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1959-1960 Order of the Royal Purple Officers

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92397
Date Range
1959-1960
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171064016126
Physical Description
Black and White photograph 5X7in
Scope and Content
Order of the Royal Purple Ladies grouped together for picture. 1959-1960 officers. Opal Jaylar, Patricia Van Horne, Dorothy Sarenson, Betty Deak, Alma Naylar, Kay Michalouski, Connie McLaren, Mary Nicalson, Arleen Price, Norma Spoulas, Rene Schnider, Emma Hackett, Ethel Stark, Veroua Smee, Marge Na…
  1 image  
Date Range
1959-1960
Description Level
Item
Creator
Order of the Royal Purple Lethbridge Lodge #32
Physical Description
Black and White photograph 5X7in
Physical Condition
Good
History / Biographical
The Order of Royal Purple was founded in Vancouver, British Columbia in September 1914. Several wives of the Elks created an informal group in 1913 to assist their husbands with benevolent, charitable and social work. In 1914, they became the recognized female auxiliary of the Elks of Canada. The objectives of the Order were to promote the principles of Justice, Charity, Sisterly Love and Fidelity, to promote the welfare and enhance the happiness of its members or for other purposes. In addition, the Order was to quicken the spirit of women toward a pure and noble citizenship, to promote harmony and good fellowship, to relieve suffering whenever possible and to strive at all times to make “Life sweeter, women better, and the world happier.” The logo was a diamond with an elk head in the center, a clock pointing to 11 o’clock opposite a pansy and the word Canada on the banner. The pansy was the official flower of the Order. The Royal Purple was a very secretive society. They required passwords for every meeting and National Conventions. The Password could only be changed by the Supreme Honored Royal Lady and the Lodges would be notified every 6 months of the password change. The colors of the Order were purple, white and gold. The tassels on their purple pill box hats represents the individual’s status. White tassel means lodge member, white and purple means Honored Royal Lady (or local president), gold for District Deputy, and purple for Supreme Honored Royal Lady (National Leader.) A non-member can be granted honorary memberships for their contributions to the Lodge. Meetings would begin and end with floor work. Each Lodge and District develop their own bylaws and Rules of Order. In 2014 the Supreme Executive of the Order of Royal Purple decided to secede from the Elks and start a new organization, the Canadian Royal Purple Society. Some locals, however, wished to remain with the Elks and these were integrated into the organization of the Elks of Canada as Royal Purple Elks Lodges. Lethbridge Lodge No. 32 was instituted on April 27, 1928 by PSHRL Mattie Lane and 23 ladies were initiated into the Order. Teas, bake sales, craft sales, rummage sales, and bingos have been annual fundraising activities for the lodge. One of their larger projects was to supply an Audiology Unit (a brain stem evoked response audiometer) costing $40,000.00 for the Regional hospital. They also undertook to supply Lifeline Units to the Auxiliary Hospital. The ladies also supported the local Soup Kitchen, local Food Bank, Parents Place, Harbor House for abused women and children, Meals on Wheels, Keep in Touch as well as other charities. The Lodge was also a supporters of the Elks and Royal Purple Fund for children. They disbanded at the end of 2017. - Information from the Royal Purple of Canada book and interview transcript For more information check out the interview with Ann Marie MacDonald and the donation of Wilma Wood Royal Purple Regalia Accession Number P20170007001
Scope and Content
Order of the Royal Purple Ladies grouped together for picture. 1959-1960 officers. Opal Jaylar, Patricia Van Horne, Dorothy Sarenson, Betty Deak, Alma Naylar, Kay Michalouski, Connie McLaren, Mary Nicalson, Arleen Price, Norma Spoulas, Rene Schnider, Emma Hackett, Ethel Stark, Veroua Smee, Marge Narster, and Mary Neve.
Access Restrictions
Public
Accession No.
20171064016126
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

1960-1961 Order of the Royal Purple Officers

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92395
Date Range
1960-1961
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171064016068
Physical Description
Colored photograph
Scope and Content
Ladies posing for group picture. Opal Jaylar, Patricia Van Horne, Alma Naylar, Kay Michalouski, Connie McLaren, Chris Moodie, Emma Hackett, Mary Nicalson, Arleen Price, Norma Spoulas, Alice Kennedy, Dorothy Sarenson, Betty Deak, Ethel Stark, Veroua Smee, and Mary Neve.
  1 image  
Date Range
1960-1961
Description Level
Item
Creator
Order of the Royal Purple Lethbridge Lodge #32
Physical Description
Colored photograph
Physical Condition
Good
History / Biographical
The Order of Royal Purple was founded in Vancouver, British Columbia in September 1914. Several wives of the Elks created an informal group in 1913 to assist their husbands with benevolent, charitable and social work. In 1914, they became the recognized female auxiliary of the Elks of Canada. The objectives of the Order were to promote the principles of Justice, Charity, Sisterly Love and Fidelity, to promote the welfare and enhance the happiness of its members or for other purposes. In addition, the Order was to quicken the spirit of women toward a pure and noble citizenship, to promote harmony and good fellowship, to relieve suffering whenever possible and to strive at all times to make “Life sweeter, women better, and the world happier.” The logo was a diamond with an elk head in the center, a clock pointing to 11 o’clock opposite a pansy and the word Canada on the banner. The pansy was the official flower of the Order. The Royal Purple was a very secretive society. They required passwords for every meeting and National Conventions. The Password could only be changed by the Supreme Honored Royal Lady and the Lodges would be notified every 6 months of the password change. The colors of the Order were purple, white and gold. The tassels on their purple pill box hats represents the individual’s status. White tassel means lodge member, white and purple means Honored Royal Lady (or local president), gold for District Deputy, and purple for Supreme Honored Royal Lady (National Leader.) A non-member can be granted honorary memberships for their contributions to the Lodge. Meetings would begin and end with floor work. Each Lodge and District develop their own bylaws and Rules of Order. In 2014 the Supreme Executive of the Order of Royal Purple decided to secede from the Elks and start a new organization, the Canadian Royal Purple Society. Some locals, however, wished to remain with the Elks and these were integrated into the organization of the Elks of Canada as Royal Purple Elks Lodges. Lethbridge Lodge No. 32 was instituted on April 27, 1928 by PSHRL Mattie Lane and 23 ladies were initiated into the Order. Teas, bake sales, craft sales, rummage sales, and bingos have been annual fundraising activities for the lodge. One of their larger projects was to supply an Audiology Unit (a brain stem evoked response audiometer) costing $40,000.00 for the Regional hospital. They also undertook to supply Lifeline Units to the Auxiliary Hospital. The ladies also supported the local Soup Kitchen, local Food Bank, Parents Place, Harbor House for abused women and children, Meals on Wheels, Keep in Touch as well as other charities. The Lodge was also a supporters of the Elks and Royal Purple Fund for children. They disbanded at the end of 2017. - Information from the Royal Purple of Canada book and interview transcript For more information check out the interview with Ann Marie MacDonald and the donation of Wilma Wood Royal Purple Regalia Accession Number P20170007001
Scope and Content
Ladies posing for group picture. Opal Jaylar, Patricia Van Horne, Alma Naylar, Kay Michalouski, Connie McLaren, Chris Moodie, Emma Hackett, Mary Nicalson, Arleen Price, Norma Spoulas, Alice Kennedy, Dorothy Sarenson, Betty Deak, Ethel Stark, Veroua Smee, and Mary Neve.
Access Restrictions
Public
Accession No.
20171064016068
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Advertising Letter. Unidentified Photographs.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions89028
Date Range
1907-1969
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161015
Physical Description
1 document. Three 21.5 x 28 cm black and white photographs.
Scope and Content
Photocopy of an advertising letter, dated December 20, 1907, from Mighton & Cavanagh Brokers of Nelson, B.C., recommending purchase of shares in the Royal Collieries Mine in Lethbridge, Alberta. Reproduction prints of an unidentified house with automobiles in front, a group of young men in a mounta…
Date Range
1907-1969
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 document. Three 21.5 x 28 cm black and white photographs.
Scope and Content
Photocopy of an advertising letter, dated December 20, 1907, from Mighton & Cavanagh Brokers of Nelson, B.C., recommending purchase of shares in the Royal Collieries Mine in Lethbridge, Alberta. Reproduction prints of an unidentified house with automobiles in front, a group of young men in a mountain setting, and an aerial view of a small unidentified village.
Accession No.
20161015
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Agnes Davidson School and Gilbert Paterson School Memorabilia.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions89996
Date Range
1969-1979
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171071
Physical Description
1 cm textual records.
Scope and Content
Photocopies of: - Program of an Agnes Davidson School production of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs". - Program of an Agnes Davidson School production of "Pinocchio". - 7 colour 23 x 16.5 cm photographs: 20171071001: group photograph of children from Aunt Dorothy's Playhouse, operated by Dorothy …
Date Range
1969-1979
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 cm textual records.
Scope and Content
Photocopies of: - Program of an Agnes Davidson School production of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs". - Program of an Agnes Davidson School production of "Pinocchio". - 7 colour 23 x 16.5 cm photographs: 20171071001: group photograph of children from Aunt Dorothy's Playhouse, operated by Dorothy Gentleman. Taken on the steps of Lethbridge City Hall. 20171071002: Agnes Davidson School. Year 1. 1969-1970. 20171071003: Agnes Davidson School. Year 2. 1970-1971. 20171071004: Agnes Davidson School. Year 3. 1971-1972. 20171071005: Agnes Davidson School. Year 4. 1972-1973. 20171071006: Agnes Davidson School. Grade 5. 1973-1974. 20171071007: Agnes Davidson School. Grade 6. 1974-1975. - Program of the 1978 Gilbert Paterson School Grade 9 Graduation "Thank You for being a Friend".
