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Other Name
N.T. (PARK LAKE POW HOSTEL)
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.T. (PARK LAKE POW HOSTEL)
Date
1945
Materials
PAPER, WATERCOLOUR, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
47.2
Length
62.5
Width
1.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER. WOODEN FRAME, PAINTED GOLD. OFF-WHITE/TAN MATTING BEHIND GLASS. UNTITLED. FOREGROUND OF PAINTING IS A BODY OF WATER, STARTING IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER AND EXTENDING DIAGONALLY TO THE LEFT, ENDING IN THE MID-GROUND. RIGHT SIDE OF HORIZON IS A STAND OF GREEN PINE TREES, WITH FOUR TAN CANVAS TENTS VISIBLE. MOUNTAINS ON THE LEFT SIDE OF PAINTING AT HORIZON. BACKGROUND IS A BLUE SKY WITH A FEW CLOUDS. SIGNED IN PENCIL BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER “K. SUCHT. 45.” MEASUREMENTS ARE OF FRAME. OPENING OF MAT IS 31.5CM X 47.0CM. REVERSE IS SEALED WITH BROWN PAPER. FRAMERS MARK IN CENTRE TOP: “PORTRAITS, PICTURE FRAMING, PRINTING, AND DEVELOPING. A.E. CROSS & SONS. 3RD AVE. SO. LETHBRIDGE.” WIRE ON THE BACK FOR HANGING. VERY GOOD CONDITION. PAINTING IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. FRAME IS SCUFFED, WORN, AND A LITTLE DIRTY. MATTING IS DISCOLOURED. PAPER BACKING IS TORN IN THE UPPER CORNERS AND ALONG THE TOP OF FRAME.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH TRACY BATHGATE AND KEVIN SOUTHWELL, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 2016. TRACY IS THE GRANDDAUGHTER FREDERICK CECIL “CECIL” WOOLDRIDGE, WHO ACQUIRED THE PAINTING FROM A PRISONER OF WAR. TRACY CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE PAINTING IN ABOUT 1991 WHEN HER PARENTS, FRANK AND KATHLEEN BATHGATE, WERE DOWNSIZING FROM THEIR HOUSE TO A CONDO. ASKED WHY THIS PAINTING WAS WANTED, KEVIN SOUTHWELL REPLIED THAT BOTH TRACY’S FATHER AND GRANDFATHER HAD “ACTUALLY PLANTED TREES IN THIS PARK, AND THAT’S WHAT I LIKED. I’VE ALWAYS LIKED ART, AND THE STORY WAS GREAT.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT THE PRISONERS “USED EGG YOLKS AND STUFF THEY FOUND TO MAKE THE PIGMENTS, WHICH IS COOL… I HEARD FROM HER GRANDFATHER AND HER FATHER … THEY USED THE MINERALS AROUND THE AREA TO GET THE COLOURS.” TRACY RECALLED THAT THIS PAINTING HUNG IN HER GRANDPARENTS HOUSE AND EXPLAINED THAT HER “GRANDFATHER MADE LOTS OF FRIENDS AT THE PRISONER-OF-WAR CAMP, AND THEY GAVE HIM GIFTS BACK, OF WHAT THEY COULD.” TRACY SHARED THAT THERE ARE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE P.O.W.S AT HER GRANDPARENTS’ HOUSE: “THERE ARE PICTURES OF [MY GRANDFATHER] WITH THE WORK CREW. HE BROUGHT THEM HOME. GRANDMA WOULD MAKE A MEAL. THERE’S LETTERS AFTER THE WAR. THEY KEPT A FRIENDSHIP, AND THEY THANKED HIM FOR HIS KINDNESS, AND BEING A FAIR AND DECENT PERSON, AND I DO BELIEVE THAT CAMP OUT THERE WAS RUN QUITE NICELY. YOU KNOW HOW SOME WAR CAMPS WERE GOOD, AND SOME WERE BAD. I DO BELIEVE IT WAS A PRETTY GOOD CAMP. IT WAS A FAIR CAMP.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CECIL’S ATTESTATION PAPERS FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR. ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY, FREDERICK CECIL “CECIL” WOOLDRIDGE WAS BORN ON AUGUST 11, 1989 IN CORNWALL COUNTY, ENGLAND. HE MOVED TO CANADA IN 1913 WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF 15, INITIALLY SETTLING IN MANITOBA AND LATER MOVING TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1943. HE SERVED IN BOTH WORLD WARS AND IS THE GRANDFATHER OF THE DONOR. CECIL PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 96 IN NOVEMBER 1994. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON MAY 5, 1945 GIVES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRISONER OF WAR HOSTEL AT PARK LAKE, AB: “GREATER USE OF GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR WILL BE MADE ON FARMS OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA THIS YEAR … THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ANNOUNCED THAT NINE HOSTELS WOULD BE OPERATED IN THE LETHBRIDGE DISTRICT SHORTLY TO SUPPLY FARMERS WITH PRISONERS OF WAR LABOR WHEN AND AS NEEDED… THE HOSTELS ARE TO BE ESTABLISHED DURING THIS MONTH AND WILL CONTINUE IN OPERATION UNTIL THE END OF OCTOBER, ADDED COLONEL [E.S.] DOUGHTY. HE EXPLAINED THAT HOSTELS WILL LIKELY BE ESTABLISHED AT BARNWELL, COALDALE, IRON SPRINGS, PARK LAKE, MAGRATH, STIRLING, GLENWOOD, WELLING AND WHITE SIDE (SOUTH OF LETHBRIDGE). THIS IS THE THIRD SUMMER THAT GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR WILL WORK ON ALBERTA SUGAR BEET FARMS. THE FIRST YEAR THE PROGRAM CONSISTED OF A CONVOY SYSTEM OPERATED FROM THE LARGE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP HERE, WHILE LAST YEAR LABOR WAS SECURED FROM THE LOCAL CAMP AND FROM FOUR HOSTELS ESTABLISHED AT DISTRICT POINTS.” IT CONTINUED, SAYING: “PRISONERS OF WAR WILL BE CAREFULLY HANDPICKED FROM THE THOUSANDS OF CAPTIVES IN THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP HERE BY MEMBERS OF THE VETERANS GUARD OF CANADA AND ONLY THOSE ABOVE SUSPICION WILL BE PERMITTED TO LEAVE THE CAMP FOR MANPOWER POOLS. NONE OF THIS CLASS OF PRISONERS WILL BE PERMITTED TO LIVE ON FARMS. THEY WILL BE TAKEN FROM HOSTELS EACH MORNING, PUT IN A FULL EIGHT-HOUR WORK DAY, AND THEN BE RETURNED TO THE HOSTELS.” ANOTHER ARTICLE, PUBLISHED MAY 30, 1945 GAVE THE FOLLOWING DETAILS: “ESTABLISHMENT OF PRISONER OF WAR HOSTELS IN IRRIGATED AREAS ABOUT LETHBRIDGE HAS STARTED AND EXPECTATIONS ARE THAT IN ANOTHER WEEK OR 10 DAYS MORE THAN A THOUSAND GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR FROM THE LARGE CAMP HERE WILL BE AVAILABLE TO FARMERS FROM EIGHT MANPOWER POOLS … CAPT C.E. WILLIAMS, A LABOR SUPERVISOR IN THIS REGION ... EXPLAINED THAT A HOSTEL WILL BE OPENED AT PARK LAKE ON THURSDAY … EACH HOSTEL WILL CONTAIN BETWEEN 100 AND 140 WORKERS, IN ADDITION TO GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR REQUIRED FOR THE GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF HOSTELS … BEFORE THE FIRST HOSTELS WERE ESTABLISHED MANY GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR WERE TAKEN FROM THE LARGE CAMP HERE TO WORK ON FARMS, DEMAND FOR WORKS BEING SO GREAT THAT ALL ORDERS COULD NOT BE READILY FILLED.” A JUNE 18, 1945 ARTICLE INDICATES THAT P.O.W. LABOUR FROM PARK LAKE WAS BEING USED AT COMMERCE, AB: “BEET THINNING IS IN PROGRESS BETWEEN RAINS, WITH MANY GROWERS USING PRISONERS OF WAR FROM THE CAMP AT PARK LAKE.” P.O.W. LABOUR WAS ALSO USED AT DIAMOND CITY, AB: “POW LABOR FOR BEET THINNING IS BEING USED QUITE EXTENSIVELY, SUPPLIED BY THE HOSTEL AT PARK LAKE.” ON JUNE 19, 1945, THE HERALD REPORTED THAT P.O.W.S WERE ALSO BEING USED IN NEWLANDS, AB: “GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR ARE BEING USED BY MANY FARMERS IN THIS DISTRICT, AND THE HOSTEL AT PARK LAKE IS PROVING A GREAT CONVENIENCE FOR FARMERS.” A JUNE 30, 1945 ARTICLE FOCUSES ON DIAMOND CITY AGAIN: “THINNING OPERATIONS ARE ALMOST COMPLETED BY POW HELP HAS BEEN IN STRONG DEMAND TO HELP FINISH UP THINNING AND GROWERS ARE EXPRESSING SATISFACTION WITH THE ARRANGEMENT OF HAVING A HOSTEL AT PARK LAKE RATHER THAN TO MAKE DAILY TRIPS TO THE INTERNMENT CAMP.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20160004000
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
4.5
Width
3
Description
A – B: WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HAS “CANADIAN MEDICAL CORPS” STAMPED BRONZE-COLOURED WITH REMOVABLE PIN. THE BADGE DEPICTS A MAPLE LEAF WREATH WITH A SNAKE AROUND THE SWORD AT THE CENTER. THERE IS A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE. GOOD CONDITION. THE METAL HAS DULLED AND DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON NOVEMBER 25, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A PHONE INTERVIEW WITH MIKE LEVIN OF OTTAWA, ONTARIO TO DISCUSS A WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE BADGE BELONGED TO HIS GRANDFATHER, DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, WHO WAS A MEDICAL PHYSICIAN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND A WORLD WAR I VETERAN. LEVIN HAS BEEN IN POSSESSION OF THE BADGE SINCE 2009-2010 AFTER THE PASSING OF HIS UNCLE, ROBERT G. WRAY, WHO HAD INHERITED IT FROM HIS FATHER, DR. J. S. WRAY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE BADGE HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT PHONE INTERVIEW: “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY DIDN’T TALK ABOUT THEMSELVES AT ALL… [W]HEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED BEFORE I WAS BORN. I LIVED OUT OF THE COUNTRY FOR A LONG TIME AND WHEN I CAME BACK, I RE-ACQUAINTED MYSELF WITH MY UNCLE BOB. HE’S THE ONE WHO DONATED SOME STUFF TO THE GALT BEFORE..." THE DONOR’S UNCLE BOB (ROBERT G. WRAY) PASSED AWAY IN EDMONTON. ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, THIS MILITARY BADGE IS THE ONLY OBJECT THAT EXISTS WITHIN THE FAMILY FROM DR. JOHN S. WRAY’S MILITARY SERVICE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT DR. JOHN S. WRAY COMES FROM A HISTORY FOUND IN A 1924 PUBLICATION TITLED, ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT, BY JOHN BLUE: “DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, A WORLD WAR VETERAN WHO, SINCE JUNE 1919, HAS ENGAGED IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AT LETHBRIDGE, WAS BORN IN LINWOOD, ONTARIO, OCTOBER 28, 1882, A SON OF GEORGE AND ANN (ALLINGHAM) WRAY, BOTH OF WHOM WERE NATIVES OF IRELAND...” “JOHN STANLEY WRAY IS THE YOUNGEST OF A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN. HE WAS EDUCATED IN PUBLIC SCHOOL NO. 21 IN WELLESLEY TOWNSHIP, WATERLOO DISTRICT, ONTARIO, AND LATER HE ATTENDED THE KITCHENER HIGH SCHOOL AND THE EDMONTON HIGH SCHOOL. HE THERE ACQUIRED A LICENSE TO TEACH AND DEVOTED ABOUT THREE YEARS TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING IN AND NEAR EDMONTON BUT REGARDED THIS MERELY AS AN INITIAL STEP TO OTHER PROFESSIONAL LABOR. HE THEN ENTERED THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO IN TORONTO, CANADA, IN 1905, AND BY REASON OF THE STEADY PROGRESS THAT HE MADE IN HIS STUDIES WAS THERE GRADUATED IN 1909. HE THEN LOCATED FOR PRACTICE AT RAYMOND, ALBERTA, WHERE HE CONTINUED FOR SIX YEARS, WHEN THE NEED FOR AID IN CONNECTION WITH THE WORLD WAR LED HIM TO JOIN THE ARMY AS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ARMY MEDICAL CORPS, WITH THE RANK OF CAPTAIN. HE SERVED IN CALGARY UNTIL MARCH, 1917, WHEN HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIRST BATTALION IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT AND WENT OVERSEAS. HE SERVED IN ENGLAND WITH RESERVE BATTALIONS AND IN HOSPITALS AND WAS FOR A TIME A MEMBER OF A TRAVELING MEDICAL BOARD, THUS CONTINUING IN ACTIVE DUTY UNTIL MAY, 1918, WHEN HE WENT TO FRANCE AND WAS ATTACHED TO THE THIRD CANADIAN AMBULANCE CORPS. LATER HE WAS IDENTIFIED WITH THE FIRST CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY AND WAS IN THE BATTLE OF AMIENS IN AUGUST, 1918. LATER HE RETURNED TO ENGLAND WITH A BROKEN ARM AND WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE CANADIAN ARMY ON THE 27TH OF APRIL, 1919. AT THE BREAKING OF THE HINDENBURG LINE ON THE 1ST AND 2ND OF SEPTEMBER, 1918, HE WAS ON DUTY WITH THE THIRD FIELD AMBULANCE. FOLLOWING HIS RETURN HOME HE LOCATED AT LETHBRIDGE FOR THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN JUNE, 1919, AND HAS HERE REMAINED.” ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT DR. WRAY’S SERVICE IN WORLD WAR I COMES FROM HIS SERVICE RECORDS OBTAINED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA’S ONLINE DATABASE. ACCORDING TO THE RECORDS, DR. WRAY ENLISTED ON JUNE 13, 1916 IN THE SARCEE CAMP IN CALGARY. DR. WRAY AND MARION WRAY HAD THREE CHILDREN: MARGARET ALICE LEWIS, PHYLISS NEILSON LEVIN, AND ROBERT G. WRAY. DR. WRAY PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE DURING 1952 AT THE AGE OF 69 YEARS. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, FULL ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT ARTICLE, AND SERVICE RECORDS.
