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Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON APRIL 3, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JOHN WENSVEEN REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE. WENSVEEN HAD RETIRED FROM ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED AND HAD KEPT THE TELEPHONE AS A SOUVENIR FROM HIS TIME EMPLOYED. ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
94
Width
32.5
Description
A. GUITAR, 94 CM LONG X 32.5 CM WIDE X 9 CM TALL. WOODEN BODY WITH PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID AS PICK GUARD AND ALONG FRET BOARD; GUITAR IS STRUNG WITH SIX WIRE STRINGS. GUITAR HAS SIX TUNING KNOBS AT HEAD WITH WHITE PLASTIC HANDLES ON METAL SCREWS. GUITAR BODY HAS DECORATIVE BROWN, RED AND GREEN TRIM AROUND EDGE; GUITAR HAS BLACK KNOB AT BASE. “VALENCIA” LABEL AT TOP OF HEAD; GUITAR SHOWS WEAR AND STAINING ON PICK GUARD AND FRET BOARD; GUITAR HAS SOILING INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. GUITAR CASE, 100 CM LONG X 37 CM WIDE X 13 CM TALL. BLACK FAUX-LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH LEATHER BUCKLE AT BASE AND LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO TOP WITH SILVER RINGS; CASE OPENS AT BASE. BASE OF CASE HAS BLACK METAL SNAP AROUND LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP. INSIDE OF CASE LINED WITH BROWN FAUX-FUR. CASE IS HEAVILY WORN ON EDGES AND PEELING; CASE IS SCRATCHED ON SIDES; LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP AT BASE IS CRACKED AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FAMER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE GUITAR, RUTH HILL RECALLED, “HE BOUGHT IT AND STARTED STRUMMING ON IT…IT WAS ALWAYS ON HIS LAP…MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT [THE BANJOLELE] FOR LORNE.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[HE BOUGHT THE GUITAR] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
55
Width
31
Description
BROWN, STUFFED "PUNKINHEAD" BEAR WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN LEATHER; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN BROWN AND WHITE PAISLEY-PATTERNED ROMPER; ROMPER HAS ELASTIC WAIST AND THREE WHITE OPAQUE PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT. TOP OF ROMPER HAS TWO STRAPS THAT CROSS CHEST AND ATTACH TO CHEST WITH WHITE BUTTONS; BOTTOMS OF ROMPER FORM SHORTS. ROMPER SEAMS MACHINE-STITCHED WITH WHITE THREAD; HOMEMADE; THREADS FRAYING ON RIGHT SIDE. ARMS AND LEGS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN THINNED; FRONT PAWS HAVE FELT PATCHES SEWN ON. LEFT FRONT PAW HAS HOLES IN FELT; BLACK THREAD ON RIGHT SIDE OF MOUTH IS LOOSE; LEATHER FEET CRACKED AND WORN; BUTTONS ON ROMPER DISCOLORED YELLOW; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE LARGEST PUNKINHEAD IN A BROWN ROMPER, OBERG RECALLED, “[I WOULD SAY] SAY IT IS IN ’57 [THAT I RECEIVERED THE BEAR] WITH THE BROWN JUMPER.” “HE WAS THE LAST ONE. FROM WHAT I UNDERSTAND, THEY ONLY CAME; THEY WERE ONLY ACCESSIBLE IN THE THREE SIZES. I HAD SHOWN SO MUCH FONDNESS TOWARDS THEM THAT MY GRANDPARENTS DECIDED THAT THEY WOULD GET ANOTHER SMALL ONE, BECAUSE THIS FELLOW [IN THE BROWN JUMPER] WAS ALMOST UNTOUCHABLE. I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR ONCE.” “I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR, AND THAT WAS FROWNED UPON BY MY PARENTS, AND MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE THEY HAVE WOODEN STUFFING/WOODEN SHAVINGS. THIS FELLOW, I THINK HE HUNG OVER THE REGISTER FOR PROBABLY A MONTH, HOPING THAT HE WOULD DRY AND NOT GO MOLDY. [MY FAMILY] WANTED TO GIVE ME ANOTHER ONE, THAT I WOULD BE ABLE TO LOVE, AND CARE FOR, LIKE LITTLE GIRLS DO WITH THEIR TEDDY BEARS.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
3
Length
36
Width
24.5
Description
A. STUFFED TOY, “PUNKINHEAD”, 36 CM LONG X 24.5 CM WIDE. BROWN PUNKINHEAD BEAR DRESSED IN BLUE SHORTS AND SHIRT. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FACE STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD CREATING NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET CASED IN BROWN LEATHER STITCHED ON WITH BLACK THREAD. PUNKINHEAD BEAR HAS LIGHTER BROWN SNOUT, CHEST, TOP OF HEAD, AND INSIDE OF EARS. FUR ON BEAR IS MISSING IN PACTHES AND THINNED; BEAR IS MISSING LIGHT HAIR FROM TOP OF HEAD; NOSE IS TORN ON SIDES AND HAS LOSS IN FABRIC SHOWING INSIDE STUFFING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON SHIRT, 11.5 CM LONG X 7.5 CM WIDE. HOMEMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG CUFFS AND HEM; BACK HAS CINCHING WITH WHITE THREAD. FRONT OF SHIRT TIED AT NECK AND OPEN AT FRONT. FABRIC IS FADED; RIP IN RIGHT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. BLUE COTTON SHORTS, 8.5 CM LONG X 9 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG LEG-HOLES AND WAIST. SHORTS FADED; TEAR INSIDE RIGHT LEG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE BLUE OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE MIDDLE-SIZED ONE [IN BLUE I RECEIVED] ’55.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Length
24.3
Width
12.3
Description
BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEAR WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN SUEDE; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN RED VELVET SHORTS SEWN TO BODY. ARMS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THINNED; TOP OF HEAD IS MISSING LIGHTER HAIR. SNOUT HAS RIP IN UNDERSIDE EXPOSING INNER STUFFING; OVERALL FAIR CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN RED SHORTS, OBERG RECALLED, “[THAT CAME LAST] IN ’59.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Length
24
Width
12.3
Description
A. BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFD BEAR, 24 CM LONG X 12.3 CM WIDE. BEAR DRESSED IN GREEN SHIRT AND SHORTS; BEAR HAS TWO WHITE PLASTIC BUTTON EYES WITH BLACK PLASTIC BEAD ON TOP, SEWN ONTO FACE; BEAR IS BROWN WITH LIGHTER BROWN CHEST, INSIDE OF EARS, SNOUT, AND TOP OF HEAD. SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET ENCASED IN BROWN LEATHER. FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THIINED; LEATHER ON FEET IS CRACKED AND FADED; BEAR IS MISSING FUR FROM LIGHTER PATCH ON TOP OF HEAD. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. GREEN COTTON SHIRT, 8 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING AT CUFFS AND HEM; BACK IS CINCHED WITH BLACK THREAD; SLEEVES HAVE ROLLED CUFFS. FRONT IS OPEN WITH TIES AT COLLAR TO ATTACH. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. GREEN COTTON SHORTS, 5.5 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING INSIDE LEG HOLES AND AT WAIST. WAIST IS ELASTIC; BACK HAS MINOR FRAYING AT EDGE OF LEFT LEG HOLE. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE GREEN OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE OLDEST IS THE RATTIEST LITTLE GUY [IN GREEN]…I WAS BORN IN ’49, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN [GIVEN TO ME] ’53.” “THE FIRST ONE [IS SPECIAL TO ME], BECAUSE HE OPENED UP MY EYES TO, AT THAT AGE, BEING TO LOVE AN INANIMATE OBJECT, AS OPPOSED TO PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS, OR SIBLINGS. HE’S PROBABLY GOT A LOT MORE SECRETS TO TELL THAN THE BIGGER ONE.” “[THE BEAR WAS] WELL- LOVED, HE’S LOST A LOT OF HAIR. HE’S GOT NEW SHOES ON…AS FAR AS I KNOW, THE FIRST ONE…WAS SO WELL-WORN, AND SO WELL- LOVED, THAT MY GRANDMOTHER, WHO DID A LOT OF SEWING AND HAND-WORK, GAVE HIM NEW SHOES. HIS LITTLE FELT PANTS, THAT CAME WITH HIM, WERE LONG WORN-OUT, SO SHE SEWED HIM ANOTHER LITTLE OUTFIT.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
104
Width
68.8
Description
POSTER WITH IMAGE ON FRONT OF PURPLE AND BLUE SKY WITH SUNRISE AND PARATROOPERS DESCENDING OVER TOWN SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS AT BOTTOM EDGE. POSTER HAS WHITE BORDERS; POSTER HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON IMAGE “IN OUR TIME NO FOREIGN ARMY HAS EVER OCCUPIED AMERICAN SOIL. UNTIL NOW” AND RED PRINTED TEXT BELOW WITH RUSSIAN SYLLABICS OVER “RED DAWN”; POSTER HAS WHITE CREDITS ALONG BOTTOM EDGE, “A VALKYRIE FILM A SIDNEY BECKERMAN PRODUCTION RED DAWN…” WITH LISTING OF CAST AND CREW MEMBERS. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS TEXT WARNING “PG-13, PARENTS ARE STRONGLY CAUTIONED TO GIVE SPECIAL GUIDANCE FOR ATTENDANCE OF CHILDREN UNDER 13, SOME MATERIAL MAY BE INAPPROPRIATE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN”, AND TEXT BESIDE “[COPYRIgHT SYMBOL” 1984 UNITED ARTISTS CORPORATION”; LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS LOGO “METRO GOLDWYN MAYER UNITED ARTISTS, DIAMOND JUBILEE, SIXTY YEARS OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT”; POSTER HAS TEXT ALONG LOWER BORDER “PROPERTY OF NATIONAL SCREEN CORPORATION LICENSED FOR USE ONLY IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXHIBITION OF THIS PICTURE AT THE THEATRE LICENSING THIS MATERIAL. LICENSEE AGREES NOT TO TRADE, SELL OR GIVE IT AWAY, OR PERMIT OTHERS TO USE IT, NOR SHALL LICENSEE BE ENTITLED TO ANY CREDIT UPON RETURN OF THIS MATERIAL. THIS MATERIAL EITHER MUST BE RETURNED OR DESTROYED IMMEDIATELY AFTER USE. LITHO. IN U.S.A., RED DAWN 840077”. BACK OF POSTER HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN RED INK IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “KEVIN MCLEAN $2.00” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “RED DAWN”. POSTER HAS TEARS AT RIGHT AND LEFT EDGES, AND LOWER EDGE; FRONT IS CREASED; BACK OF CORNERS HAS LOSS FROM REMOVAL OF ADHESIVES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIeWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE “RED DAWN” FILM POSTER, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE POSTER [WAS] UP [IN MY ROOM].” “[IN] THE 1980S, AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME. THERE WAS ONE CALLED "THE DAY AFTER" AND THAT WAS IN ’83. THEN IN 1984 THIS MOVIE COMES OUT WHICH IS CALLED RED DAWN WHICH IS, AGAIN, ABOUT RUSSIAN COMMUNIST INVASIONS OF NORTH AMERICA. IT’S A SMALL TOWN THAT ALL THESE TROOPS DROP INTO. TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER.” “IF YOU WATCHED "THE DAY AFTER"…ON ONE HAND, THAT KIND OF SUBJECT MATTER CAN FEEL FOREIGN AND ABSTRACT AND NOT RELEVANT. BUT, IF AT THE SAME TIME YOU’RE A KID, AND YOUR