Accession No.
20171071
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Agriculture Canada. Lethbridge Research Centre. Weekly Letters.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88846
Date Range
1959-1996
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161005
Physical Description
7 cm. of textual records.
Scope and Content
Lethbridge Research Centre sharing expertise with China Nader Foroud 1996 3199 Forages in saline areas may cause mineral deficiencies in beef cattle Jim J. Miller, Bill J. Read, Don J. Wentz 1996 3198 Measuring stress objectively in sheep Gerry Mears 1996 3197 Parasites of feedlot flies in sou…
Date Range
1959-1996
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
7 cm. of textual records.
History / Biographical
Weekly letters describing research performed at the Agriculture Canada Research Station in Lethbridge, Alberta.
Scope and Content
Lethbridge Research Centre sharing expertise with China Nader Foroud 1996 3199 Forages in saline areas may cause mineral deficiencies in beef cattle Jim J. Miller, Bill J. Read, Don J. Wentz 1996 3198 Measuring stress objectively in sheep Gerry Mears 1996 3197 Parasites of feedlot flies in southern Alberta Kevin Floate 1996 3196 AC Sunset, new safflower registered H.-Henning Mundel, Henry C. Huang, John P. Braun 1996 3195 Feed enzymes can improve beef cattle performance Karen A. Beauchemin, Lyle M. Rode 1996 3194 AC Harper, a new feed barley Ken W. May 1996 3193 Forage establishment economics Elwin G. Smith, Jim R. Moyer 1996 3192 New potato processing varieties can be stored at low temperatures Dermot Lynch, Larry Kawchuk 1996 3191 Powdery mildew an ally in controlling hound’s tongue Rosemarie DeClerck-Floate 1996 3190 Grazing behavior of cattle on rough fescue prairie in winter Walter Willms 1996 3189 Gray mold has become an important disease of dry bean and lentil in southern Alberta Henry H.C. Huang, Gilles Saindon 1996 3188 Scentless chamomile new weed threat R.E. (Bob) Blackshaw, K.N. (Neil) Harker 1996 3187 Research initiated on composting of livestock manure Frank J. Larney 1996 3186 DNA techniques helping to develop disease resistant wheat Andre Laroche, Tigst Demeke, Denis Gaudet 3185 Remember herbicide residues when planning crop rotations Jim R. Moyer 1996 3184 Adjust alfalfa seeding rate to local climate Darryl G. Stout, Donald J. Thompson 1996 3183 A hard seed to crack Surya N. Acharya 1996 3182 Alfalfa top legume at low and high elevations Darryl Stout 1996 3181 New navy bean will diversify producer options Gilles Saindon, Henry Huang, H.-Henning Mundel 1996 3180 Prevention of timber milkvetch poisoning W. Majak, L. Stroesser 1996 3179 Cicer milkvetch being improved for pasture Surya N. Acharya 1996 3177 Five rules for getting a good forage stand Surya N. Acharya 1995 3176 Chemistry techniques simplify ivermectin detection W. (Wes) Taylor, T. (Terry) J. Danielson 1996 3174 Soil respiration – a sign of life in the soil Ben Ellert 1995 3173 Enzyme differences may affect performance of cattle breeds Priya S. Mir 1995 3172 Bulls must keep their cool John P. Kastelic, R. Byrne Cook. Glenn H. Coulter 1995 3171 Warble vaccine nearing commercialization Robert W. Baron 1995 3169 Soil’s dynamic equilibrium John Dormaar 1995 3168 Managing sainfoin for seed and forage Joanna Fraser 1995 3167 Assessing stress in sheep and cattle Gerry Mears 1995 3166 Earthworms and tillage Jill Clapperton 1995 3165 New techniques ensure high levels of disease resistance in potato varieties D.R. (Dermot) Lynch, L.M. (Larry) Kawchuk, P.S. (Piara) Bains 1995 3164 Some flies are natural enemies of grasshoppers Troy Danyk, Dan Johnson, Craig Andrews 1995 3162 High-density upright beans worth a try Gilles Saindon, Henry Huang 1995 3160 Stripe rust outlook R.L. (Bob) Conner 3158 Computers help with farm decisions E.G. Smith, C. Pavlik, C.W. Lindwall, M. Green 1995 3157 Sunbathing grasshoppers Derek J. Lactin, Dan L. Johnson 1995 3156 Climate change – believe it or not David J. Major, Alassane Toure 1995 3155 Managing crop stubble on fallow R. (Bob) E. Blackshaw 1995 3154 Selenium availability in ruminants Karen M. Koenig, Lyle M. Rode 1995 3153 Eartags reduce livestock exposure to insecticides Terry J. Danielson 1995 3151 Few herbicide residues in conservation tillage soils Jim J. Miller, Bernie D. Hill, C.W. Lindwall 1995 3150 Bunt still a threat to wheat Denis A. Gaudet, Andre Laroche 1995 3149 Wind erodability: residue cover vs. soil clouds Frank Larney 1995 3148 Storing atmospheric carbon in soils Eric Bremer, H. Henry Janzen, Ben H. Ellert 1995 3147 Summerfallow weed control with short-term cover crops Jim R. Moyer, R.E. (Bob) Blackshaw 1995 3146 How climate may alter prairie farms in the next century Sean M. McGinn, Wole O. Akinremi 1995 3145 Root growth affected more by soil moisture than soil strength Karl M. Volkmar 1995 3144 Double your money Bernie H Sonntag 1995 3143 Performance of native grass species Ken May, Larry Michielsen 1995 3142 Insecticides can be more harmful to beneficial insects than to pests Dicky S. Yu, Bernie D. Hill, Richard A. Butts 1995 3141 Tall fescue is as good as orchardgrass Darryl Stout, Dee Quinton, Zahir Mir, Bruce Gossen 1995 3140 Neural networks: a computerized crystal ball for agriculture Bernie Hill 1995 3139 Index – 1994 Absorption of insect repellent studied on cattle Wes G. Taylor 1994 3138 Barley/ryegrass silage as good as corn silage for feedlot cattle Zahir Mir, Priya Mir, Darryl Stout, D.J. Thompson, T. Moore 1994 3136 Adapted disease resistant alfalfa pays Elwin Smith, Surya Acharya, Henry Huang 1994 3135 Irrigation amounts for efficient water use on grain Jack M. Carefoot 1994 3134 Using atomic differences to monitor soil carbon Ben H. Ellert 1994 3133 Strategies for effective biological control of toadflax Rosemary DeClerck-Floate, Ken Richards 1994 3132 Research progress on safflower seedling diseases H.-Henning Mundel, Henry C. Huang 1994 3131 AC Phil – a new soft white spring wheat cultivar R.S. Sadasivaiah 1994 3130 Animal use at the Lethbridge Research Centre John Kastelic 1994 3129 Straw is a valuable boil-building resource John Dormaar 1994 3128 DNA marker guarantees plant disease resistance Larry Kawchuk, Dermot Lynch 1994 3127 Wheat streak mosaic virus Bob Conner, Julian Thomas 1994 3126 Bioenergy economics: ethanol production in western Canada Tammy Peters, Brian Freeze 1994 3125 Progress in dryland salinity research G.J. Beke 1994 3124 Biological control of leafy spurge on the prairies Peter Harris 1994 3123 Predicting calf and lamb growth potential Gerry Mears 1994 3122 The role of carbon dioxide in sustainable agriculture Sean McGinn 1994 3121 Irrigation method affects insect abundance Burton G. Schaber 1994 3120 Take another look at winter wheat Julian Thomas 1994 3119 Earthworms: nature’s plow M. Jill Clapperton 1994 3118 Measuring the extent of conservation practices Dave Major, Anne Smith 1994 3115 Biocontrol agents for stable flies show promise Tim Lysyk 1994 3114 Foxtail barley likes reduced tillage Bob Blackshaw 1994 3113 Potatoes need water early Dermot Lynch, Nader Foroud 1994 3112 Water infiltration under reduced tillage Jim J. Miller 1994 3111 New studies into biological control of livestock insect pests Kevin D. Floate 1994 3110 Manure as an amendment for eroded soils Frank J. Larney 3109 Companion crops slow forage establishment Jim Moyer 1994 3108 Not all barleys are created equal Ken W. May, Tim Ferguson 1994 3107 Breakdown of crop residues by ultraviolet radiation H.H. Janzen 1994 3106 White mold, a major problem in dry bean production Henry C. Huang, Gilles Saindon 1994 3105 Sheep production strategies L. Anne McClelland, Brian Freeze 1994 3104 Liver abscesses decline in Canadian cattle T.A. McAllister, K.