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL, WWI
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, COPPER PLATE, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20170001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL, WWI
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Materials
BRONZE, COPPER PLATE, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
14.5
Width
3.9
Diameter
3.6
Description
GREAT WAR VICTORY MEDAL. ROUND COPPER-PLATED BRONZE MEDAL ATTACHED TO WATERED RIBBON IN RAINBOW COLOURS, BEGINNING WITH VIOLET ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES AND MEETING WITH RED AT THE CENTER. THE OBVERSE OF THE MEDAL HAS AN EMBOSSED IMAGE OF WINGED FEMALE FIGURE OF VICTORY WITH LEFT ARM RAISED AND SHE IS HOLDING A PALM BRANCH IN HER RIGHT HAND. WREATH EMBOSSED ON CIRCUMFERENCE OF REVERSE, WITH TEXT READING "THE GREAT WAR FOR CIVILISATION 1914-1919" ENGRAVED AT CENTRE. EDGE ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “228409 PTE. T. OKUTAKE. P. P. C. L. I.” BOTH ENDS OF THE RIBBON ARE FRAYING WITH WHITE THREADS VISIBLY COMING LOOSE. SLIGHT LOSS OF SHAPE TO SHORTER SIDE OF THE RIBBON AND WRINKLING OVERALL. SLIGHT SCUFFING AND LOSS OF FINISH OF THE MEDAL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE MEDALS' DONOR PATRICIA "PAT" SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED FROM TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. THE INFORMATION BELOW IS COMPILED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES, WHICH ALL PROVIDE GREATER DETAIL ABOUT THE LIFE OF TOMOMI OKUTAKE. ON 13 OCTOBER 1976, TOMOMI OKUTAKE’S WIFE – TSURU OKUTAKE (NEE GENKA) – WAS INTERVIEWED BY TOMIO WAKAYAMA. THE INTERVIEW IS HELD BY SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW, WHICH WAS TRANSLATED FOR THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES BY TOMOKO GREENSHIELDS: OF THE FAMILY’S IMMIGRATION TO CANADA, MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINED THAT HER HUSBAND CAME FROM SHURI, OKINAWA. “[TOMOMI] CAME [TO CANADA] IN 1907. I CAME HERE IN 1930… HE CAME TO WORK FOR A TRAIN COMPANY (THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY). WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE REASON FOR HER HUSBAND’S IMMIGRATION TO CANADA, MRS. OKUTAKE STATED, “WELL, JAPAN HAD A WAR WITH CHINA… THE SHINO-JAPANESE WAR. HE WAS TAUGHT THAT OKINAWA OWED CHINA… SO HE DID NOT WANT TO FIGHT WITH CHINA… HIS UNCLE WENT TO HAWAII LONG BEFORE, [SO] HE WANTED TO GO TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY [AS WELL]…" CONTINUING WITH THE DISCUSSION OF MR. OKUTAKE’S IMMIGRATION, MRS. OKUTAKE MENTIONED, "HE STAYED IN VANCOUVER [UPON HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA]. [THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE BEFORE JAPANESE PEOPLE CAME] WERE AGAINST THE JAPANESE IMMIGRANTS…” MRS. OKUTAKE SPECULATES THAT MR. OKUTAKE MOVED TO ALBERTA AROUND 1911. SHE SAYS, “[HE WORKED AT] THE COAL MINE NUMBER 6… UNTIL HE RETIRED. THE NUMBER 6... SHUT DOWN, SO HE WORKED AT THE NUMBER 8 UNTIL HE WAS 65, 64.” THIS SPECULATION IS CONFIRMED IN A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY PAT SASSA FOR A HISTORY BOOK ABOUT THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE-CANADIAN COMMUNITY TITLED NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY (PUBLISHED IN 2001). THIS HISTORY STATES THAT OKUTAKE ARRIVED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911. IN THE 1976 INTERVIEW, MRS. OKUTAKE CONTINUES ABOUT HER HUSBAND’S EXPERIENCE WORKING ABOVE GROUND FOR THE MINES, “I THINK [HIS JOB WAS HARD]. MY HUSBAND’S JOB WAS TO LOAD COAL UP ON A CART… OTHER PEOPLE TRIED BUT THEY COULD NOT [DO IT LIKE HE COULD]… HE WAS A MAN WHO COULD ENDURE SO MUCH… HE WORKED AT A COAL MINE DURING THE WINTER AND WORKED AT A FARM DURING THE SUMMER.” MRS. OKUTAKE SAID HER HUSBAND HAD RECEIVED HIS CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP IN EITHER 1914 OR 1915. A CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION HOUSED AT THE NIKKEI NATIONAL MUSEUM IN BRITISH COLUMBIA STATES THAT TOMOMI OKUTAKE WAS NATURALIZED ON JANUARY 25, 1915. ACCORDING TO HIS ATTESTATION PAPERS, MR. OKUTAKE ENLISTED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR ON 26 MAY 1916 IN CALGARY. THESE PAPERS LIST HIM AS BEING BORN ON 21 NOVEMBER 1889. THERE IS A DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THE BIRTH YEAR LISTED IN THE SERVICE RECORDS AND THAT IN FAMILIAL DOCUMENTS, WHICH RECORD 1888. IN AN INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT TOOK PLACE ON 16 JANUARY 2017 WITH OKUTAKE’S DAUGHTER, PATRICIA SASSA, SHE EXPLAINED THE DIFFERING RECORDS: “… [IT’S] NOT TYPO, BUT A LOT OF THE JAPANESE PEOPLE WOULD PUT THEIR JAPANESE AGE DOWN, BECAUSE WHEN THEY’RE BORN THEY’RE ALREADY A YEAR OLD. SO THAT MIGHT BE THE REASON.” IN THE 1976 INTERVIEW, OKUTAKE’S WIFE DESCRIBED HIS ENLISTMENT: “HE STUDIED THE HAN CHINESE IN JAPAN WHEN HE WAS LITTLE. IN CONFUCIANISM, THEY SAY THAT WHEN PEOPLE MOVE TO A NEW PLACE THEY SHOULD ACT AS PEOPLE DO IN THAT PLACE. HE LIVED IN CANADA, SO HE TRIED TO FULFILL HIS OBLIGATION AS A CANADIAN… HE AND MR. KANDA WENT TO [AN] ALBERTA CITY HALL TO TELL THEM THAT THEY WANTED TO GO TO THE WAR. IT WAS IN THE NEWSPAPER… IT SAID THAT TWO SCARY-LOOKING JAPANESE MEN APPLY TO GO TO THE WAR (LAUGHED). SCARY FACE OR SOMETHING. I FORGOT. THEY COULD NOT MIX ONLY ONE OR TWO JAPANESE SOLDIERS WITH WHITE SOLDIERS, SO THE JAPANESE SOLDIERS WERE PUT TOGETHER WITH JAPANESE SOLDIERS. I CANNOT REMEMBER WHERE THEY WERE ASKED TO GO SOMEWHERE. I WOULD ASSUME THEY WENT TO VANCOUVER.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE RECORDS, TOMOMI OKUTAKE BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER WITH THE 13TH REGIMENT CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES (C.M.R.), WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON SERVICE FROM CALGARY ON 26 MAY 1916. HE WAS ASSIGNED THE SERVICE NUMBER 228409. HE ARRIVED IN ENGLAND ON 6 JULY 1916 BY THE S. S. OLYMPIC. HIS NAME APPEARS ON THE NOMINAL ROLL FOR THE PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY (P.P.C.L.I.), WHICH STATES HE JOINED THE P.P.C.L.I. IN FIELD ON 21 SEPTEMBER 1916. ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION STATES THAT HIS DATE OF SERVICE WITH THE INFANTRY BEGAN ON 27 AUGUST 1916 AND THE THEATRE OF WAR WAS FRANCE. HE WAS STRUCK OFF STRENGTH FROM THE P.P.C.L.I. TO THE 52ND BATTALION ON 4 OCTOBER 1916. RECORDS FROM THE CANADIAN GREAT WAR PROJECT STATE HE RANKED A TROOPER WITH THE 13TH REGIMENT AND A PRIVATE IN BOTH THE P.P.C.L.I. AND THE 52ND BATTALION. WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHO FROM THE JAPANESE COMMUNITY IN LETHBRIDGE JOINED THE WAR, MRS. OKUTAKE ANSWERED, “… ONLY MY HUSBAND. OH, [AND] MR. SHINBASHI… MY HUSBAND FOUGHT IN THE FRONT LINE. THERE WERE GERMAN SOLDIERS IN FRONT OF THEM. THEY THREW A GRENADE AT EACH OTHER. [THE JAPANESE SOLDIERS] WERE IN A TRENCH WHICH THE GERMANS MADE [AND THE GERMANS] THREW GRENADES STRAIGHT AT THEM. HE WAS SCARED… THERE WAS NOT ENOUGH FOOD, SO THE SOLDIERS FOUGHT OVER A PIECE OF BREAD LIKE HUNGRY GHOST[S]. HE SAID THAT THAT WAS WAR.” OKUTAKE’S STATEMENT OF SERVICE RECEIVED FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA STATES THAT HIS THEATRES OF SERVICE WERE CANADA, BRITAIN, AND FRANCE. FOR HIS SERVICE, HE RECEIVED THE BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND VICTORY MEDAL, BOTH OF WHICH HAVE BEEN DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY SASSA. RESEARCH SHOWS THE 52ND BATTALION, WHICH OKUTAKE WAS A PART OF, FOUGHT AS PART OF THE 9TH INFANTRY BRIGADE RESERVE AT THE BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE. ACCORDING TO INFORMATION FROM THE VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF CANADA, “FEBRUARY 1917 SAW THE 52ND TRAINING AND PREPARING FOR THE VIMY RIDGE OFFENSIVE. THE BATTALION PLAYED AN ACTIVE ROLE CONDUCTING LARGE SCALE TRENCH RAIDS IN THE LEAD UP TO THE ATTACK ON APRIL 9. THESE EFFORTS LEFT THE UNIT DRAINED AND WHEN THE ATTACK WENT FORWARD, THE 52ND PLAYED A SUPPORTING ROLE AS THE 9TH BRIGADE RESERVE.” THE 52ND BATTALION WAS ATTACHED TO THE LAKE SUPERIOR SCOTTISH REGIMENT. WHILE WITH THE 52ND BATTALION, HE REPORTED SICK ON 30 OCTOBER 1916 AND UNDERWENT MULTIPLE AMBULANCE AND HOSPITAL TRANSFERS THROUGH FRANCE, AND EVENTUALLY TO ENGLAND, AS A RESULT OF A HERNIA. HE UNDERWENT AN OPERATION IN NOVEMBER 1917. AFTER