMS. LEATHER SOLES HAVE BEEN RE-HEELED. INTERIORS LABELLED “ACME BOOT” AND INK STAMPED, “MADE IN THE USA”. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH BOOTS, THERE IS A RED DYE LOSS IN VARIOUS PLACES, ESPECIALLY AT THE TOES. SOME OF THE GOLD ACCENTS ARE SCUFFED. REGULAR WEAR TO THE BOTTOM SOLES. THERE IS WEAR TO THE INSIDE SOLES (MORE SEVERELY ON BOOT A). BOTH BOOTS ARE MISSHAPEN (BOOT B TO A GREATER EXTENT). ON BOOT A, THERE IS A LOOSE THREAD ON THE TOE DESIGN. THERE IS A LOOSE YELLOW THREAD ON THE INSIDE HEEL ON BOOT B.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER EXPLAINED SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. WHEN DESCRIBING HER HUSBAND'S MUSIC CAREER, HORHOZER SAID, “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, WELL, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” THESE RED COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE COSTUME JOE HORHOZER WORE WHEN HE PERFORMED WITH THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND LATER THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS,' A LETHBRIDGE-BASED BAND FOR WHICH HE PLAYED THE ACCORDION BEGINNING IN 1958. IT WAS EVERAL WHO DYED THEM THE BRIGHT RED COLOUR: “HE ASKED ME [TO DYE THE BOOTS]. HE SAID HE WANTED TO CHANGE, THEY WERE GETTING TO LOOK KIND OF SHABBY, AND I DON’T KNOW WHY HE PICKED RED, BUT THAT’S WHAT HE DID SO, THAT’S WHAT I - ACTUALLY THESE STOOD UP QUITE WELL [LAUGHS]. THE REGULAR COLOUR WAS - I THINK THEY WERE BLACK-LIKE. BLACK WITH WHITE... THOSE WERE THE ONLY BOOTS THAT HE HAD.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON THEN, I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHES] - LIKE THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"COORS"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20180029007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"COORS"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
23
Diameter
6
Description
BROWN GLASS BOTTLE WITH SILVER AND YELLOW METAL TOP; TOP HAS FLUTED EDGES AND BLACK TEXT “TWIST OFF, COORS, OR USE OPENER”. BOTTLE NEVER OPENED; CONTENTS INTACT. BOTTLE HAS YELLOW LABEL ON FRONT WITH BLACK TEXT “COORS” WITH BLACK AND WHITE IMAGE OF A WATERFALL AND RED BANNER OVER IMAGE WITH WHITE TEXT “BEER, BANQUET, BIERE”, WHITE TEXT AT LOWER EDGE “341 ML”. LABEL SIDES GOLD WITH BLACK TEXT ON RIGHT “BREWED ACCORDING TO THE QUALITY STANDARDS OF THE ADOLPH COORS COMPANY, GOLDEN, COLORADO, U.S.A., AGED SLOWLY FOR THAT [WORD HAS HOLE IN CENTER], MOUNTAIN SMOOTHNESS AND [WORD HAS HOLE IN CENTER]”, TEXT ON LEFT “BREWED UNDER LICENCE AND SUPERVISION OF THE ADOLPH COORS COMPANY, GOLDEN, COLORADO, U.S.A., MOLSON BREWERIES OF CANADA LTD., MONTREAL, ST. JOHN’S, TORONTO, BARRIE, WINNIPEG, REGINA, EDMONTON, VANCOUVER, CANADA, UNION MADE”. BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT IN GLASS ABOVE LABEL “COORS”. LABEL HAS TEARS AND HOLES IN SIDES; LOWER EDGE OF LABEL FRONT IS TORN WITH LOSS; BOTTLE HAS LIGHT SOILING ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE BEER BOTTLE, MACLEAN RECALLED, “AS FAR AS IDENTITY GOES, WITH GOING DOWN TO WHITEFISH, AND SEEING NEON SIGNS IN BAR WINDOWS…THERE’S ALL [THE] NEON SIGNS FOR BEER. I ALWAYS LIKED THE COORS SIGN. MY NEIGHBOR, WHO DIDN’T LIKE MY MUSIC CHOICES, HE LITERALLY HAD, FROM THE U.S., BOUGHT A COORS NEON SIGN AND IT WAS IN HIS BEDROOM WINDOW IN HIS FARMHOUSE. IT WAS THE WHITE MOUNTAINS WITH THE RED COORS, AND I THOUGHT [IT] WAS COOL. THERE’S NO BEER SELECTION BACK THEN. IT WAS FORMS OF LABATT’S, MOLSON, IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO GET KOKANEE, BUT I CHOSE COORS. THAT WAS MY WAY OF EXERCISING SOME LEVEL OF DIFFERENCE.” “WHY [THE BOTTLE] GOT KEPT IS, NUMBER ONE IT HAS COORS ON IT, WHICH WAS MY BEER. [IN GRADE 11 WAS] ABOUT DRINKING AND DRIVING, WHICH IS THE YEAR THAT WE’RE PARTYING, SO THAT WOULD BE ’87. THE SPRING OF ’86, THERE’S A GRADUATION FOR THE KIDS IN GRADE 12 AND, BECAUSE IN GRADE 11 WE’RE BEING VERY SOCIAL AND WE’RE PARTYING…YOU’RE BEING INCLUDED TO GO TO A GRADE 12 [GRADUATION] EVEN THOUGH YOU’RE IN GRADE 11. THAT GRADUATION, FOR THAT YEAR, WHICH WAS 1986, WAS OUT IN IRON SPRINGS. IT WAS AT A SCHOOL, IT WAS IN THE FIELD AND EVERYBODY DROVE. THE WHOLE FIELD [WAS] JUST FULL OF VEHICLES, THAT’S ALL I REMEMBER. HAVE VAGUE MEMORIES OF BEING SICK AND AT A TREE AND SOMEBODY COMING OVER TO ASK HOW I WAS DOING AND I WASN’T DOING WELL, AND JUST THINKING, “THAT WAS REALLY NICE THAT THEY CARED ABOUT ME ENOUGH THAT THEY WOULD COME AND ASK.” WE SLEPT IN THE CAR THAT NIGHT. AT THAT TIME, I WAS LISTENING TO PINK FLOYD AND “THE WALL” AND I WAS LISTENING TO BOSTON.” “[IN] ’87, WE HAVE THE VERY FIRST SAFE GRAD. I DON’T KNOW HOW AND WHY THAT CAME TO PASS. I REMEMBER TWO NIGHTS OF PARTIES. ONE WAS AT SHANNON HYNDS’ FARM, THE OTHER WAS AT ALAN JANZEN’S FARM. THE SECOND NIGHT, AT ALAN’S, I ACTUALLY HAD VIDEO OF THAT PARTY. WE WERE ON BUSES, WE GOT BUSSED [TO THE LOCATION]. WE HAD TO, IN ADVANCE OF THE PARTY, BUY OUR ALCOHOL. WE WERE SUPPOSED TO BUY OUR ALCOHOL, WHICH WAS A CASE OF COORS, IN MY CASE, AND THEN HAVE IT SOMEWHERE SO THAT WE WEREN’T ACTUALLY TAKING THE ALCOHOL ITSELF TO THE SITE. IT WAS ALREADY THERE.” “THE WAY THEY SERVED THIS – I REMEMBER AT SHANNON’S AND MAYBE ALAN’S – THAT THEY HAD GALVANIZED DRINKING TROUGHS FOR CATTLE AND HORSES. THEY FILLED THEM FULL OF ICE WATER AND THEN THAT’S WHAT THESE [BOTTLES] WERE IN. THE REASON I REMEMBER THIS IS THAT BY THE END—AND SOMEONE TRIED TO DO IT TO ME BUT THEY WEREN’T SUCCESSFUL—THEY WERE THROWING KIDS INTO THAT ICE WATER. THE UNCOOL THING IS THAT THE BOTTLES WERE BREAKING AND IT WAS FULL OF BROKEN GLASS AND PEOPLE WERE BEING THROWN IN THERE. THAT WASN’T VERY COOL. WHEN I TOOK THE BOTTLE…I’M DRINKING COORS LIGHT. I HAD MY OWN NEON SIGN, SILVER BULLET. I TAKE THE BOTTLE BECAUSE IN MY MIND, BECAUSE THIS PARTY IS ENDED AND WE HAVE TO LEAVE, DOESN’T MEAN THAT I’M INTERESTED IN STOPPING DRINKING. I TAKE THE BOTTLE TO DRINK WHEREVER I’M GOING NEXT AND THEN I DON’T END UP DRINKING IT ‘CAUSE IT’S PROBABLY FIVE IN THE MORNING. OVER TIME, IT GETS SAVED BECAUSE IT’S A REMINDER OF THIS WHOLE HIGH SCHOOL [CULTURE].” ON HIS TIME DRINKING AND PARTYING, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “MY PARENTS CERTAINLY HAD PARTIES AT THE HOUSE SO THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS FAMILIAR TO ME. THEY BUILT A HOUSE UP IN PICTURE BUTTE IN 1975. THEY HADN’T, INITIALLY, DEVELOPED THEIR BASEMENT. THEY DID WITHIN TWO TO THREE…THERE WERE HERITAGE ELEMENTS EITHER BY DECORATION, BY THE DESIGN OF THE INTERIOR THAT SHE INCORPORATED WHICH SPIKED MY INTEREST. THEY HAD A DANCE FLOOR DOWN THERE, OF WOOD. THE WALLS WERE MIRRORS, SO ALL THAT DISCO ERA-TYPE STUFF. THERE WAS A BAR THAT WAS BUILT, TOO. MY PARENTS WERE FRIENDS WITH AN R.C.M.P. OFFICER’S FAMILY, SO THE FAMILY IS OVER, AND THEY’RE UPSTAIRS AND I’M LITERALLY SERVING THE R.C.M.P. OFFICER’S KIDS…WHISKEY OUT OF THIS BAR. IT WASN’T THAT I HAD SOME SENSE THAT BY DRINKING THE FLUID THERE WAS IMPAIRMENT. IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT ADULTS DID.” “IN TERMS OF [MY FRIENDS AND I] IT HAPPENS TO BE THAT VERY TIME [WHEN] WE’RE IN THE BACK OF THAT PICKUP, AS KIDS…WHEN WE FINISH GRADE 9…THE SUMMER OF 1984. MY DAD DROPS US OFF IN THE COULEES DOWN AT THE END OF THE GRAVEL ROAD. THERE’S A BIG, DEEP COULEE DOWN THERE. WE HIKE AROUND AND THEN WE MANAGE TO COME BACK AND THERE’S SHALLOWER COULEES BY MY OWN PLACE. WE SET UP A TENT AND WE SLEEP OVERNIGHT DOWN THERE. ONE KID [WITH US] IS LES. I DON’T REMEMBER HOW OR WHY BUT HE HAD A MICKEY OF VODKA [OR GIN]. HE POUNDED IT BACK. HE DRANK THE WHOLE THING IN FRONT OF US. WE DON’T REALIZE OR UNDERSTAND WHAT THAT’S GOING TO DO EXCEPT TO KNOW THAT ALCOHOL IS SOMETHING THAT ADULTS ARE SUPPOSED TO BE DOING. LATER ON THAT NIGHT HE STARTED THROWING UP [ALL OVER THE PLACE]. THE REST OF US NEVER TOUCHED IT. HE WAS THE ONLY ONE. THEN WE KNEW THAT ALCOHOL MAKES YOU SICK. “IN GRADE 10 WE LEAVE. THERE’S FIVE BOYS AND ELEVEN GIRLS [IN MY CLASS]. WE LEAVE A CATHOLIC SCHOOL AND WE GO INTO THE PUBLIC SYSTEM. WE MERGE WITH ALL THESE OTHER KIDS.” “[WE’RE] STILL IN PICTURE BUTTE…THERE’S THIRTY-FOUR PUBLIC KIDS. SOME OF THOSE KIDS WOULD BE FROM MORE DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS THAN OUR OWN. MOST OF THE KIDS THAT WERE IN MY CLASS WERE ACTUALLY FROM DUTCH FAMILIES. THERE’S A LOT OF DISTRACTION FOR ME BECAUSE OF ALL THESE OTHER KIDS, SOME OF WHOM DON’T NECESSARILY WORK AS HARD IN SCHOOL. I DON’T THINK I WAS A KID WHO EVER THOUGHT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO WORK THAT HARD IN SCHOOL. I JUST WANTED TO HAVE FUN. GRADE 10, THERE’S ALSO THE GIRLS AND STUFF. BUT, THERE’S NO DRINKING AT ALL [IN GRADE 10] THAT I REMEMBER. THERE’S CERTAINLY DISTRACTIONS AS A BOY IN GRADE 10 WOULD HAVE.” “THEN IN THE SUMMER OF…1985, IN AUGUST…I DON’T REMEMBER HOW OR WHY BUT I’M WITH LES. I’VE SPENT NINE YEARS WITH HIM…IN PART, BECAUSE OF WHERE HE LIVED. MY AUNT AND UNCLE LIVED RIGHT NEXT DOOR. HE HAD A SISTER THAT WAS THE SAME AGE AS MY SISTER—HIS PARENTS WERE “FIFTY-SIXERS”, HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION…HE WAS ON THE FARM—WE CONNECTED. I REMEMBER BEING IN THE VEHICLE WITH HIM, AND THE VEHICLE BELONGED TO A [GIRL] NAMED CAROLINE OHLGART. SHE WAS DRIVING AND IT WAS A MUSTANG. SHE WAS THE ONE WHO WAS DRIVING AND THEN THERE WAS ANOTHER [GIRL], MELINDA. I THINK THERE [WERE] THREE BOYS AND TWO GIRLS IN THIS CAR. IT’S THE END OF THE SUMMER AND WE’RE IN SHAUGHNESSY. SOMEHOW THEY GET THIS GUY WHO SOMEBODY KNOWS…AND THEY GET OFF-SALES FROM THE SHAUGHNESSY BAR. THEY GUY HAD A CORVETTE; THE UGLY ‘70S CORVETTE. WE GET A CASE OF BEER AND THAT’S REALLY THE FIRST TIME [I DRINK]. IT WASN’T EVEN SO MUCH THAT WE WERE DRINKING AS THE FACT THAT I WAS WITH THESE OTHER GIRLS AND GUYS. IT JUST FELT LIKE A VERY EXCITING THING TO DO. IT TURNED OUT, AS AN EXPERIENCE GOES, TO BE A REALLY GOOD EXPERIENCE. THAT SET THE STAGE, RIGHT OFF THE BAT, FOR GRADE 11, WHICH WAS PARTYING.” “IN GRADE 11, INITIALLY [LES IS] STILL A FRIEND. I’M HANGING OUT WITH HIM BUT I’M ALSO HANGING OUT WITH EVERYBODY. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHO THEY WERE, I COULD HANG OUT WITH ANYBODY. BUT, I’M NOTING THAT, FOR VARIOUS REASONS, HE AND ANOTHER GUY…[WERE] GOING DOWN A PARTICULAR ROAD AND, IF I EXERCISE SOME CRITICAL JUDGMENT AT [THE] TIME, IT WAS THAT, ‘OKAY, I SHOULD NOT CONTINUE ON THIS PATH’. IT DOESN’T MEAN THAT I CAN’T BE FRIENDS WITH THESE PEOPLE BUT IN TERMS OF MY IMMEDIATE SOCIAL CIRCLE, THAT MIGHT NOT BE A WAY TO GO. THEN I ELECTED…TO BE HANGING OUT MORE WITH [OTHERS]. THEY’RE MORE [INTO] SPORTS. THEY’RE DOING BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL WHICH I NEVER DID ‘CAUSE I COULD NEVER PLAY ANYTHING. THEY’RE ALSO RELATIVELY STRONG ACADEMICALLY. THEY’RE GOOD KIDS FROM GOOD BACKGROUNDS. [THAT] DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY’RE NOT PARTYING BECAUSE THEY’RE OUT PROBABLY EQUALLY EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND. BUT, THAT PARTYING WOULD INVOLVE BEER AS OPPOSED TO HASH OIL AND WEED WHICH WOULD BE MORE WHAT THE KIDS THAT THINGS DON’T NECESSARILY END UP WELL FOR [DID], LOOKING BACK.” “WE’RE OUT EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND AND, UNLIKE BEING IN LETHBRIDGE WHERE HOUSE PARTIES MIGHT BE A LITTLE BIT MORE ACCESSIBLE AND CLOSE…[OUR] HOUSE PARTIES ARE MILES AWAY. YOU WOULD HAVE TO GET THERE AND GET BACK. I REMEMBER, CERTAINLY IN GRADE 11 IN THE FALL, I DON’T HAVE MY DRIVER’S LICENSE ‘CAUSE THAT’S 1985. [I WAS] THINKING AT THE TIME THAT, AS LONG AS I WASN’T THE ONE DRIVING, THEN IT WAS OKAY AND [I WASN’T] NECESSARILY KNOWING WHAT THE STATE [WAS] OF THE INDIVIDUAL THAT WAS DRIVING.” “IT WOULD BE ALSO AT THIS TIME THAT THE WHOLE DRINKING AND DRIVING THING WAS GOING DOWN BECAUSE, POTENTIALLY, THREE YEARS PREVIOUS IT WAS NOT, CULTURALLY, AS BIG OF A DEAL. BUT, BY 1985, IT’S A BIG DEAL. IT’S STARTING TO REALLY KICK IN…OVER THE YEARS, YOU’VE WITNESSED IT, THAT THERE’S PEOPLE THAT WILL DRINK AND DRIVE, PEOPLE THAT YOU KNOW.” “IN TERMS OF PARTYING, I KNOW THAT IN GRADE 10, I WASN’T PAYING ATTENTION. I WAS KEEPING UP WITH MY FRIENDS BUT I WASN’T PUTTING ANY EXTRA WORK INTO [SCHOOL]…I WAS MORE ABOUT [THE] SOCIAL [ASPECTS]. THEN, IN GRADE 11, IT BECAME PARTYING EVERY WEEKEND. BY GRADE 12, I WAS [THINKING], ‘OH, YOU KNOW WHAT, THIS IS ALL GOING TO COME TO AN END IN FAIRLY SHORT ORDER SO I BETTER START WORKING A LITTLE BIT HARDER.’ I REMEMBER THE WHOLE PARTY THING AS BEING A LITTLE BIT LESS. NOT TO SAY THAT IT WASN’T STILL GOING ON BUT I KNEW THAT I HAD TO WORK HARDER IN SCHOOL. IN GRADE 12, THOUGH, THESE KIDS ARE GETTING TO BE OLDER…THEY ARE ABLE TO START TO DRIVE BECAUSE THEY HAVE DRIVER’S LICENSES TO DRIVE INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ACTUALLY GET ADMITTED TO BARS. THEY WOULDN’T EVEN WANT ME TO BE WITH THEM BECAUSE IF THEY WANTED TO GO TO A SPECIFIC BAR, WHICH, IF IT WAS A REALLY COOL BAR, AND I WAS WITH THEM, AND I COULDN’T GET IN, THEN THEY COULDN’T GO.” “IN ALL HONESTY…MY RELATIONSHIPS WITH [MY CLASSMATES] MEANT SOMETHING AND THAT CLASS OF FIFTY KIDS. I GENERALLY, OVER ALL AT THE TIME, ENJOYED THEIR COMPANY. THEY WERE FRIENDS. WHEN I CAME INTO LETHBRIDGE, FOR SOME YEARS—YOU COULD ALMOST SAY IT WAS NOT TILL UNIVERSITY—BUT THERE WOULD BE A FEW YEARS THAT I WOULD HAVE VERY WARM FEELINGS WHERE TODAY I DON’T LOOK BACK UPON IT AS THIS ‘BEST TIME OF MY LIFE’.” “BECAUSE I DIDN’T GO TO HIGH SCHOOL THE CITY…THE CLASSES ARE A LOT SMALLER [IN PICTURE BUTTE]. BY THE TIME I GRADUATE IN JUNIOR HIGH, THERE’S ONLY SIXTEEN OF US. WHEN I GRADUATE [FROM] HIGH SCHOOL, THERE’S ONLY FIFTY. I THINK [THE LCI GRADUATING CLASS AT THE TIME] WAS THREE HUNDRED KIDS. IT WAS HUGE. WHERE YOU DON’T EVEN KNOW ALL THE KIDS. I GUESS THERE’S MORE OPPORTUNITY FOR POCKETS OF KIDS WHO WANT TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES MORE STRONGLY. TO HAVE OTHER KIDS WHO FEEL THE SAME WAY. TO SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER. BUT THERE, OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE, I WOULDN’T SAY IT’S THE CASE AT ALL. MAYBE IT’S MY NOT WANTING TO STAND OUT AND DRAW ATTENTION TO MYSELF…IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME THAT I FIT IN WHICH [DRINKING] WAS PART OF, TOO. IT WASN’T THAT I DON’T WANT TO DO THIS BUT I HAVE TO DO THIS, BECAUSE I WAS HAPPY TO DO THIS, ‘CAUSE I LIKE THE SOCIAL PART OF IT. THAT WAS ALSO PART AND PARCEL BECAUSE THEN THAT PUT YOU INTO ANOTHER GROUP IN TERMS OF ACCEPTABILITY. IN FACT KIDS THAT WOULD BE OLDER THAN YOU BY A YEAR OR TWO YEARS WOULD GIVE YOU ACCESS TO THOSE KIDS, TOO, ‘CAUSE THEN YOU WERE SHARING EXPERIENCES WITH THEM ON THE WEEKEND, CREATING CONNECTIONS WITH THEM.” MACLEAN NOTED HIS REASONS FOR SAVING AND DONATING THE BOTTLE, “I THINK I’VE SAVED THIS [BOTTLE] IN PART BECAUSE EITHER I THINK THAT IT’S HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT. I THINK SAFE GRADS AND DRINKING AND DRIVING [ARE] IMPORTANT.” “OVER TIME, [I THOUGHT] ‘YOU KNOW WHAT, THAT WAS FROM THE VERY FIRST SAFE GRAD OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE.’ IT MIGHT BE THE CASE ‘CAUSE WHEN [MY WIFE] GRADUATED, SHE HAD A SAFE GRAD AT LCI AND THAT COULD HAVE BEEN THE SAME YEAR…WEREN’T OUT [OF CLASSES] YET. [GRADUATION WOULD BE] IN JUNE AND I THINK WE WERE STILL IN CLASSES AFTER THAT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029007
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Date
1968
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.25
Length
18.5
Width
10
Description
RECTANGULAR BOX WITH HINGED LID, MADE OF SILVER WITH WOOD INTERIOR LINING. SCROLLWORK ON UPPER AND LOWER EDGES, WITH SCALLOPED SHAPE ON LIP OF LID. LID IS ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “PRESENTED TO HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS MARRIAGE JANUARY TWENTY FOURTH NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY EIGHT BY THE COMMANDING OFFICER AND OFFICERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY (MILITIA)”. BOTTOM OF BOX HAS FOUR CIRCLES OF GREEN FELT GLUED ON AT THE BOX’S CORNERS. A FAINT MAKERS’ STAMP AND SILVER HALLMARK ARE BARELY VISIBLE AT THE CENTER OF THE BOX’S BOTTOM – ONLY THE WORDS “OLD”, “MADE IN CANADA” AND “98” ARE LEGIBILE. BOX’S WOOD INTERIOR HAS SOME AREAS OF WHITE STAINING FROM REMNANTS OF SILVER POLISH. EXTERIOR IS TARNISHED. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
CONTAINER
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THIS BOX WAS GIVEN TO FRED KING TO COMMEMORATE HIS MARRIAGE TO NANCY TIDMARSH ON JANUARY 24, 1968, FROM THE OFFICERS OF THE 18TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. AFTER KING’S DEATH IN 1986, NANCY KEPT THE BOX, PASSING IT ALONG TO FAMILY FRIENDS CAROLE AND JACK ROBERTS, THE DONORS. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE ROBERTS ABOUT THEIR POSSESSION OF THE BOX ON JANUARY 19, 2015. CAROLE SAID: “WE BECAME GOOD FRIENDS [WITH NANCY]. WE HELPED HER MOVE [BECAUSE] SHE WAS ON HER OWN – HER HUSBAND HAD PASSED AWAY YEARS AGO AND SHE WAS A LADY THAT HAD MOVED HERE AS A YOUNG ENGLISH GIRL AFTER THE WAR TO WORK AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL… WE CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF THE BOX] BECAUSE SHE THOUGHT WE SHOULD GIVE IT TO THE MUSEUM OR GIVE IT TO THE LEGION. WE WERE DOWNSIZING FOR HER... I POLISHED IT AND PUT IT IN A PLACE OF HONOUR.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON FRED KING WAS FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P19790097000 - KING’S RCA SERGE UNIFORM. ACCORDING TO FREDERICK “FRED” THOMAS KING’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, “KING PASSED AWAY ON SATURDAY MARCH 8TH 1986, AT THE AGE OF 82 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. NANCY KING OF 1416, 15TH AVENUE SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE. BORN IN LONDON ENGLAND IN 1904, THE LATE MR. KING IMMIGRATED TO CANADA IN 1919 TO MAPLE CREEK SASKATCHEWAN. HE LATER MOVED TO WINNIPEG, MANITOBA WHERE HE TRAINED AS A MECHANIC FOR THE CPR. FRED LATER MOVED TO ALBERTA WHERE HE BECAME INVOLVED IN THE AUTOMOBILE BUSINESS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1927, FORMING FRED KING MOTOR CO. LTD., IN 1945, AND OPERATED A SUCCESSFUL AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP UNTIL RETIRING IN 1971. MR. KING WAS APPOINTED HONORARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL 18TH FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1965 AND HONORARY COLONEL 1969-1977. HE WAS ALSO APPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ARMY CADET LEAGUE OF CANADA FROM 1971-1977 AND SERVED ON THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ALBERTA ARMY CADET LEAGUE FROM 1971-78 AND WAS PRESIDENT FROM 1975-1976.” ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHY IN THE PERMANENT FILE, “KING ENLISTED AS GUNNER 112TH FIELD BATTERY, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1940 AND WAS COMMISSIONED LIEUTENANT 41ST FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1944. KING WAS ALSO AN HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL STEWART BRANCH OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION (AT THE TIME OF DONATION IN 1982).” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING SERVICE RECORDS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P19790097000. OTHER COLLECTED ARTIFACTS RELATED TO KING INCLUDE: P19820020000, P19820021000, P19820022001-6, P19820023000, P19820024000, AND P19860039000.