-J. Cheng, M.E. Olson, D.W. Morck 1994 3103 Bumblebees as crop pollinators Ken W. Richards 1994 3102 Role of NMR in studying metabolite chemistry T.W. (Eric) Hall 1994 3101 Index - 1993 Symbiosis for sustainability M.J. (Jill) Clapperton 1993 3098 Johne’s disease in sheep L.A. McClelland, Dr. N. Harries 1993 3097 Phosphorus key to productivity on eroded soils Chenyong Zhang, Karl Volkmar 1993 3096 Establishing Altai wildrye with a companion crop Walter D. Willms 1993 3095 Research aims to integrate Russian wheat aphid control Richard A. Butts, Dicky S. Yu 1993 3094 Pheromone traps improve European corn borer control D.S. (Dicky) Yu, J.R. (Bob) Byers 1993 3093 Canadian wheat in Oriental noodles J.B. (Julian Thomas 1993 3092 Controlled-release nitrogen fertilizers Jack Carefoot 1993 3090 Fungicide-resistant pathogen responsible for devastating potato losses Larry Kawchuk, Dermot Lynch 1993 3089 Annual clovers Joanna Fraser 1993 3088 Fewer locations need for coop testing of dry beans G. Saindon 1993 3086 Cool bulls are more fertile R. Byrne Cook, John P. Kastelic, Glenn H. Coulter 1993 3084 Feeding densified hay boosts fat content of milk Karen A. Beauchemin, Lyle M. Rode 1993 3083 Herbicides detected in southern Alberta groundwater Bernie D. Hill 1993 3080 Pollinators needed for sainfoin Ken W. Richards 1993 3077 Enzymes help to study the fate of insecticides applied to animals Wes G. Taylor 1993 3076 Watch out for the alfalfa weevil Burt D. Schaber 1993 3074 Good news on Russian wheat aphids Rick A. Butts 1992 3073 Radar, home on the range David J. Major, Anne M. Smith 1993 3070 Dryland salinity watch Gerry J. Beke 1993 3068 Economics of conventional and accelerated lambing systems Brian Freeze, L. Anne McClelland 1993 3065 The potential use of native grass species Ken W. May 1993 3064 Reduced tillage increases earthworm numbers Jim J. Miller 1993 3062 Russian wheat aphid populations affected by local disease Mark S. Goettel, Rick A. Butts 1993 3060 Seedling disease in safflower and other field crops Henry H. Huang, H.-Henning Mundel 1993 3058 Salt stress tolerance among grasses Surya N. Acharya 1993 3057 Index – 1992 Horn fly insecticide resistance widespread Doug Coulwell, Tim Lysyk, Agnes Whiting, Hugh Philip 1992 3056 Eradication of maedi-visna in sheep flocks L. Anne McClelland 1992 3055 Fumigant protects leafcutter bees from disease Mark Goettel, Wayne Goerzen 1992 3053 A role for alfalfa and feedlot manure in dryland cropping Elwin G. Smith 1992 3052 Annual medics look promising for forage Joanna Fraser 1992 3049 Soil compaction Jack M. Carefoot, C. Wayne Lindwall 1992 3048 The life of the soil M.J. (Jill) Clapperton 1992 3047 AC Ptarmigan – a new early maturing potato Dermot Lynch 1992 3045 AC Reed – a new soft white spring wheat cultivar R.S. Sadasivaiah 1992 3043 The unknown prairie Walter D. Willms 1992 3042 Root penetration affected by seed age and development Karl M. Volkmar 1992 3040 Soil changes under crested wheatgrass John F. Dormaar 1992 3039 Diet affects gain without altering growth hormone in calves Gerry J. Mears 1992 3038 Runoff model for environmental planning Nader Foroud 1992 3036 Prediction of long-term alfalfa forage yields from short-term trials S.N. Acharya 1992 3034 Embryonic loss in cattle John P. Kastelic 1992 3033 Reducing the risk: prediction leafcutter bee and parasite emergence Ken W. Richards 1992 3029 Chinch bug reappears after 20 years B.D. Schaber 1992 3028 Establishing forage crops in saline soils G.J. Beke 1992 3027 New sprayer looks for weeds R.E. Blackshaw, C.W. Lindwall 1992 3026 Absorption by the skin considered in control of livestock pests W.G. Taylor 1992 3024 Agricultural research on water quality protects the environment J.J. Miller 1992 3023 Canada thistle and quackgrass control pays in alfalfa seed fields J.R. Moyer 1992 3022 Insect pests in stored grain J.R. (Bob) Byers 1992 3021 Stripe rust risk in 1992 R.L. Conner 1992 3020 Making a virus-resistant potato plant L.M. Kawchuk 1992 3019 Livestock insect population ecology studies T.J. Lysyk 1992 3017 Preserving organic matter reduces CO2 emission H.H. Janzen 1992 3016 Bridge K.W. May 1992 3013 Endosperm protein controls rate of cereal grain digestion T.A. McAllister, R.C. Phillippe, L.M. Rode, K.-J. Cheng 1992 3012 Index - 1991 The changing face of agricultural research B.H. Sonntag 1991 3011 Release of tiny wasps reduces European corn borer damage D. S.-K. Yu 1991 3010 Toxicology research ensures food safety Terry J. Danielson 1991 3009 Improving cicer milkvetch seed production Joanna Fraser 1991 3008 Breeding for disease resistance in soft white spring wheat R.S. Sadasivaiah 1991 3006 Results encouraging in search for natural means of controlling grasshoppers Dan Johnson, Mark Goettel 1991 3004 Soil – the lifeblood of Canada J.F. Dormaar 1991 3003 Producing safflower for the oilseed market R.J. Morrison, H.H. Mundel 1991 3002 Horn fly diapause studies Tim J. Lysyk 1991 3001 Manure: too much of a good thing is too much Chi Chang 1991 3000 Reseeding foothills rangelands from broadcast seed W.D. Willms 1991 2999 Common root rot: minimum problem under minimum tillage R.L. Conner, C.W. Lindwall 1991 2998 Does improved root penetration enhance drought resistance? K.M. Volkmar 1991 2997 Preventing sulfur toxicity in livestock G.J. Beke, R. Hironaka 1991 2994 Spring burning bolsters brome grass seed yield Burton D. Schaber 1991 2991 Drought risk on the Canadian prairies S.M. McGinn 1991 2990 Applied pollinator management K.W. Richards 1991 2989 Managing dryland salinity for better water quality G.J. Beke 1991 2986 Cattle can spread weeds R.E. Blackshaw, L.M. Rode 1991 2985 Metabolites of popular insect repellent identified W.G. Taylor 1991 2983 Livestock industry supports Agriculture Canada research G.H. Coulter 1991 2981 Aquatic vegetation in irrigation conveyance canals John R. Allan 1991 2980 A new bacterial disease of dry peas found in southern Alberta H.C. Huang 1991 2978 Yesterday’s clients are today’s partners G.A. Neish 1991 2976 Deuterium techniques aid livestock research T.W. Hall 1991 2975 Radar remote sensing in agriculture D.J. Major 1991 2974 Stubble can harvest moisture Barry W. Grace 1991 2971 Preservation of soil productivity H.H. Janzen 1991 2970 Waxy barley performance in southern Alberta K.W. May 1991 2968 Weather and seeding dates affect Russian wheat aphids Richard A. Butts 1991 2967 Cattle selected for weight gain are longer, not taller R.P. Gilbert, D.R.C. Bailey, N.H. Shannon 1991 2966 Index - 1990 Do agricultural scientists do the right research? B.H. Sonntag 1990 2965 Control of aquatic vegetation in dugouts (listed as “Algae control in dugouts” in Index 1990) J.R. Allan 1990 2964 Ultrasound technology to determine body composition in beef cattle David R.C. Bailey 1990 2963 Tiny wasp can combat Russian wheat aphid D.S. Yu 1990 2962 A new sheep facility for the Lethbridge Research Station L. Anne McClelland 1990 2961 Yes, cattle grubs are still here D.D. Colwell 1990 2960 Fat figures in livestock overdosing T.J. Danielson 1990 2959 Insect population management by cutting alfalfa B.D. Schaber, A.M. Harper 1990 2957 Superior quality sought for soft white wheat M.S. Kaldy 1990 2955 Mite-resistant wheat R.L. Conner, J.B. Thomas, E.D.P. Whelan 1990 2953 Fungus has potential for control of grasshoppers Mark S. Goettel, Dan L. Johnson 1990 2952 Can native range soils erode? J.F. Dormaar 1990 2950 Preparing for the next grasshopper outbreak D.L. Johnson 1990 2949 Topsoil: can we afford to lose it? F.J. Larney, C.W. Lindwall 1990 2943 Managing rangelands to improve grazing efficiency W.D. Willms 1990 2942 Life-line in the soil Barry M. Olson 1990 2939 Nutrient losses due to water erosion G.J. Beke, C.W. Lindwall 1990 2936 Russian wheat aphids overwinters in southern Alberta R.A. Butts 1990 2935 Windbreaks conserve soil moisture S.M. McGinn 1990 2934 Making dry bean production more profitable G. Saindon, C.A. Webber 1990 2932 Breeding forage crops for improved quality S.N. Acharya 1991 2931 Nightshade alert R.E. Blackshaw 1990 2929 Developing snow mold-resistant winter wheats for northern prairies D.A. Gaudet 1990 2928 Dwarf corn for the prairies R.J. Morrison 1990 2927 1990 cutworm and bertha armyworm forecast for southern Alberta J.R. Byers 1990 2926 Monitoring herbicides at the part per billion level J.R. Moyer 1990 2924 Establishing priorities for beef cattle research G.H. Coulter 1990 2923 Identification of biting fly attractants J.A. Shemanchuk, J.F. Sutcliffe 1990 2922 Some fungal sclerotia are harmful to animals H.C. Huang 1990 2920 Anther culture in wheat breeding E.D.P. Whelan 1990 2919 Root physiology: tackling drought from the bottom up K.M. Volkmar 1990 2918 Winter barley for southern Alberta K.W. May 1990 2916 Frozen soil in winter lays the groundwork for erosion in spring? J.F. Dormaar 1990 2915 Index - 1989 Monitoring populations of soil bacteria M.F. Hynes 1989 2912 Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in agricultural research T.W. Hall 1989 2910 Alternate control strategies for horn flies D.D. Colwell, T.J. Lysyk 1989 2909 How chewing affects intake and digestion of feed K.A. Beauchemin 1989 2908 Barley for high moisture grain K.W. May 1989 2904 Safflower for lactating dairy cows L.M. Rode 1989 2903 Romanov rams deliver dollars L.A. McClelland 1989 2899 Agrometeorology research looks at drought S.M. McGinn 1989 2898 Statistics