RECOVERY, HE WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE WHARNCLIFFE WAR HOSPITAL, SOUTH YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND ON 30 JANUARY 1917 AND WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH FROM THE CANADIAN CASUALTY ATTACHMENT CENTRE TO THE COMMANDING CANADIAN GARRISON DUTY DEPOT. HE WAS THEN STRUCK OFF STRENGTH TO THE MANITOBA REGIMENT DEPOT ON 13 MARCH 1917 AND ATTACHED TO THE 1ST C.C.D. (SPECULATED ABBREVIATION FOR CAVALRY COMMAND DEPOT) AND THEN RECEIVED BY THE 18TH RESERVE BATTALION SHORTLY ON 13 SEPTEMBER 1917. THE PLACES OF SERVICE FOLLOWING HIS DISCHARGE FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE IN ENGLAND. ON 9 DECEMBER 1918, HE WAS PUT ON TRANSFER DUTY TO CANADA. OKUTAKE’S DISCHARGE CERTIFICATE STATES HE WAS “DISCHARGED FROM THE SERVICE [ON 10 MAY 1919] BY REASON OF DEMOBILIZATION. WHEN ASKED IF HE WAS MORE HIGHLY RESPECTED BY HIS COMMUNITY UPON HIS RETURN TO CANADA AFTER THE WAR. MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINED IN 1976 THAT THIS WAS NOT SO: “[NO], GOING TO THE WAR DID NOT REALLY DO ANYTHING. HE WAS PROUD [OF HIS SERVICE TO HIS COUNTRY].” LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM MAY 1916 STATE UNREST IN THE LETHBRIDGE COLLIERIES – WHERE OKUTAKE WAS EMPLOYED PRIOR TO HIS ENLISTMENT – BECAUSE OF THE INCREASE OF JAPANESE LABOUR IN THE MINES DUE TO WAR-TIME LABOUR SHORTAGES. THE REACTION AGAINST JAPANESE LABOR WITHIN MINING UNIONS ESCALATED BY 1918. ON 6 DECEMBER 1918, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTS, “THE MINERS OF THIS DISTRICT, ACCORDING TO LOCAL OFFICIALS, ARE DETERMINED TO ENFORCE THEIR DEMANDS THAT NO MORE JAPANESE LABOR BE EMPLOYED IN THE MINES HERE. THERE ARE AT PRESENT ONLY TWO JAPANESE MINERS EMPLOYED HERE, AND THEY ARE AT NO. 6 MINE OF THE GALT COLLIERIES. THIS MATTER OF ORIENTAL LABOR HAS BEEN HANGING FIRE FOR A LONG TIME, BUT THE NOTICE OF A STRIKE CAME YESTERDAY WITH SUDDENNESS AND CONSIDERABLE SURPRISE AMONG LOCAL MINING CIRCLES. [THE VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE MINE] IS CREDITED WITH HAVING PRECIPITATED THE ULTIMATUM IN THE ABSENCE OF PRESIDENT BIGGS… IF THE JAPANESE [MINERS] WHO ARE AT NO. 6 ARE STILL AT WORK ON MONDAY MORNING, THERE WILL BE NO OTHER MINERS TO WORK WITH THEM. IF THE COMPANY STILL PERSISTS IN RETAINING THEIR SERVICE, THEN THE ENTIRE DISTRICT WILL BE CALLED OUT, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIALS… AT THE PRESENT TIME THERE ARE ABOUT 15 JAPANESE [MINERS] WORKING AT THE GALT COLLIERIES, ALL OF WHOM ARE ABOVE GROUND ON PICKING JOBS OR OTHER WORK OF THIS NATURE. NONE ARE IN THE PIT. MANY OF THESE [WORKERS] HAVE BEEN EMPLOYED BY THE COMPANY SINCE THE TIME NO. 6 MINE WAS UNDER CONSTRUCTION MORE THAN 10 YEARS AGO. OF THE JAPANESE COLONY IN THE MINING CAMP THREE OR FOUR WENT TO VANCOUVER WHEN THE WAR BROKE OUT AND THERE ENLISTED WITH THE JAPANESE BATTALION OF THE CANADIAN ARMY… LEWIS STOCKETT, HEAD OF THE MINES BRANCH OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, WHEN SEEN BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE HERALD THIS MORNING, STOUTLY DENIED THAT ANY JAPANESE [WORKERS] WERE EMPLOYED AT THE GALT COAL MINES AT LETHBRIDGE, OR, AS A MATTER OF FACT, AT ANY OF THEIR MINES…” WHILE HIS RETURN FROM SERVICE FOR HIS COUNTRY DID NOT GARNER OKUTAKE INCREASED RESPECT AMONG THE CAUCASIAN POPULATION IN LETHBRIDGE, HE WAS A RESPECTED LEADER WITHIN THE JAPANESE-CANADIAN COMMUNITY. MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINS, “[AT NUMBER 6], HE CAME AS A LEADER [AMONG THE OTHER JAPANESE PEOPLE]. MANY PEOPLE DID NOT UNDERSTAND JAPANESE BECAUSE THEY WERE IN THE COUNTRY SIDE FROM OKINAWA, SO THEY NEEDED A LEADER… PEOPLE WHO WERE MY HUSBAND’S AGE HAD AN EDUCATION.” THE OKINAWAN IMMIGRANTS THE AGE OF MR. TOMOMI OKUTAKE COULD SPEAK JAPANESE, BUT THE OLDER OKINAWAN IMMIGRANTS COULD ONLY SPEAK THE OKINAWAN DIALECT. ACCORDING TO DONOR PAT SASSA’S FAMILY HISTORY IN NIKKEI TAPESTRY, BECAUSE OF HER FATHER’S ABILITY TO SPEAK JAPANESE, THE OKINAWAN DIALECT, AND ENGLISH “HE WAS APPOINTED AS SPOKESPERSON FOR MANY OF THE SETTLER AND CHURCH GROUPS, THE MOST FREQUENT BEING THE LOCAL BUDDHIST TEMPLES AND THE OKINAWA CULTURE SOCIETY…” THE FAMILY HISTORY STATES, “MRS. TSURU OKUTAKE WAS BORN TO CHYOTATSU AND MAKATO GENKA ON DECEMBER 18, 1904 IN OKINAWA, JAPAN… SHE MARRIED TOMOMI CHOJITSU OKUTAKE IN APRIL 1930. HE WAS BORN ON NOVEMBER 21, 1888 AT SHURI CITY, OKINAWA, JAPAN… TOMOMI RETURNED TO OKINAWA [TWELVE YEARS AFTER THE WAR] AND LATER MARRIED TSURU GENKA IN APRIL 1930. THEY MADE THEIR FIRST HOME IN THE READYMADE DISTRICT AND TRIED FARMING, BUT SOON RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO BE EMPLOYED WITH THE COLLIERS (NO. 6 MINES). THE SITE (NO. 8) WAS MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE SHORTLY AFTER, AND HE CONTINUED AS A MINER UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1953. HE WAS UNABLE TO BENEFIT FROM BOTH PENSIONS, SO HE CHOSE TO RETIRE AS A WAR VETERAN.” A CANADIAN IMMIGRATION SERVICE RECORD DATED 10 MAY 1930 LISTS THAT MR. OKUTAKE MADE A RETURN TO CANADA FROM A PORT IN MANILA, PHILIPPINES ON THE S. S. EMPRESS OF CANADA - BRINGING HIS NEW WIFE WITH HIM. THESE RECORDS STATE THAT MR. OKUTAKE’S NATIONALITY WAS CANADIAN FROM THE YEARS 1907-1929, LISTING HARDIEVILLE, ALBERTA AS HIS ADDRESS. DURING HER INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN IN 2017, SASSA COMMENTED: “…HE WAS A LEARNED, SELF-EDUCATED MAN, BUT I DO BELIEVE THAT HE WAS STUDYING HIS ENGLISH PRIOR TO ENLISTING BECAUSE HE, YOU KNOW, WORKED ACROSS CANADA YOU KNOW, WITH THE RAILWAY WITH THE CPR, SO I THINK THAT HE PICKED UP THE LANGUAGE VERY QUICKLY… HE SPENT A LOT OF QUIET TIME IN HIS ROCKING CHAIR. HIS HEAD WAS ALWAYS DOWN, ALWAYS QUIETLY THINKING AND WHEN I LOOK BACK NOW I REALLY DO THINK HE MAY HAVE SUFFERED SOME YOU KNOW, POST TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCES… BUT ANYWAYS, HE WAS ALWAYS IN DEEP THOUGHT AND I DO BELIEVE HE WAS RE-LIVING THE WARS NOW THAT I THINK BACK. HE WAS CONSERVATIVE. I THINK HE SPOKE ONLY WHEN HE WAS ASKED SOMETHING…” SASSA STATED IN HER FAMILY HISTORY, “TOMOMI DID NOT TALK ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES IN THE WAR, AND I AM DISAPPOINTED THAT I WAS NOT THE PERSISTENT, CURIOUS CHILD WHO ASKED MANY QUESTIONS; THEREFORE, MUCH OF HIS PERSONAL MEMORIES GO UNSHARED…” IN THE INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, SASSA ELABORATED, “I DO REMEMBER HIM IN DISCUSSION WITH SOME ADULTS TALKING ABOUT HIS HOW HE WAS LICE INFESTED, AND THAT’S ALL I CAN REMEMBER THAT HE TALKED ABOUT…” SHE CONTINUED, “I REMEMBER HE NEVER MISSED A REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE AT THE CENOTAPH, WHICH WAS THEN AT THE GALT GARDENS. NEVER EVER MISSED. IF IT WAS SUB-ZERO, I DON’T REMEMBER EVEN GETTING IN HIS CAR IN THOSE DAYS. HE WALKED FROM HARDIEVILLE. IF IT WAS WINTER HE STILL WALKED. ALWAYS WORE A SUIT AND TIE WHEN HE WENT UP TOWN, AND ALWAYS DRESSED LIKE A GENTLEMAN WITH A CAP ON, YOU KNOW, WHEN HE WENT TO THE CEREMONIES.” IN HER INTERVIEW, SASSA EXPLAINED HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE ARTIFACTS: “... IT WAS AT THE TIME OF THE MOVE WHEN MY FATHER PASSED AWAY. THAT WOULD BE IN 1971, AND I WAS AWARE THAT HE HAD THESE TREASURES INSIDE OF AN ATTACHÉ… [AND] IN THAT WERE THESE MEDALS… I ACQUIRED THESE I THINK AFTER MARRIAGE, BECAUSE I DIDN’T HAVE THEM IN MY POSSESSION UNTIL ROY AND I WERE MARRIED, SO I MUST HAVE... TAKEN THEM AT THAT TIME AND SO, BUT AT THAT TIME THEY WERE ALREADY IN LETHBRIDGE, SO MY MOTHER HAD THEM… SHE NEEDED SOMEBODY TO LOOK AFTER THEM... MY SISTER [ESTHER AYUKAWA] TOOK [THE VICTORY MEDAL] AND HOW IT WAS RETURNED TO ME WAS... SHE FELT THAT BECAUSE HIS HOME WAS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE IS BURIED IN THE VETERAN’S PLOTS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE FELT IT BELONGED HERE. SO SHE BROUGHT THEM BACK AND THEN WE DISCUSSED THE IDEA THAT PERHAPS IT WOULD HAVE A MORE HISTORICAL VALUE IF WE DONATED THEM TO THE MUSEUM.” SPEAKING OF HER FATHER’S PASSING, SASSA REMEMBERS, “HE HAD [A STROKE] AT HOME…AND SO MY MOTHER’S FRIEND CALLED THE AMBULANCE AND HE WAS ADMITTED AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT, IT WAS ARMISTICE DAY. AND ROY AND I WERE IN TABER ATTENDING THE CENOTAPH… HE HAD A SECOND STROKE AND PASSED AWAY ON [NOVEMBER] 23RD, [1971].” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001001