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
Acquisition Date
2013-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20180029002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
No. Pieces
1
Height
16
Length
24
Diameter
17.3
Description
GREEN AND BROWN CAMOFLAGUE PATTERN CAP WITH BRIM ON FRONT. CAP HAS STITCHED BAND ALONG FRONT EDGE AND ABOVE BRIM; BRIM HAS STITCHING IN SEMI-CIRCLE PATTERN WITH GREEN THREAD. INSIDE OF CAP HAS GREEN LINING; CAP HAS FLAPS ALONG EDGE THAT FOLD UP INTO CAP OR FOLD DOWN TO EXTEND CAP. CAP HAS FADED GREEN TAG ON INSIDE WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAP, COMBAT, WOODLAND CAMOUFLAGE PATTERN, DLA100-32-C-2002, 8415-01-084-1686, 65% COTTON, 35% NYLON, PROPPER INTERNATIONAL INC., SIZE: 7 ¼”. CAP HAS FADED GREEN TAG BELOW WITH PRINTED BLACK TEXT “CAP, COMBAT, WOODLAND CAMOUFLAGE PATTERN, 1.DO NOT WEAR CAP IN COLD WEATHER ENVIRONMENTS. USE CAP IN COLD WEATHER, INSULATING HELMET LINER. 2.IF CAP IS WORN UNDER HELMET, HELMET HEAD BAND MAY REQUIRE READJUSTMENT FOR PROPER FIT AND COMFORT. 3.MACHINE WASH. USE PERMANENT PRESS CYCLE. WAS IN WARM WATER WITH MILD DETERGENT. 4.HAND WASH. HAND WASH IN WARM WATER USING MILD DETERGENT. DO NOT WRING OR TWIST. RINSE IN CLEAN WARM WATER. 5.DO NOT USE CHLORINE BLEACH OR STARCH. 6.DRY AT LOW HEAT (DO NOT EXCEED 130 [DEGREE SYMBOL]F). DO NOT REMOVE THIS LABEL”. TAGS ARE STITCHED ONTO CAP LINING. CAP IS CREASED AT FRONT; BRIM IS FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE CAMOFLAGUE CAP, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE HAT…WOULD FIT ME. [IT] WOULD BE AN ADULT’S HAT.” “FOR REASONS I DON’T KNOW OR UNDERSTAND, I’VE HAD, TO VARYING DEGREES OVER MY LIFE, AN INTEREST IN MILITARY STUFF. MY EARLIEST MEMORIES OF THAT INTEREST WOULD BE HANGING OUT WITH MY COUSIN BRYAN IN LETHBRIDGE, AND HIS DAD [HE DIDN’T SERVE IN KOREA]…[WHO WAS] ENLISTING RIGHT ABOUT THE TIME IN KOREA. MY COUSIN HAD HIS DAD’S DOG TAGS AND I REMEMBER RUNNING AROUND THE PARK, AND WE WOULD TELL EVERYONE WE WERE IN THE ARMY AND I THOUGHT THAT WAS PRETTY COOL. THAT WOULD BE PROBABLY BE IN THE LATE 1970S—’78, ’79, ’80—THERE’S A BUNCH OF OTHER STUFF THAT’S GOING ON AT THE SAME TIME, WITH ROCKETS. FOR SOME REASON, I HAD A THING ABOUT ROCKETS. THE SPACE SHUTTLE IS STARTING TO LAUNCH IN 1981…EVEN MY BEDROOM WAS ROCKET-BASED STUFF. IN THE EARLY ‘80S—’81, ’82—I WAS TWELVE. MY COUSIN, WHOSE NAME IS REG [SAKAMOTO], MY MOM’S NEPHEW—MY MOM’S SISTER [MARRIED] A JAPANESE-CANADIAN, PROBABLY IN THE 1960S. [REG’S] PARENTS DIVORCE WHEN HE’S YOUNG. ONE MOVES TO HONOLULU AND THEN THE OTHER MOVES TO ARIZONA. HE’S RAISED BETWEEN HIS PARENTS IN THESE TWO STATES, AND BY 1982 HE COMES TO LIVE WITH US AND HE’S ABOUT SIX YEARS OLDER THAN I AM. HE WOULD BE THE CLOSEST THING THAT I WOULD HAVE TO A BROTHER, DEFINITELY, AT THE TIME. TO HAVE A BROTHER WHO’S [A HANDSOME GUY] AND [WHO HAS] THIS BACKGROUND OF HAVING LIVED IN HAWAII AND ARIZONA…YOU CAN IMAGINE IN YOUR HOUSE, WHEN YOU’RE TWELVE YEARS OLD, HAVING THIS FAMILY MEMBER.” “[IT] WAS REALLY COOL AND HE’S AN INTERESTING GUY AND SUPER FUNNY. AT SOME POINT, HE DECIDES TO LEAVE LETHBRIDGE AFTER HE’S BEEN LIVING HERE, IN THE CITY AND IN OUR HOME, FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. HE JOINS THE U.S. ARMY BECAUSE HE’S GOT AMERICAN PERMANENT RESIDENCY. I THINK HE HAD PERMANENT RESIDENCY ANYWAYS ‘CAUSE HE GREW UP THERE. HE GOES BACK AND HE JOINS.” “HE JUST MADE A LIFE CHOICE TO JOIN THE MILITARY…AND THIS PATTERN WAS DEVELOPED IN 1981 SO IT’S RELATIVELY NEW. BEFORE THAT, THEY WERE IN GREEN STUFF WHICH—WHEN YOU THINK OF M.A.S.H.—[WAS] THAT LOOK, THROUGH VIETNAM.” “[IT WAS DEVELOPED] BY THE U.S. MILITARY. SOMETIMES…I LIKE CERTAIN, SPECIFIC THINGS AND I’M NOT HAPPY WITH ANYTHING ELSE. I IDENTIFY THIS AS BEING SPECIAL BECAUSE IT’S JUST THE SOLDIERS THAT ARE WEARING IT. SO, I WANT IT. I DON’T KNOW IF HE IS IN [THE ARMY], BY THEN. POTENTIALLY, HE IS. I REMEMBER TELLING MY PARENTS I WANTED CAMOUFLAGE AND I LITERALLY REMEMBER GOING INTO A DEPARTMENT STORE AT THE TIME AND THERE WAS SOMETHING THERE—OTHERWISE IT WASN’T A THING. THROUGH THE ‘70S AND EARLY ‘80S YOU COULDN’T FIND IT. AT THE SAME TIME, THEY WERE STARTING TO DEVELOP HUNTING CAMOUFLAGE, WHICH I’VE NEVER CONNECTED WITH.” “SO, I SAID, “NO, I DON’T WANT HUNTING CAMO—THIS [ARMY CAMO] IS WHAT I WANT.” NEEDLESS TO SAY, REG IS IN THE MILITARY AND, IN 1983, HE’S SENDING ME LETTERS BACK, HE COMES BACK FOR A VISIT. IT COULD BE WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF HIS JOINING…HE BRINGS THIS BACK FOR ME WHICH HE BOUGHT DOWN THERE. HE COULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CAROLINAS AND HE GAVE ME THIS CAP, WHICH HAPPENS TO BE HIS OWN, PERSONAL CAP. AS PRESENTS GO, IT WOULDN’T HAVE COST HIM A TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF MONEY. BUT, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND IN CANADA, LET ALONE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THIS IS AT A TIME THAT THERE IS NO INTERNET. ANYTIME YOU WANT SOMETHING, YOU HAVE TO DO IT BY MAIL AND THIS IS RECENTLY DEVELOPED TECHNOLOGY. IT WOULD BE TWO YEARS OLD.” “MY BELIEF IS THAT THEY WOULD HAVE HAD STORES ON THE BASES WHERE [OFFICERS] COULD BUY THEIR OWN THINGS THAT SERVE THEIR OWN PERSONAL NEEDS. I’M PRETTY SURE THAT THIS IS WHERE HE GOT IT—IS FROM A STORE ON THE BASE.” ON HIS TIME WEARING THE CAP, MACLEAN RECALLED, “I WOULD GUESS I’M THIRTEEN [WHEN I’M GIVEN THE UNIFORM]. I WOULD HAVE BEEN IN APPROXIMATELY GRADE 8.” “IN TERMS OF THE WEAR OF THIS…IF YOU LOOK AT THE LABEL IT’S BEEN WORN. I DID WEAR IT. I WOULD BE SO PROUD TO WEAR A HAT THAT MY COUSIN, WHO IS IN THE U.S. ARMY, WAS WEARING…SO TREMENDOUSLY PROUD. I PROBABLY WORE THE