in agricultural research G.C. Kozub 1989 2897 Russian wheat aphid still a concern R.A. Butts 1989 2895 Wheat striate mosaic virus R.L. Conner, J.R. Byers 1989 2891 Biological control of ring rot of potatoes G.A. Nelson 1989 2890 The 1989 Alberta grasshopper forecast D.L. Johnson 1989 2882 Winter grazing in the foothills W.D. Willms 1989 2879 The quality of soil organic matter J.F. Dormaar 1989 2876 Feed values of common weeds J.R. Moyer, R. Hironaka 1989 2875 New system in use for improved grasshopper outbreak forecasts D.L. Johnson 1989 2874 Remote sensing of rangeland condition D.J. Major, W.D. Willms 1989 2871 Technology transfer: sowing seeds of profit R.W. McMullin 1989 2868 Thiamin supplementation of beef cattle diets R. Hironaka 1989 2867 Green manure as a fertilizer replacement in wheat production systems H.H. Janzen 1989 2866 Image analyser broadens research capabilities Eric G. Kokko 1989 2865 Beef is leaner than you think C.B. Bailey 1989 2864 Index - 1988 Insecticide metabolites investigated W.G. Taylor 1988 2862 Christmas message P.A. O’Sullivan 1988 2861 Field populations of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium M.F. Hynes, R.M.N. Kucey 1988 2859 Pressed beet pulp, a new version of an old feed R. Hironaka, B. Freeze 1988 2853 Outbreak of wheat streak mosaic in wheat R.L. Conner, J.B. Thomas 1988 2852 Russian wheat aphid – a new pest of cereal crops in western Canada J.R. Byers, R.A. Butts 1988 2851 Hornflies may need new control methods D.D. Colwell 1988 2849 New feed barley varieties K.W. May 1988 2848 Canal lining for seepage control T.G. Sommerfeldt 1988 2847 Maximize herbicide performance R.E. Blackshaw 1988 2845 Treated straw can extend forage supply L.M. Rode, K.-J. Cheng 1988 2844 Decision-making under increasing uncertainty Christopher A. Webber 1988 2841 Hormones enhance milk production G.J. Mears, L.M. Rode 1988 2840 Curculio inhibits cicer milkvetch growth B.D. Schaber, W.A. Charnetski 1988 2839 Decreasing income risk in cattle feeding Brian S. Freeze 1988 2837 A pesticide monitoring system for public use B.D. Hill 1988 2835 Control for chalkbrood disease of leafcutter bees K.W. Richards 1988 2834 Crop water requirements and irrigation conservation computer program N. Foroud 1988 2833 Do your cattle have enough water? L.M. Rode 1988 2832 Control of common bunt in spring and winter wheats D.A. Gaudet 1988 2831 Soft white spring wheat quality R.S. Sadasivaiah, M.S. Kaldy 1988 2830 Diet and selection affect bulls D.R.C. Bailey, G.H. Coulter, J.E. Lawson 1988 2829 European corn borer monitoring update D.L. Struble, J.R. Byers 1988 2828 Litter stabilizes production from native range W.D. Willms 1988 2827 The 1988 Alberta grasshopper forecast D.L. Johnson 1988 2826 New technology boosts research E.G. Kokko 1988 2825 Weeds are a problem in Tanzania too J.R. Moyer 1988 2823 Testicular temperature through thermography G.H. Coulter 1988 2820 Soybean: current status and potential H.-H. Mundel 1988 2819 Know your water quality G.J. Beke 1988 2818 Crossbred Romanov sheep yield a unique fleece L.A. McClelland 1988 2817 Microorganisms in research R.C. Phillippe 1988 2816 Cattle grub control benefits livestock industry D.D. Colwell, J.A. Shemanchuk 1988 2815 Nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat H.H. Janzen, C.W. Lindwall 1988 2814 New technology can speed up wheat breeding Ernest D. Whelan 1988 2812 Index -- 1987 Restoration of irrigated saline soil C. Chang 1988 2811 Experimental insect repellents show promise W.G. Taylor 1987 2810 Christmas message D.G. Dorrell 1987 2809 Breeding corn for a short-season environment Malcolm D. MacDonald 1987 2808 Plasmids in agriculture M.F. Hynes 1987 2807 Economics of cow-calf production John E. Lawson, Elwin G. Smith 1987 2806 Soil conservation: an ongoing concern Wayne Lindwall, J.F. Dormaar 1987 2805 Weather affects black flies J.L. Shipp, B. Grace 1987 2804 Sainfoin for bloat safety M.R. Hanna 1987 2803 Black point problem in soft white spring wheat R.L. Conner, R.S. Sadasivaiah 1987 2800 Effect of water deficiency on the yield and quality of potatoes Dermot R. Lynch 1987 2799 A successful “double-barrelled” attack on cattle grubs D.D. Colwell 1987 2797 Barley on salt-affected land K.W. May 1987 2796 Stinkweed and flixweed control in winter wheat R.E. Blackshaw 1987 2793 Hormone manipulation improves lamb growth G.J. Mears 1987 2792 Some Kiwi tips on sheep reproduction L.A. McClelland 1987 2791 Controlling algae in dugouts J.R. Allan 1987 2790 What’s a frost? B. Grace 1987 2789 Preservation of high-moisture feed barley K.-J. Cheng, L.M. Rode 1987 2788 Evapotranspiration for a Chinook-dominated region N. Foroud 1987 2787 Burning of alfalfa seed fields for insect control B.D. Schaber 1987 2786 Temperature and viruses can affect symptoms of ring rot in potatoes G.A. Nelson 1987 2785 Dandelions in irrigated grass pastures P. Bergen, R. Hironaka, J.R. Moyer 1987 2784 Irrigation and mosquitos J.A. Shemanchuk 1987 2783 Effect of water and nitrogen on winter wheat D.J. Major 1987 2782 High quality forage production pays L.M. Rode 1987 2781 Bacteria alter wheat growth R.M.N. Kucey 1987 2779 Reproductive performance in beef cows D.R.C. Bailey, E.E. Swierstra 1987 2778 Monitoring for illegal deposits of pyrethroid insecticides B.D. Hill 1987 2777 Future snow mold resistance in winter wheats D.A. Gaudet 1987 2776 Grazing native grassland for optimum results W.D. Willms 1987 2774 Possible recurrence of stripe rust in soft white spring wheat R.S. Sadasivaiah, R.L. Conner 1987 2773 Useful methods to test fertility of beef bulls G.H. Coulter 1987 2772 Prospects for controlling white mold of dry bean H.D. Huang, G.A. Kemp 1987 2769 Soil salinity and groundwater levels in irrigated land G.J. Beke 1987 2767 Safflower research for improved oil content Hans-Henning Mundel 1987 2766 A new test for winter hardiness in wheat J.B. Thomas, D.W.A. Roberts 1987 2764 Aphids galore A.M. Harper 1987 2762 Quality requirements for cake and pastry flours M.S. Kaldy 1987 2761 Does zero tillage adversely affect the soil? C. Chang, C.W. Lindwall 1987 2759 New corn hybrids in the pipeline M.D. MacDonald 1986 2758 Christmas message D.G. Dorrell 1986 2757 Effect of oral bacterial inocula on newborn lambs K. –J. Cheng 1986 2756 Utilization of protein by ruminants C.B. Bailey 1986 2755 Barrier alfalfa M.R. Hanna 1986 2754 Why calves are susceptible to warbles R.W. Baron 1986 2753 Tillage affects activity of soil microbes J.M. Carefoot 1986 2752 Winter storage of leafcutter bees K.W. Richards, G.H. Whitfield 1986 2751 Feed barley for irrigated areas in southern Alberta K.W. May 1986 2750 Chalkbrood: a disease of leafcutter bees G.H. Whitfield, K.W. Richards 1986 2749 Improving black fly control J.L. Shipp 1986 2748 Potassium fertilizer unnecessary in southern Alberta D.C. MacKay 1986 2747 Micropropagation in potatoes Dermot R. Lynch 1986 2746 Grains damaged by greenbug A.M. Harper 1986 2745 Inheritance of cold-hardiness in wheat D.W.A. Roberts 1986 2744 Mole drainage for southern Alberta soils Theron G. Sommerfeldt 1986 2742 Altai wildrye for winter grazing Walter D. Willms 1986 2741 Early prairie agriculture B. Grace 1986 2740 Beef cow size and productive efficiency L.M. Rode, M. Bowden 1986 2739 Trends in soft white spring wheat breeding R.S. Sadasivaiah 1986 2738 Integrated pest management in alfalfa B.D. Schaber 1986 2737 Algae control in farm dugouts J.R. Allan 1986 2736 Environment and selection in beef cattle D.R.C. Bailey 1986 2734 Let’s celebrate! J.C.M. L’Arrivee 1986 2733 Ring rot resistance in potatoes G.A. Nelson, D.R. Lynch 1986 2732 Residue chemist helps test aerially applied insecticides B.D. Hill 1986 2731 Specialized grazing systems S. Smoliak 1986 2730 Biological fertilizers – fact or fiction? R.M.N. Kucey 1986 2729 Persistent herbicides – good or bad? P. Bergen 1986 2728 Calcium requirements of feedlot beef cattle R. Hironaka 1986 2727 Will grasshoppers damage safflower? H. –H. Mundel, D.L. Johnson 1986 2726 The value of airborne soil J.F. Dormaar 1986 2725 Increasing crop yields D.J. Major 1986 2724 Stripe rust of soft white spring wheat R.L. Conner, R.S. Sadasivaiah 1986 2723 Internal parasites in southern Alberta beef cattle D.D. Colwell, P.J. Scholl 1986 2722 Risk of soil erosion in 1986 Wayne Lindwall 1986 2721 Alternative methods for grasshopper control D.L. Johnson 1986 2720 1986 cutworm forecast for southern Alberta J.R. Byers 1986 2719 Resistance to ergot F.R. Harper 1986 2718 Water table monitoring for dryland salinity control G.J. Beke 1986 2717 Breeding cattle in a range environment