PARENTS ARE WATCHING THE NEWS EVERY NIGHT, AND YOU HAVE AN INTEREST IN WHAT’S GOING ON—A LOT OF KIDS DON’T CARE BUT FOR SOME REASON, I WAS VERY INTERESTED. THEN YOU THOUGHT, “NO, THIS IS A VERY REAL PROSPECT. THIS COULD ACTUALLY HAPPEN.” I WAS TERRIFIED ABOUT IT. BUT, AT THE SAME TIME, I WAS ALSO ATTRACTED TO IT, LIKE A FLAME. IT WAS…ROCKETS…I DON’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS BUT I WAS ACTIVELY INTERESTED IN [THEM]. THEN AT SOME POINT, THAT PIVOTED, WHICH IS WHEN I KNOW I WAS LOOKING AT THE SOLDIER OF FORTUNE MAGAZINES AND THEN I STARTED BUYING COMIC BOOKS…WORLD WAR TWO COMIC BOOKS.” “WE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH TV OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE. [OTHER PEOPLE] PROBABLY HAD LOTS OF CHANNELS IN LETHBRIDGE. ONE CHANNEL WE DID HAVE—I THINK WE ONLY HAD THREE—WAS CBC. I REMEMBER [MY PARENTS] WATCHING THE NATIONAL. I THINK [THERE] WAS [A SHOW] CALLED THE JOURNAL WITH BARBARA FRUM [THAT MY PARENTS] WOULD WATCH AT TEN O’CLOCK EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. I WOULD SNEAK OUT OF MY ROOM AND HIDE BEHIND THE COUCH, AND [THE COLD WAR IS] ON THE NEWS EVERY SINGLE NIGHT.” “IN TERMS OF [THE COLD WAR] MANIFESTING ITSELF LOCALLY…I THINK TRUDEAU’S IN POWER, AND THERE’S A WHOLE DEBATE ABOUT CANADA HAVING NUKES IN THIS COUNTRY. ULTIMATELY, IT DIDN’T HAPPEN. BUT, THE U.S. WAS TESTING CRUISE MISSILES IN ALBERTA, AND NOT FAR FROM MY FRIEND’S HOUSE OUT NEAR PICTURE BUTTE, WHEN THE TALK OF A CRUISE MISSILE BEING TESTED IN ALBERTA WAS IN THE NEWS, ACTIVELY, PEOPLE WERE UNHAPPY AND PROTESTING. A BUNCH OF TRACTOR TRAILERS PULLED UP ON THE TOP OF A HILL, TWO MILES AWAY FROM [MY FRIEND’S] HOUSE, WITH U.S. LICENSE PLATES. OTHERWISE, THEY WERE TOTALLY UNMARKED. THEY BUILT THIS RADAR INSTALLATION UP ON THE TOP OF THE HILL, WHERE IT REMAINED…FOR THREE DAYS OR [SO]…AND THEN IT ALL DISAPPEARED.” “I CAN’T SAY THAT I KNOW FOR A FACT THAT IT WAS RELATED TO CRUISE MISSILE TESTING.” “GENERALLY TO SAY…WITH THESE [OBJECTS] I CAN DRAW A BIT OF A LINE FROM MY HAVING POSSESSED THEM ALL THE WAY, IN SOME FORM…THEY WOULD HAVE HAD AN IMPACT ON [MY] IDENTITY AND WHO I THINK I AM TODAY. I DON’T VALUE THEM BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE UTILITY AND THEY DON’T HAVE PRACTICAL VALUE. I DON’T LOOK AT THEM ALL THE TIME, BUT I KNOW THAT THEY HAVE SOME IMPORTANCE LIFE-WISE.” “IN SCHOOL, THERE WAS A GAME THAT WE WERE PLAYING. THIS IS AT A TIME WHEN THERE’S ONE COMPUTER FOR THE ENTIRE SCHOOL. IT WAS AN APPLE…AND IT WAS A WW2-BASED GAME. MY INTEREST, INITIALLY, WAS IN CONTEMPORARY-TYPE STUFF. THEN WE’RE PLAYING THIS GAME WHICH I’M NOT REALLY–IT’S ABSTRACT TO ME. WE’RE JUST PLAYING THIS GAME AND THEN, BECAUSE I’M INTO THIS, I’M BUYING MAGAZINES CALLED SOLDIER OF FORTUNE, AND I CAN REMEMBER FLIPPING THROUGH THE PAGES OF [THE] PROXY WAR IN AFGHANISTAN. [THE RUSSIANS] HAD GONE INTO AFGHANISTAN, AND I SAW A WW2 PICTURE AND I CONNECTED IT TO THIS GAME AND I [THOUGHT], “OH, THIS IS A REAL THING.” THEN, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THIS CONTEMPORARY STUFF IS OF LESSER INTEREST AND THEN IT BECOMES MORE SECOND WORLD WAR INTEREST AFTER THAT.” “MAYBE I STILL AM [THAT PERSON] TODAY A BIT…IN DIFFERENT RESPECTS. [THE OBJECTS] TAKE UP SOME SPACE BUT I COULDN’T LET THEM GO BECAUSE THEY’RE SYMBOLS, IN A WAY. THEY’RE ONLY THAT BECAUSE OF WHAT IS IN MY HEAD, SO I THOUGHT AT SOME POINT IT WAS GOOD TO [DONATE THEM]…IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MAYBE EASIER TO LET SOME OF THIS STUFF GO.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
3
Height
1.7
Length
11
Width
7
Description
A. CASSETTE TAPE CASE, 11 CM LONG X 7 CM WIDE X 1.7 CM TALL. CLEAR PLASTIC RECTANGULAR CASE WITH TWO PLASTIC PRONGS INSIDE. CASE FRONT HAS EMBOSSED STAMP IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “TDK, MADE IN JAPAN”. RIGHT SIDE HAS INDENT FOR OPENING; CASE IS HINGED ON LEFT SIDE. CASE IS SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED, WITH BLACK STAINING ON FRONT, BACK, AND LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASSETTE TAPE, 10 CM LONG X 6.4 CM WIDE X 0.7 CM TALL. TAPE IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO HOLES THROUGH CASSETTE; TAPE HAS CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW BETWEEN HOLES SHOWING TAPE INSIDE; BOTTOM EDGE OF TAPE HAS FIVE SQUARE OPENINGS SHOWING BROWN TAPE. TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK; FRONT TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, HELLS BELLS/SHOOT TO THRILL/, WHAT DO YOU DO FOR MONEY HONEY, GIVE THE DOG A BONE/LET ME PUT MY LOVE IN YOU, CP 1, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILUNGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TOP EDGE OF TAPE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “MADE IN CANADA”. BACK OF TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, BACK IN BLACK/YOU SHOOK ME ALL NIGHT LONG, HAVE A DRINK ON ME, SHAKE A LEG/ROCK AND ROLL AIN’T NOISE POLLUTION, CP 2, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TEXT ON TAPE IS WORN AND FADED; LOWER EDGE OF TAPE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT FOR CASSETTE TAPE, 10.3 CM LONG X 6.6 CM WIDE X 1.4 CM TALL. PAPER BOOKLET WITH BLACK COVER AND WHITE TEXT; FRONT OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC DC, BACK IN BLACK, ATLANTIC, SUPER CASSETTE”; SIDE OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC/DC, BACK IN BLACK, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS-16018, SUPER CASSETTE”; BACK OF COVER HAS TEXT INCLUDING TRACK LIST FOR “SIDE ONE/SIDE TWO” AND PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN PLAYING GUITAR, TEXT BELOW PHOTOGRAPH “1980 LEIDSPELEIN PRESSE B.V., UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION OF THIS RECORDING IS PROHIBITED BY LAW AND SUBJECT TO CRIMINAL PROSECUTION”, TEXT BELOW IS BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY, WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 1810 BIRCHMOUNT RD. SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. INSIDE OF COVER WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT “ALL SONGS WRITTEN BY YOUNG, YOUNG AND JOHNSON, PRODUCED BY ROBERT JOHN “MUTT” LANGE, ENGINEERED BY TONY PLATT, ASSISTANT ENGINEERS: JACK NEWBER, BENJI ARMBRISTER, RECORDED AT COMPASS POINT STUDIOS, APRIL-MAY 1980, MIXING ENGINEER: BRAD SAMUELSON, ART DIRECTION: BOB DEFRIN, PHOTOS: ROBERT ELLIS”, WITH “THANKS” BELOW, TEXT BELOW “FOR MORE INFORMATION ON AC/DC’S FAN CLUB AND MERCHANDISING, PLEASE SEND A SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE TO: AC/DC FAN CLUB, 18 WATSON CLOSE, BURY ST. EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK ENGLAND, ALBERT PRODUCTIONS”. BACK INSIDE INCLUDES TEXT ON “NEW LEVELS OF EXCELLENCE” IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH. BACK OF BOOKLET HAS TWO HOLES PUNCHED THROUGH; COVER IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE CASSETTE TAPE, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “I WOULD THINK IT’S…IN THE WINTER OF GRADE 10 THAT I FOUND AC/DC AND THE SONG WAS, “FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK”. I REMEMBER LISTENING TO IT WITH A BUDDY IN KALISPELL AND PLAYING ARCADE GAMES IN THE HOTEL AND THINKING, “OH, MY GOD, THIS IS THE COOLEST.”” “[BECAUSE] I’M A CATHOLIC KID…WE WERE PRETTY INNOCENT KIDS, AND [LISTENING TO BANDS LIKE AC/DC AND IRON MAIDEN] WOULD BE LIKE, “OH, I’M NOT GONNA GO THERE.” IT’S JUST TOO GRAPHIC…I THOUGHT IT DIDN’T REPRESENT ANYTHING GOOD. AC/DC CAME FIRST [FOR ME].” “THE OTHER THING THAT ATTRACTED ME TO AC/DC…THIS IS 1985, SO PART OF [MY INTEREST] IS THAT THEY’RE QUITE BLUE COLLAR…THE GLAM-ROCK THING…NEVER DID AS MUCH FOR ME. BUT THESE GUYS LOOK LIKE ORDINARY, WORKING-CLASS GUYS WHICH…IN TERMS OF WANTING TO FIT IN AND NOT HAVE A LOOK THAT STANDS OUT THEN, THERE WAS SOME APPEAL TO THESE GUYS, TOO.” “THIS, “BACK IN BLACK”, I’M CARRYING IN MY JEAN JACKET IN THE LEFT BREAST POCKET. WHEN I GO TO PARTIES, EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND, I HAD THIS TAPE BECAUSE IF PEOPLE DIDN’T HAVE “BACK IN BLACK” IN THEIR HOUSE, THEN I HAD IT. THEY COULD PLAY IT WHILE WE WERE PARTYING.” MACLEAN RECALLED HIS INTEREST IN MUSIC IN THE 1980S, NOTING, “[MY] DAD LISTENED TO COUNTRY MUSIC, CHARLEY PRIDE AND WILLIE NELSON, WHICH I WASN’T REALLY GETTING ANYTHING OUT OF. MY MOM, THOUGH, HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN CONTEMPORARY STUFF, WHATEVER THAT WORLD MIGHT BE. SHE IS THE ONE IN THE FAMILY WHO’S PROBABLY BUYING MOST OF THE RECORDS AND WHO IS LISTENING TO MUSIC LOTS, IN THE HOUSEHOLD. SHE DID JAZZERCISE STUFF SO SHE TAUGHT CLASSES. THERE’S LOTS OF VINYL IN THE HOUSE WHEN I’M GROWING UP. AT SOME POINT IN TIME, I DON’T KNOW HOW IT HAPPENED, BUT THERE WAS A RECORD PLAYER THAT WENT INTO MY BEDROOM AND INITIALLY, [BECAUSE] IT’S PROBABLY THE ONLY TIME I LISTENED TO VINYL, IT WAS MOM AND DAD’S KENNY ROGERS RECORD. I THINK I LIKED IT [BECAUSE] I COULD SING TO IT.” “IN ABOUT 1983, I WOULD HAVE AN ALLOWANCE. I START BUYING MUSIC AND THAT’S ALL I WANTED MONEY FOR; TO BUY MUSIC AND TO BUY A TAPE BACK THEN BECAUSE TAPES [WERE] COMPETING WITH VINYL RECORDS. WHERE I HAVE FRIENDS WHO ARE YOUNGER THAN ME OR WHO ARE THE SAME AGE AS ME WHO ARE BUYING VINYL, IT’S GENERALLY, I WOULD SAY, BECAUSE THEY HAVE SIBLINGS WHO ARE ALSO BUYING VINYL. THEY’RE DOING THE RECORD PLAYER THING BUT I WENT RIGHT TO CASSETTE.” “WHEN I FIRST STARTED BUYING MUSIC, THE FIRST [CASSETTE] I BOUGHT WAS MICHAEL JACKSON “THRILLER”; THAT WAS THE FIRST ONE. ALMOST AT THE EXACT SAME TIME, I BOUGHT DURAN DURAN “RIO” AND I THINK MY THIRD TAPE WAS EDDY GRANT; IT WAS A SONG CALLED “ELECTRIC AVENUE”. WHEN I’M BUYING MUSIC, I’M COMING INTO LETHBRIDGE. I REMEMBER THERE WAS A MUSIC STORE—THERE [WAS] NO PARK PLACE MALL—IN THE LETHBRIDGE CENTRE MALL.” “MY COUSIN, WHO’S LIVING WITH US—REG—IS SIX YEARS OLDER THAN ME. HE [HAS] A TAPE CASE BEFORE I BUY MY FIRST TAPE CASE. HIS MUSIC IS PREDOMINANTLY CANADIAN ROCK FROM THE EARLY ‘80S. SO, BANDS THAT WERE ALL COMING OUT AT THE SAME TIME LIKE STREETHEART, TORONTO, CHILLIWACK, HEADPINS, PRISM, THE STUFF THAT RON SAKAMOTO, THE PROMOTER, WAS BRINGING INTO THE SPORTSPLEX. BUT I WAS NOT INTERESTED IN ROCK. I WANTED POP MUSIC AND I REMEMBER SHARING MY LOVE OF MY POP MUSIC WITH MY