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BRITISH WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1918
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20170001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BRITISH WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1918
Materials
SILVER, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
13
Width
3.5
Diameter
3.6
Description
ROUND SILVER MEDAL WITH A STRAIGHT CLASP SUSPENDER. ATTACHED TO THE SUSPENDER IS A WATERED RIBBON IN BLUE, BLACK, WHITE AND ORANGE. MEDAL DESIGN DEPICTS UNCLOTHED HORSEMAN EMBOSSED ON REVERSE. HORSE TRAMPLES ON THE PRUSSIAN SHIELD AND SKULL AND CROSS-BONES. IN THE UPPER PORTION BETWEEN HORSE'S NECK AND RIDER'S KNEE IS SUN OF VICTORY. EMBOSSED TEXT ALONG BORDER READS “1914 1918”. OBVERSE HAS EFFIGY OF KING GEORGE V FACING LEFT WITH TEXT READING "GEORGEIVS V BRITT:OMN:REX ET IND:IMP:". MEDAL EDGE ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “228409 PTE. T. OKUTAKE. P. P. C. L. I.” CONDITION: VERY SLIGHT DISCOLOURATION OF THE RIBBON. FRAYING ON BOTH RIBBON ENDS. SLIGHT SCUFFING TO MEDAL’S FINISH.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001002
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.7
Length
2.8
Width
2.8
Description
THIS IS A COLLAR BADGE THAT ACCORDING TO RESEARCH IS EITHER MADE OF COPPER OR BRASS. THE BADGE IS THE SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE CENTER AND “CANADA” ACROSS THE BOTTOM. THERE IS ONE LOOP ATTACHED TO BOTH THE BOTTOM AND THE TOP OF THE BACK OF THE BADGE. CONDITION: THE METAL IS BROWNING. THE TOP POINT OF THE MAPLE LEAF IS BENT INWARDS. THE LOOPS ON THE BACK OF THE BADGE ARE BENT TOWARDS THE TOP OF THE BADGE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
3.7
Width
3.7
Description
A: COLLAR BADGE MADE OF EITHER BRASS OR COPPER. BADGE IN SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE TOP OF THE LEAF. IN THE CENTER IS THE NUMBER “52” WITH A CIRCULAR BORDER AROUND IT CONTAINING THE WORDS “NEW ONTARIO”. AT THE BASE OF THE LEAF READS, “CANADA”. THERE IS A SHINE TO THE METAL’S VARNISH. ON THE BACK SIDE IS TWO METAL LOOPS, ONE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZONTALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 4.2 CM IN LENGTH. CONDITION: MINOR WEAR TO VARNISH.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
4.4
Width
2.9
Description
A: A PRINCESS PATRICIA CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY COLLAR BADGE. THE DESIGN IS A FLOWER ENCLOSED IN A CIRCLE, WHICH READS “PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY”. AT THE TOP OF THE CIRCLE IS A CROWN AND THERE IS A SMALL DESIGN EXTENDING FROM THE BOTTOM. ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE BADGE ARE TWO LOOPS – ONE AT EITHER SIDE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZIONALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 3.9 CM IN LENGTH. OVERALL CONDITION: METAL HAS DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1000 PENGO" HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160006001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1000 PENGO" HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Date
1945
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
18.3
Width
8.9
Description
PINK PAPER BANK NOTE WITH BLUE INK DESIGN. FACE: TYPE READS “EZER PENGO” IN LARGE LETTERS WITH FIVE LINES OF TEXT UNDERNEATH IT. THE FIRST LINE BEGINS WITH “BUDAPEST, 1945…”, THE 3RD LINE IS MADE UP OF THREE SIGNATURES, AND THE LAST LINE ENDS IN “A TÖRÉNY BUNTETI”. THE TOP CENTER OF THE BILL READS: “1000” WITH A CREST BELOW. AN IMAGE OF A WOMAN WITH FLOWERS IN HAIR FILLS THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BILL. AROUND THE TEXT AND IMAGES IS A FLORAL DESIGN. WHITE STAMP WITH PINK DESIGN READING “MAGYAR … BANK” STUCK TO THE RIGHT OF WOMAN’S FACE. BACK: FLORAL DESIGN BORDERING THE BORDER. “1000” IN TOP CENTER AND “EZER PENGO” IN CENTER OF DESIGN” STAMPED “F236” AND “040898” ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BILL. CONDITION: THE COLOUR IS SEVERELY FADED, ESPECIALLY ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES. THERE IS A BROWN STAIN VISIBLE ON THE RIGHT SIDE (WITH WOMAN’S IMAGE) THROUGH TO THE BACK SIDE. STAINING AND SLIGHT WEAR AROUND THE EDGES.
Subjects
EXCHANGE MEDIUM
Historical Association
CURRENCY/MAUNDY
History
THIS ARTIFACT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," WHICH RAN FROM 31 OCTOBER 2015 TO 17 JANUARY 2016. COPIED BELOW IS THE TEXT PANEL ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARTIFACT’S DONOR, ANTHONY (TONY) HORVATH FOR THE “CHANGING PLACES” EXHIBIT: “HORVATH WAS BORN IN AN AREA OF EASTERN EUROPE WHERE COUNTRIES’ BORDERS AND NAMES CHANGED MANY TIME DURING HIS LIFE. TONY FOUND HIMSELF WITHOUT A COUNTRY AFTER THE SECOND WORLD WAR. OF HUNGARIAN ANCESTRY, HE WAS DENIED WORK AND HE REFUSED TO BECOME A SERBIAN CITIZEN SO HE WAS ALLOWED TO LEAVE. HE TRAVELLED TO AUSTRIA AND THEN TO THE BREMERHAVEN DISPLACED PERSONS CAMP IN GERMANY. HE SAILED TO CANADA IN DECEMBER 1951 – FIGHTING SEA SICKNESS ALL THE WAY. HE TOOK THE TRAIN FROM HALIFAX TO MONTREAL AND FROM THERE HE WENT TO A FARM NEAR VERMILION, NORTH OF EDMONTON, WHERE HE CLEANED THE BARN AND FED PIGS. LEARNING THAT LETHBRIDGE HAD A LARGE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY HE HITCH-HIKED SOUTH. HE HAD A FEW CLOTHES, $15 DOLLARS AND HIS VIOLIN. HIS FIRST JOB WAS IN THE BEET FIELDS NEAR PICTURE BUTTE. LATER HE DROVE HORSES THAT PULLED COAL CARTS IN THE SHAUGHNESSY UNDERGROUND MINE. PLAYING THE VIOLIN BROUGHT HIM MUCH JOY, MANY FRIENDS, AND HIS WIFE ANGELIKA. HE OFTEN WENT TO GALT GARDENS AFTER WORK TO PLAY HIS MUSIC AND SOON MET ANGIE, A YOUNG WOMAN RECENTLY ARRIVED FROM GERMANY. FEARING THE DANGEROUS WORK IN THE MINE, ANGIE DEMANDED THAT TONY FIND SAFER WORK ONCE THEY WERE MARRIED. INITIALLY HE WORKED FOR ELLISON MILLING COMPANY, BUT CANADIAN DRESSED MEAT PACKING HOUSE (BURNS MEATS) OFFERED $.08 MORE AN HOUR, SO HE SWITCHED EMPLOYMENT. HE WORKED THERE UNTIL HE RETIRED 27 YEARS LATER. ANGIE WORKED AT THE HOSPITAL AND THEN AS A TAILOR FOR SIMPSON SEARS DURING THAT SAME TIME PERIOD. TOGETHER THEY RAISED FOUR GIRLS.” THE INFORMATION THAT WAS PRESENTED ON THE TEXT PANEL WAS SOURCED FROM AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY AIKENS ON 8 JULY 2015. IN THAT INTERVIEW – STORED AT THE GALT ARCHIVES (20151076) – HORVATH SAID THAT HE WAS BORN IN THE BALKAN PENINSULA. HE SPOKE OF THE UNREST DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND RECALLED SEEING THE BOMBING FROM ALLIES, SAYING “THE GROUND WAS SHAKEN.” HE REMEMBERED THE PUBLIC EXECUTIONS, MASS BURIALS, AND THE WOUNDED PEOPLE IN THE STREETS. IN THE INTERVIEW, HE DESCRIBED HOW THE QUALITY OF LIFE WAS NOT MUCH BETTER FOLLOWING THE WAR, DURING THE YEARS 1945 TO 1950. THERE WERE HARDSHIPS, SUCH AS LONG LINES FOR BREAD, AND THE CONFLICT HAD MADE FINDING GOOD WORK DIFFICULT FOR HORVATH – A HUNGARIAN, AND THEREFORE AN ETHNIC MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA. SOON AFTER HE STARTED HIS JOURNEY TO CANADA IN 1951, WHICH HE DESCRIBED TO GREATER DEPTH IN THE INTERVIEW. ON 5 JULY 2013, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HORVATH IN HIS HOME TO SPEAK ABOUT THE DONATION OF AN ARTIFACT (P20120044000) BY THE MEZEI ORCHESTRA, WHICH HORVATH WAS INVOLVED IN. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: "I [WAS] BORN IN [THE 24TH OF JANUARY] 1931 AND THE SERBS OCCUPIED HUNGARY… SO I BORN ACTUALLY IN YUGOSLAVIA, AND THEN, IN 1939, WHEN THE WAR BROKE OUT – THE SECOND WORLD WAR – IN 1940, THE HUNGARIANS TOOK [IT] BACK… FROM SERBIA. AND IT WAS AGAIN HUNGARY UNTIL 1945, TILL THE WAR FINISHED. [ETHNICALLY HUNGARIAN,] I BECAME A NATIONAL MINORITY IN MY OWN COUNTRY… [A] NATIONAL MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA, BUT IT’S NOT YUGOSLAVIA ANYMORE. IT FALL APART AND IT’S AGAIN SERBIA.” IN THE INTERVIEW, HORVATH EXPLAINED, “I ENDED UP BACK AT HOME ABOUT 3 MONTHS BEFORE THE END OF THE [SECOND WORLD] WAR, BACK TO SERBIA TO A CITY CALLED SRBOBRAN. THE CIRCUMSTANCES WAS THAT THE LIFE STANDARD WAS POOR… BEFORE I CAME TO CANADA, I GOT A JOB IN ALEXANDERONKOVICH FACTORY, TORPEDO AND BOMBS AND ALL THAT. I WAS 18 MONTHS WORKING THERE, AND THEN I STARTED TO INVESTIGATE HOW COULD I COME OUT FROM THAT COUNTRY… I DECIDED… I [COULD] APPLY OFFICIALLY TO GIVE UP MY CITIZENSHIP – YUGOSLAVIAN CITIZENSHIP – AND [BECOME] OFFICIALLY [AN] ETHNIC MINORITY… I APPLIED TO EMIGRATE FROM SERBIA, AND I ENDED UP IN AUSTRIA AND FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMENHAVEN, A DISPLACED PERSON I [INDICATED I WAS], BUT ACTUALLY I WASN’T. I WAS A REAL IMMIGRANT BECAUSE I CAME WITH LEGAL PAPERS TO CANADA. IN 1951, I CAME TO CANADA, AND ENDED UP IN THE SUGAR BEETS, I EARNED A LIVING AS A LABOURER – CLEANING… COW STALLS, AND SO FORTH. I MET MY WIFE IN ’53. SHE IS FROM GERMANY. WE GOT MARRIED IN ’54, AND FORTUNATELY, WE HAVE 4 GROWN-UP DAUGHTERS BETWEEN US.” HORVATH ELABORATED ON HIS IMMIGRATION EXPERIENCE, “I HAD AUSTRALIAN OPTION. BUT THE CANADIAN CONSUL SENT MOVIES, PICTURES, ADVERTISEMENTS... [AND THEN] IN 1 MONTH, I WAS IN CANADA. FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMERHAVEN, IN GERMANY, IN 2-3 WEEKS, I WAS READY TO COME TO CANADA. [I] ENDED UP IN MONTREAL. THERE [WERE] STILL CAMPS FOR PRISONER OF WARS FROM THE SECOND WORLD WAR, LIKE GERMANS AND ALL THE OTHER, AND I WAS IN THERE FOR ABOUT 6 MONTHS, IN MONTREAL, FROM THERE, SOME FARMERS WERE LOOKING FOR LABOURERS. THEY ASKED ME DID I WANT TO COME TO ALBERTA. I DIDN’T KNOW ALBERTA. BIG DEAL, ALBERTA. I WASN’T SURE AT ALL, BUT WHEN I WAS TRAVELLING DAY AND NIGHT FROM THERE, TO GET TO EDMONTON FIRST, A FARMER WAS WAITING FOR ME, FROM VERMILION. I STILL REMEMBER THE NAME, BOB HOLDEN. HE WAS FROM ENGLAND, I THINK, PREVIOUSLY. HE HAD A FARM THERE AND HE NEEDED A LABOURER. I WAS A LABOURER, BUT WHEN THEY FOUND OUT I CAN PLAY THE MUSIC, FIRST I HAD A BEET SHACK. THEN THEY TOOK ME INTO HIS HOUSE. HE DIDN’T PAY MUCH. THE NEIGHBOUR [IN VERMILION] OVER THERE WAS A HUNGARIAN OLD FARMER. HE SAID TO ME, ‘SON, DON’T STAY HERE, GO TO LETHBRIDGE. THERE IS LOTS OF HUNGARIANS [THERE], AND YOU CAN GO TO THE SUGAR BEETS [FIELDS], AND YOU CAN MEET FRIENDS OVER THERE,’ AND SO ON. I HAD $15.00 IN MY POCKET BECAUSE THE FARMER DEDUCTED MY JEANS, WHAT HE BOUGHT, I CALLED THEM ‘COWBOY JEANS.' AND I ONLY HAD $15.00 LEFT, SO I HITCHHIKED FROM VERMILION ALL THE WAY ‘TIL I GET TO LETHBRIDGE I STILL HAVE SOME MONEY LEFT, AND I ENDED UP IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S PLACE, WORKING IN THE SUGAR BEETS.” “IT WAS DIFFICULT AT THE BEGINNING… THE LANGUAGE…,” HORVATH EXPLAINED, “… VERY HARD BECAUSE HUNGARIAN DOESN’T HAVE A SIMILAR WORD WITH ENGLISH; GERMAN IS ABOUT 30%, SO I THANK MY WIFE; SHE LEARNED QUICKER THAN I DID, BUT, NOW, I AM O.K. I CAN GET BY.” WHEN HE FIRST CAME TO CANADA, HORVATH SAID, “I DIDN’T WANT TO BELIEVE [IT]. I THOUGHT IT’S A HEAVEN BECAUSE EVERYONE WAS FRIENDLY, NICE, YOU KNOW. MIND YOU, I WASN’T ASSOCIATING VERY MUCH WITH THE YOUNG MEN, 18-19 YEARS OLD, YOU KNOW.” HE TOLD AITKENS IN 2015 THAT HE DID NOT BRING MUCH ELSE. HE STATES, “[I] ESPECIALLY [DIDN’T BRING] MONEY. NO MONEY… EXCEPT WHAT IS WORTH NOTHING. INFLATION MONEY BY THE HUNDRED THOUSAND, MILLION, TEN MILLION… WHATEVER I HAD I GAVE TO THE OTHER MUSEUM THAT WAS IN THE GALT GARDEN (GURNEY MUSEUM)… INFLATED. THAT’S WHAT WE CALLED IT. THAT WAS INFLATION MONEY. IT WAS SO MANY, PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW THE NUMBER. THEY JUST SAID, ‘5 YELLOW, 2 GREEN AND…’ YOU KNOW? JUST BY THE COLOUR. THE NUMBER WAS IN MILLIONS AND BILLIONS AND HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS. PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW. NO VALUE. YOU COULD USE IT FOR BATHROOM.” INTERNET RESEARCH STATES THAT THE PENGO WAS THE CURRENCY OF HUNGARY FROM 1927 TO 1946 AND EXPERIENCED THE MOST SERIOUS HYPERINFLATION RECORDED (SOURCE ACCESSED 10 MAY 2018). HORVATH REMEMBERED THE BELONGINGS HE BROUGHT WITH HIM IN HIS IMMIGRATION TO CANADA. IN BOTH THE 2015 INTERVIEW WITH AITKENS AND THE 2013 INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, HE SPEAKS OF HIS VIOLIN. IN 2013, HE TOLD MACLEAN, “IT WAS A FAMILY VIOLIN. ACTUALLY, MY UNCLE, THE VERY FIRST ONE, I GOT IT FROM HIM, AND, OF COURSE IT WAS LAYING IN THE HOUSE TILL I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, AND THEY DIDN’T WANT ME TO FOOL AROUND WITH IT, TO BREAK IT OR WHATEVER, SO I GOT A SMALLER SIZE OF VIOLIN, HALF A SIZE, AND LATER, I GOT THAT BACK AND I BROUGHT IT WITH ME TO CANADA. THE VIOLIN GAVE ME OPPORTUNITIES NEVER TO BE ALONE. I HAD FRIENDS ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD PARTIES ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD FOOD; I HAD DRINK; AND I HAD GOOD TIME. IT WAS MY BEST PARTNER AND BEST FRIEND. THAT’S HOW I MET MY WIFE, WITH MY VIOLIN CASE UNDER MY ARM, AT LETHBRIDGE GALT GARDEN.” HE REMEMBERED BEING IMMEDIATELY EMBRACED BY THE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY IN THE AREA: “IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S NEIGHBOUR, MR. GABOR GENCSI, HEARD ME PLAYING, [AND] HE TOOK ME OVER. HE SAYS, ‘YOU DON’T WORK THAT HARD IN THE SUGAR BEETS. COME TO ME.’ HE HAD A WIFE BUT THEY HAD NO CHILDREN, AND HE SAYS THAT THEY ARE GOING TO ADOPT ME TO STAY. I SAYS, ‘NO, I CANNOT BE ADOPTED. I HAD MOTHER AND FATHER.’ BUT, WHEN HE HEARD ME PLAYING, I WENT OVER TO HIS PLACE – THE NEIGHBOUR[ING] FARM – HE GAVE ME $100.00 IN ONE BILL. I DIDN’T KNOW HOW MUCH IT WAS WORTH, AND HE SAID YOU ARE GOING TO GET THAT EVERY MONTH, AS LONG AS YOU ARE HERE, BUT YOU HAVE TO PLAY IN THE EVENING TO ME AND TO MY WIFE. THEN I KEPT ON PLAYING EVERY NIGHT. IT WAS A GOOD CHANCE FOR PRACTICE, YOU KNOW. THEY GAVE ME THE FIRST BEDROOM, AND THEY WENT TO THE SMALLER BEDROOM JUST TO TREAT ME WELL, FREE BOARD, FREE ROOM, JUST TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE EVENING. SOMETIMES I WENT OUT AND DROVE THE HORSES WHEN HE WAS THROWING THE BALES ON THE WAGON, SO I HAD A VERY GOOD TREAT, AND A VERY GOOD CHANCE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN.” HORVATH ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN GETTING HIS PARENTS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA, WHERE THEY SET UP A NEW LIFE. HORVATH SAID, “IN 1948, WHEN MY DAD CAME BACK FROM, BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE ARMY, ON THE GERMAN SIDE. HE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR IN RUSSIA, AND HE CAME BACK IN 1948 FROM RUSSIAN PRISONER OF WAR CAMP. I FELT VERY SORRY FOR MY DAD BECAUSE EVERY TIME YOU WANTED TO ASK SOMETHING ABOUT THE WAR IN RUSSIA, HE NEVER WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT, NEVER, TO NOBODY. I DECIDED HERE, WHEN I WAS IN CANADA, THE BEST THING THEY WOULD COME OUT HERE, NO MATTER HOW OLD THEY ARE. THEY WERE VERY HAPPY… AND IN 1960 WHEN I WAS ALREADY ESTABLISHED HERE, AND MARRIED WITH CHILDREN, [I] BROUGHT MY FAMILY OUT, MY FATHER, MOTHER AND SISTER, WHO IS LIVING NOW IN STIRLING, ALBERTA. AND, THEY [WERE] ALREADY WAS IN THEIR 60’S WHEN I BROUGHT THEM OUT, BUT THEY MANAGED TO ESTABLISH THEMSELVES A GOOD LIFE HERE TOO ON 80 ACRES…” OF HIS IMMIGRATION STORY, HE TOLD AITKENS, “[IT WAS EXCITING TO] ME – TRAVELLING HALF OF EUROPE WITH NO MONEY IN THE POCKET, EXCEPT HAVING THE FIDDLE IN YOUR HAND…” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE TEXT PANEL COPY. FOR INFORMATION REGARDING HORVATH’S INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN IN 2013, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20120044000.
Catalogue Number
P20160006001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
10,000 PENGO, HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160006002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
10,000 PENGO, HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Date
1945
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
16.9
Width
8.2
Description
OFF-GREEN PAPER BANK NOTE WITH MAROON INK DESIGN. CENTER LEFT OF BILL IS A PINK COLOUR. FACE: TEXT ON LEFT SIDE OF NOTE READS “10000” IN DESIGN ABOVE LARGER OVAL CONTAINING TEXT: “TIZEZER PENGO” IN LARGE LETTERS WITH TWO LINES OF TEXT BENEATH “BUDAPEST 1945…” AND ENDING IN “NEMZETI BANK” WITH THREE SIGNATURES AFTER. BANNER READING “A BANKJEGYHAMISITAST… BUNTETI” BELOW. IMAGE OF WOMAN WEARING TIARA ENCLOSED IN A CIRCLE ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BANK NOTE. CREST BELOW IMAGE. FLORAL DESIGN OVERALL. BACK: FLORAL BORDER AROUND BACK SIDE WITH “10000” ENCLOSED IN A TULIP-SHAPE IN ALL FOUR CORNERS. CENTER READS “TIZEZER 1000 TIZEZER” WITHIN A DECORATIVE OVAL THAT IS SURROUND BY SMALL PRINT TEXT. “L879” AND “027538” STAMPED IN RED ON EITHER SIDE OF NOTE. CONDITION: SEVERELY DISCOLOURED. DARK STAIN ACROSS ENTIRE UPPER EDGE. SLIGHT WEAR TO EDGES.