John E. Lawson 1986 2716 Romanov sheep sale J.A. Vesely 1986 2715 Sprouting resistance in soft white spring wheat J.B. Thomas 1986 2714 Trucking stress does not affect testicular size of beef bulls G.H. Coulter 1986 2713 Fertilizer promotes soil conservation H.H. Janzen 1986 2712 Tissue culture speeds wheat breeding E.D.P. Whelan 1986 2711 Expansion of European corn borer in Alberta D.L. Struble, J.R. Byers 1986 2710 Flies, carriers of animal diseases R.H. Robertson 1986 2709 Reclaiming saline soil C. Chang 1986 2708 Index -- 1985 Production of grasses for complementary grazing S. Smoliak 1985 2707 Canola development at Lethbridge A.K. Topinka, H.C. Huang 1985 2706 Snow molds limit winter wheat expansion D.A. Gaudet 1985 2704 Pollinators needed for cicer milkvetch K.W. Richards 1985 2703 Disease-resistant alfalfa varieties M.R. Hanna 1985 2702 Electrostatic sprayer for applying insecticides or repellents to cattle J.A. Shemanchuk 1985 2701 Improving the efficiency of hay diets C.B. Bailey 1985 2700 Parasitism of leafcutter bees during incubation G.H. Whitfield, K.W. Richards 1985 2699 Soil erosion: a caveat J.F. Dormaar 1985 2698 Feedlot manure – an alternative to commercial fertilizer T.G. Sommerfeldt, B.S. Freeze 1985 2697 Late-season treatments for cattle grub control J. Weintraub, P.J. Scholl 1985 2926 Barley for grain and silage in southern Alberta K.W. May 1985 2695 Older animals more resistant to cattle grubs R.W. Baron 1985 2694 Several crops a year in Alberta A.M. Harper 1985 2693 Nutritive value of weeds R. Hironaka, J.R. Moyer 1985 2692 Elimination of ring rot from potatoes G.A. Nelson 1985 2691 Agroclimatic research tackles soil moisture problems Barry Grace 1985 2690 Adaptation and performance in beef cattle John E. Lawson, David R.C. Bailey 1985 2689 Food microstructure M.S. Kaldy 1985 2688 Insect movement in cut alfalfa fields B.D. Schaber 1985 2687 A new technique for water loss prediction N. Foroud 1985 2686 White mold in southern Alberta H.C. Huang 1985 2684 Early spring control of alfalfa weevil W.A. Charnetski 1985 2681 Reseeding on foothill ranges W.D. Willms 1985 2680 Maximizing benefits of ear tags on cattle W.O. Haufe 1985 2679 Banding increases efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers R.M.N. Kucey 1985 2678 Coping with salinized well water G.J. Beke 1985 2677 Redesigning field beans G.A. Kemp 1985 2676 Wool of Romanov sheep J.A. Vesely, G.A. Brooks 1985 2675 Grain sorghum may have potential for southern Alberta H.H. Janzen 1985 2674 The 1985 cutworm forecast for southern Alberta J.R. Byers 1985 2673 Take-all in southern Alberta R.L. Conner, M.D. Macdonald 1985 2671 Insecticidal ear tags for livestock explained W.G. Taylor 1985 2670 Aerial application of pyrethroids to control insects B.D. Hill 1985 2669 Recrop stubble in 1985 Wayne Lindwall 1985 2668 Carcass grades for heavy weight steers R. Hironaka, G.C. Kozub 1985 2667 Agrispon – friend or foe? R.J. Rennie 1985 2666 The effects of horn flies on cattle R.H. Robertson 1985 2665 Establishing forage stands S. Smoliak 1985 2664 “High Tech” hits bull evaluation G.H. Coulter 1985 2662 Grasshopper outbreak concentrates in southern Alberta D.L. Johnson 1985 2661 Index -- 1984 Nitrite poisoning in cattle K. –J. Cheng 1985 2658 U.S. –Canada cooperation, the key to grub control D.D. Colwell, P.J. Scholl 1985 2657 Solonetzic soils – a tough problem Chi Chang 1985 2656 Tall fescue to the rescue D.B. Wilson 1985 2655 The ergot problem in cereals F.R. Harper 1984 2654 Christmas message – 1984 D.G. Dorrell 1984 2653 Lethbridge Research Station exports technology J.C.M. L’Arrivee 1984 2652 Canada world leader in alfalfa pollinators K.W. Richards 1984 2651 Yellow-fleshed potato varieties D.R. Lynch 1984 2650 Update on warble vaccine research R.W. Baron 1984 2649 A better insect emergence forecast G.H. Whitfield 1984 2648 Agroclimatic program keeps producers informed B. Grace, H. H. Janzen 1984 2647 Fall treatment for warble grub control J. Weintraub 1984 2646 The search for early indicators of calf growth rate G.J. Mears 1984 2645 Alfalfa varieties for irrigated areas M.R. Hanna 1984 2644 Benefits from organic matter research J.F. Dormaar 1984 2643 Quality aspects of small white beans M.S. Kaldy 1984 2642 Using weather to forecast population levels of black flies J.L. Shipp 1984 2641 Be wary of fat bulls G.H. Coulter 1984 2614 Control of snow mold in winter wheat D.A. Gaudet 1983 2602 Early maturing safflower nearly ready H. –H. Mundel 1983 2554 Two sides to crossbreeding John E. Lawson 1983 2553 Sulfur fertilizers no required in southern Alberta J.B. Bole 1982 2539 Economic benefits of warble grub control J. Weintraub 1982 2532 Developing soybeans for Alberta H. –H. Mundel 1982 2521 Improving the control of livestock pests W.G. Taylor 1982 2506 Processing plant wastewater used for irrigation W.D. Gould 1982 2500 The corn borer has returned C.E. Lilly, A.M. Harper 1981 2490 Determining the feeding value of forages C.B.M. Bailey 1981 2473 Sex lure for male June beetle C.E. Lilly 1981 2470 Whole or cut potatoes for seed? S. Dubetz 1981 2454 No-see-ums cause painful bites J.A. Shemanchuk 1981 2453 Legumes replacing nitrogen K. Dale Russell 1980 2433 The potential of Highland cattle John E. Lawson 1980 2416 The value of topsoil C.W. Lindwall 1980 2411 Breeding short-season corn M.D. MacDonald 1980 2396 Index -- 1979 Why control sheep keds W.A. Nelson 1979 2369 Ultrasonic measurement of live lamb J.A. Vesely 1979 2363 Selection for gain can affect milk production J.E. Lawson 1978 2338 All grasses are not born equal L.E. Lutwick 1978 2333 To vaccinate against enterotoxemia? J.A. Vesely 1978 2314 The Alberta grasshopper forecast for 1978 N.D. Holmes 1978 2298 High protein wheat in poultry nutrition E.E. Gardiner, S. Dubetz 1977 2255 Performance of bison-Hereford calves D.G. Keller, J.E. Lawson 1976 2239 Hard red spring wheat varieties for southern Alberta Hugh McKenzie 1976 2192 Long-term selection of beef cattle J.E. Lawson, D.G. Keller 1976 2189 Protecting bees on alfalfa A.M. Harper 1975 2181 The Twenty-five-ton potato club S. Dubetz 1975 2149 Alfalfa supplies nitrogen to the soil A.D. Smith 1975 2145 Excess irrigation and our environment J.C. van Schaik 1974 2125 Crossbreeding with bison J.E. Lawson 1974 2119 Early and late blight of potatoes G.A. Nelson 1973 2064 Parasites and cost-benefit efficiency in livestock production W.O. Haufe 1973 2062 Irrigate for extra profit E.H. Hobbs 1973 2061 Range renovation S. Smoliak 1973 2048 Markets for Canadian barley S.A. Wells 1972 2029 Grass species and dandelions A. Douglas Smith 1971 1965 Potato protein M.S. Kaldy 1971 1964 Fertilizer testing on dry lands U. J. Pittman 1971 1963 Probing the rhizosphere J.L. Neal 1971 1957 Parasite tolerance in livestock W.O. Haufe 1971 1955 Beef cattle improvement J.E. Lawson 1971 1954 Irrigation scheduling K.K. Krogman 1971 1953 Alfalfa “sickness” E.J. Hawn 1971 1951 Soil and organic matter J.F. Dormaar 1971 1949 Toxic reactions R.H. Robertson 1971 1948 Seeding sainfoin M.R. Hanna 1971 1947 Turfgrass is big business J.B. Lebeau 1971 1943 Sugar-beet root maggots C.E. Lilly 1971 1941 Corn herbicides J.J. Sexsmith 1971 1940 Chemical defleecing of sheep W.A. Nelson 1971 1939 Efficiency of feed utilization by beef cows D.M. Bowden 1971 1938 Cooling growing crops E.H. Hobbs 1971 1937 New research programs J.E. Andrews 1971 1936 Crop insect outlook N.D. Holmes 1971 1934 Field corn S. Freyman 1971 1931 New possibilities in forage crops A. Johnston 1970 1910 Marketing of bulls J.E. Lawson 1970 1904 The ensiling process D.B. Wilson 1970 1901 Maggot control must start early G.E. Swailes 1970 1883 Beef cattle performance J.E. Lawson 1969 1867 Winter wheat seeding rates U.J. Pittman 1969 1857 Pitic 62 Hugh McKenzie 1969 1832 A complete cattle starter ration R. Hironaka 1969 1829 The soil – our universal disposal field – is it? T.G. Sommerfeldt 1968 1819 Chromosomes and wheat breeding M.D. MacDonald 1968 1797 Face flies in Alberta K. R. Depner 1968 1793 Beef feedlot on grass S.B. Slen 1967 1764 Herd fertility and beef cattle profits L.J. Sumption 1967 1756 Early treatment of cattle with systemic insecticides to control warble grubs J.R. Weintraub 1967 1751 The enigma of soil organic matter J.F. Dormaar 1967 1742 A volatile antibiotic from mustard J.S. Horricks 1967 1724 New approaches for the control of animal pests R.H. Robertson 1967 1719 Breeding more efficient broilers E.E. Gardiner 1966 1712 Synchronizing heat in cattle and in sheep T.J. Devlin 1966 1703 Sainfoin M.R. Hanna 1966 1700 Entomology in 1965 N.D. Holmes 