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Other Name
BOXED, “B-D YALE, REGULAR POINT”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140027001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOXED, “B-D YALE, REGULAR POINT”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
4
Height
1.25
Length
7
Width
6.25
Description
SQUARE CARDBOARD BOX CONTAINING STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES IN PLASTIC TUBES. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. .A – BOX LID – BLUE AND WHITE WITH TEXT READING “B-D YALE, ONE DOZEN 25G ½”, REGULAR POINT HYPODERMIC NEEDLES”. TWO LIGHT BLUE PRICE STICKERS IN THE LOWER LEFT CORNER OF THE LID ARE STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “WOODWARD’S” AND TWO DIFFERENT PRICES. 1.1 X 7 X 6.25 .B – BOX BOTTOM – WHITE CARDBOARD WITH A NUMBER STAMPED IN BLUE INK ON BOTTOM: “37863C”. 1 X 6.8 X 6 .C – NEEDLES – SIX STAINLESS STEEL NEEDLES CLIPPED INTO THREE CLEAR PLASTIC TUBES, POINTED ENDS FACING INWARD, THAT ARE HELD TOGETHER WITH BEADS OF PLASTIC ALONG INNER EDGES. 0.75 X 6.5 X 2.75 .D – NEEDLES – TWO STAINLESS STEEL NEEDLES CLIPPED INTO ONE CLEAR PLASTIC TUBE, POINTED ENDS FACING INWARD. 0.75 X 6.5 X 0.75
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS BOX OF HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BELONGED TO THE DONOR, JIM JORDAN, WHO USED THEM AS PART OF HIS TREATMENT FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES FROM THE 1960S THROUGH THE 1980S. ON JULY 14, 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JORDAN ABOUT HIS PERSONAL HISTORY WITH THE DISEASE AND THE EVOLUTION OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS. JORDAN SAID: “I WAS BORN AND RAISED IN BELLEVUE IN THE CROWSNEST PASS… THEN I MOVED TO CALGARY [IN 1958]. I WORKED THERE FOR APPROXIMATELY A YEAR AND THEN THE ECONOMY CRASHED AND THERE WAS ACTUALLY NO EMPLOYMENT, SO I JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY FOR THREE YEARS… BEING RELEASED IN JUNE 1963 I RETURNED TO CALGARY AND WENT TO WORK FOR THE CITY OF CALGARY… I WASN’T FEELING TOO WELL. I HAD A COUPLE OF SORES ON MY FOOT SO I WENT TO THE DOCTOR AND HE DID SOME CHECKS ON ME… HE SAYS TO ME “I WANT YOU TO REPORT TO THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL THIS AFTERNOON AND WE’LL START DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT FOR WHAT WE CONTEMPLATE IS TYPE 1 DIABETES.”… I WAS ONLY 20 YEARS OLD. IN THOSE DAYS, THE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR A PERSON DIAGNOSED WITH DIABETES WAS APPROXIMATELY 20 YEARS, SO, I THOUGHT WELL, I’VE LIVED HALF MY LIFE ALREADY… THINGS IN THE WAY THEY TREATED DIABETES IN THOSE DAYS HAVE REALLY CHANGED SIGNIFICANTLY. SO MUCH SO THAT HERE I AM AT AGE 71. I’VE EXCEEDED WHAT THEY TOLD ME WAS MY LIFE EXPECTANCY, AND THAT’S BECAUSE OF THE IMPROVEMENTS THEY MADE IN SUGAR DIABETES CARE OVER THE YEARS.” JORDAN CONTINUED: “WHEN I WAS IN THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL, I BEFRIENDED A YOUNG WOMAN WHO WAS JUST A STUDENT NURSE, AND HER AND I BECAME CLOSE AND DATED FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER THAT… SHE WAS ON MY CASE EVERY TIME WE WENT ANYWHERE AND DID ANYTHING. IF I FELL OFF THE WAGON AT ALL [WITH DIET OR TREATMENT] SHE WAS ON MY CASE, AND IT EVENTUALLY GOT THROUGH TO ME WHAT SHE WAS SAYING… SOME OF THE PROBABILITIES OF WHAT COULD OCCUR TO YOU… YOUR KIDNEYS FAILING, YOUR EYES FAILING… I DIDN’T LIKE THE SOUNDS OF THINGS LIKE THAT… I BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT IF I WANTED TO LIVE PAST FORTY, I’D BETTER START MAKING SOME OF THESE CHANGES… YOU KNEW THAT IF YOU WENT OUT AT NIGHT AND HAD THAT HAMBURGER AND THAT BEER WITH THE GUYS… YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE DONE THAT… THE TYPES OF INSULIN THEY WERE USING WERE CHANGING, THE AMOUNT OF INSULIN THAT YOU WERE TAKING [AND] THE TIMES YOU WERE TAKING THE INSULINS… THEY WERE REFINING IT SO IT WORKED BETTER… WHEN I FIRST CAME DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE, IN THE 1980S] I WAS TAKING INSULIN ONCE A DAY. I WOULD WAKE IN THE MORNING, AND I WOULD READ TO MY BEDSIDE TABLE, AND THESE SYRINGES AND HYPODERMIC NEEDLES WERE SITTING THERE… PICK UP THE NEEDLES AND TAKE YOUR SHOT… THE GLASS SYRINGES AND STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BECAME A THING OF THE PAST [BY THE LATE 1980S]. THANK GOD FOR THAT BECAUSE THE NEW STUFF WAS A LOT EASIER TO USE… THEY ARE ANCIENT HISTORY AND I’M SURE IF THEY TRIED TO TREAT SOMEBODY TODAY WITH THOSE TYPE OF THINGS THEY WOULD SAY ‘WHOA, I DON’T LIKE THE LOOKS OF THOSE THINGS’, BECAUSE THEY’RE ALMOST LIKE PUNCHING YOURSELF WITH A TOOTHPICK RATHER THAN A NEEDLE… YOU HAD TO PROCESS THOSE GLASS SYRINGES… I WOULD TAKE THE APART AND PUT THEM IN A BATH OF WATER AND VINEGAR, AND BOIL THEM FOR ABOUT FIVE MINUTES… IT STERILIZED THEM, BUT IT ALSO KEPT THE SCALE FROM BUILDING UP ON THE PLUNGER OF THE SYRINGE SO THEY WORKED PROPERLY. THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLES… THEY WERE VERY EXPENSIVE… I USED TO USE THEM FOR APPROXIMATELY TWO WEEKS, AND THEY WOULD GET DULL BY THE END OF TWO WEEKS. THEY WERE ‘OUCH’ TO USE…” WHEN ASKED WHY HE SAVED THE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES LONG AFTER THEY HAD BEEN REPLACED BY NEW MEDICAL EQUIPMENT, JORDAN SAID: “I GUESS THEY SORT OF BECAME LIKE A KEEPSAKE. IN THOSE BOXES IS MY LIFE. IF I DIDN’T HAVE THOSE, I WOULDN’T BE HERE TODAY… AFTER I CHANGED FROM THOSE OLD GIMMICKS TO THE NEWER STYLE, I’D TAKE THEM OUT ABOUT ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS, AND LOOK AT THEM, AND SAY ‘I SHOULD JUST GET RID OF THOSE THINGS’… IT’S LIKE AN OLD POCKET KNIFE… I’M GOING TO HANG ONTO IT EVEN THOUGH IT’S DULL AND NO LONGER ANY USE… THERE IS A RITUAL. YOU GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND YOU WASH, AND YOU TAKE YOUR SHOTS, AND YOU GO DOWN AND EAT, AND THEN YOU START THE CLOCK TICKING… I THINK IT’S IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE SEE SOME HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL PROGRESS THAT’S BEEN MADE, IN THIS ONE PARTICULAR AREA… [THESE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES] ARE AN INTERESTING [ARTIFACT] OF HISTORY ABOUT DIABETES, AND HOW IT’S BEEN PROGRESSED AND LOOKED AFTER…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20140027001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASED, “CAUTION - PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140027002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASED, “CAUTION - PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Materials
GLASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Height
4.25
Length
14.5
Width
7.75
Description
OVAL-SHAPED PLASTIC CASE CONTAINING TWO GLASS SYRINGES, CUSHIONED WITH PIECE OF PINK TISSUE. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. .A – CASE – CLEAR PLASTIC LID HINGED TO WHITE PLASTIC BOTTOM. WHITE LABEL ON LID IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED FROM MOISTURE EXPOSURE, WITH BLACK TEXT READING “CAUTION – PERIODICALLY FLUSH PUMP WITH HOT SOAPY WATER TO CLEAN MECHANISM. DO NOT USE ‘CONCENTRATED’ ACIDS IODINE OR SILVER NITRATE – PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS – ALCOHOL BORIC SOL. ACETONE TR – METAPHEN M.E.K. TR – MERTHIOLATE – PERCHLOROETHYLENE 5% PHENOL BENZINE MERCUROCHROME CARBON TET TR – MERCRESIN ETHER TR – ZEPHIRAN”. BOTTOM OF CASE HAS RAISED LOGO READING “DUPONT”. 4.25 X 14.5 X 7.75 .B – SYRINGE – CLEAR GLASS SYRINGE WITH PLUNGER. BROWN VOLUME MARKINGS ALONG LENGTH OF BARREL, AND TEXT READING “B-D YALE INSULIN, MADE IN U.S.A., N 3608, FOR USE WITH U-100 INSULIN ONLY”. 1 X 11 X 1.25 .C - SYRINGE – CLEAR GLASS SYRINGE WITH PLUNGER. BROWN VOLUME MARKINGS ALONG LENGTH OF BARREL, AND TEXT READING “B-D YALE INSULIN, MADE IN U.S.A., O 3720, FOR USE WITH U-100 INSULIN ONLY”. 1 X 11 X 1.25
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THESE GLASS SYRINGES BELONGED TO THE DONOR, JIM JORDAN, WHO USED THEM AS PART OF HIS TREATMENT FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES FROM THE 1960S THROUGH THE 1980S. ON JULY 14, 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JORDAN ABOUT HIS PERSONAL HISTORY WITH THE DISEASE AND THE EVOLUTION OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS. JORDAN SAID: “I WAS BORN AND RAISED IN BELLEVUE IN THE CROWSNEST PASS… THEN I MOVED TO CALGARY [IN 1958]. I WORKED THERE FOR APPROXIMATELY A YEAR AND THEN THE ECONOMY CRASHED AND THERE WAS ACTUALLY NO EMPLOYMENT, SO I JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY FOR THREE YEARS… BEING RELEASED IN JUNE 1963 I RETURNED TO CALGARY AND WENT TO WORK FOR THE CITY OF CALGARY… I WASN’T FEELING TOO WELL. I HAD A COUPLE OF SORES ON MY FOOT SO I WENT TO THE DOCTOR AND HE DID SOME CHECKS ON ME… HE SAYS TO ME “I WANT YOU TO REPORT TO THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL THIS AFTERNOON AND WE’LL START DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT FOR WHAT WE CONTEMPLATE IS TYPE 1 DIABETES.”… I WAS ONLY 20 YEARS OLD. IN THOSE DAYS, THE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR A PERSON DIAGNOSED WITH DIABETES WAS APPROXIMATELY 20 YEARS, SO, I THOUGHT WELL, I’VE LIVED HALF MY LIFE ALREADY… THINGS IN THE WAY THEY TREATED DIABETES IN THOSE DAYS HAVE REALLY CHANGED SIGNIFICANTLY. SO MUCH SO THAT HERE I AM AT AGE 71. I’VE EXCEEDED WHAT THEY TOLD ME WAS MY LIFE EXPECTANCY, AND THAT’S BECAUSE OF THE IMPROVEMENTS THEY MADE IN SUGAR DIABETES CARE OVER THE YEARS.” JORDAN CONTINUED: “WHEN I WAS IN THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL, I BEFRIENDED A YOUNG WOMAN WHO WAS JUST A STUDENT NURSE, AND HER AND I BECAME CLOSE AND DATED FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER THAT… SHE WAS ON MY CASE EVERY TIME WE WENT ANYWHERE AND DID ANYTHING. IF I FELL OFF THE WAGON AT ALL [WITH DIET OR TREATMENT] SHE WAS ON MY CASE, AND IT EVENTUALLY GOT THROUGH TO ME WHAT SHE WAS SAYING… SOME OF THE PROBABILITIES OF WHAT COULD OCCUR TO YOU… YOUR KIDNEYS FAILING, YOUR EYES FAILING… I DIDN’T LIKE THE SOUNDS OF THINGS LIKE THAT… I BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT IF I WANTED TO LIVE PAST FORTY, I’D BETTER START MAKING SOME OF THESE CHANGES… YOU KNEW THAT IF YOU WENT OUT AT NIGHT AND HAD THAT HAMBURGER AND THAT BEER WITH THE GUYS… YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE DONE THAT… THE TYPES OF INSULIN THEY WERE USING WERE CHANGING, THE AMOUNT OF INSULIN THAT YOU WERE TAKING [AND] THE TIMES YOU WERE TAKING THE INSULINS… THEY WERE REFINING IT SO IT WORKED BETTER… WHEN I FIRST CAME DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE, IN THE 1980S] I WAS TAKING INSULIN ONCE A DAY. I WOULD WAKE IN THE MORNING, AND I WOULD READ TO MY BEDSIDE TABLE, AND THESE SYRINGES AND HYPODERMIC NEEDLES WERE SITTING THERE… PICK UP THE NEEDLES AND TAKE YOUR SHOT… THE GLASS SYRINGES AND STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BECAME A THING OF THE PAST [BY THE LATE 1980S]. THANK GOD FOR THAT BECAUSE THE NEW STUFF WAS A LOT EASIER TO USE… THEY ARE ANCIENT HISTORY AND I’M SURE IF THEY TRIED TO TREAT SOMEBODY TODAY WITH THOSE TYPE OF THINGS THEY WOULD SAY ‘WHOA, I DON’T LIKE THE LOOKS OF THOSE THINGS’, BECAUSE THEY’RE ALMOST LIKE PUNCHING YOURSELF WITH A TOOTHPICK RATHER THAN A NEEDLE… YOU HAD TO PROCESS THOSE GLASS SYRINGES… I WOULD TAKE THE APART AND PUT THEM IN A BATH OF WATER AND VINEGAR, AND BOIL THEM FOR ABOUT FIVE MINUTES… IT STERILIZED THEM, BUT IT ALSO KEPT THE SCALE FROM BUILDING UP ON THE PLUNGER OF THE SYRINGE SO THEY WORKED PROPERLY. THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLES… THEY WERE VERY EXPENSIVE… I USED TO USE THEM FOR APPROXIMATELY TWO WEEKS, AND THEY WOULD GET DULL BY THE END OF TWO WEEKS. THEY WERE ‘OUCH’ TO USE…” WHEN ASKED WHY HE SAVED THE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES LONG AFTER THEY HAD BEEN REPLACED BY NEW MEDICAL EQUIPMENT, JORDAN SAID: “I GUESS THEY SORT OF BECAME LIKE A KEEPSAKE. IN THOSE BOXES IS MY LIFE. IF I DIDN’T HAVE THOSE, I WOULDN’T BE HERE TODAY… AFTER I CHANGED FROM THOSE OLD GIMMICKS TO THE NEWER STYLE, I’D TAKE THEM OUT ABOUT ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS, AND LOOK AT THEM, AND SAY ‘I SHOULD JUST GET RID OF THOSE THINGS’… IT’S LIKE AN OLD POCKET KNIFE… I’M GOING TO HANG ONTO IT EVEN THOUGH IT’S DULL AND NO LONGER ANY USE… THERE IS A RITUAL. YOU GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND YOU WASH, AND YOU TAKE YOUR SHOTS, AND YOU GO DOWN AND EAT, AND THEN YOU START THE CLOCK TICKING… I THINK IT’S IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE SEE SOME HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL PROGRESS THAT’S BEEN MADE, IN THIS ONE PARTICULAR AREA… [THESE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES] ARE AN INTERESTING [ARTIFACT] OF HISTORY ABOUT DIABETES, AND HOW IT’S BEEN PROGRESSED AND LOOKED AFTER…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20140027002