Subjects
EXCHANGE MEDIUM
Historical Association
CURRENCY/MAUNDY
History
THIS ARTIFACT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," WHICH RAN FROM 31 OCTOBER 2015 TO 17 JANUARY 2016. COPIED BELOW IS THE TEXT PANEL ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARTIFACT’S DONOR, ANTHONY (TONY) HORVATH FOR THE “CHANGING PLACES” EXHIBIT: “HORVATH WAS BORN IN AN AREA OF EASTERN EUROPE WHERE COUNTRIES’ BORDERS AND NAMES CHANGED MANY TIME DURING HIS LIFE. TONY FOUND HIMSELF WITHOUT A COUNTRY AFTER THE SECOND WORLD WAR. OF HUNGARIAN ANCESTRY, HE WAS DENIED WORK AND HE REFUSED TO BECOME A SERBIAN CITIZEN SO HE WAS ALLOWED TO LEAVE. HE TRAVELLED TO AUSTRIA AND THEN TO THE BREMERHAVEN DISPLACED PERSONS CAMP IN GERMANY. HE SAILED TO CANADA IN DECEMBER 1951 – FIGHTING SEA SICKNESS ALL THE WAY. HE TOOK THE TRAIN FROM HALIFAX TO MONTREAL AND FROM THERE HE WENT TO A FARM NEAR VERMILION, NORTH OF EDMONTON, WHERE HE CLEANED THE BARN AND FED PIGS. LEARNING THAT LETHBRIDGE HAD A LARGE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY HE HITCH-HIKED SOUTH. HE HAD A FEW CLOTHES, $15 DOLLARS AND HIS VIOLIN. HIS FIRST JOB WAS IN THE BEET FIELDS NEAR PICTURE BUTTE. LATER HE DROVE HORSES THAT PULLED COAL CARTS IN THE SHAUGHNESSY UNDERGROUND MINE. PLAYING THE VIOLIN BROUGHT HIM MUCH JOY, MANY FRIENDS, AND HIS WIFE ANGELIKA. HE OFTEN WENT TO GALT GARDENS AFTER WORK TO PLAY HIS MUSIC AND SOON MET ANGIE, A YOUNG WOMAN RECENTLY ARRIVED FROM GERMANY. FEARING THE DANGEROUS WORK IN THE MINE, ANGIE DEMANDED THAT TONY FIND SAFER WORK ONCE THEY WERE MARRIED. INITIALLY HE WORKED FOR ELLISON MILLING COMPANY, BUT CANADIAN DRESSED MEAT PACKING HOUSE (BURNS MEATS) OFFERED $.08 MORE AN HOUR, SO HE SWITCHED EMPLOYMENT. HE WORKED THERE UNTIL HE RETIRED 27 YEARS LATER. ANGIE WORKED AT THE HOSPITAL AND THEN AS A TAILOR FOR SIMPSON SEARS DURING THAT SAME TIME PERIOD. TOGETHER THEY RAISED FOUR GIRLS.” THE INFORMATION THAT WAS PRESENTED ON THE TEXT PANEL WAS SOURCED FROM AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY AIKENS ON 8 JULY 2015. IN THAT INTERVIEW – STORED AT THE GALT ARCHIVES (20151076) – HORVATH SAID THAT HE WAS BORN IN THE BALKAN PENINSULA. HE SPOKE OF THE UNREST DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND RECALLED SEEING THE BOMBING FROM ALLIES, SAYING “THE GROUND WAS SHAKEN.” HE REMEMBERED THE PUBLIC EXECUTIONS, MASS BURIALS, AND THE WOUNDED PEOPLE IN THE STREETS. IN THE INTERVIEW, HE DESCRIBED HOW THE QUALITY OF LIFE WAS NOT MUCH BETTER FOLLOWING THE WAR, DURING THE YEARS 1945 TO 1950. THERE WERE HARDSHIPS, SUCH AS LONG LINES FOR BREAD, AND THE CONFLICT HAD MADE FINDING GOOD WORK DIFFICULT FOR HORVATH – A HUNGARIAN, AND THEREFORE AN ETHNIC MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA. SOON AFTER HE STARTED HIS JOURNEY TO CANADA IN 1951, WHICH HE DESCRIBED TO GREATER DEPTH IN THE INTERVIEW. ON 5 JULY 2013, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HORVATH IN HIS HOME TO SPEAK ABOUT THE DONATION OF AN ARTIFACT (P20120044000) BY THE MEZEI ORCHESTRA, WHICH HORVATH WAS INVOLVED IN. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: "I [WAS] BORN IN [THE 24TH OF JANUARY] 1931 AND THE SERBS OCCUPIED HUNGARY… SO I BORN ACTUALLY IN YUGOSLAVIA, AND THEN, IN 1939, WHEN THE WAR BROKE OUT – THE SECOND WORLD WAR – IN 1940, THE HUNGARIANS TOOK [IT] BACK… FROM SERBIA. AND IT WAS AGAIN HUNGARY UNTIL 1945, TILL THE WAR FINISHED. [ETHNICALLY HUNGARIAN,] I BECAME A NATIONAL MINORITY IN MY OWN COUNTRY… [A] NATIONAL MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA, BUT IT’S NOT YUGOSLAVIA ANYMORE. IT FALL APART AND IT’S AGAIN SERBIA.” IN THE INTERVIEW, HORVATH EXPLAINED, “I ENDED UP BACK AT HOME ABOUT 3 MONTHS BEFORE THE END OF THE [SECOND WORLD] WAR, BACK TO SERBIA TO A CITY CALLED SRBOBRAN. THE CIRCUMSTANCES WAS THAT THE LIFE STANDARD WAS POOR… BEFORE I CAME TO CANADA, I GOT A JOB IN ALEXANDERONKOVICH FACTORY, TORPEDO AND BOMBS AND ALL THAT. I WAS 18 MONTHS WORKING THERE, AND THEN I STARTED TO INVESTIGATE HOW COULD I COME OUT FROM THAT COUNTRY… I DECIDED… I [COULD] APPLY OFFICIALLY TO GIVE UP MY CITIZENSHIP – YUGOSLAVIAN CITIZENSHIP – AND [BECOME] OFFICIALLY [AN] ETHNIC MINORITY… I APPLIED TO EMIGRATE FROM SERBIA, AND I ENDED UP IN AUSTRIA AND FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMENHAVEN, A DISPLACED PERSON I [INDICATED I WAS], BUT ACTUALLY I WASN’T. I WAS A REAL IMMIGRANT BECAUSE I CAME WITH LEGAL PAPERS TO CANADA. IN 1951, I CAME TO CANADA, AND ENDED UP IN THE SUGAR BEETS, I EARNED A LIVING AS A LABOURER – CLEANING… COW STALLS, AND SO FORTH. I MET MY WIFE IN ’53. SHE IS FROM GERMANY. WE GOT MARRIED IN ’54, AND FORTUNATELY, WE HAVE 4 GROWN-UP DAUGHTERS BETWEEN US.” HORVATH ELABORATED ON HIS IMMIGRATION EXPERIENCE, “I HAD AUSTRALIAN OPTION. BUT THE CANADIAN CONSUL SENT MOVIES, PICTURES, ADVERTISEMENTS... [AND THEN] IN 1 MONTH, I WAS IN CANADA. FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMERHAVEN, IN GERMANY, IN 2-3 WEEKS, I WAS READY TO COME TO CANADA. [I] ENDED UP IN MONTREAL. THERE [WERE] STILL CAMPS FOR PRISONER OF WARS FROM THE SECOND WORLD WAR, LIKE GERMANS AND ALL THE OTHER, AND I WAS IN THERE FOR ABOUT 6 MONTHS, IN MONTREAL, FROM THERE, SOME FARMERS WERE LOOKING FOR LABOURERS. THEY ASKED ME DID I WANT TO COME TO ALBERTA. I DIDN’T KNOW ALBERTA. BIG DEAL, ALBERTA. I WASN’T SURE AT ALL, BUT WHEN I WAS TRAVELLING DAY AND NIGHT FROM THERE, TO GET TO EDMONTON FIRST, A FARMER WAS WAITING FOR ME, FROM VERMILION. I STILL REMEMBER THE NAME, BOB HOLDEN. HE WAS FROM ENGLAND, I THINK, PREVIOUSLY. HE HAD A FARM THERE AND HE NEEDED A LABOURER. I WAS A LABOURER, BUT WHEN THEY FOUND OUT I CAN PLAY THE MUSIC, FIRST I HAD A BEET SHACK. THEN THEY TOOK ME INTO HIS HOUSE. HE DIDN’T PAY MUCH. THE NEIGHBOUR [IN VERMILION] OVER THERE WAS A HUNGARIAN OLD FARMER. HE SAID TO ME, ‘SON, DON’T STAY HERE, GO TO LETHBRIDGE. THERE IS LOTS OF HUNGARIANS [THERE], AND YOU CAN GO TO THE SUGAR BEETS [FIELDS], AND YOU CAN MEET FRIENDS OVER THERE,’ AND SO ON. I HAD $15.00 IN MY POCKET BECAUSE THE FARMER DEDUCTED MY JEANS, WHAT HE BOUGHT, I CALLED THEM ‘COWBOY JEANS.' AND I ONLY HAD $15.00 LEFT, SO I HITCHHIKED FROM VERMILION ALL THE WAY ‘TIL I GET TO LETHBRIDGE I STILL HAVE SOME MONEY LEFT, AND I ENDED UP IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S PLACE, WORKING IN THE SUGAR BEETS.” “IT WAS DIFFICULT AT THE BEGINNING… THE LANGUAGE…,” HORVATH EXPLAINED, “… VERY HARD BECAUSE HUNGARIAN DOESN’T HAVE A SIMILAR WORD WITH ENGLISH; GERMAN IS ABOUT 30%, SO I THANK MY WIFE; SHE LEARNED QUICKER THAN I DID, BUT, NOW, I AM O.K. I CAN GET BY.” WHEN HE FIRST CAME TO CANADA, HORVATH SAID, “I DIDN’T WANT TO BELIEVE [IT]. I THOUGHT IT’S A HEAVEN BECAUSE EVERYONE WAS FRIENDLY, NICE, YOU KNOW. MIND YOU, I WASN’T ASSOCIATING VERY MUCH WITH THE YOUNG MEN, 18-19 YEARS OLD, YOU KNOW.” HE TOLD AITKENS IN 2015 THAT HE DID NOT BRING MUCH ELSE. HE STATES, “[I] ESPECIALLY [DIDN’T BRING] MONEY. NO MONEY… EXCEPT WHAT IS WORTH NOTHING. INFLATION MONEY BY THE HUNDRED THOUSAND, MILLION, TEN MILLION… WHATEVER I HAD I GAVE TO THE OTHER MUSEUM THAT WAS IN THE GALT GARDEN (GURNEY MUSEUM)… INFLATED. THAT’S WHAT WE CALLED IT. THAT WAS INFLATION MONEY. IT WAS SO MANY, PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW THE NUMBER. THEY JUST SAID, ‘5 YELLOW, 2 GREEN AND…’ YOU KNOW? JUST BY THE COLOUR. THE NUMBER WAS IN MILLIONS AND BILLIONS AND HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS. PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW. NO VALUE. YOU COULD USE IT FOR BATHROOM.” INTERNET RESEARCH STATES THAT THE PENGO WAS THE CURRENCY OF HUNGARY FROM 1927 TO 1946 AND EXPERIENCED THE MOST SERIOUS HYPERINFLATION RECORDED (SOURCE ACCESSED 10 MAY 2018). HORVATH REMEMBERED THE BELONGINGS HE BROUGHT WITH HIM IN HIS IMMIGRATION TO CANADA. IN BOTH THE 2015 INTERVIEW WITH AITKENS AND THE 2013 INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, HE SPEAKS OF HIS VIOLIN. IN 2013, HE TOLD MACLEAN, “IT WAS A FAMILY VIOLIN. ACTUALLY, MY UNCLE, THE VERY FIRST ONE, I GOT IT FROM HIM, AND, OF COURSE IT WAS LAYING IN THE HOUSE TILL I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, AND THEY DIDN’T WANT ME TO FOOL AROUND WITH IT, TO BREAK IT OR WHATEVER, SO I GOT A SMALLER SIZE OF VIOLIN, HALF A SIZE, AND LATER, I GOT THAT BACK AND I BROUGHT IT WITH ME TO CANADA. THE VIOLIN GAVE ME OPPORTUNITIES NEVER TO BE ALONE. I HAD FRIENDS ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD PARTIES ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD FOOD; I HAD DRINK; AND I HAD GOOD TIME. IT WAS MY BEST PARTNER AND BEST FRIEND. THAT’S HOW I MET MY WIFE, WITH MY VIOLIN CASE UNDER MY ARM, AT LETHBRIDGE GALT GARDEN.” HE REMEMBERED BEING IMMEDIATELY EMBRACED BY THE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY IN THE AREA: “IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S NEIGHBOUR, MR. GABOR GENCSI, HEARD ME PLAYING, [AND] HE TOOK ME OVER. HE SAYS, ‘YOU DON’T WORK THAT HARD IN THE SUGAR BEETS. COME TO ME.’ HE HAD A WIFE BUT THEY HAD NO CHILDREN, AND HE SAYS THAT THEY ARE GOING TO ADOPT ME TO STAY. I SAYS, ‘NO, I CANNOT BE ADOPTED. I HAD MOTHER AND FATHER.’ BUT, WHEN HE HEARD ME PLAYING, I WENT OVER TO HIS PLACE – THE NEIGHBOUR[ING] FARM – HE GAVE ME $100.00 IN ONE BILL. I DIDN’T KNOW HOW MUCH IT WAS WORTH, AND HE SAID YOU ARE GOING TO GET THAT EVERY MONTH, AS LONG AS YOU ARE HERE, BUT YOU HAVE TO PLAY IN THE EVENING TO ME AND TO MY WIFE. THEN I KEPT ON PLAYING EVERY NIGHT. IT WAS A GOOD CHANCE FOR PRACTICE, YOU KNOW. THEY GAVE ME THE FIRST BEDROOM, AND THEY WENT TO THE SMALLER BEDROOM JUST TO TREAT ME WELL, FREE BOARD, FREE ROOM, JUST TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE EVENING. SOMETIMES I WENT OUT AND DROVE THE HORSES WHEN HE WAS THROWING THE BALES ON THE WAGON, SO I HAD A VERY GOOD TREAT, AND A VERY GOOD CHANCE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN.” HORVATH ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN GETTING HIS PARENTS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA, WHERE THEY SET UP A NEW LIFE. HORVATH SAID, “IN 1948, WHEN MY DAD CAME BACK FROM, BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE ARMY, ON THE GERMAN SIDE. HE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR IN RUSSIA, AND HE CAME BACK IN 1948 FROM RUSSIAN PRISONER OF WAR CAMP. I FELT VERY SORRY FOR MY DAD BECAUSE EVERY TIME YOU WANTED TO ASK SOMETHING ABOUT THE WAR IN RUSSIA, HE NEVER WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT, NEVER, TO NOBODY. I DECIDED HERE, WHEN I WAS IN CANADA, THE BEST THING THEY WOULD COME OUT HERE, NO MATTER HOW OLD THEY ARE. THEY WERE VERY HAPPY… AND IN 1960 WHEN I WAS ALREADY ESTABLISHED HERE, AND MARRIED WITH CHILDREN, [I] BROUGHT MY FAMILY OUT, MY FATHER, MOTHER AND SISTER, WHO IS LIVING NOW IN STIRLING, ALBERTA. AND, THEY [WERE] ALREADY WAS IN THEIR 60’S WHEN I BROUGHT THEM OUT, BUT THEY MANAGED TO ESTABLISH THEMSELVES A GOOD LIFE HERE TOO ON 80 ACRES…” OF HIS IMMIGRATION STORY, HE TOLD AITKENS, “[IT WAS EXCITING TO] ME – TRAVELLING HALF OF EUROPE WITH NO MONEY IN THE POCKET, EXCEPT HAVING THE FIDDLE IN YOUR HAND…” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE TEXT PANEL COPY. FOR INFORMATION REGARDING HORVATH’S INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN IN 2013, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20120044000.