1965 1649 Vigilance required to reduce losses from insects L.A. Jacobson 1965 1633 Fertilizers and germination S. Dubetz 1965 1626 Limiting concentrate intake by the addition of salt L.M. Bezeau 1964 1604 A bonus from insect studies R.W. Salt 1964 1603 Aphids A.M. Harper 1964 1593 Summer pasture D.B. Wilson 1964 1582 What’s on the label! J.J. Sexsmith 1964 1578 Do not misuse pesticidal chemicals S. McDonald 1964 1575 Alfalfa – the role of variety and management M.R. Hanna 1964 1572 The Alberta grasshopper forecast D.S. Smith 1964 1561 Calcium and phosphorus for broilers E.D. Walter 1963 1556 The Earlicrop tomato G.A. Kemp 1963 1553 Ways that arthropods cause infections R.H. Robertson 1963 1545 Chromosome manipulation in wheat improvement Ruby I. Larson, M.D. MacDonald 1963 1541 Winalta hard red winter wheat M.N. Grant 1963 1537 When to control insects on sugar beets C.E. Lilly, A.M. Harper 1963 1534 Spring killing of winter wheat D.W.A. Roberts 1963 1524 A household pest – the carpet beetle P.E. Blakeley 1963 1518 Cattle oilers for feedlots R.H. Painter 1962 1505 Green plants, red blood cells, and winter H.J. Perkins 1962 1504 Nutritive value of southern Alberta crops G. Strachan 1962 1501 Invention, development, and research R.W. Salt 1962 1499 Resistance of sheep to keds W.A. Nelson 1962 1497 Concentrate to hay ratios for fattening cattle R. Hironaka 1962 1492 Uniform irrigation is important regardless of method K.K. Krogman 1962 1490 Winalta winter wheat M.N. Grant 1962 1484 Meeting the forage needs of 1962 D.B. Wilson 1962 1470 Wintering beef calves S.B. Slen 1962 1461 Imported cattle in warble grub research J. Weintraub 1962 1459 Drought and insects L.A. Jacobson 1960 1437 Grey speck of oats D.G. Woolley, T.G. Atkinson 1961 1436 Pre-emergent damage in seedlings J.B. Lebeau 1961 1431 Ideas and research T.H. Anstey 1960 1402 Pea beans for southern Alberta G.A. Kemp 1960 1392 Rust on Merion bluegrass J.B. Lebeau 1960 1379 Irrigation scheduling made easier L.G. Sonmor 1960 1377 Sheep ked cycles W.A. Nelson 1960 1367 Seed treatment for cereals and flax J.S. Horricks 1960 1361 The winter problem of controlling lice on cattle W.O. Haufe 1960 1355 The pale western cutworm L.A. Jacobson 1959 1338 Grasshoppers D.S. Smith 1959 1321
Accession No.
20161005
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1937-1989
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20171124
Physical Description
0.30 m of textual records; over 400 photographs
Scope and Content
001: Photographs on two poster papers (5 lake photos and 10 military photos) oversized 002: 32 photographs from Reed Ainscough- military, South Alberta Light Horse, Cadets 003: Reed and Chris Ainscough- Newspaper cutouts, wartime money, correspondence, railway tickets, 10 photographs, notebooks, ph…
Date Range
1937-1989
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Ainscough family
Physical Description
0.30 m of textual records; over 400 photographs
History / Biographical
History/Biographical: William T. Ainscough (Born 1854,) and his wife Margaret moved to Alberta in 1899 with their six children from Utah. They had a total of 15 children, 9 lived to adulthood; Mary Elizabeth (md. Ernest Quinton), Ada Ann (md. Alfred Mandel), William George (md. Zina Peterson), Elmer Earl (md. Evelyn May Bradbury), Lewis Franklin (md. Leah Hanson), Charles Owen (md. Marguerite Dalley), Lillian Hortense (md. 1. William Canning 2. Dave Munson), Scott Thomas (Died 10 years old from raptures appendix), and Stanley Russell (md. Leona Stoddard.) William George Ainscough (Born May 15, 1885,) served in WW1 as Captain with 13th Canadian Mountain Rifles. After the war, he worked as a general road foreman in Southern Alberta. He married Zina Peterson and had five children; Rex William (Born August 3, 1912 and Died November 12, 1925), Hugh Scott (md. Violet Lutz), Reed Wilson (md. Buck Craig), George Alan (md. Jean Suffern), Grant Lee (md. Jacqueline Cross). Reed W. Ainscough (Born June 2, 1918,) son of William George Ainscough and Zina Peterson, joined the 93rd Field Battery in 1940. His battery served in Normandy and in North West Europe. (In July 1942 he took a leave to marry Buck Craig.) After the war he returned to Fort Macleod and took command of the 93rd Field Battery. He also commanded the Fort Macleod Cadet Corps and formed three other Cadet Corps – Pincher Creek, St. Pauls, and St. Marys Corps on the Blood Reserve. Reed was very active within the community. He was awarded the Fort Macleod “Citizen of the Year” award in 1958. In June 1959 he moved to Medicine Hat as District Manager of Canada Life. He became Commanding Officer of the South Alberta Light Horse from 1964 to 1968. In 1969, he moved back to Lethbridge as Manager of the Canada Life Office. Reed was also very active in the Alberta Heart Foundation in 1964, joined the Provincial Board in 1970, and served as Provincial President in 1981 and 1982. When Lethbridge hosted the 1975 Canada Winter Games he served as Chairman of the Ceremonies Committee. Reed was appointed to the Senate of the University of Lethbridge from 1981-1987 and served in the Board of Governors for two years. Reed and Buck had two sons Craig and Chris. (For more information on the Ainscough Family see file 2016.1070/019)
Language
English
Scope and Content
001: Photographs on two poster papers (5 lake photos and 10 military photos) oversized 002: 32 photographs from Reed Ainscough- military, South Alberta Light Horse, Cadets 003: Reed and Chris Ainscough- Newspaper cutouts, wartime money, correspondence, railway tickets, 10 photographs, notebooks, photocopy of notebooks 004: 1940 Notebook military Reed Ainscough 005: Photo album 163 photos 006: Photo album 152 photos 007: Photo album 89 photos 008: 93rd Field Battery Reunion 1989- member list, minutes, correspondence, program, newspaper cutouts and photocopies, 85 photographs
Accession No.
20171124
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
20171021011
Physical Description
Black and white photograph
Scope and Content
A crowd gathers around a bi-plane in a famrer's field. They are either looking the machine over or paying for a ride in the plane.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Black and white photograph
Physical Condition
Very Good
History / Biographical
Photograph is part of a collection of 40 images belonging to Calvin Logan. He has donated them to the Galt Archives. They are a variety of subjects from family, Military, railway, and air travel.
Scope and Content
A crowd gathers around a bi-plane in a famrer's field. They are either looking the machine over or paying for a ride in the plane.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20171021011
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

A. John L. Fisher. Personal Papers. Calgary Power California Tour.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions90011
Date Range
1965
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171075
Physical Description
1.5 cm. textual materials.
Scope and Content
Correspondence, participant lists, and newspaper clippings relating to a tour of growers and other agricultural sites in California, organized by Calgary Power.
Date Range
1965
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1.5 cm. textual materials.
Scope and Content
Correspondence, participant lists, and newspaper clippings relating to a tour of growers and other agricultural sites in California, organized by Calgary Power.
Accession No.
20171075
Collection
Archive
Less detail

A. John L. Fisher. Personal papers. Miscellaneous.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions90012
Date Range
1964-1969
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171075
Physical Description
2.5 cm. textual material
Scope and Content
Assorted personal papers: - membership lists for the Engineering Institute of Canada, the Kinsmen Club, and the Lethbridge Rotary Club. - Agreement between Lethbridge Municipal Hospital District No. 65 and the Lethbridge Hospital Employees Union No. 408, Canadian Union of Public Employees, 1967. - …
Date Range
1964-1969
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
2.5 cm. textual material
Scope and Content
Assorted personal papers: - membership lists for the Engineering Institute of Canada, the Kinsmen Club, and the Lethbridge Rotary Club. - Agreement between Lethbridge Municipal Hospital District No. 65 and the Lethbridge Hospital Employees Union No. 408, Canadian Union of Public Employees, 1967. - Hudson's Bay Company, Souvenir of Historical Exhibit. - "McLeod Hotel Rules and Regulations".