HAT MORE BECAUSE I WAS VERY SELF-CONSCIOUS OF STICKING OUT. IF YOU ARE IN THE EARLY ‘80S, WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, THEN IT’S JUST…NUMBER ONE, IT WASN’T A TIME THAT YOU WANTED TO STICK OUT. THIS WOULD [HAVE SEEN] SOME WEAR BECAUSE HE HAD WORN IT HIMSELF DOWN IN THE STATES BEFORE HE GAVE IT TO ME.” “I DO REMEMBER WEARING IT SKIING IN WHITEFISH. ABOUT THE SAME TIME WE STARTED SKIING AS A FAMILY IN 1982. WE WOULD BE TRAVELING DOWN THERE AND THEN YOU WOULD FIND SURPLUS STORES IN THE U.S. SO, FOR ME, THE EXCITEMENT TO GO TO WHITEFISH WASN’T TO GO SKIING, IT WAS ACTUALLY TO GO TO THE SURPLUS STORES.” “[AT THE TIME] I STILL HAVE SOME SMALL INTEREST IN THIS SUBJECT MATTER. TO THE POINT WHERE [I WAS INTERESTED IN] WHAT THE CANADIANS WERE WEARING OVERSEAS IN AFGHANISTAN.” MACLEAN ELABORATED ON HIS INTEREST IN THE JACKET AND MILITARY HISTORY, NOTING, “WHILE ALL THIS IS GOING ON—THE 1980S—AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME…TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS KIND OF SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER. “ “I WOULD BE CONFIDENT THAT BY GRADE 10, I WAS NOT WEARING IT…MY INTEREST MOVED INTO THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “AGAIN, [REG IS] LIKE AN OLDER BROTHER TO ME. I GOT SOME PRETTY NICE GIFTS WHEN I WAS A KID. BUT, SOMEBODY BRINGING THIS BACK, ALL THE WAY FROM THE CAROLINAS, OR WHERE HE WAS POSTED—AND THE FACT THAT PROBABLY, EVEN BY ’85, IT WOULD BE NEAR IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND, ALTHOUGH YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO GET IT AT A SURPLUS STORE BY THEN—IT HAD A LOT OF MEANING TO ME. SO I’VE HUNG ONTO IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029002
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160007002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
34
Height
8.7
Length
20.5
Width
16.2
Description
.1: BOX, BOTTOM. WOOD. PAINTED RED ON THREE SIDES (TWO LONG AND ONE SHORT SIDE). FOURTH SIDE REMAINS UNFINISHED. PARTIALLY PAINTED BOTTOM. GROOVE ALONG TOP ON THREE SIDES FOR LID TO SLIDE INTO. H: 8.7CM L: 20.5CM W: 16.2CM POOR TO GOOD CONDITION. GROOVE FOR LID MISSING ALONG ONE LONG SIDE OF THE BOX. INTERIOR OF BOX IS STAINED, POSSIBLY WITH AN OILY SUBSTANCE. .2: BOX, LID. WOOD. PAINTED RED ON OUTSIDE, UNFINISHED INSIDE. CREST SHAPED INDENTATION IN LID, TO ALLOW IT TO BE OPENED. THREE SIDES OF LID HAVE A THIN SECTION OF WOOD, WHICH FITS INTO THE GROOVE OF THE BOX. H: 1.0CM L: 19.7CM W: 14.7CM POOR TO GOOD CONDITION. MISSING THIN SECTION OF WOOD ON ONE LONG SIDE. .3: ROOK. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.7CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CHIP ON BOTTOM. .4: ROOK. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.7CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5: KNIGHT. BLACK. WOOD. H: 5.0CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CHIP ON BOTTOM. .6: KNIGHT. BLACK. WOOD. H: 5.0CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .7: BISHOP. BLACK. WOOD. H: 5.6CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT PIECE IS MISSING, ABOVE THE GROOVE. SMALL CHIP ON SHOULDER. .8: BISHOP. BLACK. WOOD. H: 5.6CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT PIECE IS MISSING, ABOVE THE GROOVE. LARGE CHIPS ON SHOULDER SO THAT ABOUT HALF IS MISSING. .9: QUEEN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 7.1CM D: 3.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT TOP IS MISSING, ABOVE THE CROWN. SMALL CHIP IN CROWN. SMALL CHIP ON SHOULDER. SMALL INDENTATION ON UPPER PORTION OF THE BASE. .10: KING. BLACK. WOOD. H: 8.5CM D: 3.5CM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. TOP CROSS PORTION BROKEN, LEAVING A THIN PIECE WOOD THAT IS 0.9CM TALL STICKING OUT OF THE TOP. .11: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .12: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. CHIP ON SHOULDER, ALMOST HALF IS MISSING. .13: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. CHIP ON SHOULDER, ALMOST HALF IS MISSING. .14: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .15: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. CHIP ON SHOULDER, ALMOST HALF IS MISSING. .16: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CHIP ON SHOULDER. TWO WHITE SPOTS ON ROUND TOP. .17: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. TWO SMALL CHIPS ON BOTTOM. .18: PAWN. BLACK. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. CHIP ON SHOULDER, ALMOST HALF IS MISSING. .19: ROOK. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.7CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .20: ROOK. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.7CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .21: KNIGHT. WHITE. WOOD. H: 5.0CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. DIRT HAS ACCUMULATED IN THE DETAILED CARVINGS OF THE KNIGHT. .22: KNIGHT. WHITE. WOOD. H: 5.0CM D: 3.1CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. DIRT HAS ACCUMULATED IN THE DETAILED CARVINGS OF THE KNIGHT. .23: BISHOP. WHITE. WOOD. H: 5.6CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT PIECE IS MISSING, ABOVE THE GROOVE. SMALL GREEN SPOT JUST BLOW THE GROOVE. DIRTY JUST BELOW SHOULDER. .24: BISHOP. WHITE. WOOD. H: 5.6CM D: 3.1CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT PIECE IS MISSING, ABOVE THE GROOVE. SMALL CHIP ON SHOULDER. .25: QUEEN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 7.1CM D: 3.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. SMALL CIRCLE ON VERY TOP SUGGESTS THAT TOP IS MISSING, ABOVE THE CROWN. .26: KING. WHITE. WOOD. H: 8.5CM D: 3.5CM. 3.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .27: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. GOOD CONDITION. SMALL CHIP ON BOTTOM. .28: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .29: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .30: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .31: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .32: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .33: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. EXCELLENT CONDITION. .34: PAWN. WHITE. WOOD. H: 4.3CM D: 2.5CM. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. ROUND PORTION ABOVE SHOULDER COMPLETELY MISSING.