FRIENDS. I REMEMBER WHEN I GOT DURAN DURAN “RIO”, I WOULD CALL UP MY FRIEND ON THE ROTARY DIAL PHONE AND WITH MY VIKING CASSETTE RECORDER/TAPE PLAYER PUSH ‘PLAY’ AND HOLD THE RECEIVER OVER SO THAT HE COULD HEAR THIS MUSIC THAT I WAS SO EXCITED TO SHARE.” “WHEN I BUY, WHEN I TELL MY NEIGHBOUR FRIEND, [I ASK], “IS THIS OKAY? IS THIS A GOOD ONE?” AND THE ONE TIME, I REMEMBER HIM GOING, “YEAH, THAT’S A GOOD CHOICE.” IT WAS A BAND CALLED, THE TUBES. THAT WOULD BE GRADE 8 AND PROBABLY INTO GRADE 9 AND MY TAPE CASE WOULD BE FULL OF STUFF THAT WOULD BE POP, DURAN DURAN AND MICHAEL JACKSON.” “[IN] GRADE 9, RIGHT BEFORE HIGH SCHOOL, I FIND TWISTED SISTER…THIS WOULD BE BY THE SUMMER OF ’84. [THEIR] VIDEO WAS GETTING TO BE A BIG DEAL…THERE WAS, “WE’RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT” WHICH IS REBELLION FROM YOUR PARENTS AND THE DAD IS LIKE A DRILL SERGEANT. THEN [THE KIDS] ALL TURN INTO TWISTED SISTER. I LOVED THIS TAPE. I PLAYED IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. [IT WAS] MY FIRST ROCK TAPE AND IT WAS LIFE-CHANGING BECAUSE THEN, ALL THIS POP THAT HAD BEEN IN MY TAPE CASE…I SOLD TO JACK PEACOCK BY GRADE 10. I GOT RID OF ALL MY POP, SO WHERE THAT POP HAD BEEN DEFINING…ALL OF A SUDDEN IT’S LIKE, “I’M NOT THAT, ANYMORE.” IT WAS LIKE A LIGHT SWITCH WENT ON…IN GRADE 10.” “I WAS WEARING A JEAN JACKET IN GRADE 11…WHICH IS ABOUT AS MUCH AS, IN TERMS OF ME AND MY DRESS, HOW I’M REFLECTING [MY IDENTITY]. THIS IS A BIG DEAL BECAUSE WHERE MAYBE YOU DON’T WANT, IN YOUR OWN PARTICULAR DRESS, TO BE WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, YOU COULD THEN OPEN UP A TAPE CASE AND, BY PEOPLE SEEING WHAT’S IN YOUR TAPE CASE, THAT IS SPEAKING TO WHO YOU ARE.” “LISTENING TO MUSIC HASN’T NECESSARILY BEEN CONSISTENT BECAUSE THERE WERE YEARS WHEN WE WERE [AT HOME] THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE A STEREO SYSTEM BECAUSE IT JUST DIDN’T FEEL LIKE IT WAS THE RIGHT THING TO DO AT THE TIME. I WOULD HAVE BEEN LISTENING TO [TAPES] MORE IN MY VEHICLE. WHEN WE GOT OUR…SYSTEM BACK, THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN I’M LISTENING TO IT A LOT, AGAIN. BUT, THERE’S NO QUESTION, IT’S BEEN A MAINSTAY.” “MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE MY EYES ARE SO CRAPPY, [I ASK] IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE BETWEEN YOUR EYESIGHT AND YOUR HEARING, WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE? DO I REALLY WANT TO LOSE MY HEARING? I WANT MONEY TO BUY MUSIC. THAT’S ALL I WANT MONEY FOR. NOTHING ELSE…THE FUNNY PART WITH THAT, TOO, THAT I LEARNED WAS THAT YOU NEVER WANTED TO BUY TOO MUCH MUSIC AT THE SAME TIME. IF YOU DID, YOU DIDN’T LISTEN TO A TAPE AS INTENSELY BECAUSE YOU HAD TWO OR THREE TAPES, SO YOU WOULDN’T APPRECIATE THEM EQUALLY. I LEARNED EARLY, YOU SHOULD ONLY BUY ONE RECORD OR ONE TAPE AT A TIME AND LISTEN TO IT OVER AND OVER AND OVER AGAIN.” “I SWITCHED OVER TO CD’S IN THE SUMMER OF ’89. MY TAPE LISTENING WOULD BE A VERY SHORT TIME. TAPES DON’T LAST VERY LONG. CASSETTE TAPES DON’T LAST. WHEN YOU THINK OF CD’S, WHICH YOU CAN STILL GO AND BUY AND THEY WERE BEING SOLD BY, AT LEAST LOCALLY, FOR SURE, BY 1987, AND THEY’RE STILL BEING SOLD, CASSETTE TAPES [DIDN’T LAST LONG]. FOR ME, [I’M BUYING CASSETTE TAPES FROM] ’83 TO ’88. SIX YEARS.” “IT’S FUNNY, BECAUSE [MY TAPE CASE] WOULD HAVE BEEN FULL AND, FOR SOME REASON, I CHOSE TO GET RID OF THE OTHER TAPES. PROBABLY BECAUSE I WASN’T LISTENING TO THEM AND I THOUGHT, ‘OH, I CAN TAKE THEM TO A USED PLACE,’ BUT I SHOULDN’T HAVE DONE THAT. I SHOULD HAVE ACTUALLY KEPT IT FULL. I WISH I HAD [BECAUSE] I HAD ALL THE AC/DC’S. BUT YOU CAN TELL BY WHAT I KEPT, I OBVIOUSLY KNEW THAT THIS WAS A REALLY IMPORTANT TAPE; TWISTED SISTER [AND] “BACK IN BLACK”. THOSE ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT…” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SLURPEE CUP
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SLURPEE CUP
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2005
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.3
Diameter
10.6
Description
PLASTIC CUP WITH YELLOW, ORANGE AND GREY PRINTED IMAGE OF SOLDIER IN HELMET IN CITYSCAPE WITH BLUE AND ORANGE LOGO “HALO 2”. CUP HAS BLUE BORDER UNDER RIM WITH WHITE TEXT “SLURPEE”. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS BLACK AND GREEN LOGO “XBOX”; CUP HAS TEXT AT ALONG BASE “32 OZ, US (946 ML)” WITH WHITE, GREEN, RED AND ORANGE LOGO “7 ELEVEN”, AND BARCODE “0 05120 7” AND TEXT “WWW.SLURPEE.COM”. RIGHT END OF IMAGE HAS GREEN BORDER FROM BASE TO RIM WITH GREEN, RED AND WHITE LOGOS “MOUNTAIN DEW”. BESIDE “MOUNTAIN DEW” LOGOS IS WHITE BORDERS WITH BLACK TEXT “[COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] 2004 MICROSOFT CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MICROSOFT, BUNGIE, THE BUNGIE LOGO, HALO, XBOX, XBOX LIVE, THE XBOX LOGO AND THE XBOX LIVE LOGO ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE U.S. AND/OR IN OTHER COUNTRIES. THIS PROMOTION IS BASED ON A MATURE-RATED VIDEO GAME. MOUNTAIN DEW AND THE MD DESIGN ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF PEPSICO, INC.” INSIDE OF CUP IS OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC; BASE OF CUP IS OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “TECHNIMARK, ASHEBORO, NC, MADE IN USA, 6, TM-32T, [RECYCLING SYMBOL] 7, OTHER”. LABEL ON FRONT HAS TEARS IN IMAGE AND SCUFF MARKS AT BASE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE SLURPEE CUP, MACLEAN RECALLED, “I WAS IN THE [ARMY] RESERVES AT THE TIME WHEN [THE] HALO CUPS CAME OUT, SO I’M PRETTY SURE THAT THEY WOULD DATE TO ABOUT 2001 AND 2002. UP UNTIL THAT POINT I WOULD BE USING DISPOSABLE CUPS. I HAD A 7-ELEVEN…WHEN WE LIVED IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 15TH STREET FOR 10 YEARS, THERE WAS A 7-ELEVEN A BLOCK AWAY FROM MY HOUSE. LATER IT WOULD BE ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE…BY THE SANDMAN IS WHERE I WOULD HAVE GOT THE HALO CUPS. WHAT I DID [IS] I BOUGHT A NUMBER OF THOSE CUPS SO I COULD HAVE HAD AS MANY AS 15 TO 20 OF THEM AND THEN I WOULD HAVE A CUP DISPENSER. IF YOU WERE IN MY VEHICLE [A YUKON], THERE WOULD HAVE BEEN 15-20 CUPS ON THE BACK SEAT. I ALWAYS HAD CUPS THAT I WOULD TAKE IN. I WOULD USE THOSE CUPS BECAUSE I THINK I WOULD ACTUALLY GET SOME REDUCTION IN PRICE FOR BRINGING THAT CUP IN. BUT I ALSO THOUGHT IT WAS A REALLY COOL CUP.” “IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN [PART OF A COLLECTOR’S SERIES].” “[THE CUPS WERE] MOVIE BASED…THAT ONE IS ACTUALLY GAME BASED [HALO IS A GAME]. AFTER THAT ONE CAME OUT THERE WAS A NUMBER OF, EITHER GAMES OR MOVIES, THAT WERE COMING OUT THAT 7-ELEVEN WOULD PROMOTE ON THOSE CUPS. I THINK I HAD TERMINATOR CUP, AND I HAD SOME FUTURE HALO CUPS. I NEVER LIKED THEM AS MUCH AS I LIKED THAT CUP THAT I’VE DONATED.” “I [LIKED] THE COLORS OF IT AND, BECAUSE I WAS IN THE ARMY AT THE TIME, I THOUGHT IT WAS A COOL CUP. AT THAT SAME TIME THEY WERE TWINNING MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE, MAKING IT 3 LANES IN BOTH DIRECTIONS, I REMEMBER COMING FROM THE ARMORY GOING DOWN TO 7-ELEVEN TO GET MY SLURPEE.” “I DON’T [PLAY HALO]. I JUST LIKED THE SOLDIER GUY.” MACLEAN SPOKE TO HIS INTEREST IN SLURPEES, NOTING, “THERE WOULD BE THINGS THAT WOULD BE PART OF MY DAY TO DAY LIFE AND EXISTENCE THAT, I WOULD SAY, ARE PART OF MY IDENTITY IN TERMS OF WHO I AM. DRINKING SLURPEES WOULD HAVE BEEN ONE OF THOSE THINGS. IF YOU WOULD HAVE BEEN AT WORK WITH ME IN THE 1990S THEN YOU POTENTIALLY WOULD HAVE RECALL OF ME DRINKING SLURPEES EVERY SINGLE DAY. IT WAS SUPER IMPORTANT TO ME SO I THOUGHT I SHOULD OFFER ONE TO THE MUSEUM. I KNEW THERE WASN’T ALREADY A SLURPEE CUP.” “I REMEMBER MY AUNT AND UNCLE, WHO ARE BRIAN AND BONNIE MURRAY, TAKING ME AS A KID [AT ABOUT 8 OR 9 YEARS OLD]…THIS WOULD BE IN THE LATE 1970S, AND WE VISITED A STRIP COMMERCIAL SPACE ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE OUT BY THE GREEN STRIP. LOCATED THERE WAS A 7-ELEVEN ADJACENT TO A TACO TIME. I THINK WE WENT TO BOTH LOCATIONS BECAUSE I WAS A FARM KID IN PICTURE BUTTE. I REMEMBER EATING SOFT TACOS WITH MEXI-FRIES AND THEN FOR SURE GOING TO 7-ELEVEN AND HAVING A GRAVEYARD SLURPEE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME.” “[A GRAVEYARD SLURPEE IS] ORANGE CRUSH MIXED WITH COKE AND ROOT BEER. IT’S A WHOLE BUNCH OF FLAVORS MIXED IN ONE AND I THOUGHT IT WAS THE COOLEST THING. I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS THE TEXTURE IN MY MOUTH OR IF IT WAS THE TEMPERATURE BUT IT RESONATED WITH ME IN A BIG WAY.” “I POTENTIALLY WOULD DRINK MULTIPLE SLURPEES PER DAY AND THE SLURPEES ARE NOT ALL THE SAME. DEPENDING ON WHEN YOU GO, THE QUALITY OF THE SLURPEE IS GOING TO BE DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE A BAD SLURPEE EXPERIENCE, YOU MIGHT DECIDE NOT TO DRINK THE WHOLE THING AND THEN WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO IS GO BACK IN FOUR HOURS AND TRY AGAIN. OR YOU COULD HAVE A REALLY GOOD SLURPEE EXPERIENCE AND YOU WOULD GO BACK AND TRY AGAIN. BUT THERE WOULD BE THINGS LIKE, IF I WALKED INTO THE STORE AND SOMEONE WAS IN FRONT OF ME AND THEY HAPPENED TO HAVE ONE OF THOSE LARGE THERMOS [CUPS], THAT COULD HOLD THE EQUIVALENT OF 4 OR 5 OF [MINE]…THEY WOULD DESTROY THE CONSISTENCY OF THE SLURPEE. IF THEY’RE IN FRONT OF ME, I’D BE GETTING REALLY ANGRY AT THEM OVER A SLURPEE WHICH ISN’T GOOD AT ALL. IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE I COULD WALK IN THE FRONT DOORS AND I COULD LOOK AT THE MACHINE, WHICH WOULD BE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE OF THE ROOM AND TELL, JUST BY THE COLOUR AND HOW QUICKLY THAT PADDLE WAS GOING AROUND, HOW GOOD THAT SLURPEE WAS GOING TO BE. I WOULD TURN AROUND AND WALK OUT IF IT WAS MOVING RELATIVELY QUICK AND IT WAS REALLY DARK. SO I KNEW. THAT’S A PROBLEM AND…POTENTIALLY MY BLOOD PRESSURE WOULD CHANGE WHEN I’M DISPENSING THE SLURPEE BECAUSE I’M SO EXCITED TO GET IT. A LOT OF WHAT WE DO AS HUMAN BEINGS IS ABOUT RITUAL AND IT’S NOT EVEN REALLY ABOUT THE SLURPEE ITSELF BUT THAT, AT A CERTAIN POINT OF THE DAY, WE DO THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AGAIN BECAUSE IT FEELS GOOD. FOR ME, IT WAS AT LUNCH TIME, DRIVING FROM MY HOUSE TO GO GET THAT SLURPEE TO BRING IT BACK TO WORK, WHICH IS A TREMENDOUS WASTE OF TIME. AND FOR WHAT? EXCEPT