Catalogue Number
P20160006002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
100,000 PENGO, HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160006003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
100,000 PENGO, HUNGARIAN CURRENCY
Date
1945
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.9
Width
8.2
Description
OFF-WHITE AND BLUE PAPER BANK NOTE WITH BROWN INKED DESIGN. FACE: LEFT OF NOTE CONTAINS TEXT BEGINNING IN “100000 SZAZER PENGO”, THEN “BUDAPEST 1945…” ENDING IN “A TURVENY BUNTETI”. IMAGE OF WOMAN WITH PLEATED HAIR ON LEFT SIDE. BROWN FLOWER DESIGN ON BLUE BACKGROUND OVERALL. BORDER IS UNINKED (WHITE). BACK: BROWN ON BLUE DESIGN WITH UNMARKED/UN-INKED BORDER. TOP CENTER READS, “100000” WITH CREST DESIGN IN CENTER OF NOTE AND “SZAZEZER PENGO” ON BOTTOM BORDER. TEXT ALONG TOP OF BILL. A HORN DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF BILL IN DARK BLUE INK. “M 284” AND “058914” IN DARK BLUE INK STAMPED ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BILL. CONDITION: SEVERELY DISCOLORED. DARK BROWN STAIN ALONG ENTIRE BOTTOM EDGE. EDGE SLIGHTLY WORN.
Subjects
EXCHANGE MEDIUM
Historical Association
CURRENCY/MAUNDY
History
THIS ARTIFACT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," WHICH RAN FROM 31 OCTOBER 2015 TO 17 JANUARY 2016. COPIED BELOW IS THE TEXT PANEL ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARTIFACT’S DONOR, ANTHONY (TONY) HORVATH FOR THE “CHANGING PLACES” EXHIBIT: “HORVATH WAS BORN IN AN AREA OF EASTERN EUROPE WHERE COUNTRIES’ BORDERS AND NAMES CHANGED MANY TIME DURING HIS LIFE. TONY FOUND HIMSELF WITHOUT A COUNTRY AFTER THE SECOND WORLD WAR. OF HUNGARIAN ANCESTRY, HE WAS DENIED WORK AND HE REFUSED TO BECOME A SERBIAN CITIZEN SO HE WAS ALLOWED TO LEAVE. HE TRAVELLED TO AUSTRIA AND THEN TO THE BREMERHAVEN DISPLACED PERSONS CAMP IN GERMANY. HE SAILED TO CANADA IN DECEMBER 1951 – FIGHTING SEA SICKNESS ALL THE WAY. HE TOOK THE TRAIN FROM HALIFAX TO MONTREAL AND FROM THERE HE WENT TO A FARM NEAR VERMILION, NORTH OF EDMONTON, WHERE HE CLEANED THE BARN AND FED PIGS. LEARNING THAT LETHBRIDGE HAD A LARGE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY HE HITCH-HIKED SOUTH. HE HAD A FEW CLOTHES, $15 DOLLARS AND HIS VIOLIN. HIS FIRST JOB WAS IN THE BEET FIELDS NEAR PICTURE BUTTE. LATER HE DROVE HORSES THAT PULLED COAL CARTS IN THE SHAUGHNESSY UNDERGROUND MINE. PLAYING THE VIOLIN BROUGHT HIM MUCH JOY, MANY FRIENDS, AND HIS WIFE ANGELIKA. HE OFTEN WENT TO GALT GARDENS AFTER WORK TO PLAY HIS MUSIC AND SOON MET ANGIE, A YOUNG WOMAN RECENTLY ARRIVED FROM GERMANY. FEARING THE DANGEROUS WORK IN THE MINE, ANGIE DEMANDED THAT TONY FIND SAFER WORK ONCE THEY WERE MARRIED. INITIALLY HE WORKED FOR ELLISON MILLING COMPANY, BUT CANADIAN DRESSED MEAT PACKING HOUSE (BURNS MEATS) OFFERED $.08 MORE AN HOUR, SO HE SWITCHED EMPLOYMENT. HE WORKED THERE UNTIL HE RETIRED 27 YEARS LATER. ANGIE WORKED AT THE HOSPITAL AND THEN AS A TAILOR FOR SIMPSON SEARS DURING THAT SAME TIME PERIOD. TOGETHER THEY RAISED FOUR GIRLS.” THE INFORMATION THAT WAS PRESENTED ON THE TEXT PANEL WAS SOURCED FROM AN ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY AIKENS ON 8 JULY 2015. IN THAT INTERVIEW – STORED AT THE GALT ARCHIVES (20151076) – HORVATH SAID THAT HE WAS BORN IN THE BALKAN PENINSULA. HE SPOKE OF THE UNREST DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND RECALLED SEEING THE BOMBING FROM ALLIES, SAYING “THE GROUND WAS SHAKEN.” HE REMEMBERED THE PUBLIC EXECUTIONS, MASS BURIALS, AND THE WOUNDED PEOPLE IN THE STREETS. IN THE INTERVIEW, HE DESCRIBED HOW THE QUALITY OF LIFE WAS NOT MUCH BETTER FOLLOWING THE WAR, DURING THE YEARS 1945 TO 1950. THERE WERE HARDSHIPS, SUCH AS LONG LINES FOR BREAD, AND THE CONFLICT HAD MADE FINDING GOOD WORK DIFFICULT FOR HORVATH – A HUNGARIAN, AND THEREFORE AN ETHNIC MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA. SOON AFTER HE STARTED HIS JOURNEY TO CANADA IN 1951, WHICH HE DESCRIBED TO GREATER DEPTH IN THE INTERVIEW. ON 5 JULY 2013, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HORVATH IN HIS HOME TO SPEAK ABOUT THE DONATION OF AN ARTIFACT (P20120044000) BY THE MEZEI ORCHESTRA, WHICH HORVATH WAS INVOLVED IN. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: "I [WAS] BORN IN [THE 24TH OF JANUARY] 1931 AND THE SERBS OCCUPIED HUNGARY… SO I BORN ACTUALLY IN YUGOSLAVIA, AND THEN, IN 1939, WHEN THE WAR BROKE OUT – THE SECOND WORLD WAR – IN 1940, THE HUNGARIANS TOOK [IT] BACK… FROM SERBIA. AND IT WAS AGAIN HUNGARY UNTIL 1945, TILL THE WAR FINISHED. [ETHNICALLY HUNGARIAN,] I BECAME A NATIONAL MINORITY IN MY OWN COUNTRY… [A] NATIONAL MINORITY IN YUGOSLAVIA, BUT IT’S NOT YUGOSLAVIA ANYMORE. IT FALL APART AND IT’S AGAIN SERBIA.” IN THE INTERVIEW, HORVATH EXPLAINED, “I ENDED UP BACK AT HOME ABOUT 3 MONTHS BEFORE THE END OF THE [SECOND WORLD] WAR, BACK TO SERBIA TO A CITY CALLED SRBOBRAN. THE CIRCUMSTANCES WAS THAT THE LIFE STANDARD WAS POOR… BEFORE I CAME TO CANADA, I GOT A JOB IN ALEXANDERONKOVICH FACTORY, TORPEDO AND BOMBS AND ALL THAT. I WAS 18 MONTHS WORKING THERE, AND THEN I STARTED TO INVESTIGATE HOW COULD I COME OUT FROM THAT COUNTRY… I DECIDED… I [COULD] APPLY OFFICIALLY TO GIVE UP MY CITIZENSHIP – YUGOSLAVIAN CITIZENSHIP – AND [BECOME] OFFICIALLY [AN] ETHNIC MINORITY… I APPLIED TO EMIGRATE FROM SERBIA, AND I ENDED UP IN AUSTRIA AND FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMENHAVEN, A DISPLACED PERSON I [INDICATED I WAS], BUT ACTUALLY I WASN’T. I WAS A REAL IMMIGRANT BECAUSE I CAME WITH LEGAL PAPERS TO CANADA. IN 1951, I CAME TO CANADA, AND ENDED UP IN THE SUGAR BEETS, I EARNED A LIVING AS A LABOURER – CLEANING… COW STALLS, AND SO FORTH. I MET MY WIFE IN ’53. SHE IS FROM GERMANY. WE GOT MARRIED IN ’54, AND FORTUNATELY, WE HAVE 4 GROWN-UP DAUGHTERS BETWEEN US.” HORVATH ELABORATED ON HIS IMMIGRATION EXPERIENCE, “I HAD AUSTRALIAN OPTION. BUT THE CANADIAN CONSUL SENT MOVIES, PICTURES, ADVERTISEMENTS... [AND THEN] IN 1 MONTH, I WAS IN CANADA. FROM AUSTRIA TO BREMERHAVEN, IN GERMANY, IN 2-3 WEEKS, I WAS READY TO COME TO CANADA. [I] ENDED UP IN MONTREAL. THERE [WERE] STILL CAMPS FOR PRISONER OF WARS FROM THE SECOND WORLD WAR, LIKE GERMANS AND ALL THE OTHER, AND I WAS IN THERE FOR ABOUT 6 MONTHS, IN MONTREAL, FROM THERE, SOME FARMERS WERE LOOKING FOR LABOURERS. THEY ASKED ME DID I WANT TO COME TO ALBERTA. I DIDN’T KNOW ALBERTA. BIG DEAL, ALBERTA. I WASN’T SURE AT ALL, BUT WHEN I WAS TRAVELLING DAY AND NIGHT FROM THERE, TO GET TO EDMONTON FIRST, A FARMER WAS WAITING FOR ME, FROM VERMILION. I STILL REMEMBER THE NAME, BOB HOLDEN. HE WAS FROM ENGLAND, I THINK, PREVIOUSLY. HE HAD A FARM THERE AND HE NEEDED A LABOURER. I WAS A LABOURER, BUT WHEN THEY FOUND OUT I CAN PLAY THE MUSIC, FIRST I HAD A BEET SHACK. THEN THEY TOOK ME INTO HIS HOUSE. HE DIDN’T PAY MUCH. THE NEIGHBOUR [IN VERMILION] OVER THERE WAS A HUNGARIAN OLD FARMER. HE SAID TO ME, ‘SON, DON’T STAY HERE, GO TO LETHBRIDGE. THERE IS LOTS OF HUNGARIANS [THERE], AND YOU CAN GO TO THE SUGAR BEETS [FIELDS], AND YOU CAN MEET FRIENDS OVER THERE,’ AND SO ON. I HAD $15.00 IN MY POCKET BECAUSE THE FARMER DEDUCTED MY JEANS, WHAT HE BOUGHT, I CALLED THEM ‘COWBOY JEANS.' AND I ONLY HAD $15.00 LEFT, SO I HITCHHIKED FROM VERMILION ALL THE WAY ‘TIL I GET TO LETHBRIDGE I STILL HAVE SOME MONEY LEFT, AND I ENDED UP IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S PLACE, WORKING IN THE SUGAR BEETS.” “IT WAS DIFFICULT AT THE BEGINNING… THE LANGUAGE…,” HORVATH EXPLAINED, “… VERY HARD BECAUSE HUNGARIAN DOESN’T HAVE A SIMILAR WORD WITH ENGLISH; GERMAN IS ABOUT 30%, SO I THANK MY WIFE; SHE LEARNED QUICKER THAN I DID, BUT, NOW, I AM O.K. I CAN GET BY.” WHEN HE FIRST CAME TO CANADA, HORVATH SAID, “I DIDN’T WANT TO BELIEVE [IT]. I THOUGHT IT’S A HEAVEN BECAUSE EVERYONE WAS FRIENDLY, NICE, YOU KNOW. MIND YOU, I WASN’T ASSOCIATING VERY MUCH WITH THE YOUNG MEN, 18-19 YEARS OLD, YOU KNOW.” HE TOLD AITKENS IN 2015 THAT HE DID NOT BRING MUCH ELSE. HE STATES, “[I] ESPECIALLY [DIDN’T BRING] MONEY. NO MONEY… EXCEPT WHAT IS WORTH NOTHING. INFLATION MONEY BY THE HUNDRED THOUSAND, MILLION, TEN MILLION… WHATEVER I HAD I GAVE TO THE OTHER MUSEUM THAT WAS IN THE GALT GARDEN (GURNEY MUSEUM)… INFLATED. THAT’S WHAT WE CALLED IT. THAT WAS INFLATION MONEY. IT WAS SO MANY, PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW THE NUMBER. THEY JUST SAID, ‘5 YELLOW, 2 GREEN AND…’ YOU KNOW? JUST BY THE COLOUR. THE NUMBER WAS IN MILLIONS AND BILLIONS AND HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS. PEOPLE DIDN’T KNOW. NO VALUE. YOU COULD USE IT FOR BATHROOM.” INTERNET RESEARCH STATES THAT THE PENGO WAS THE CURRENCY OF HUNGARY FROM 1927 TO 1946 AND EXPERIENCED THE MOST SERIOUS HYPERINFLATION RECORDED (SOURCE ACCESSED 10 MAY 2018). HORVATH REMEMBERED THE BELONGINGS HE BROUGHT WITH HIM IN HIS IMMIGRATION TO CANADA. IN BOTH THE 2015 INTERVIEW WITH AITKENS AND THE 2013 INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, HE SPEAKS OF HIS VIOLIN. IN 2013, HE TOLD MACLEAN, “IT WAS A FAMILY VIOLIN. ACTUALLY, MY UNCLE, THE VERY FIRST ONE, I GOT IT FROM HIM, AND, OF COURSE IT WAS LAYING IN THE HOUSE TILL I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, AND THEY DIDN’T WANT ME TO FOOL AROUND WITH IT, TO BREAK IT OR WHATEVER, SO I GOT A SMALLER SIZE OF VIOLIN, HALF A SIZE, AND LATER, I GOT THAT BACK AND I BROUGHT IT WITH ME TO CANADA. THE VIOLIN GAVE ME OPPORTUNITIES NEVER TO BE ALONE. I HAD FRIENDS ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD PARTIES ON ACCOUNT OF THE VIOLIN; I HAD FOOD; I HAD DRINK; AND I HAD GOOD TIME. IT WAS MY BEST PARTNER AND BEST FRIEND. THAT’S HOW I MET MY WIFE, WITH MY VIOLIN CASE UNDER MY ARM, AT LETHBRIDGE GALT GARDEN.” HE REMEMBERED BEING IMMEDIATELY EMBRACED BY THE HUNGARIAN COMMUNITY IN THE AREA: “IN PICTURE BUTTE, JOE SCHAEFFER’S NEIGHBOUR, MR. GABOR GENCSI, HEARD ME PLAYING, [AND] HE TOOK ME OVER. HE SAYS, ‘YOU DON’T WORK THAT HARD IN THE SUGAR BEETS. COME TO ME.’ HE HAD A WIFE BUT THEY HAD NO CHILDREN, AND HE SAYS THAT THEY ARE GOING TO ADOPT ME TO STAY. I SAYS, ‘NO, I CANNOT BE ADOPTED. I HAD MOTHER AND FATHER.’ BUT, WHEN HE HEARD ME PLAYING, I WENT OVER TO HIS PLACE – THE NEIGHBOUR[ING] FARM – HE GAVE ME $100.00 IN ONE BILL. I DIDN’T KNOW HOW MUCH IT WAS WORTH, AND HE SAID YOU ARE GOING TO GET THAT EVERY MONTH, AS LONG AS YOU ARE HERE, BUT YOU HAVE TO PLAY IN THE EVENING TO ME AND TO MY WIFE. THEN I KEPT ON PLAYING EVERY NIGHT. IT WAS A GOOD CHANCE FOR PRACTICE, YOU KNOW. THEY GAVE ME THE FIRST BEDROOM, AND THEY WENT TO THE SMALLER BEDROOM JUST TO TREAT ME WELL, FREE BOARD, FREE ROOM, JUST TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE EVENING. SOMETIMES I WENT OUT AND DROVE THE HORSES WHEN HE WAS THROWING THE BALES ON THE WAGON, SO I HAD A VERY GOOD TREAT, AND A VERY GOOD CHANCE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN.” HORVATH ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN GETTING HIS PARENTS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA, WHERE THEY SET UP A NEW LIFE. HORVATH SAID, “IN 1948, WHEN MY DAD CAME BACK FROM, BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE ARMY, ON THE GERMAN SIDE. HE WAS A PRISONER OF WAR IN RUSSIA, AND HE CAME BACK IN 1948 FROM RUSSIAN PRISONER OF WAR CAMP. I FELT VERY SORRY FOR MY DAD BECAUSE EVERY TIME YOU WANTED TO ASK SOMETHING ABOUT THE WAR IN RUSSIA, HE NEVER WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT, NEVER, TO NOBODY. I DECIDED HERE, WHEN I WAS IN CANADA, THE BEST THING THEY WOULD COME OUT HERE, NO MATTER HOW OLD THEY ARE. THEY WERE VERY HAPPY… AND IN 1960 WHEN I WAS ALREADY ESTABLISHED HERE, AND MARRIED WITH CHILDREN, [I] BROUGHT MY FAMILY OUT, MY FATHER, MOTHER AND SISTER, WHO IS LIVING NOW IN STIRLING, ALBERTA. AND, THEY [WERE] ALREADY WAS IN THEIR 60’S WHEN I BROUGHT THEM OUT, BUT THEY MANAGED TO ESTABLISH THEMSELVES A GOOD LIFE HERE TOO ON 80 ACRES…” OF HIS IMMIGRATION STORY, HE TOLD AITKENS, “[IT WAS EXCITING TO] ME – TRAVELLING HALF OF EUROPE WITH NO MONEY IN THE POCKET, EXCEPT HAVING THE FIDDLE IN YOUR HAND…” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE TEXT PANEL COPY. FOR INFORMATION REGARDING HORVATH’S INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN IN 2013, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20120044000.