Accession No.
20171075
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Alexander Johnston fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions6
Date Range
1850-1989
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
ca. 3.6 m. of textual records and other material.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of biographical information, diplomas, correspondence, publications, histories, minutes, and research materials of Alexander Johnston pertaining to his activities as a historian and heritage activist. Includes original and photocopied research materials pertaining to irrigation,…
Date Range
1850-1989
Fonds
Alexander Johnston fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Copy Location
Material also found at P19911057000/335.
Creator
Johnston, Alexander, 1920-1989
Physical Description
ca. 3.6 m. of textual records and other material.
Physical Condition
Includes ca. 3.6 m. of textual records, ca. 210 photographs, 11 sound recordings, 2 videorecordings.
History / Biographical
Alexander Johnston was born in Webb, Saskatchewan in 1920. He graduated with a BSA at the University of Saskatchewan in 1941 and received his MS from the University of Montana in 1954. He worked at the Lethbridge Experimental Station from 1946-1961 as the Research Officer before being seconded to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations from 1961-1962. He returned to the Lethbridge Research Station in 1962 to serve as its Research Scientist (Range Management) until his retirement in 1980. He was a member of numerous agricultural associations but also had an abiding interest in the history of Southern Alberta. He was president of the Lethbridge Historical Society, a founding member of the Alberta Museums Association, a member of the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation Board of Governors, and a member of the City of Lethbridge Museum Advisory Committee. He researched and wrote extensively on the history of southern Alberta and, in particular, the City of Lethbridge, including its industries, social life and culture, first nations, ethnic groups, and individual and family life. For his efforts, he received a 1967 Canada Centennial Medal, honourary members and an honourary degree from the University of Lethbridge. He died in 1989.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of biographical information, diplomas, correspondence, publications, histories, minutes, and research materials of Alexander Johnston pertaining to his activities as a historian and heritage activist. Includes original and photocopied research materials pertaining to irrigation, agriculture, natural history, ranching, coal mining, ethnic and religious groups, local medical history, Fort Whoop-Up, as well as Lethbridge individuals, families, events, community organizations and buildings. Also includes oral history interviews with Lethbridge citizens.
Notes
Title based on the contents of the fonds.
Finding Aid
File list available.
Category
Agriculture
Family and personal life
Religions
Exploration, discovery and travel
Name Access
Johnston, Alexander, 1920-1989
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
20061047
Physical Description
14 files
Scope and Content
001 - School Registers 1898-1899 002 - Paterson School and Mr. White 12 slides 1965 003 - Room pictures, Paterson School 23 slides 004 - Centenial School Parade, Opportunity Class 15 slides 1967 005 - Teachers Contract 1967 006 - Letter to Premier Laurier from Rev. Father Van Tighem on the Halfbree…
Material Type
Manuscript
Creator
Avice Frayne Anderson
Physical Description
14 files
Physical Condition
Fair
History / Biographical
Miss Frayne was a schoolteacher at Westminister School from 1949 to 1965.
Language
English
Scope and Content
001 - School Registers 1898-1899 002 - Paterson School and Mr. White 12 slides 1965 003 - Room pictures, Paterson School 23 slides 004 - Centenial School Parade, Opportunity Class 15 slides 1967 005 - Teachers Contract 1967 006 - Letter to Premier Laurier from Rev. Father Van Tighem on the Halfbreed Commission not keeping the scheduled visit and causing problems for Lethbridge, NWT. (Aug 1900) 007 - Lethbridge on the Map, pamphlet with four maps.1921 008 - Unidentified building with "Alberta Hotel" cart parked in front of it. 009 - "Reflections" book listing all the students in Miss K. Frayne's classes from 1949 to 1965 010 - Four photographs sent by the Lethbridge Herald to Miss Frayne 011 - Class photos for Miss Frayne's classes 1949 to 1963, including staff pictures. 012 - 2 "The Spotlight" yearbooks (1926+1928) marked 'Property of Avice Anderson, 2302-10th Ave. S Lethbridge' and 'Kathleen L. Frayne'. 013 - "The Valedicta" June 1933 Lethbridge Collegiate Institute. Kathleen Frayne is listed on page 27. 014 - "Class Creations" a book of collected short stories written by Miss Frayne's students and dedicated to her in 1965.
Notes
There are several items listed on the Accession form that are not among the Anderson files.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20061047
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Allan Morton, James Morton: Certificates of Masonic Membership.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions91995
Date Range
1930-1962
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181024
Physical Description
2 certificates. 1 black and white photograph.
Scope and Content
Life Membership certificate for James Morton in Charity Lodge No. 62 in Lethbridge, Alberta, dated 1959. Membership Certificate for Allan Morton in Charity Lodge No. 62, Lethbridge, Alberta, dated 1931. Photograph of the members of Charity Lodge No. 62, Lethbridge, Alberta, taken at their 50th Anni…
Date Range
1930-1962
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
2 certificates. 1 black and white photograph.
Custodial History
Certificates and photograph belonged to the Morton family (related to the donor).
Scope and Content
Life Membership certificate for James Morton in Charity Lodge No. 62 in Lethbridge, Alberta, dated 1959. Membership Certificate for Allan Morton in Charity Lodge No. 62, Lethbridge, Alberta, dated 1931. Photograph of the members of Charity Lodge No. 62, Lethbridge, Alberta, taken at their 50th Anniversary in 1962.
Accession No.
20181024
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions8
Date Range
1952-1988
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
19901039000
Physical Description
3.3 m. of textual records. -- 17 photographs.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of executive and annual general meetings of the Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge, financial records, correspondence, and project files pertaining to activities of the Council and its member groups.
Date Range
1952-1988
Fonds
Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge
Physical Description
3.3 m. of textual records. -- 17 photographs.
History / Biographical
The Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge was established in 1952 to coordinate and support the development of the arts in Lethbridge. The Council operates the Bowman Arts Centre.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of executive and annual general meetings of the Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge, financial records, correspondence, and project files pertaining to activities of the Council and its member groups.
Notes
Title based on the contents of the fonds.
Accession No.
19901039000
Category
Arts
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1878-1986
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171111
Physical Description
1 softcover book. 3 photographs. One 23-page manuscript.
Scope and Content
Publication "Reflections of a community: Twin Butte Community Hall Golden Anniversary 1936-1986". 3 photographs of the Allred Family. Manuscript: "Pioneer Ancestors: Frank Allred & Josie Bailey".
Date Range
1878-1986
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 softcover book. 3 photographs. One 23-page manuscript.
Scope and Content
Publication "Reflections of a community: Twin Butte Community Hall Golden Anniversary 1936-1986". 3 photographs of the Allred Family. Manuscript: "Pioneer Ancestors: Frank Allred & Josie Bailey".
Accession No.
20171111
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1947-1987
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20171094
Physical Description
0.3 m of textual records, over 500 photographs, 1 sketch
Scope and Content
The materials were preserved and enhanced through research by Joyce Sasse 001: 1963 Day planner 002: 1964 Day planner 003: 1965 Day planner 004: Book- Proud Procession (1947) 005: Book- Young Explorers (1947) 006: Book- Totem Tipi and Tumpline (1955) 007: Book- No Man Stands Alone (1965) 008: Book…
Date Range
1947-1987
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Annora Brown
Physical Description
0.3 m of textual records, over 500 photographs, 1 sketch
History / Biographical
Annora Brown was born outside of Red Deer in 1899 and died at the age of 88 in Deep Cove, British Columbia in 1987 where she retired. Brown is one of the Alberta’s foremost early artists. Based for much of her life in historic Fort Macleod, Brown played a major role in creating a ‘picture’ of Southern Alberta: its wild landscape, First Nations, pioneer rural communities, local history- above all its wondrous nature symbolized by the wildflower. Her work was able to capture the culture of the First nation communities that she lived near. Her father was Edmund Foster Brown and mother was Elizabeth Ethel (Cody) Brown. Her mother supported and encouraged Brown’s love for art and from 1925-1929 Brown attended the Ontario College of Art in Toronto. She returned in 1929 and developed and art program for Calgary’s Mounted Royal College but later had to leave due to her mother’s illness. A student of the celebrated landscape painters, known as the Group of Seven (1920-1933), Brown’s artistic practice spans the 1930s to mid-1980s. During that time, she cobbled together a living as an artist, often by teaching, illustrating books and magazines, and selling, whenever she could, her captivating paintings in watercolor, tempera oil and later serigraph prints. In 1945-1950, brown worked as a respected artist and teacher at the Banff School of Fine Arts. She was also commissioned to paint over 200 western wild flowers for the Glenbow Foundation. Brown’s work was also included in Crescent Heights High School in Calgary, University of Alberta in Edmonton, United College in Winnipeg, and the Canadian Handicrafts Guild in Montreal. She was also awarded a prize in the Alberta Government’s 1955 Jubilee Contest for Alberta painters. In 1965 Brown retired to Deep Cove British Columbia to paint and garden. She had given a “voice” to a region that had been rarely presented in Canadian art. Her attention to the unique aspects of Old Man’s Country like Niitsitapi, the character and isolation of its small rural communities as well as its unforgettable environment was expressed mainly through her focus on wildflowers and native plants. Buoyed by the conviction that a woman’s activities “need not be limited to polishing furniture and raising babies”, Brown was also a writer and author of two books: the Western Canadian classic Old Man’s Garden and her autobiographical Sketches from Life. She was the first woman to receive an honorary degree from the University of Lethbridge in 1971 for her contribution to “western art and living.” (written by Mary-Beth Laviolette; Summer 2016 Gallery Exhibit at Galt Museum)
Scope and Content
The materials were preserved and enhanced through research by Joyce Sasse 001: 1963 Day planner 002: 1964 Day planner 003: 1965 Day planner 004: Book- Proud Procession (1947) 005: Book- Young Explorers (1947) 006: Book- Totem Tipi and Tumpline (1955) 007: Book- No Man Stands Alone (1965) 008: Book- Canaries on the Clothesline (1974) 009: Sketch of Annora Brown oversized 010: 26 Photos of the Rockies 011: 2 Photos, Editorial, Crighton photocopy with description 012: 8 Photos of her house and her graduation 013: 17 Photos of the cabin, 5 prints, letters about her house in Fort Macleod, and letters from the Town of Fort Macleod 014: Research notes of Annora Brown by Joyce Sasse 015: 215 Photos building the cabin 016: 250 Photos of her art, excerpt of Sketches from Life, and later years; 3 Newspaper cutouts Language: English
Access Restrictions
Public
Accession No.