THAT, I REALLY DID LIKE DRINKING SLURPEES. I REALLY LIKED THE SUGAR RUSH A LOT. IT GAVE ME A LOT OF ENERGY AND I DON’T KNOW IF I HAVE THAT ANY MORE. I NEVER CRASHED AFTER I DRANK THEM. I SAID “IT WAS LIKE I PARACHUTED BACK TO EARTH”. I LOVED THEM LOTS.” “[I STOPPED DRINKING SLURPEES] AROUND [2011/2012]. THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE WAS OFFERING A HEALTH CHECK-UP WHICH WAS REALLY GOOD. I WENT AND THEY MEASURED MY BLOOD SUGAR WHICH WAS HIGH NORMAL. IT WASN’T OUTSIDE NORMAL, BUT IT WAS HIGH NORMAL AND THEY WERE RECOMMENDING TO ME…THAT PERHAPS I SHOULDN’T BE DRINKING SUGAR EVERY DAY. AND ME KNOWING THAT PANCREATIC CANCER IS SOMETHING THAT COULD BE RELATED TO SUGAR CONSUMPTION, I JUST KNEW THAT THERE WAS REALLY NO GOOD REASON FOR ME TO BE DRINKING THOSE STUPID THINGS AS PART OF MY DAY TO DAY EXISTENCE.” “I CUT THEM OUT. I STOPPED AND I THINK IF YOU CAN BREAK THE RITUAL OF GOING TO GET THEM, BECAUSE YOU CAN GET THERE, YOU DON’T EVEN DRINK IT OR YOU DON’T EVEN GET IT. I JUST THOUGHT I HAVE TO BREAK THE PATTERN. SO I BROKE THE PATTERN AND THEN I HAVEN’T GONE BACK.” “I DON’T THINK I’VE KNOWN ANYONE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN CONSUMING THE NUMBER OF SLURPEES THAT I WAS. I KNOW MY SISTER AND HER HUSBAND WERE DRINKING BIG GULPS, AND THEY WOULD HAVE MUCH LARGER CONTAINERS THAN I EVER HAD. PEOPLE WERE CRITICAL OF MY SLURPEE CONSUMPTION, AND MY SISTER AND BROTHER-IN-LAW WERE PROBABLY DRINKING AS MUCH IF NOT MORE COKE, [OR] FOUNTAIN POP, THAN ME. I DON’T KNOW WHY SLURPEES GET SUCH A BAD RAP, BUT I’VE NEVER KNOWN MANY PEOPLE THAT LIKED TO DRINK MORE THAN ME. THE OTHER THING IS THAT I HAVE NO CAVITIES. I DON’T EVEN GO TO THE DENTIST EVERY YEAR BECAUSE I THINK IT’S A RACKET. I WOULD GO, AND THEY WOULDN’T FIND ANY CAVITIES.” “[THE CUP HAS] MEANING TO ME TO SEE [IT] BECAUSE [SLURPEES WERE] PART OF MY DAY TO DAY EXISTENCE FOR—IF IT STARTED IN 1979 AND ENDED BY 2012—THE BETTER PART OF THIRTY-TWO YEARS. IT’S A LONG TIME, AND I [THOUGHT] OF THEM EVEN DURING HIGH SCHOOL.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029008
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SAXOPHONE W/CASE AND ACCESSORIES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, VELVET, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190003000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SAXOPHONE W/CASE AND ACCESSORIES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
BRASS, VELVET, WOOD
No. Pieces
9
Height
15.3
Length
61.2
Width
26
Description
A. CASE, BLACK SYNTHETIC LEATHER EXTERIOR, 61.2 CM LONG X 26 CM WIDE X 15.3 CM TALL. LINED WITH BLUE COTTON VELVET; CASE HAS BLACK LEATHER HANDLE ON FRONT WRAPPED IN BLACK PLASTIC TAPE; FRONT HAS TWO SILVER METAL CLASPS AND SILVER METAL LOCK IN CENTER. FRONT HAS BROWN PAPER LABEL WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “S.R. SMEREK”. FRONT AND TOP HAVE WORN BROWN PAPER LABELS; WORN LABEL ON TOP HAS REMAINING TEXT “CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS COMPANY”. CORNERS OF CASE HAVE SILVER METAL GUARDS. CASE EXTERIOR HAS METAL GUARD ALONG EDGE OF LID COVERED SYNTHETIC LEATHER. INSIDE HAS INDENT FOR SAXOPHONE BODY; INSIDE HAS SQUARE COMPARTMENT WITH BLACK LEATHER STRAP AND SILVER BUTTON SNAP FOR STORING MOUTHPIECE, NECK, REEDS, AND CLEANING CLOTH. CASE EXTERIOR IS WORN, SCRATCHED, AND STAINED ON ALL SIDES; EDGES OF CASE ARE HEAVILY WORN WITH WOOD UNDER OUTER LINING VISIBLE IN PATCHES. METAL CORNERS AND CLASPS ARE TARNISHED; LABELS ARE DISCOLOURED AND BRITTLE. INSIDE OF CASE HAS WORN LINING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. SAXOPHONE BODY, BRASS, 57 CM LONG X 22.5 CM WIDE. SAXOPHONE KEYS INLAID WITH PEARL; BOW HAS RED FELT RESTS ON VALVES. BELL HAS INSCRIPTION ON FRONT, “INDIANA, INDIANA BAND INST. CO., ELKHART, IND., U.S.A.” WITH LOGO OF THE PROFILE OF A NATIVE AMERICAN MAN IN HEADDRESS. BACK OF BODY HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL TAPED ON WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “STEVE SMEREK, ROYAL ALBERTANS ORCHESTRA 1940’S, LETHBRIDGE, AB”. INCLUDED INSIDE IS YELLOW COTTON-FELT RING FOR FITTING TO BODY AT NECK IN TRANSPORT. BACK OF BODY HAS BRASS LOOP FOR ATTACHING NECK STRAP. BODY IS TARNISHED AND CORRODED ON BACK, KEYS, AND BELL; BELL HAS WHITE RESIDUE AROUND BASE OF VALVES AND BASES OF VALVE GUARDS; INSIDE NECK AND BELL OPENINGS ARE TARNISHED AND CORRODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SAXOPHONE NECK, 16,3 CM LONG X 2.2 CM DIAMETER. BRASS NECK PIECE WITH CORK AT END TO ATTACH TO MOUTHPIECE. BASE HAS ROUND OCTAVE PIN RING WITH OCTAVE KEY THAT RUNS ALONG TOP; OCTAVE KEY HAS RED COTTON PAD ON BASE AND CORK ALONG UNDERSIDE THAT TOUCHES NECK. INSIDE OF NECK IS TARNISHED AND CORRODED; OUTSIDE OF NECK IS TARNISHED; CORK AT MOUTHPIECE END HAS TARNISHING WORN THROUGH; TARNISHING VISIBLE AROUND BODY END. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. CLEANING CLOTH, 48 CM LONG X 21 CM WIDE. YELLOW COTTON CLOTH WITH BROWN STITCHED EDGING AT ENDS; CLOTH IS FRAYED AT UPPER EDGE. CLOTH IS STAINED WITH BROWN, BLACK AND GREEN ON FRONT AND BACK; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. E. MOUTHPIECE IN BOX. MOUTHPIECE 10 CM LONG X 2.5 CM DIAMETER; BOX 12.5 CM LONG X 4.3 CM WIDE X 4.2 CM TALL. MOUTHPIECE BLACK PLASTIC WITH SILVER METAL CAP, WOODEN REED, SILVER METAL CLASP AND TWO SILVER METAL PINS. BACK OF MOUTHPIECE HAS WHITE SQUARE PATCH; BACK OF CLASP HAS ENGRAVED “A”. BOX BASE IS BLUE CARDBOARD WITH BLUE INSERT AND ATTACHED BLACK ELASTIC BAND. BOX LID IS LIGHT BLUE CARDBOARD WITH DARK BLUE TEXT ON TOP “BRILLHART” WITH IMAGES OF MOUTHPIECE AND REED; SIDE OF LID HAS DARK BLUE TEXT “TOMALIN, CLARINET, SERIAL NO. FACING, 24607, 3” WITH IMAGE OF STAR BESIDE “3”; SIDE OF LID HAS HANDWRITTEN PENCIL INSCRIPTION “SCCC, 15.50”. MOUTHPIECE HAS TARNISHING ON CAP AND METAL CLASP AND PINS; BOX BASE IS WORN ON INSIDE AND OUTER SIDES; BOX LID IS WORN AT EDGES AND ON SIDES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. TWO REEDS IN PAPER SLEEVE, 11.4 CM LONG X 3.2 CM WIDE. ORANGE CARDBOARD SLEEVE WITH GREY CARDBOARD INSERT; CANE REED INSERTED ON EITHER SIDE OF CENTER CARDBOARD. ORANGE CARDBOARD STAPLED CLOSED AT EDGES. CANE REEDS DISCOLORED PINK; REEDS STAMPED IN BLACK AT BASES “RICO” WITH BARS AND TREBLE CLEF BACKGROUND IMAGE, “REGISTERED U.S. PAT. OFFICE” AND “REG. U.S. PAT.”, “V1” AND “V2” STAMPED AT BASE. REEDS HAVE RESIDUE AT TOPS; LABELS FADED ON REEDS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. G. CANE REED IN CARDBOARD SLEEVE, 9.1 CM LONG X 3.8 CM WIDE. CARDBOARD SLEEVE FOLDED OVER; FRONT HAS BLACK PRINTED IMAGE OF REED AND TEXT “MICRO “PLASTICOAT” REED, A GUARANTEED “MICRO” PRODUCT” AND FADED STAMP AT BOTTOM EDGE “ALTO SAX. NO. 2”. BACK OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “PLEASE NOTE: AFTER USING YOUR MACRO “PLASTICOAT” REED FOR A WHILE THE PLASTI-COATING MAY PEEL OFF. WHEN THIS HAPPENS YOUR REED IS READY TO GIVE YOU EVEN MORE SATISFACTION AS TO TONE AND PLAYING SERVICE. IT IS ONLY THE EXCESS COATING THAT PEELS OFF.” INSIDE OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAUTION: TO AVOID DAMAGE TO TIP, DO NOT PUSH REED TOO FAR IN. IMPORTANT: FOR BEST RESULTS, WET REED THOROLY, SAME AS CANE REED, BEFORE PLAYING.” REED IS WOODEN WITH WORN BLACK COATING ON BACK AND FRONT; REED FRONT HAS BLACK AND GOLD LABEL AT BASE, “MICRO PLASTICOAT CANE REED, REG. U.S. PAT. OFF., MADE IN U.S.A., 2”. SLEEVE IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; BACK OF SLEEVE HAS RED STAINING AT LOWER EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. H. CANE REED IN CARDBOARD SLEEVE, 9.1 CM LONG X 3.7 CM WIDE. CARDBOARD SLEEVE FOLDED OVER; FRONT HAS BLACK PRINTED IMAGE OF REED AND TEXT “MICRO “PLASTICOAT” REED, A GUARANTEED “MICRO” PRODUCT” AND FADED STAMP AT BOTTOM EDGE “ALTO SAX. NO. 3”. BACK OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “PLEASE NOTE: AFTER USING YOUR MACRO “PLASTICOAT” REED FOR A WHILE THE PLASTI-COATING MAY PEEL OFF. WHEN THIS HAPPENS YOUR REED IS READY TO GIVE YOU EVEN MORE SATISFACTION AS TO TONE AND PLAYING SERVICE. IT IS ONLY THE EXCESS COATING THAT PEELS OFF.” INSIDE OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAUTION: TO AVOID DAMAGE TO TIP, DO NOT PUSH REED TOO FAR IN. IMPORTANT: FOR BEST RESULTS, WET REED THOROLY, SAME AS CANE REED, BEFORE PLAYING.” REED IS WOODEN WITH GROOVED BACK OF BASE; REED HAS FADED BLACK STAMP ON BASE OF FRONT “VIBRATOR, CHIRON, FRANCE, M.F.G. U.S.A.” SLEEVE IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED ON FRONT AND BACK; SLEEVE HAS RIP ON FRONT RIGHT EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. NECK STRAP, 40.8 CM LONG X 10.3 CM WIDE. BROWN LEATHER AT NECK WITH COTTON CORDS ATTACHED. CORDS ATTACH AT BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC FITTING; CORDS ARE TWINED AT BASE TO ATTACH TO SILVER METAL HOOK. COTTON CORDS STAINED GREEN; LEATHER IS WORN AND STAINED GREEN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
MILITARY