Catalogue Number
P20160006003
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, ALEXANDRIEN"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, ALEXANDRIEN"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
14.4
Length
22
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING THAT DEPICTS A SCENE FROM A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. TOMB WITH CROSS IN FOREGROUND WITH MULTIPLE TENTS BEHIND. SEA IN THE BACKGROUND. THE TITLE, "K. G. LAGER, ALEXANDRIEN," IS WRITTEN IN THE BOTTOM LEFT AND THE ARTIST'S SIGNATURE, "K. ENGEL" IS IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD/EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE TITLE OF THIS WORK IS "K. G. LAGER ALEXANRIEN". K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THIS SCENE IS A DEPICTION OF A CAMP THAT ENGEL MOST LIKELY SPENT TIME IN BEFORE BEING TRANSFERED TO CANADA IN 1942. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010001
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, HELUAN, KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, HELUAN, KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
14.6
Length
22.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING THAT DEPICTS A SCENE FROM A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT. THE IMAGE INCLUDES TENTS, A PLATFORM WITH A WATER TAP, AND MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. THE WORK IS TITLED "K. G. LAGER, HELUAN KAIRO" IN BOTTOM LEFT CORNER AND SIGNED BY ARTIST, "K. ENGEL" ON BOTTOM RIGHT. BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51" IN A CIRCULAR STAMP. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; SLIGHT STAINING IN THE UPPER LEFT QUADRANT OF THE FRONT; PENCIL MARK ON THE UPPER LEFT EDGE OF BACK.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE TITLE OF THIS WORK IS "K. G. LAGER ALEXANRIEN". K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THIS SCENE IS A DEPICTION OF A CAMP THAT ENGEL MOST LIKELY SPENT TIME IN BEFORE BEING TRANSFERED TO CANADA IN 1942. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010002
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K.G. LAGER, HELUAN, KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K.G. LAGER, HELUAN, KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
17.7
Length
25.4
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER DEPICTING A SCENE OF A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT. THE IMAGE INCLUDES TENTS AND A WATER TAP ON A PLATFORM WITH MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. THE PAINTING IS TITLED "K. G. LAGER, HELUAN, KAIRO" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER AND IS SIGNED BY THE ARTIST, "K. ENGEL" IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THERE IS A CIRCULAR CENSOR STAMP ON THE BACK SIDE THAT READS "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: MARKS ACROSS EACH CORNER ON THE FRONT SIDE; FOXING ON THE BOTTOM LEFT QUADRANT OF WORK AND ALONG THE UPPER BACK EDGE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE TITLE OF THIS WORK IS "K. G. LAGER ALEXANRIEN". K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THIS SCENE IS A DEPICTION OF A CAMP THAT ENGEL MOST LIKELY SPENT TIME IN BEFORE BEING TRANSFERED TO CANADA IN 1942. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010003
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER KAIRO"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
22
Length
29.3
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER DEPICTING A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT. THE SCENE HAS A WATER TAP ON A PLATFORM WITH A CLOTHESLINE RUNNING FROM IT TO A POST OUTSIDE ONE OF THE FIVE TENTS DISPLAYED IN THE PAINTING. A FIGURE IS IN THE BACKGROUND AT A GUARD POST. MOUNTAINS ARE IN THE BACKGROUND ON THE RIGHT SIDE. THERE IS A BLANK BORDER AROUND ALL FOUR EDGES OF WORK. THE PAINTING IS TITLED "K. G. LAGER KAIRO" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND SIGNED BY THE ARTIST, "K. ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE HAS A CIRCULAR CENSOR STAMP THAT READS "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; FOXING IN UPPER RIGHT QUADRANT OF FRONT AND ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT OF BACK. SLIGHT WRINKLING AT THE EDGES.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE TITLE OF THIS WORK IS "K. G. LAGER ALEXANRIEN". K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THIS SCENE IS A DEPICTION OF A CAMP THAT ENGEL MOST LIKELY SPENT TIME IN BEFORE BEING TRANSFERED TO CANADA IN 1942. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010004
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ROM, KOLOSSEUM"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
INK, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ROM, KOLOSSEUM"
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1946
Materials
INK, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
18.2
Length
26.2
Description
INK PAINTING ON PAPER. THE PAINTING IS IN A SEPIA TONE RENDERING OF RUINS, ALONG WITH BUSHES AND TRESS. THERE IS A BLANK BORDER AROUND ALL FOUR SIDES. THE WORK IS TITLED, "ROM, KOLOSSEUM," ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND SIGNED BY ARTIST, "KARL ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES OF PAPER ARE SLIGHTLY WRINKLED. STAIN ON THE UPPER RIGHT QUADRANT OF THE BACK.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010005
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ROCKY MOUNTAINS, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CHARCOAL, GRAPHITE, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ROCKY MOUNTAINS, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
CHARCOAL, GRAPHITE, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.7
Length
30.5
Description
GRAPHITE AND CHARCOAL DRAWING ON PAPER. TREES IN FRONT OF MOUNTAINS SET IN BACKGROUND WITH ONE LARGER TREE IN FOREGROUND. WHITE CHARCOAL SMUDGING OVER THE SURFACE OF DRAWING. BLANK AREA OF PAPER BORDERING THE WORK. THE WORK IS SIGNED "ROCKY MOUNTAINS, KANADA" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND "KARL ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLECT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF THE PAPER; STAIN ON THE UPPER RIGHT EDGE; WRIKLE ON THE UPPER EDGE; RUBBING MARKS ON ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK SIDE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
MILITARY
FINE ARTS
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). HE WAS TRANSFERRED THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 IN OZADA IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS OF CANADA ON 25 JULY 1942. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010006
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER OZADA KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GRAPHITE. PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER OZADA KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
GRAPHITE. PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.8
Length
30.5
Description
GRAPHITE DRAWING ON PAPER. SCENE OF CAMP WITH 5 TENTS. CLOTHESLINE IN FOREGROUND. HILLS AND MOUNTAINS BEHIND CAMP. BLANK BORDER AROUND THE SCENE. THE WORK IS SIGNED "K. G. LAGER OZADA KANADA" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND "COP. KARL ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; MODERATE WRINKLING OF THE UPPER LEFT EDGE; OVERALL RUBBING AND WRINKING ON THE EDGES OF THE BACK.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 IN OZADA IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS OF CANADA ON 25 JULY 1942. THIS DRAWING, TITLED "K. G. LAGER OZADA KANADA," DEPICTS THAT CAMP. K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010007
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, OZADA, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GRAPHITE, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER, OZADA, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
GRAPHITE, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.9
Length
30.4
Description
GRAPHITE DRAWING ON PAPER DEPICTING SCENE OF THE CAMP IN OZADA. THE IMAGE INCLUDES TENTS, CLOTHESLINE, GUARD TOWER WITH HILLS AND MOUNTAINS IN BACKGROUND. BLANK BORDER AROUND THE SCENE. THE DRAWING IS SIGNED, "K. G. LAGER, OZADA, KANADA" IN THE BOTTOM LEFT AND THE ARTIST SIGNED THE WORK "KARL ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; WRINKLING AT CORNERS; AND FOLD AT THE TOP RIGHT CORNER. RUBBING MARKS ON ENTIRE SURFACE OF THE BACK SIDE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 IN OZADA IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS OF CANADA ON 25 JULY 1942. THIS DRAWING, TITLED "K. G. LAGER, OZADA, KANADA," DEPICTS THAT CAMP. K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A P.O.W., KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A P.O.W.. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A P.O.W. WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE P.O.W. CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED P.O.W. RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE P.O.W.’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010008
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

69 records – page 1 of 4.