20171094
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1910-1985
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181096
Physical Description
4 cm. textual material.
Scope and Content
Canadian passport issued to Anton Jellenig in 1980. Various business documents including legders, Unemployment Insurance Commission certificate, a time book, resource materials on pricing, business license, etc. Map of Shaughnessy-Lethbridge Coal Reserves produced by Fording Coal Ltd. "Plan of a…
Date Range
1910-1985
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
4 cm. textual material.
History / Biographical
Anton Jellenig was born in Austria and emigrated to the Melville, Saskatchewan area. In 1941 he came to Shaughnessy and worked in the Shaughnessy mine. In 1949, he opened the Shaughnessy Coffee Shop. This grew into Tony's Cash Store, which he operated until his retirement in 1976. Anton Jellenig passed away in 1985. The store is in operation today as "Tickety Boo" in Shaughnessy.
Custodial History
The donor's husband was in possession of these documents as an executor of Anton Jellenig's estate.
Scope and Content
Canadian passport issued to Anton Jellenig in 1980. Various business documents including legders, Unemployment Insurance Commission certificate, a time book, resource materials on pricing, business license, etc. Map of Shaughnessy-Lethbridge Coal Reserves produced by Fording Coal Ltd. "Plan of additions to the Townsite of Wallace". The original name of the town and school district was Wallace. In 1929 the post office was named Shaughnessy (after Lord Shaughnessy, mine owner) as there were other post offices named Wallace.
Accession No.
20181096
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.08
Width
12.4
Description
BLACK, CERAMIC ASHTRAY. THE INSIDE OPENING OF THE ASHTRAY IS 6.4 CM. THE LETTERING ON THE TOP SAYS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA.” THERE IS AN ABSTRACTED FLORAL DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF THIS LETTERING. THE FLOWERS ARE PAINTED RED AND THEIR STEMS PAINTED GREEN. THIS WORDING AND DESIGN REPEATS ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. THE LETTERING ON THE BOTTOM SAYS, “MADE IN JAPAN 29.” VERY GOOD CONDITION. USED WITH SOME WEAR APPARENT. BLACK PAINT IS WEARING OFF ON SOME PARTS OF THE SURFACE. SIGNIFICANT WEAR TO THE RED AND GREEN PAINT OF THE DECALS.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 16, 2015, DONOR CHRIS MORRISON INFORMED COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT SHE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE ASHTRAY WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BECAME STEWARDS OF A WATERTON CABIN IN 1976. THE CABIN, LOCATED AT 103 CAMERON FALLS, WAS OWNED BY HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY MORRISON (D. 1995). IT WAS AMONG ASSORTED FURNISHINGS LEFT BEHIND WHEN DOROTHY MOVED OUT AND CHRIS MOVED IN. THE DONOR’S RECOLLECTION OF THE ASHTRAY’S USE IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO IT BECOMING HER PROPERTY WAS AS A CONTAINER. MORRISON SAID, “IT WAS IN A [CABIN] WASHSTAND AND USED TO HOLD LITTLE OBJECTS LIKE ROLLED UP KEROSENE LANTERN TAPE WICKS”. ACCORDING TO MORRISON, IT WAS ALSO KNOWN AS “GRANDPA’S ASHTRAY”. GRANDPA REFERS TO JAMES J. MORRISON OF LETHBRIDGE. “HE ONLY SMOKED CIGARS” SAID THE DONOR, WHEREAS HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY DID NOT SMOKE AT ALL. THE ASHTRAY’S USE AS A CONTAINER FOR LANTERN WICKS AND SMALL ITEMS CONTINUED RIGHT UP TO THE DAY THAT IT WAS OFFERED TO THE GALT IN 2015. ACCORDING TO HER OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DOROTHY MORRISON, PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON NOVEMBER 26, 1995 AT THE AGE OF 83 YEARS. JAMES JACOB MORRISON, DOROTHY’S FATHER-IN-LAW, PASSED ON FEBRUARY 18TH, 1975 AT AGE 93. THE ASHTRAY IS MARKED WITH “MARQUIS HOTEL,” WHICH COULD REFER TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL THAT OPENED IN JUNE 1928. REALIZING A NEED FOR A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN LETHBRIDGE, ESPECIALLY ONE WITH A BANQUET HALL, THE BUSINESSMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRADE COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE HOTEL IN 1927. AFTER ITS OPENING, THE BOARD OF TRADE WOULD HOLD THEIR REGULAR, NOON-HOUR MEETINGS AT THE HOTEL FOR MANY YEARS TO COME. THE HOTEL CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1985 AND THE BUILDING WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A WRITE-UP ABOUT THE HOTEL IN THE PUBLICATION TITLED "WHERE WAS IT? A GUIDE TO EARLY LETHBRIDGE BUILDINGS," BY IRMA DOGTEROM. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A COPY OF THE INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION CITED ABOVE.
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Manuscript
Accession No.
20061047003013
Physical Description
1 slide, color.
Scope and Content
Rows of students at desks in the back of the room.
  1 image  
Material Type
Manuscript
Creator
Avice Frayne Anderson
Physical Description
1 slide, color.
Physical Condition
Fair
History / Biographical
Miss Frayne was a schoolteacher at Westminister School from 1949 to 1965.
Language
English
Scope and Content
Rows of students at desks in the back of the room.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20061047003013
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1961-1962
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20171064016066
Physical Description
Colored photograph
Scope and Content
Ladies dressed in white dresses with purple ribbons being addressed at a meeting.
  1 image  
Date Range
1961-1962
Description Level
Item
Creator
Order of the Royal Purple Lethbridge Lodge #32
Physical Description
Colored photograph
Physical Condition
Good
History / Biographical
The Order of Royal Purple was founded in Vancouver, British Columbia in September 1914. Several wives of the Elks created an informal group in 1913 to assist their husbands with benevolent, charitable and social work. In 1914, they became the recognized female auxiliary of the Elks of Canada. The objectives of the Order were to promote the principles of Justice, Charity, Sisterly Love and Fidelity, to promote the welfare and enhance the happiness of its members or for other purposes. In addition, the Order was to quicken the spirit of women toward a pure and noble citizenship, to promote harmony and good fellowship, to relieve suffering whenever possible and to strive at all times to make “Life sweeter, women better, and the world happier.” The logo was a diamond with an elk head in the center, a clock pointing to 11 o’clock opposite a pansy and the word Canada on the banner. The pansy was the official flower of the Order. The Royal Purple was a very secretive society. They required passwords for every meeting and National Conventions. The Password could only be changed by the Supreme Honored Royal Lady and the Lodges would be notified every 6 months of the password change. The colors of the Order were purple, white and gold. The tassels on their purple pill box hats represents the individual’s status. White tassel means lodge member, white and purple means Honored Royal Lady (or local president), gold for District Deputy, and purple for Supreme Honored Royal Lady (National Leader.) A non-member can be granted honorary memberships for their contributions to the Lodge. Meetings would begin and end with floor work. Each Lodge and District develop their own bylaws and Rules of Order. In 2014 the Supreme Executive of the Order of Royal Purple decided to secede from the Elks and start a new organization, the Canadian Royal Purple Society. Some locals, however, wished to remain with the Elks and these were integrated into the organization of the Elks of Canada as Royal Purple Elks Lodges. Lethbridge Lodge No. 32 was instituted on April 27, 1928 by PSHRL Mattie Lane and 23 ladies were initiated into the Order. Teas, bake sales, craft sales, rummage sales, and bingos have been annual fundraising activities for the lodge. One of their larger projects was to supply an Audiology Unit (a brain stem evoked response audiometer) costing $40,000.00 for the Regional hospital. They also undertook to supply Lifeline Units to the Auxiliary Hospital. The ladies also supported the local Soup Kitchen, local Food Bank, Parents Place, Harbor House for abused women and children, Meals on Wheels, Keep in Touch as well as other charities. The Lodge was also a supporters of the Elks and Royal Purple Fund for children. They disbanded at the end of 2017. - Information from the Royal Purple of Canada book and interview transcript For more information check out the interview with Ann Marie MacDonald and the donation of Wilma Wood Royal Purple Regalia Accession Number P20170007001
Scope and Content
Ladies dressed in white dresses with purple ribbons being addressed at a meeting.
Access Restrictions
Public
Accession No.
20171064016066
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

440 records – page 1 of 22.