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARBARA LEGGE AND ROBERT SMEREK REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF A SAXOPHONE, CASE, AND ACCESSORIES. LEGGE AND SMEREK RECALLED THAT THE SAXOPHONE BELONGED TO THEIR FATHER, STEVE SMEREK, WHO PLAYED IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE SAXOPHONE, LEGGE ELABORATED, “IT WAS STILL MY DAD’S…HE DIED IN 1970. MY DAD [WAS] STEVE SMEREK, THE ORCHESTRA LEADER OF THE ROYAL ALBERTAN’S ORCHESTRA.” “[DAD] PLAYED IN…THE ROYAL ALBERTAN’S ORCHESTRA…FROM IN THE EARLY ‘40S, TILL 1951. [ROB AND I WERE] VERY SMALL [ROB WAS BORN IN ’43, AND I WAS BORN IN 1948], AND THEY PLAYED TILL ’51, AS FAR AS I COULD CAPTURE [FROM] THE NEWSPAPER ARTICLES. I ONLY REMEMBER GOING TO A PRACTICE WITH HIM. I THINK IT WAS AT THE TRIANON…WHEN I WAS YOUNG…WHEN HE WAS WORKING, WE WOULD PLAY ON THE PIANO…” “I PLAYED WITH MY DAD, WHILE ON THE PIANO, AND THEN HE ACCOMPANIED ME WITH THE SAXOPHONE [THAT WAS IN JUNIOR HIGH, I GUESS]…WE STARTED BAND IN GRADE TEN, SO THAT WAS PROBABLY IN 1964, THAT I ACTUALLY HAD [THE SAXOPHONE] IN MY HANDS.” “MY BIGGEST MEMORY IS HIM COMING IN AND PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE, JOINING ME ON WHATEVER I WAS PRACTICING ON THE PIANO. [MY] BEGINNER PIANO LESSONS WERE IN CLASSICAL MUSIC. I WAS PROBABLY PLAYING POPULAR MUSIC BY THAT TIME. I HAD SWITCHED TO A MRS. SINCLAIR, TO LEARN POPULAR MUSIC. THAT’S WHEN I REMEMBER HIM COMING IN. I’D PLAY SOME OF HIS OLD SONGS, BECAUSE HE HAD BOOKS OF OLD SONGS THAT I USED TO PLAY ON PIANO, SO HE WOULD KNOW ALL THE MUSIC.” ROBERT SMEREK ADDED, “I WAS THERE ONCE, AT THE TRIANON BALLROOM…IT WAS A PRACTICE. THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN RECORDING TOO…IN THE ‘50S, THE BIG BANDS WERE ON THE WAY OUT, SO THAT’S WHEN THE BAND TERMINATED, AND I WAS ONLY 8 YEARS OLD.” “I DON’T THINK THEY TRAVELED. THEY PLAYED THE TRIANON BALLROOM, HENDERSON LAKE PAVILION, THE RAINBOW BALLROOM IS ANOTHER ONE.” LEGGE CONTINUED, “BEFORE THAT, HE WAS IN OTHER BANDS, WITH SOME OF [THE SMALLER BANDS]. [HE WAS] IN A MELODY QUEEN’S BAND, WHEN HE WAS YOUNGER. THEN [HE WAS] IN THE 18TH BRIGADE BAND, DURING THE WAR. SOME PEOPLE FROM OTHER BANDS IN LETHBRIDGE, THEY WERE ALL KIND OF MUSICAL FRIENDS, (LOU GONZY AND THE RANCH BOYS, A FEW PEOPLE), AND I HAVE NO IDEA HOW [THE BAND MEMBERS] ALL GOT TOGETHER FOR THIS ORCHESTRA. THEY ALL PLAYED, AS FAR AS I COULD TELL, DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS, BECAUSE THERE’S DIFFERENT PICTURES THAT WE HAVE. IN ONE, MY DAD’S PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE, BUT THERE’S ANOTHER ONE WHERE HE’S PLAYING THE CLARINET. IN SOME OF THE MUSIC, I THINK HE’S PLAYING THE TRUMPET. I DON’T KNOW IF IT’S HIM, FOR SURE. THEY WOULD SWITCH INSTRUMENTS, EXCEPT FOR MY UNCLE MIKE, WHO WAS THE DRUMMER IN THE BAND.” “SOME OF THE ANNOUNCEMENTS…WERE AT THE MARQUIS HOTEL, WHICH ISN’T HERE ANYMORE, AND THE LEGION MEMORIAL HALL. THERE’S A FEW WHERE, I THINK, THEY PROBABLY WENT OUT OF TOWN, BUT PROBABLY NO FARTHER THAN COALDALE. I THINK MOST, OR ALL THESE ANNOUNCEMENTS, ARE MOSTLY AT THE HENDERSON LAKE PAVILION, UNTIL THE END, THERE IS A TRIANON ONE…[DAD] HAD A FAMILY, SO HE DIDN’T REALLY TRAVEL…THE STORY TOLD BY MY AUNT, HIS SISTER-IN-LAW, WAS THAT, WHEN TOMMY DORSEY WAS HERE IN [JULY] 1951, THAT HE WANTED MY DAD TO JOIN HIS BAND WHEN HE WAS ON TOUR HERE. BUT MY DAD DIDN’T WANT TO GO, BECAUSE HE DIDN’T WANT TO LEAVE HIS FAMILY. WE WERE ALL SMALL THEN. AS FAR AS I KNOW, HE DIDN’T REALLY GO OUT OF TOWN. IT WAS ALL LAKE PAVILION, AND WORKING AT HIS REGULAR JOB.” “THE DANCES WERE…EVERY SATURDAY, AND TUESDAYS…I REMEMBER WEDNESDAYS IN LETHBRIDGE, THE STORES WERE CLOSED, AT LEAST FOR HALF A DAY, BECAUSE MY MOM USED TO WORK AT EATON’S, AND WEDNESDAY WAS THEIR DAY OFF, AT LEAST AFTER 12:00 NOON. SO, THERE WAS A LOT OF DANCING ON TUESDAYS, AND SATURDAYS.” “[MY DAD STARTED PLAYING MUSIC WHEN] MY GRANDMA (HIS MOM) WAS TOLD BY A DOCTOR THAT HIS LUNGS WERE A BIT WEAK, AND THAT THE BEST THING TO DO WAS TO START BLOWING AN INSTRUMENT…HIS LUNGS WERE KIND OF WEAK SO THE BEST THING TO DO WAS BLOW AN INSTRUMENT. THEY TELL YOU THAT TODAY, TOO. YOU CAN STRENGTHEN YOUR LUNGS BY BLOWING AN INSTRUMENT…THERE WAS MUSIC IN OUR FAMILY, PRIOR TO THAT, SO I’M NOT SURE WHY [DAD CHOSE] THE SAXOPHONE…[OUR DAD’S] GRANDFATHER HAD BEEN IN BANDS. THERE’S A FUNNY STORY ABOUT THE SMEREK’S – THERE WERE TWO SISTERS MARRIED TWO BROTHERS…AND THEY’RE ALL SINGERS, AND MUSICAL BACKGROUNDS FROM THE OLD COUNTRY. [THAT WAS] THE STORY WE WERE TOLD WHY HE STARTED PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE. MY GRANDMA DIDN’T WANT HIM TO GO INTO THE MINE…BECAUSE AN OLDER BROTHER WAS KILLED IN THE MINE–-THE #9 OR #6 MINE ON THE NORTH SIDE.” “[ROBERT] PLAYED THE TENOR, SO I RECEIVED THE ALTO SAX [FROM DAD], BECAUSE [DAD] TOLD ME IT WAS EASIER TO PLAY THAN HIS CLARINET, TO LEARN ON A SAXOPHONE INSTEAD. THAT WAS JUST IN HIGH SCHOOL, WHEN [MOM AND DAD WERE] STILL IN LETHBRIDGE.” ON THE MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE SAXOPHONE, LEGGE ELABORATED, “AFTER OUR DAD DIED, OUR MOTHER KEPT ALL THE INSTRUMENTS TILL WE WANTED THEM…I HAVE BEEN HOLDING [ONTO] THE SAXOPHONE [SINCE 1970], BECAUSE MY CHILDREN PLAYED IT IN BAND, IN HIGH SCHOOL [IN FORT MCMURRAY, ALBERTA], AND I PLAYED IT IN BAND, IN CATHOLIC CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL…ROB PLAYED THIS SAXOPHONE IN HIGH SCHOOL BAND AT ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL, LETHBRIDGE…WE’RE GETTING OLDER NOW, AND MOST OF THE PEOPLE THAT WE HAVE THE HISTORY FROM ARE NO LONGER WITH US. I DECIDED THAT IT WAS TIME TO PUT IT SOMEWHERE WHERE EVERYBODY CAN LOOK AT IT AND ENJOY IT…THE INSTRUMENT ITSELF. [I] WANT IT SOMEWHERE PROTECTED.” “IT’S VERY DIFFICULT FOR ME [TO GIVE IT UP], AND IT TOOK A WHILE FOR ME TO WANT TO DO THIS, AND KNOW THAT IT’S GOING TO BE HERE. I JUST HAVE TO ADJUST TO IT, BUT IT’S STILL, TODAY, A VERY DIFFICULT DAY FOR ME TO ACTUALLY GIVE YOU THIS [SAXOPHONE].” “IT’S ‘HIM’. IT JUST IS, BUT I STILL THINK [DONATING THE SAXOPHONE IS] A GOOD THING FOR US TO DO…[DAD] PLAYED A BIG ROLE IN LETHBRIDGE, IN THE BAND ERA, IN THE ‘40S. I JUST WANT HIM TO BE REMEMBERED, AND I WANT HIS STUFF TO BE ENJOYED BY OTHER PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY MY KIDS, BECAUSE THEY HAVEN’T REALLY HEARD THESE RECORDS DIRECTLY, LIKE I HAVE. [MY KIDS] THOUGHT IT WAS A GOOD IDEA. I RAN IT BY EVERYBODY, TO SEE HOW THEY FELT ABOUT IT. THEY’RE OK WITH IT, BUT IT’S STILL HARD TO DO.” ROBERT SMEREK ADDED, “I’D LIKE TO HAVE OTHER PEOPLE SEE IT, AND REMEMBER [DAD]. [BARBARA] WOULD HAVE MORE CONNECTION TO IT THAN I’D HAVE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190003000-GA
Catalogue Number
P20190003000
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SONY CDP-X779ES
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SONY CDP-X779ES
Date
1992
Materials
METAL, GLASS, WOOD
No. Pieces
12
Height
12.5
Length
46
Width
37
Description
A- CD PLAYER; PALE GOLD METAL CONTROL PANEL ON FRONT INCLUDES THIRTEEN BUTTONS OF VARIOUS SIZES, RECTANGULAR GLASS DISPLAY WINDOW, CD DRAWER AND GOLD HEADPHONE PORT. STICKER ABOVE DRAWER READS, “PULSE / D/A CONVERTER”. TOP RIGHT CORNER OF FRONT PANEL READS, “X779ES / HIGH DENSITY LINEAR CONVERTER / DIRECT DIGITAL SYNC”. TOP PANEL IS GOLD COLOUR WITH SILVER SCREWS IN EVERY CORNER AND MIDDLE EDGE. SIDES ARE REFLECTIVE DARK WOOD PANELS. BACK PANEL IS BLACK, COMPLETE WITH A HORIZONTAL ROW OF FOUR GOLD CABLE PORTS, THREE LARGE PALE GOLD PORTS, AND TWO BLACK BUTTONS. BLUE STICKER ON BACK READS “AUDIO VIDEO EQUIPMENT…NN788413”. WHITE TEXT BELOW READS, “…SERIAL NO. A700039…” MAIN BODY STANDS ON FOUR SHORT CYLINDRICAL LEGS. VERY GOOD CONDITION; MINOR WEAR AND STAINING ON FRONT PANEL BUTTONS, FINGERPRINT MARKS ON TOP PANEL. PLUG-IN CABLE ATTACHED TO THE BACK OF CD PLAYER. THICK BLACK RUBBER PROTECTIVE COVERING. GOLD TEXT ON CABLE READS, “E41381-T VW-1…” HARD PLASTIC HEAD, WITH TWO SILVER METAL PRONGS. VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT WEAR ON PRONGS. B- REMOTE CONTROL: H: 2. L: 17.4. W: 5.8. DARK BROWN AND BLACK BODY. TOP HAS PALE GOLD PERFORATED METAL PANEL WITH 36 BUTTONS, SOME OF WHICH READ, “PEAK SEARCH”, “FILE RECALL”, “CONTINUE”, “C.INDEX”, “ERASE”. BELOW FIRST PANEL, IS A SECOND SOLID GOLD METAL PANEL WITH 14 ADDITIONAL BUTTONS. WHITE TEXT BELOW READS, “CD PLAYER / RM-D995 / SONY”. BACK HAS BLACK PLASTIC PANEL TO COVER BATTERIES. VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT DUST. C- INSTRUCTION MANUAL: H: 1CM. L: 28.2CM. W: 21CM. WHITE PAPER MANUAL WITH TWO METAL STAPLES ALONG SPINE FOR BINDING. BLACK TEXT IN MIDDLE RIGHT OF THE PAGE READS “COMPACT DISC PLAYER / OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS”. BLACK TEXT ON BOTTOM OF COVER READS “…CDP-X779ES…” GREEN PAGE MARKER VISIBLE AT THE TOP IS ATTACHED TO PAGE 18, “HOOKING UP THE SYSTEM”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT YELLOWING OF PAPER, MINOR BLACK FINGERPRINT SMUDGE AND SCUFF ON THE BACK. D- CARDBOARD BOX: H: 22.8. L: 45.5. W: 56. BROWN RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD BOX WITH CLEAR STRIPS OF BROKEN TAPE OVER TOP, FRONT AND BACK. TOP OF BOX READS “SONY” IN NAVY BLUE TEXT. TO THE RIGHT IS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER THAT READS, “72-YRM”. BELOW IS AN ATTACHED STRIP OF WHITE PLASTIC WITH A SINGLE RED MARK. TEXT ON BOTTOM LEFT CORNER READS, “COMPACT DISC DIGITAL AUDIO” IN NAVY BLUE LETTERING. TEXT ON BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER READS, “CDP-X779ES / COMPACT DISC PLAYER / LECTEUR COMPACT DISC”. ON LEFT SIDE OF BOX, WHITE STICKER READS, “…ORDER: 493553 B/L: 324997…” GOOD CONDITION: CARDBOARD IS RIPPED, DENTED, PEELING AND STAINED FROM TAPE ADHESIVE. E- BAG OF EXTRA SCREWS: H: 2.5. L: 4. W. 7.6. BLACK SCREWS WITH MUSHROOM HEADS AND ‘X’ SHAPED CAVITIES. TEXT ON WHITE STICKER READS, “CAUTION…EXCHANGE LONG SCREWS FOR INCLUDED SHORT ONES…4-943-721-01”. EXCELLENT CONDITION: UNOPENED. F- THIN FOAM SHEET: L: 56.3. W: 130. WHITE STRIPES, WITH WAVED EDGES. DEEP VERTICAL CREASES INDICATE TRIFOLD FOLDING. GOOD CONDITION: HEAVY CREASING, SCUFF MARKS, “U” SHAPED HOLE ON RIGHT HAND EDGE. G- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (TOP REAR): H: 9. L: 54. W: 9.4. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG WITH CREVICE TO STORE REMOTE CONTROL. UNDERSIDE IS CUT TO FIT TOP REAR SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON RIGHT SIDE READS, “TOP REAR”. PACKAGING WAS FOUND ON TOP FRONT. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SMALL AREAS REMOVED FROM ITS UNDERSIDE. H- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (TOP FRONT): H: 9. L: 54. W: 9.4. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH UNDERSIDE CUT TO FIT TOP FRONT SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON RIGHT SIDE READS, “TOP FRONT”. PACKAGING WAS FOUND ON TOP REAR. EXCELLENT CONDITION. I- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (BOTTOM REAR) H: 8. L: 54. W: 9. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH TOP CUT TO FIT BOTTOM REAR SURFACE OF PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON MIDDLE TOP READS, “BOTTOM REAR”. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: HEAVY CRACKING AND MISSING PIECES OF STYROFOAM. J- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (BOTTOM FRONT) H: 8. L: 54. W: 9. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH TOP CUT TO FIT BOTTOM FRONT SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON THE MIDDLE TOP READS, “BOTTOM FRONT”. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MINOR CRACKS IN STYROFOAM. K- LEFT STEREO PACKAGING: H: 2. L: 36. W: 11. YELLOW CARDBOARD LINED WITH GREY FOAM. CORNERS ARE HELD TOGETHER BY YELLOW PIECES OF TAPE. BOTH LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES EXHIBIT TWO HOLES, ONE ABOVE THE OTHER, 5CM APART. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT WARPING OF CARDBOARD, TWO CIRCULAR INDENTS TO THE LEFT OF LEFT SET OF HOLES. L- RIGHT STEREO PACKAGING: H: 2. L: 36. W: 11. YELLOW CARDBOARD LINED WITH GREY FOAM. CORNERS ARE HELD TOGETHER BY YELLOW PIECES OF TAPE. BOTH LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES EXHIBIT TWO HOLES, ONE ABOVE THE OTHER, 5CM APART. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WARPING OF CARDBOARD ON TOP, BOTTOM AND RIGHT SIDE. TWO MINOR SCRATCHES ON BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF FOAM.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON JANUARY 29, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROD SCHULTZ REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A MODEL X779ES SONY CD PLAYER. SCHULTZ DISCUSSED HOW HE ACQUIRED THE CD PLAYER, “I PURCHASED THIS IN 1994… SONY HAD A BRAND CALLED ES AND THAT’S THE VERY TOP LINE OF THEIR STEREO SYSTEMS … I HAD HEARD THEM BEFORE – I HEARD THIS ONE PARTICULAR UNIT AND I WANTED TO BUY IT. THEN SONY DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO NOT BE INVOLVED IN MARKETING THOSE HIGH-END PRODUCTS ANYMORE BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T REALLY SEE… A CONTINUATION OF CD’S COMING BECAUSE EVERYTHING WAS GOING TO DIGITAL STREAMING - PEOPLE WEREN’T GOING TO BE BUYING THESE. I WENT OUT AND LISTENED TO THESE UNITS. I COMPARED THEM AND CAME BACK PROBABLY 10 TIMES BEFORE I HEARD THIS UNIT AND I WAS CERTAIN THIS WAS THE ONE I WANTED TO HAVE. MY WIFE WASN’T THRILLED BUT I WAS PREPARED TO MAKE SOME SACRIFICES FOR THAT. WHAT HAPPENED IS THAT I WAS GOING TO BUY IT AND THEN SONY DECIDED THAT THEY WERE GOING TO SHUT DOWN THE STORES THAT THEY HAD IN CANADA. THEY SHUT DOWN THE LETHBRIDGE ONE FIRST. THIS WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WAS LEFT IN CANADA AND THERE WAS STILL ONE AVAILABLE IN MEDICINE HAT. I DROVE TO MEDICINE HAT AND I BOUGHT IT THERE BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T SHIP IT FROM MEDICINE HAT TO THE [LETHBRDIGE] STORE THAT WAS GOING TO BE CLOSING. I TOLD THEM, I SAID, “I TELL YOU, I’M COMING TODAY. DO NOT SELL THAT UNIT ON ME.” “PEOPLE WOULD SAY, ‘YOU SPENT $2400 ON A COMPACT DISC PLAYER. THERE IS NO WAY IT CAN BE WORTH THAT KIND OF MONEY.’ I’D SAY, ‘I’LL TELL YOU WHAT, YOU HAVE COMPACT DISCS. YOU BRING YOUR VERY FAVORITE OVER AND LISTEN TO IT SEVERAL TIMES AT YOUR HOUSE AND YOU COME OVER AND YOU LISTEN TO MINE.’ THEY SAID, ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE THE DIFFERENCE. IF SOMEONE HAD TOLD ME THAT I’D HAVE SAID, “NO, IT’S NOT POSSIBLE FOR THERE TO BE THAT KIND OF DIFFERENCE BUT I UNDERSTAND WHY YOU ARE DEVOTED TO BUYING …I FINALLY HEARD THIS WAS THE CREAM OF THE CROP.”’ AND THAT’S WHY I DECIDED THAT WAS THE ONE I WAS GOING TO OWN…AFTER I FOUND IT I DIDN”T BELIEVE IT COULD BE ANY BETTER AND I JUST…TREATED IT THE BEST I COULD.” “IT WAS A THRILL TO OWN THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT. I USED TO SPEND 4 HOURS A DAY LISTENING TO MUSIC. WHEN THE KIDS WENT TO BED, I HAD MY QUIET TIME AND THAT’S WHEN I KIND OF FELL OFF THE FACE OF THE EARTH...” “IT STARTED TO FAIL ABOUT NINE MONTHS AGO... YOU MIGHT HAVE TO SHUT THE ON/OFF BUTTON ON TWICE TO FINALLY GET IT TO RUN, AND THEN IT FINALLY WOULD RUN [BUT] IT WOULD NEVER QUIT PART OF THE WAY THROUGH. IT BECAME SOMETHING THAT WAS PERFECT THAT ALL OF A SUDDEN WAS NO LONGER PERFECT.” “I THOUGHT MAYBE THERE WAS SOMETHING WRONG WITH [THE] OTHER COMPONENTS THAT WERE HOOKED TO IT SO I HAD THE AMPLIFIER CHECKED OUT, THE PRE-AMPLIFIER, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS FINE. THERE’S A GUY…WHO WAS AN ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN THAT OWNED THE SAME PLAYER IN CALGARY… I USED TO GO UP TO CALGARY TO VISIT THIS GUY, AND HE HAD THE SAME ISSUE WITH THE SAME PLAYER, WITH HIS, AND HE WAS NEVER ABLE TO FIX IT…HE TOLD ME IT WAS A DONE DEAL, THERE’S NOTHING I CAN DO ABOUT IT. [I ALMOST HAD TO GO THROUGH A LEVEL OF GRIEVING AND LOTS OF DENIAL] I COULDN’T BELIEVE IT HAPPENED, SO I FINALLY BOUGHT THE REPLACEMENT THROUGH SMITH’S AUDIO.” ON THE ORIGINS OF HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC, SCHULTZ RECALLED, “…I FIRST GOT INTERESTED IN CLASSICAL MUSIC… BECAUSE OF MY FATHER-IN-LAW. HE WAS THE COOLEST GUY IN THE WORLD… WHEN I FINALLY GOT THROUGH SCHOOL AND I STARTED TO PAY ATTENTION TO LISTEN TO MUSIC SERIOUSLY. [I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE] IN 1977 AND I USED TO TAKE OUT 30 LPs AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WEEK AND 30 LPs AT THE END OF THE WEEK AND I WOULD…EXPLORE DIFFERENT COMPOSERS IN LETHBRIDGE – SO I WOULD BORROW THEM FROM THERE AND I WOULD LISTEN TO THEM ON MY PHONOGRAPH… I WAS ABLE TO DETERMINE EXACTLY WHICH COMPOSERS I LIKED AND MUSIC I LIKED, WHICH WERE THE REALLY GOOD ORCHESTRAS. I DEVELOPED THIS REPERTOIRE OF MUSIC THAT… JUST MADE MY SKIN HOT.” “I’M ALMOST POSITIVE THAT [THE FIRST CD I BOUGHT] WAS… A PIECE OF MUSIC BY BACH…IT WAS AN OBOE CONCERTO, IN AN OBOE ENVIRONMENT. IT WAS [AN] ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS PIECE OF MUSIC... I STILL HAVE IT TODAY AND IT PLAYS BEAUTIFULLY. I LISTEN TO IT ONCE A MONTH.” “I HAVE A LOT OF COMPACT DISCS, PROBABLY 450 THAT ARE PRIMARILY CLASSICAL ONES… I TRY TO PICK MUSIC BY WELL-KNOWN COMPOSERS, BEAUTIFUL THINGS, I CALL IT EAR CANDY AND THAT[‘S] WHAT IT IS TO ME. IT IS SOMETHING THAT CAN BRING ME TO TEARS, THAT I CAN BE EMOTIONALLY ATTACHED TO IT…TO ME IT’S LIKE A SOOTHER FOR AN ADULT. THIS IS MAYBE A STRANGE THING TO SAY, BUT IT GIVES ME GREAT JOY. I WOULD RATHER BE BLIND THAN TO LOSE MY HEARING BECAUSE IF I LISTEN TO MUSIC, I’D BE CRYING RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU… I REALLY BELIEVE IN MY HEART THAT COMPOSERS ARE A GIFT FROM GOD.” “IT DOES SOMETHING TO ME…I MEAN, I’VE GOT A BEAUTIFUL WIFE, BEST FAMILY, NICE HOME BUT THIS IS STILL A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE AND MY MENTAL HEALTH.” “SOMETIMES I THINK FOR PEOPLE [MUSIC IS] JUST NOISE IN THE BACKGROUND, BUT…IF I SIT ON THE SOFA AND I LISTEN TO MUSIC, IT’S ALMOST LIKE I ELEVATE FROM THE GROUND. I’M NOT A CRAZY PERSON BUT IT JUST TAKES ME TO A DIFFERENT REALM. IT TAKES ME TO A DIFFERENT PLACE THAT HAS JUST ME ENJOYING SOMETHING I LOVE. IT’S SPECIAL TO ME.” ON DONATING THE CD PLAYER TO THE MUSEUM, SCHULTZ EXPLAINED, “IF I COULD HAVE FIXED THIS, IT WOULD STILL BE IN MY SYSTEM…I JUST COULDN’T DO IT. YOU ASKED ME WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR ME TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT. I COULD LEAVE THIS [TO] SIT IN A BOX. IT’S IN A BOX AND IT HAS MEMORIES TO ME, BUT THIS IS AN ELECTRONIC PIECE OF ART AND IT’S A VERY, VERY WELL DESIGNED AND BEAUTIFUL SOUNDING PIECE OF EQUIPMENT… IT IS SUCH A UNIQUE THING AND SOMETHING I’VE PRIZED [TOO] MUCH THAT, TO ME, IT WOULD BE A TRAVESTY TO JUST SIT IN A BOX AND DO NOTHING, WHERE IT COULD POSSIBLY ONE DAY BE APPRECIATED BY OTHER PEOPLE FOR THE BEAUTY OF IT AND FOR THE DESIGN OF IT AND THE FACT THAT IT WAS REALLY AT THE TOP OF ITS CLASS AND THE REVIEWS THAT THEY HAVE STATED THAT THIS WAS ONE OF THE BEST CD PLAYERS THAT HAS EVER BEEN MADE IN THE WORLD.” “THERE’S A PLACE I COULD GO DOWN AND RECYCLE [THE CD PLAYER, BUT IT’S THE] MOST DISRESPECTFUL THING I COULD DO…BECAUSE IT DESERVES BETTER THAN THAT FROM WHAT IT GAVE ME. SO I SAVE THEM. I FEEL EMBARRASSED THAT I’M EMOTIONAL ABOUT IT BUT TO ME – I DON’T KNOW IF IT’S A LOVE AFFAIR WITH SOMETHING, BUT IT’S NOT THAT FAR FROM IT. IT JUST GAVE ME SO MUCH INCREDIBLE JOY. [DESTROYING IT] WOULD BE THE MOST DISRESPECTFUL THING I COULD DO TO SOME INANIMATE OBJECT. I COULDN’T DO IT. THAT’S WHY IT SAT IN MY BASEMENT. I THOUGHT TO MYSELF, ‘THERE’S A BETTER HOME FOR IT THAN A CARDBOARD BOX’.” “I HAVE A CONNECTION HERE [TO THE GALT] AND I BELIEVE IN WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WHAT YOU’RE TRYING TO ACHIEVE. IT MAKES ME FEEL PEACEFUL. I CAN SAY “GOODBYE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PHOTOGRAPHS AND ADDITIONAL RECEIPTS DATED 1987, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190004000
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TOY, STUFFED
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHERETTE, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150013001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TOY, STUFFED
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
LEATHERETTE, LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
21.5
Length
29.5
Width
5.5
Description
A: STUFFED DOG, GREEN LEATHERETTE BODY, RED LEATHERETTE EARS. RED STITCHING AROUND EDGE OF DOG’S BODY. SAME RED THREAD MAKES A SMALL TAIL. BLACK BUTTON EYES. TOY DESIGNED WITH ONLY 2 LEGS, FRONT AND BACK. B: ADJUSTABLE BLACK LEATHER COLLAR WITH SILVER COLOURED METAL BUCKLE. MINOR REPAIRS WITH OFF-WHITE THREAD VISIBLE AT TAIL AND ABOVE LEFT EYE. MINOR REPAIR WITH STAPLES ON FRONT LEFT FOOT. LEATHERETTE RUBBED OFF AT NOSE AREA AND UNDER BUTTON EYES. SEAMS WHERE LEGS MEET BODY ARE WELL-WORN AND LOOSE, SOME STUFFING IS VISIBLE, ESPECIALLY ON RIGHT FRONT LEG.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THIS STUFFED DOG BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013001
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TEDDY BEAR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FAKE FUR, WOOL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TEDDY BEAR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FAKE FUR, WOOL, COTTON
No. Pieces
3
Height
37
Length
31.5
Width
13
Description