Subjects
GAME
Historical Association
LEISURE
MILITARY
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH HILARY WHITE AND WENDY RUSSELL, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN FEBRUARY 2016. WENDY IS THE DAUGHTER OF SERGEANT DENZIL ASHBY, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE RCMP DETACHMENT IN MEDICINE HAT WHERE WILLI MUELLER WAS HELD PRIOR TO HIS HANGING IN 1946. HILARY IS WENDY’S NIECE AND IS THE DAUGHTER OF ROSEMARY WELLS. WILLI MUELLER GAVE THE PAINTING AND THE CHESS SET TO DENZIL ASHBY. UPON HIS DEATH IN 1983, THE ITEMS WERE GIVEN TO ROSEMARY. SHE IN TURN GAVE THE TWO PIECES TO HER NEPHEW (AND WENDY’S SON) MICHAEL RUSSELL. WENDY EXPLAINED THAT MICHAEL “WAS VERY INTERESTED IN ANYTHING TO DO WITH MILITARY, PARTICULARLY CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY.” UPON MICHAEL’S DEATH, THE ITEMS WERE TRANSFERRED TO HILARY, WHO HAS DONATED THEM TO THE GALT. IN EXPLAINING HER MOTIVATIONS TO DO SO, HILARY SAID “I LIVE IN SINGAPORE AND I AM A RESEARCHER AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE, AND I KNOW HOW MUCH THESE THINGS ARE TREASURES, AND THE STORIES THAT GO WITH THEM. SO I WAS ENCOURAGED, WHILE WENDY HAS THE STORIES STILL FRESH IN HER MIND, (LAUGHTER) TO HOPEFULLY SHARE THEM WITH YOU.” THE RCMP DETACHMENT IN MEDICINE HAT HOUSED NOT ONLY THE PRISONERS, BUT THE ASHBY FAMILY AS WELL. WENDY EXPLAINED: “IT WAS JUST A RANCH HOME THAT HAD JUST BEEN DIVIDED AND MADE INTO A DETACHMENT. ON THE FRONT PART OF THE DETACHMENT, I REMEMBER, THERE WERE THE OFFICES, THE JAIL – I THINK THERE WERE TWO CELLS IN THE BASEMENT, AND I ONLY SORT OF PEEKED THROUGH A HOLE IN THE WALL TO SEE THEM. I DON’T THINK I EVER WENT NEAR THEM. AND THEN ON THE UPPER FLOOR, I THINK THE THIRD FLOOR, WAS WHERE THE CONSTABLES SLEPT. THERE WAS ONLY ONE MARRIED OFFICER AND THAT WAS MY FATHER AND THE REST WERE ALL CONSTABLES. SO WE WOULD USUALLY HAVE TWO OR THREE.” SHE ELABORATED, SAYING: “I CAN REMEMBER SITTING ON THE BASEMENT STEPS BECAUSE THE HOUSE WAS DIVIDED. IT WAS AN RCMP DETACHMENT AND SO THE JAILS WERE IN THE BASEMENT ON THE OFFICE SIDE, AND THE PERSONAL WAS ON THE OTHER, AND I WOULD SIT ON THE STAIRS AND LISTEN TO WILLI PLAY HIS HARMONICA. AND IT WAS LILI MARLENE. I GET ALL TEARY WHEN I THINK – BUT HE WAS A VERY, VERY PLEASANT YOUNG MAN. I DON’T REALLY VISUALIZE – I, SEEING PICTURES OF HIM NOW, I CAN RECALL HIS NICE COUNTENANCE. HE HAD A VERY FRIENDLY FACE AND VERY RELAXED, VERY, VERY PERSONABLE, VERY RELIABLE, VERY RESPECTFUL. AND I KNOW MY MOTHER, OF COURSE, DID ALL THE HOME COOKING FOR THE PRISONERS THERE, SO WILLI HAD NICE HOME COOKING, CHOCOLATE CAKE, AND I CAN’T REMEMBER ANYTHING THAT WAS BAD BECAUSE I THINK MY FATHER KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CALM. I HAD NO IDEA THAT THERE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP. I WOULDN’T KNOW WHAT THAT MEANT, AND EVEN THAT WILLI WAS GOING TO BE HANGED. BUT OF COURSE, MY SISTER DID.” SHE CONTINUED: “BEING A SMALL CHILD, I WAS JUST AWARE THAT HE WAS THERE. HE WAS CUTTING THE GRASS AND HE WAS A PLEASANT PERSON AND ROSEMARY WAS VERY FOND OF HIM. SHE WAS A TEENAGER AND HE WAS A NICE LOOKING YOUNG MAN AND I THINK SHE SORT OF HAD A CRUSH ON HIM. HE WAS VERY GENTLE AND AS I SAY, VERY RESPECTFUL.” SHE DESCRIBED WILLI FURTHER: “HE WAS VERY RESPECTFUL; HE WASN’T A PUSHY PERSON, OR LIKE, WE OFTEN THINK OF THE GERMANS AS BEING ALOOF AND – BUT HE WASN’T. HE WAS JUST A VERY NATURAL AND VERY – MY FATHER LEFT HIM IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT ONCE. IT WAS A BIT OF – THIS IS ALL HEARSAY, BUT THERE WAS A FIRE SOMEWHERE NEAR MEDICINE HAT AND IT WAS SPREADING AND THEY NEEDED TO GO, SO DAD TOOK ALL THE – MAYBE TWO CONSTABLES AND HIMSELF, AND THEY HAD TO GO, SO HE LEFT WILLI CUTTING THE GRASS AND APPARENTLY HE TOLD HIM, HE SAID, ‘NOW WE HAVE AN EMERGENCY.’ HE SAID, ‘YOU’RE IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT. I EXPECT YOU TO BE HERE WHEN I GET BACK.’ AND HE SAID, ‘YES,’ AND HE WAS.” WENDY’S MOTHER ALSO FOUND WILLI CHARMING: “MY MOTHER THOUGHT HE WAS LOVELY, BECAUSE HE WAS SUCH A GENTLEMAN, I THINK.” WENDY HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE CHESS SET: “I THINK MY FATHER MENTIONED THAT THEY WERE PROVIDED WITH CHESS SETS OR THINGS TO OCCUPY THEIR TIME IN SOME OF THE CAMPS, AND THAT WILLI HAD THIS SET WITH HIM AND HE USED TO PLAY IT IN THE – I DON’T KNOW IF HE PLAYED WITH, YOU KNOW, BY HIMSELF OR SOMEBODY ELSE - ONE OF THE OTHER BOYS THAT WERE IN THE STATION WOULD PLAY WITH HIM. I DO KNOW THAT [THE PAINTING AND CHESS SET] BELONGED TO HIM, AND WHEN HE WAS TAKEN AWAY, HE PRESENTED THESE TO MY FATHER.” WENDY RECALLS BEING TOO YOUNG TO KNOW THAT WILLI HAD BEEN HANGED, BUT FIGURED THAT HER SISTER ROSEMARY KNEW: “WE JUST KNEW THAT HE HAD GONE. BUT ROSEMARY WOULD HAVE KNOWN [THAT HE