A: TEDDY BEAR, MEDIUM BROWN FAKE FUR BODY WITH YELLOW FAKE FUR ON EARS, NOSE, AND PAWS. TWO RED BUTTON EYES. NOSE AND MOUTH ARE BLACK YARN SEWN ONTO YELLOW SNOUT. FAKE FUR HAS RUBBED OFF ON BEAR'S SNOUT AND AROUND SEVERAL SEAMS, ESPECIALLY ON EARS AND FEET. MINOR REPAIRS EVIDENT BELOW SNOUT, ABOVE LEFT EYE, BACK OF NECK, AND BOTTOM OF RIGHT FOOT. B: TEAL GREEN WOOL CARDIGAN WITH 5 GOLD-COLOURED BUTTONS. BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH AIRPLANE FLYING OVER WAVY WATER. C: RED ROMPER PANTS UNDER SWEATER. MATERIAL HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE BOWS WITH NAVY BLUE CENTRES. STRAPS OF PANTS AFFIXED IN FRONT WITH TWO TAN BUTTONS.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THIS TEDDY BEAR BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. UPDATE: ON 26 OCTOBER 2017, DONOR ROBERT SMITH RESPONDED BY EMAIL TO AN ENQUIRY BY MUSEUM STAFF ON THIS OBJECT’S MANUFACTURE, SAYING THAT, “MY MOTHER DID KNIT AND SEW, AND HAD A TREADLE-TYPE SINGER SEWING MACHINE [AND] WHILE I CAN'T BE SURE, IT IS LIKELY THAT SHE MADE THE BEAR'S CLOTHES AND THE BABY BONNET.” IN ANOTHER EMAIL, THE FOLLOWING DAY (27 OCTOBER), HE ADDED, “THE BEAR WAS PROBABLY STORE BOUGHT, AND THE CLOTHES ADDED TO PERSONALIZE IT. [I] DON'T KNOW IF IT WAS A GIFT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013003
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20150013004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
9
Width
10.5
Diameter
7.5
Description
TEETHING RING. LARGE ORANGE PLASTIC RING (7.5CM DIAMETER) WITH 8 SMALLER RINGS (4.2CM DIAMETER) ON IT. OF THE SMALLER RINGS, TWO ARE BLUE, THREE ARE ORANGE, AND THREE ARE OFF-WHITE. EACH RING (BIG AND SMALL) IS STAMPED WITH "MADE IN U.S.A." LARGE RING CAN BE OPENED, BUT IS PRESENTLY HELD TOGETHER BY STRING TIED THROUGH TWO SMALL HOLES. MINOR STAINING EVIDENT ON THE OFF-WHITE RINGS. INSIDE THE LARGE RING THERE IS PLASTIC MISSING AROUND THE SMALL HOLES.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS TEETHING TOY BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013004
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
No. Pieces
3
Height
34.5
Width
27
Diameter
21.5
Description
A: LARGE, GREEN AND SILVER PORTABLE THERMAL JUG. MAIN BODY OF THE JUG IS FOREST GREEN, WITH THE UPPER PORTION MADE OF SILVER COLOURED METAL. LARGE SILVER HANDLE ON SIDE AND TWO SILVER POSTS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, (POSSIBLY FOR A STRAP TO BE ATTACHED). INTERIOR IS LINED WITH GLASS. "WILLOUGHBY" WRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER ON BOTTOM. B: REMOVABLE LID IS METAL AND CORK, WITH A METAL SECTION ON THE INSIDE TO PROTECT THE CORK FROM THE LIQUID WITHIN. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ON TOP HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE SCREWED INTO THE LID, TO KEEP THE LID IN PLACE. C: SMALL CORK STOPPER IN THE SPOUT ON THE LID. JUG HAS BEEN WELL USED. GREEN PORTION IS IN GOOD CONDITION, WITH ONLY A FEW SPOTS WHERE THE FINISH HAS WORN OFF. UPPER SILVER PORTION HAS SEVERAL SEVERAL DENTS, SCUFF MARKS, AND A LARGE DRIP OF GREY PAINT. SIDE HANDLE HAS A YELLOW SUBSTANCE ON THE METAL. CORK IN LID DARK AND DISCOLOURED ON LOWER PORTION. INTERIOR METAL PORTION OF LID HAS COME AWAY FROM THE CORK SLIGHTLY. CORK STOPPER WELL WORN AND APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN HAND CARVED, POSSIBLY FROM A WINE CORK. INTERIOR GLASS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS WATER COOLER/THERMAL JUG USUALLY HELD LEMONADE, EITHER FROZEN OR POWERED “LEMON SQUASH”. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “DAD WOULD SELL POWDERED LEMON SQUASH. HE HAD A BIN OF IT IN THE BASEMENT OF THE STORE … HE WOULD PROVIDE IT FOR THE SOUTHMINSTER SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNICS … BUT WE HAD THE FROZEN LEMONADE TOO, THAT WAS A TREAT.” BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT. WE WOULD HAVE BUNS FROM ERICKSEN’S AND CARROT AND CELERY STICKS. THERE WAS OFTEN POTATO SALAD, BUT I DIDN’T CARE FOR IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS DESSERT, EVEN ON PICNICS – USUALLY HOMEMADE COOKIES. I’M SURE THERE WAS MORE, AS MUM WAS A GREAT COOK, BUT THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT STAND OUT.” THIS WATER COOLER IS PART OF A PICNIC SET, WHICH WAS USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
7
Height
36
Width
32.3
Diameter
29.5
Description
RED PLAID, 4-GALLON, CLYINDRICAL COOLER WITH RED HANDLE, REMOVABLE LID, PLASTIC SHELF INSERT, AND ICE PACKS. A: COOLER BODY. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE BOTTOM AND TOP OF COOLER IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. RED PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED ON ONE SIDE WITH A BLACK SCREW (MISSING ON OTHER SIDE). INSIDE OF COOLER IS SILVER COLOURED AND HAS A SMALL LIP 4.2CM DOWN FROM EDGE FOR THE SHELF (C) TO SIT ON. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. BLACK SCREW FOR ONE SIDE OF HANDLE MISSING. LARGE DENT IN CENTRE OF COOLER ON ONE SIDE. DENT DOES NOT EXTEND TO THE INSIDE OF THE COOLER. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS AND SCRATCHES IN THE PLAID SURFACE ALL OVER BODY OF COOLER. SILVER COLOURED LINING SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED. RUST MARKS ON THE BOTTOM OF COOLER FROM ICE PACKS. B: COOLER LID. CIRCULAR. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE OUTSIDE IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. SLIGHT INDENDATIONS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER MAKE HAND GRIPS TO REMOVE LID. INSIDE OF LID IS SILVER COLOURED. STAMPED ONTO INSIDE OF LID: "HAMILTON - THE SKOTCH KOOLER* - A PETRA CABOT DESIGN - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO, PAT. APP. FOR" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SURFACE HAS SOME SMALL SCRATCHES. A FEW WATER MARKS ON THE SURFACE. A FEW VERY SMALL DENTS ON THE INSIDE SURFACE. C: SHELF. CLEAR PLASTIC, CIRCULAR, REMOVABLE SHELF. HAS TWO INDENTED SECTIONS, OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, TO FACILITATE THE REMOVAL OF THE SHELF. GOOD CONDITION. PLASTIC IS SLIGHTLY OPAQUE FROM SCRATCHES. SMALL CRACK (5.5CM LONG) IN PLASTIC. SOME CIRCULAR RUST SPOTS ON SHELF. D-G: ICE PACKS. SMALL METAL CANS, RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AT JOINT OF CAN, THERE IS A 2.1CM STRIPE OF UNFINISHED METAL. TOPS AND BOTTOMS ARE TAN AND HAVE A YELLOW DOTTED LINE AROUND THE OUTSIDE. IN THE CENTRE READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - FREEZE AGAIN AND AGAIN - DO NOT OPEN". OTHER END READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOME SMALL SCRATCHES IN PLAID FINISH. EVIDENCE OF RUST ON TOPS AND BOTTOMS AND ALONG EXPOSED METAL SURFACE OF CAN.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS COOLER SET WAS ACQUIRED SOMETIME IN THE LATE 1950s. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER, KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB AND KIT BELIEVE THAT THE COOLER CAME FROM A WHOLESALE STORE LOCATED ON 5TH STREET, AND THAT THE STOREFRONT IS NOW OCCUPIED BY BREAD, MILK, AND HONEY (FORMERLY THE ROUND STREET CAFÉ). BARB RECALLED THAT “BECAUSE DAD HAD A RETAIL STORE HE COULD GO AND BUY THINGS THERE … AND THIS MAY HAVE COME FROM THERE OR IT MAY HAVE BEEN A PROMOTION THAT IF YOU BOUGHT SO MANY ITEMS FROM A PARTICULAR WHOLESALER, THAT THEY WOULD GIVE YOU STUFF … I DON’T THINK WE EVER ASKED WHERE IT CAME FROM. BUT IT WOULD BE IN THE LATE ‘50s THAT WE STARTED USING IT.” IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB SPECULATED THAT THE COOLER WAS “A PROMOTIONAL GIFT RECEIVED THROUGH THE DRUG STORE (LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOLTEL), BUT IT MAY HAVE BEEN PURCHASED IN THE LATE 50s.” THIS COOLER SET IS PART OF A LARGER SET OF PICNIC ITEMS THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
24.3
Length
51.5
Width
38.7
Description
RECTANGULAR, UNPAINTED WICKER PICNIC BASKET. TWO ADJUSTABLE HANDLES, ATTACHED TO BASKET WITH WICKER. HINGED LID, CLOSES WITH SIMPLE HOOK AND EYE CLOSURE. THERE ARE TWO THIN LEATHER STRIPS, WITH METAL BUCKLES, ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE LID. THESE STRAPS CONTINUE INTO THE BASKET AND HOLD A WOODEN ORGANIZATION INSERT TO THE UNDERSIDE THE INSIDE OF THE LID. INSERT HAS LEATHER STRAPS FOR PLATES AND CUTLERY. TWO PIECES OF LEATHER, AT EITHER END OF BASKET, ATTACH LID TO BASE. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD/EXCELLENT CONDITION. FRONT LEFT HANDLE ATTACHED WITH LEATHER STRING, RATHER THAN WICKER. BACK RIGHT HANDLE HAS A FEW SPOTS OF WHITE PAINT. LEATHER STRAPS HAVE A FEW MOISTURE STAINS.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS PICNIC BASKET WAS USED TO HOLD ALL OF THE GLASSES, DISHES, TABLECLOTH, ETC. NECESSARY FOR A PICNIC. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “WE DIDN’T HAVE THIS WHEN WE WERE KIDS … THEY ACQUIRED THAT, I THINK, WHEN WE STARTED HAVING FAMILY PICNICS IN THE ‘70s, ‘80s.” IN A SHORT NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB EXPLAIND THAT "I DON'T HAVE AS MANY MEMORIES OF THE PICNIC BASKET, AS I THINK THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ACQUIRED AFTER I LEFT HOME. IN MY CHILDHOOD, OUR PLATES AND OTHER SUPPLIES WERE SIMPLY PACKED IN A CARDBOARD BOX." THESE PICNIC ITEMS WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
52
Height
2.1
Length
27.1
Width
9.2
Diameter
0.4
Description
A: BOX OF STRAWS. BOX IS CARDBOARD, WITH A SMALL CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW. BACKGROUND OF BOX IS A LIGHT BROWN WOOD GRAIN PATTERN. "EXTRA-LONG STRAWS FOR EXTRA-TALL BOTTLED DRINKS - SWEETHEART EXTRA-LONG DRINKING STRAWS - 100-10 1/2" SWEETHEART STRAWS. MANUFACTURED BY THE IMPERIAL CONE COMPANY, LONDON - CANADA". ON REVERSE: "THE CONVENIENT SANITARY WAY TO DRINK ... MILK, ICED DRINKS, BOTTLED BEVERAGES". PRICE STAMPED ONTO TOP OF BOX, VERY FADED, APPEARS TO READ "2/35 CENTS". BOTTOM LEFT CORNER IS AN IMAGE OF A BOY IN A RED SHIRT DRINKING FROM A GLASS BOTTLE. BEHIND HIM ARE THREE ADULTS, 2 WOMEN IN DRESSES AND APRONS AND ONE MAN WITH A CHEF'S HAT. B-AAA: BOX CONTAINS 52 STRAWS: 18 ARE OFF-WHITE; 16 ARE LIGHT PINK; 15 ARE MEDIUM-LIGHT GREEN AND; 3 ARE BRIGHT ORANGE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THESE STRAWS ARE PART OF A PICNIC SET THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT "MOM ALWAYS HAD HER THERMOS OF COFFEE". BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT." THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB ELABORATED WRITING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WHAT THE FRACK HAPPENED?
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160014000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WHAT THE FRACK HAPPENED?