WAS EXECUTED], AND THAT’S MAYBE WHY – I DON’T KNOW WHAT HILARY CAN TELL YOU, HOW, IF ROSEMARY TOLD HER HOW SHE FELT ABOUT IT.” HILARY RESPONDED, SAYING: “SHE DID A LOT. SHE TOLD ME LOTS OF STORIES, BUT I WAS LIKE, “AAH, MOM.” YOU KNOW I WAS FAIRLY YOUNG, PROBABLY ROLLING MY EYES ABOUT SOME ROMANCE OR SOMETHING SHE HAD WITH THIS GUY, AND I JUST REMEMBER HER TELLING ME THAT HE DIED ON HER BIRTHDAY AND IT WAS DEVASTATING, AND SHE STILL CRIED ABOUT IT … SHE MUST HAVE BEEN VERY EMOTIONALLY ATTACHED TO HIM … BUT I DON’T REALLY KNOW ANY OF THE DETAILS. I’M JUST READING ABOUT IT NOW, AND I DON’T WANT TO MIX IT UP BETWEEN WHAT SHE TOLD ME AND WHAT I’M READING.” WHEN ASKED IF THE PAINTING HAD BEEN DISPLAYED, WENDY REPLIED: “YES. [MY DAD DENZIL] HAD THIS IN HIS DEN AND HE HAD A DEN/OFFICE BECAUSE HE LATER BECAME A PROVINCIAL COURT JUDGE IN B.C. AND THIS WAS ALWAYS ON HIS WALL IN THAT LITTLE ROOM IN THE BASEMENT THAT HE HAD. THAT WAS JUST IN HIS DISPLAY CASE.” WENDY THINKS HER FATHER HELD ONTO THE PAINTING AND CHESS SET BECAUSE HE FELT WILLI SHOULDN’T HAVE BEEN HANGED: “I HAVE A FEELING [DAD] THOUGHT AT THE TIME, THAT WILLI SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN HANGED. AND I THINK THAT THAT WEIGHED ON HIM, BUT THIS IS MY FEELING, BECAUSE WILLI THOUGHT THAT BECAUSE HE WAS GIVING EVIDENCE. THIS WAS A TIME OF WAR WHEN WE ALLOWED, IF I UNDERSTAND, THE CAMPS BE RUN BY THE OFFICERS – THEY HAD THEIR OWN HIERARCHY – AND HE WAS COMMANDED OR ORDERED TO COMMIT THIS CRIME, AND DAD, I THINK, FELT BADLY ABOUT THIS. THIS WAS NOT THE – HE WAS ORDERED AND IN A TIME OF WAR, IF YOU DIDN’T DO WHAT YOUR OFFICER SAID, YOU WERE KILLED. YOU KNOW, YOU WERE – SO I THINK THAT, PERHAPS WAS A PART OF IT.” A SPECIAL SERIES FROM THE EDMONTON JOURNAL ENTITLED “HANGED: A SPECIAL SERIES ABOUT THE HISTORY OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT IN ALBERTA” INDICATES THAT THE GERMAN P.O.W.S PLAYED CHESS TO PASS THE TIME: “THE FOUR GERMANS SPENT THE DAYS BEFORE THEIR EXECUTION PLAYING CHEST, SHOUTING THEIR MOVES TO EACH OTHER FROM SEPARATE CELLS. NONE OF THE MEN WOULD SPEAK TO [DONALD SHERMAN] STALEY, WHO SPENT HIS FINAL DAYS DOING JIGSAW PUZZLES ALONE.” THE FOLLOWING PARAGRAPHS PULL THEIR INFORMATION FROM A SERIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. BIOGRAPHIC DETAILS FOR WILLI MUELLER ARE FOUND IN AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON APRIL 30, 1946: FELDWEBEL (SERGEANT MAJOR) WILLI MUELLER WAS BORN IN SILESIA, HIS NATIVE CITY BEING KLEINA IN THE PROVINCE OF GORSEROTZ. HE MADE HIS HOME IN ROSETZ IN TROCHENG, WHERE HE WORKED AS AN ENGINE MECHANIC IN CIVILIAN LIFE. MUELLER WENT INTO THE GERMAN NAVY IN 1934 AND THE FOLLOWING YEAR TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE.” AT THE TIME THE ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED, MUELLER WAS A “32-YEAR-OLD LUFTWAFFE MECHANIC, WHO WAS CAPTURED NEAR GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, ON MAY 6, 1941, AFTER HIS BOMBER WAS SHOT DOWN INTO A SWAMP BY A SPITFIRE FIGHTER. HE WEARS BOTH THE FIRST AND SECOND CLASS VERSIONS OF THE IRON CROSS AND COMPLETED 87 OPERATIONAL FLIGHTS.” THE ARTICLE CONTINUED: “WHEN HIS PLANE WAS SHOT DOWN INTO A SWAMP NEAR GLASGOW, BOTH MUELLER’S LEGS WERE BROKEN AND HE ALSO SUFFERED A FRACTURE OF A VERTEBRA. THE CAPTAIN AND LIEUTENANT IN THE BOMBER WERE KILLED. AFTER BEING RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL AND REGAINING HIS HEALTH, MUELLER WAS BROUGHT TO CANADA AND FOR SIX MONTHS WORKED IN A LUMBER CAMP NEAR FLANDERS, ONT. A SINGLE MAN, HE SPEAKS SPANISH AND ONLY A LITTLE ENGLISH.” MUELLER WAS PUT ON TRIAL FOR HIS INVOLVEMENT IN THE MURDER OF UNTEROFFIZIER (CORPORAL) DR. KARL LEHMANN, A FELLOW GERMAN PRISONER OF WAR, ON SEPTEMBER 10, 1944, AT THE MEDICINE HAT PRISONER OF WAR CAMP, NUMBER 132. LEHMANN “WAS BELIEVED TO BE A GERMAN DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND AN ANTI-NAZI” ACCORDING TO AN APRIL 20, 1946 ARTICLE. A JULY 30, 1946 ARTICLE SAID THE FOLLOWING: “LEHMANN’S REPUTATION PRIOR TO HIS DEATH WAS THAT HE WAS A ‘GOOD SPORTSMAN’ AND A ‘GOOD COMRADE.’ AFTER HIS DEATH THE RUMOR HAD BEEN THAT HE WAS A ‘TRAITOR.’” THREE OTHER P.O.W.S WERE IMPLICATED IN THE MURDER AS WELL: BRUNO PERZENOWSKI (ALSO SPELT PERZONOWSKY), WALTER WOLF, AND HEINRICH BUSCH. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON MAY 3, 1946 EXPLAINS THE MOTIVATION BEHIND THE KILLING OF LEHMANN: “PERZENOWSKI INFORMED THEM THAT HE HAD ‘ORDERS TO PUT LEHMANN ASIDE’ BECAUSE HE WAS PLANNING A COMMUNISTIC OVERTHROW AND THAT LEHMANN WAS SUPPOSED TO BE ‘THE CHIEF OF THIS COMMUNISTIC GROUP.’ MUELLER WROTE [IN A STATEMENT GIVEN TO POLICE VOLUNTARILY] THAT AS ‘I WAS A STRONG MAN, PERZENOWSKI GAVE ME THE ORDER TO HELP DO AWAY WITH LEHMANN.” ANOTHER ARTICLE PUBLISHED JUNE 27, 1946 GIVES ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: “MUELLER TOLD … THAT ON THE AFTERNOON OF LEHMANN’S HANGING HE HAD BEEN SUMMONED TO PERZENOWSKI’S QUARTERS. HERE HE WAS TOLD BY [PERZENOWSKI] OF AN ORDER RECEIVED FROM THE ‘HIGHER-UPS’ STATING THAT A ‘COURT HAD TAKEN PLACE AND THAT DURING THAT COURT THREE OR FIVE MEN HAD STATED UNDER OATH THAT CPL. LEHMANN HAD BEEN THE RINGLEADER OF A COMMUNISTIC GROUP WHICH THREATENED TO OVERTHROW THE CAMP LEADERSHIP.’ THE ORDER FURTHER STATED ‘THAT LEHMANN WAS TO BE REMOVED AND THAT I (MUELLER) WOULD HAVE TO ASSIST IN IT.’” IN AN ADDITIONAL ARTICLE, PUBLISHED MAY 13, 1946, AN UNIDENTIFIED GERMAN P.O.W. TESTIFIED THAT KARL LEHMANN WAS HANGED BECAUSE HE WAS “‘SUPPOSED TO BE DANGEROUS FOR THE GENERAL CAMP PUBLIC.’” FINALLY, AN ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 18, 1946 EXPLAINS FURTHER: “NAZI LEADERS HAD ORDERED LEHMANN KILLED WHEN HE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR IN BRITAIN AFTER HAVING BEEN SHOT DOWN WHILE SERVING WITH THE LUFTWAFFE, BECAUSE HE WAS AN ANTI-NAZI. AT THAT TIME HE WAS DETAINED AT A CAMP WITH PERZENOWSKI, MUELLER, AND BUSCH BUT WAS TRANSFERRED TO CANADA BEFORE THE ORDERS COULD BE EXECUTED. HE AGAIN MET SOME OF HIS FORMER FELLOW CAPTIVES AT THE MEDICINE HAT CAMP AND AFTER THE ATTEMPT ON HITLER’S LIFE. NAZI LEADERS IN THAT CAMP WERE ORDERED BY HIDDEN SHORT WAVE RADIO TO KILL ALL TRAITORS TO NAZISM AND ALL COMMUNISTS. LEHMANN HAD BEEN LECTURING AGAINST NAZI IDEOLOGY AT THE CAMP.” AT HIS TRIAL, PERZENOWSKI TRIED TO TAKE THE BLAME FOR THE MURDER. AN ARTICLE FROM JUNE 28, 1946 GIVES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: SERGEANT-MAJOR BRUNO PERZENOWSKI “ADMITTED THAT WITHOUT HAVING BEEN DIRECTLY ORDERED TO DO SO, HE HAD GIVEN THE ORDER TO HAVE LEHMANN REMOVED, AND HE EXPRESSED THE DESIRE THAT FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE MURDER BE PLACED ON HIM AND THAT THOSE HE HAD ORDERED TO ASSIST HIM IN THE HANGING BE NOT BLAMED.” IT CONTINUED SAYING THAT “…THE ACCUSED HAD CONSIDERED [THAT] HE WAS ACTING ACCORDING TO GERMAN MILITARY LAW WHEN ORDERING THE HANGING.” IN AN ARTICLE FROM JUNE 27, 1946, MUELLER EXPLAINED THAT THE MURDER “HAD BEEN PLANNED AND ALL PREPARATIONS MADE PRIOR TO HIS GOING TO THE HEAD BARRACKS OF HUTS DZ.” IT CONTINUED: “IT HAD ALSO BEEN ARRANGED THAT AT A GIVEN SIGNAL HE (MUELLER) WAS TO HIT LEHMANN ON THE CHIN AND KNOCK HIM DOWN. THEN THE NOOSE WAS TO BE PUT OVER HIS NECK AND HE WAS TO BE HANGED.” THE ARTICLE CONTINUED: “‘AS I ARRIVED AT THE HUT I WAS HANDED A ROPE AND A STICK BY SOMEONE AND I WAS INSTRUCTED TO HIT LEHMANN WITH THE STICK. I THREW THE STICK AWAY AND STUCK THE ROPE IN MY POCKET,’ [MUELLER] TESTIFIED. SHORTLY AFTER LEHMANN ARRIVED AND WAS ASKED BY PERZENOWSKI ‘IF HE KNEW ANYTHING ABOUT THE COMMUNISTIC ACTIVITIES. THAT WAS THE SIGNAL FOR ME TO HIT HIM.’ MUELLER SAID WHEN HE HIT HIM WITH HIS FIST, LEHMANN FELL OFF THE BENCH ON WHICH HE WAS SITTING AND THE REST OF THOSE IN THE ROOM ‘FELL UPON HIM.’ THE ROPE WAS THEN ADJUSTED ON THE VICTIM’S NECK BY ‘MYSELF AND BUSCH.’ LEHMANN WAS THEN LIFTED UP AND WHEN THE OTHER END OF THE ROPE HAD BEEN TIED, ‘I BELIEVE BY BUSCH’ TO THE GAS PIPE, ‘I LEFT.’ … [MUELLER] HAD NOT SEEN THE ORDER WHICH PERZENOWSKI SAID HE RECEIVED FROM THE ‘HIGHEST AUTHORITY’ AND HE ‘HAD THE IMPRESSION PERZENOWSKI DID NOT WANT HIM TO SEE IT.’” THE FOUR GERMAN P.O.W.S WERE FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER AND ALL WERE SENTENCED TO HANG. THREE OF THE MEN ATTEMPTED TO COMMIT SUICIDE PRIOR TO THEIR HANGING, INCLUDING MUELLER. THE MEN EXPLAINED, IN A DECEMBER 18, 1946 ARTICLE, “THAT THEY TRIED TO COMMIT SUICIDE IN A DETERMINED EFFORT TO ESCAPE HANGING LIKE CRIMINALS … THEY HAD MADE APPEALS TO BE SHOT ‘LIKE SOLDIERS.’” THE ARTICLE CONTINUED SAYING: “THE TRAP DOOR FOR MUELLER AND WOLF WAS SPRUNG AT 1242 AND THE LATTER WAS PRONOUNCED DEAD IN 12 MINUTES AND MUELLER WAS DEAD THREE MINUTES LATER.” THE FOUR P.O.W.S WERE HUNG AT THE SAME TIME AS DONALD SHERMAN STALEY, WHO WAS CONVICTED OF THE MURDER OF TWO YOUNG BOYS. THE DECEMBER 18 ARTICLE CONTINUED: “EACH OF THE NAZIS EXPRESSED RESENTMENT AT BEING SCHEDULED TO HANG WITH STALEY, THE GERMANS REGARDING HIM AS ‘A CRIMINAL’ BECAUSE HE MURDERED TWO YOUNG BOYS. THEY TREATED HIM WITH CONTEMPT … EACH OF THE MURDERERS WAS HANGED WEARING REGULAR PRISON CLOTHING CONSISTING OF A BLUE SHIRT, KHAKI TROUSERS AND A PAIR OF CANVAS SLIPPERS.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR A COPY OF THE INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, A COPY OF THE SPECIAL “HANGED” FROM THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, AND FOR COPIES OF THE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20160007002
Acquisition Date
2016-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

91 records – page 1 of 5.