Date
2014
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Length
77.7
Width
86.8
Description
.1: VEST. PATCHWORK OF VARIETY OF MATERIALS AND TEXTURES. CLOSES AT FRONT WITH A LARGE BLUE, CIRCULAR, CONVEX BUTTON, WITH THREE SMALL STONES IN THE CENTRE OF THE BUTTON. A PIECE OF VELVET TRIM LOOPS AROUND THE BUTTON TO CLOSE. A WHITE PAPER TAG (P20160014000.2) HANGS FROM THIS BUTTON. FRONT DEPICTS A NATURE SCENE. ALONG TOP OF VEST, FABRIC IS PINK AND PURPLE, POSSIBLY DEPICTING A SUNRISE OR SUNSET. ON WEARER’S LEFT THERE IS A NATURE SCENE OF A PINE TREE AND ROCKS, WHICH HAS BEEN APPLIQUED AND EMBROIDERED ONTO VEST. LIGHT BROWN YARN DEPICTS THE TREE’S ROOTS, WHICH GO DOWN FROM THE TREE INTO A GREEN SECTION ON THE VEST. THERE ARE SEVERAL BUTTONS AND SMALL ROCKS OF VARIOUS COLOURS SEWN ONTO THIS GREEN SECTION. BELOW THIS IS A BLUE STRIPE, THEN A SECTION OF MULTIPLE SHADES OF BROWN, INCLUDING ONE SECTION THAT IS VERY TEXTURED AND IS LIKELY PAINTED/DYED TYVEK. THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE DEPICTS A FARMING SCENE WITH MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. BELOW THAT IS A CONTINUATION OF THE BLUE STRIPE FROM THE RIGHT SIDE. THEN THERE IS A SECTION OF MULTIPLE SHADES OF BROWN AND PURPLE. THERE IS ALSO ANOTHER SECTION OF PAINTED/DYED TYVEK ON THIS SIDE, WHICH IS PURPLE IN COLOUR AND THERE ARE SEQUINS, BUTTONS, AND SMALL ROCKS SEWN INTO AND ONTO THIS PURPLE SECTION. BACK OF VEST DEPICTS CONSEQUENCES OF FRACKING. TOP OF VEST ON BACK IS A SHADE OF PURPLE/PINK, WITH BLACK NETTING OVER IT. THERE ARE TWO BRIDGE TRUSSES ON THE WEARER’S RIGHT SIDE AND TWO GAS RIGS ON THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE. BELOW THIS IS A STRIPE OF GOLD RIBBON, WITH 5 GOLD COLOURED KEYS AND FIVE SQUARE WOODEN BUTTONS ATTACHED HORIZONTALLY ACROSS THE VEST. BELOW GOLD STRIPE IS A PATCHWORK OF A VARIETY OF MATERIALS AND TEXTURES AND COLOURS INCLUDE VARIOUS SHADES OF PURPLE, GREEN, BLUE, RED, PINK, YELLOW, AND BROWN. MOST OF THE DIFFERENT PIECES OF MATERIAL ARE BORDERED WITH A RED FRINGE TRIM. ON WEARER’S LEFT SIDE, BELOW ARM HOLE, IS A SMALL SECTION OF BLUE FABRIC WITH THREE SMALL SEA SHELLS SEWN ON. BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF THE BACK OF VEST HAS A MEDIUM SIZED WHITE AND RED BUTTON (P20160014000.3). INSIDE OF VEST LINED WITH BLACK NETTING ON THE FRONT AND WITH GOLD, BLACK, AND RED NETTING ON THE BACK. .2: TAG. WHITE, HEAVY PAPER. HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK “CREATED BY CHERYL ATKINSON, BEV HALL, FRANCES SCHULTZ.” REVERSE HAS HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK “ART VEST. $200.XX” WITH 26-14 TYPED IN BLACK INK. 3.8CM LONG X 6.5CM WIDE .3: BUTTON: ROUND BUTTON, WHITE BACKGROUND. DEPICTS A GAS RIG WITH A RED DIAGONAL LINE ACROSS THE RIG. TEXT OF BUTTON READS: “WWW.NODRILLINGLETHBRIDGE.CA”. 6.5CM DIAMETER
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, CHERYL ATKINSON, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN MAY 2016. THIS VEST WAS CREATED AS PART OF AN ART GARMENT CHALLENGE PUT FORWARD BY THE TEXTILE SURFACE DESIGN GUILD. CHERYL WAS BOTH A PARTICIPANT AND AN ORGANIZER OF THIS ART CHALLENGE. CHERYL INDICATED THAT “PART OF THE CHALLENGE WAS TO WORK WITH OTHER MEMBERS OF THE GROUP WHO, MAYBE YOU HADN’T SPENT TIME TRYING TO WORK COLLABORATIVELY WITH.” IN JANUARY 2014 THE GUILD GOT TOGETHER TO DETERMINE THE WORKING GROUPS AND THE THEMES THAT WOULD BE WORKED ON, BASED ON “WHAT THEIR INTERESTS WERE IN LIFE. SO, SOME PEOPLE CHOSE GARDENING, ANOTHER GROUP DID ART, LIKE PURE ART, AND OUR GROUP CHOSE THE ENVIRONMENT. AND, AT THE TIME, THE ENVIRONMENT IN LETHBRIDGE WAS UNDER THREAT, IN QUESTION BECAUSE THERE WAS A COMPANY THAT WAS PLANNING TO DO DIRECTIONAL DRILLING, FRACKING, IN WEST LETHBRIDGE, AND ONE OF THE MEMBERS WHO JOINED OUR GROUP WAS PARTICULARLY CONCERNED ABOUT IT, SO WE THOUGHT THAT WOULD BE A GOOD SOURCE OF INSPIRATION FOR OUR ART GARMENT.” PART OF THE REASON THE GUILD WANTED TO DO A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT LIKE THIS IS BECAUSE THE GROUP HAD GROWN CONSIDERABLY IN SIZE: “OUR GROUP HAS EXPANDED A LOT. IN THE LAST NUMBER OF YEARS WE WENT FROM A GROUP OF ABOUT FIFTEEN PEOPLE TO A GROUP OF ABOUT FORTY PEOPLE, SO IT’S HARD TO GET TO KNOW FORTY PEOPLE INTIMATELY, SO WE WERE TRYING TO FIND A WAY TO CONNECT WITH EACH OTHER, LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR INTERESTS. AND SO, WE JUST, LIKE, HAD A CONVERSATION AND PEOPLE WERE TALKING ABOUT THINGS THEY WERE INTERESTED IN, AND THEN WE STARTED, I THINK WE PASSED AROUND A LIST OF, JUST LIKE A SHEET THAT PEOPLE WOULD WRITE DOWN KIND OF TOPICS OF THEIR INTEREST, AND THEN WE JUST STARTED MATCHING THEM UP, AND THEN WE PUT, WE DIDN’T WANT TO HAVE LIKE TEN PEOPLE ON ONE PROJECT AND ONE ON ANOTHER, SO WE TRIED TO SORT OF SPLIT THEM UP IF PEOPLE PUT DOWN MORE THAN ONE AREA OF INTEREST. SO, ENVIRONMENT JUST TURNED OUT TO BE FRANCES [SCHULTZ], BEV [HALL] AND I SO.” CHERYL INDICATED THAT THE ENVIRONMENT WAS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT TO GROUP MEMBER BEV HALL: “I THINK THAT THE ISSUE ABOUT THE FRACKING CAME UP AS WE DISCUSSED, LIKE, WHAT WE WERE GOING TO DO ABOUT THE VEST … BEV FOR INSTANCE, LOVES TO HIKE IN THE MOUNTAINS AND THAT SHE FEELS CONNECTED TO THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. AND I AM INTERESTED IN THINGS LIKE HERITAGE PLANTS AND NATIVE SPECIES AND THINGS LIKE THAT. I DON’T THINK ANY OF US HAD ANY, LIKE, WE’RE NOT TRAINED ENVIRONMENTALISTS IN ANY WAY. IT JUST SEEMED THAT THAT WAS AN AREA OF INTEREST THAT WE COULD USE AS A FOCUS FOR ART.” TO CREATE THE VEST, THE THREE WOMEN DIVIDED UP THE WORK: “WE DECIDED THAT TOGETHER WE WOULD MAKE A PATTERN AND CREATE THE SHAPE OF THE GARMENT. AND THEN, WE HAD A VERY TIGHT TIME PRESSURE, WE HAD SIX WEEKS TO FINISH IT … SO, WE DECIDED TO PARCEL IT OUT INTO PIECES. SO, FRANCES DID THE BACK, BEV DID THE SHOULDER AREA AT THE FRONT, AND I DID THE LOWER AREA AT THE FRONT. AND THEN BEV SEWED IT TOGETHER, AND THEN I EMBELLISHED IT AT THE END.” TO MAKE THE VEST, THE WOMEN USED FABRIC FROM THEIR COLLECTIONS: “WE KIND OF LOOKED AT THE MATERIALS THAT WE HAD, AND WE HAD QUITE A SELECTION! … AND TRIED TO DECIDE WHAT KINDS OF COLOURS OR TEXTURES, THINGS THAT WE COULD DRAW FROM ON OUR OWN PIECES, AND SOMETIMES WE SHARED THEM WITH THE OTHER PEOPLE THAT WERE – YOU KNOW, IF A PIECE OF MY FABRIC FIT BETTER IN BEV’S AREA, THEN I JUST GAVE HER, AND SHE COULD DECIDE WHETHER SHE’D USE IT OR NOT. AND THEN WE EACH TOOK OUR BITS HOME. BEV DID HER PART FIRST, AND THEN I ADDED MINE TO IT, SO SHE STARTED ON THE FRONT AND THEN I ADDED LATER, AND FRANCES DID THE BACK INDEPENDENTLY OF EACH OTHER. SO WE REALLY DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THE WHOLE PIECE WAS GOING TO LOOK LIKE UNTIL IT CAME TOGETHER AS ONE. AND THEN, ONCE THE PIECE WAS TOGETHER, IT WAS MEANT TO BE SHOWED AT THE TEXTILE GUILD MEETING IN MARCH, AND WE HAD A LITTLE FASHION SHOW, AND WE SHOWED IT OFF, AND RESULTING FROM THE PIECES THAT CAME TOGETHER AT THAT TIME, WE HAD A, WE WERE INVITED TO SHOW THE ARTWORK IN THE DISPLAY CASES AT CASA FOR SIX WEEKS.” CHERYL DESCRIBES THE PIECE: “SO THE IMAGERY IN THE PIECE, AT THE FRONT, WE HAVE THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA REPRESENTED ON THE TOP, THE SHOULDER AREAS. SO, THE MOUNTAINS, THE COULEES, THE TREES, THE VALLEY, THE WATER. AND THEN IT GOES DOWN TO THE LOWER, WHAT WE WOULD IMAGINE THE UNDERGROUND LAYERS LOOK LIKE IN THE EARTH, THE GEOLOGY, THE WATER TRAVELLING UNDERGROUND, THE ROCKS THE SOIL, THINGS LIKE THAT. AND THEN ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE VEST, WE SEE ALL OF THAT DISRUPTED DURING THE FRACKING PROCESS. WE SEE FRACTURING HAPPENING. THE WATER AND THE EARTH ARE GETTING ALL MIXED TOGETHER AND DAMAGED AND, THE BIG EMBELLISHMENT ACROSS THE BACK, THERE IS A SERIES OF GOLD KEYS RIGHT ACROSS THE BACK OF THE VEST, AND THEY ARE, ACTUALLY, WE HAD JUST MOVED OUT OF THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE AT THAT PERIOD IN TIME, AND WE HAD A LOT OF STUDIO KEYS LEFT OVER THAT WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH, SO WE JUST SEWED THEM ON THERE, AND THEY REPRESENT THE DRILLING COMPANY THAT WAS PROPOSING TO DO THE FRACKING IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SO, IT’S SUBTLE, BUT THERE IS KIND OF A MESSAGE THERE. AND THERE’S ALSO A BUTTON ON THE BACK FROM THE ANTI-FRACKING CAMPAIGN.” CHERYL WAS MADE CUSTODIAN OF THE VEST BECAUSE SHE WAS “SORT OF THE PROJECT LEADER … IT WAS ALSO MEANT TO FIT ME, SO I THINK THAT’S ALSO WHY I AM THE ONE THAT HAS CUSTODY OF IT.” SHE IS PROUD OF HOW THE GROUP COLLABORATION TURNED OUT AND FINDS IT A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO PART WITH THE VEST: “IT IS HARD TO PART WITH IT, BUT I CAN’T, I MEAN IT’S SORT OF A SNAPSHOT IN TIME. I MEAN IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS VERY CURRENT AND IMPORTANT, AND I THINK WE ADDED SOMETHING TO THE CONVERSATION BY HAVING THIS ON DISPLAY AT THE TIME WHERE DECISION MAKING WAS HAPPENING. BUT I DON’T REALLY KNOW, LIKE I’M NOT GOING TO WEAR IT TO CHURCH ON SUNDAY OR SOMETHING, (LAUGHS) SO, I DON’T REALLY KNOW WHAT ELSE TO DO WITH IT SO.” INCLUDED IN THE DONATION PAPER WORK IS A SMALL DESCRIPTION OF THE VEST, FROM WHEN IT WAS DISPLAYED. THE TEXT READS AS FOLLOWS: “WHAT THE FRACK HAPPENED? CHERYL ATKINSON, BEV HALL, FRANCES SCHULTZ OUR WORLD IS A FRAGILE HOME. HOW WE EXPLOIT IT CAN HAVE DRASTIC EFFECTS FAR INTO THE FUTURE. THIS GARMENT IS AN ARTISTIC RESPONSE TO THE CURRENT, MAJOR ISSUE FACING THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. THE FRONT DEPICTS THE NATURAL GEO-LANDSCAPE OF THE CITY – PRISTINE SCENERY ABOVE GROUND AND THE MANY DIFFERENT GEOLOGIC LAYERS UNDERGROUND. THE BACK ATTEMPTS TO DEPICT WHAT FRACKING MIGHT DO TO THESE GEOLOGIC LAYERS, AS WELL AS THE THREAT TO THE SURFACE. HOUSES AND THE UNIVERSITY SIT AMONG OIL WELLS WITH THE GOLDEN KEYS SYMBOLIC OF THE SOURCE OF THE THREAT. MANY SURFACE DESIGN TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN USED. THESE INCLUDE INDIGO DYEING, SHIBORI DYEING AND DISCHARGING, VEGETABLE PRINTING, TYVEK PAINTING WITH HEAT MOLDING, WAX BATIK, DYE PRINTING, BEADING, EMBROIDERY, COUCHING, MARBLING, ETC.” IN THE TEXTILE SURFACE DESIGN GUILD SPRING 2014 NEWSLETTER THE EXHIBIT IS DESCRIBED: “VESTED INTERESTS IS A COLLECTION OF ART GARMENTS CREATED COLLABORATIVELY BY TSDG MEMBERS. EACH VEST LOBBIES PASSIONATELY FOR A PERSONAL INTEREST HELD BY THE CREATIVE TEAM BEHIND ITS DESIGN. ON DISPLAY IN THE 2ND FLOOR SHOWCASE AT CASA UNTIL APRIL 26.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPY OF INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, THE EXHIBIT DISPLAY TEXT, AND THE TEXTILE SURFACE DESIGN GUILD SPRING 2014 NEWSLETTER.
Catalogue Number
P20160014000
Acquisition Date
2016-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

44 records – page 1 of 3.