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT W/ TUBE
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CARDBOARD, FOIL
Catalogue Number
P20130029002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT W/ TUBE
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1920
Materials
GLASS, CARDBOARD, FOIL
No. Pieces
4
Height
7
Diameter
3
Description
.A – TUBE – TIN CYLINDRICAL TUBE, LINED WITH CARDBOARD, WITH THREADED TOP RIM AND METAL BASE. A PAPER SHIPPING LABEL IS GLUED AROUND THE OUTSIDE, WITH PRINTED TEXT READING “FROM THE PALISADE MFG. CO. – 247-249 CLINTON AVENUE – WEST HOBOKEN, N. J.” AND TYPEWRITTEN TEXT READING “MRS. C. NELSON – 643 8TH ST., S. – LETHBRIDGE, ATLA.”. A RED STAMP WITH MALE FACE IN PROFILE AND TEXT READING “U.S. POSTAGE – 2 CENTS” IS GLUED ONTO THE LABEL. INSIDE CARDBOARD OF TUBE IS WORN; LABEL IS FADED AND PEELING AT EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 7 X 3 X 3 .B – TUBE CAP – TIN CIRCULAR CAP WITH THREADED EDGE. STAMPED TEXT CIRCLES AROUND TOP SIDE AND READS “IMPROVED MAILING CASE CO. – NEW YORK. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH GREY FELT. SOME WEAR AND DISCOLORATION; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 0.75 X 3 X 3 .C – BOTTLE – CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE STOPPED WITH CORK AND FILLED WITH DARK BROWN LIQUID. RAISED TEXT ON BOTTOM READS “TOURNADES KITCHEN BOUQUET”. GLUE AND PAPER RESIDUE ON SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 6.5 X 2.2 X 2.2 .D – BOTTLE CAP – FOIL CAP WRAPPER, PRINTED WITH BLUE TEXT ON WHITE BACKGROUND, READING “KITCHEN BOUQUET” ON TOP AND “GUARANTEED GENUINE – J. L. TOURNADE”. BOTTOM EDGE IS IRRIDESCENT PINK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 1.5 X 1.75 X 1.75
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS BOTTLE OF “KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT SAUCE BELONGED TO CHRISTINE NELSON HERRIOT, THE MOTHER-IN-LAW OF THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT HERRIOT AND HER FAMILY’S CONNECTION TO LETHBRIDGE WAS DEVELOPED WITH A GENEALOGY DOCUMENT PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT TIME OF DONATION, ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE W.F. NELSON FONDS AT GLENBOW ARCHIVES. CHRISTINE NELSON WAS BORN IN 1903 IN RUTLAND, VERMONT TO WILLIAM FREDRICK NELSON AND SARAH CROMWELL BRYAN. IN 1911 WILLIAM TOOK THE POSITION OF MANAGER AT THE ALBERTA LOAN AND INVESTMENT CO., AND THE FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. BY 1918 THE COMPANY HAD FAILED, AND WILLIAM OPENED A REAL ESTATE OFFICE, W.F. NELSON & CO., BUT DIED SUDDENLY OF HEART FAILURE THE FOLLOWING YEAR. SUSAN AND CHRISTINE WERE MENTIONED IN THE OCTOBER 19, 1920 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AS RELOCATING TO CALGARY, WHERE CHRISTINE WOULD MEET AND MARRY WILLIAM HAROLD HERRIOT IN 1928. THEIR DAUGHTER JOANNE LATER WED THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF “KITCHEN BOUQUET” WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FOUND ON WWW.COOKSINFO.COM. KITCHEN BOUQUET WAS DEVELOPED TO BE USED AS AN INGREDIENT IN COOKING, RATHER THAN AS A TABLE CONDIMENT. IT IS PRIMARILY USED FOR ITS ABILITY TO ADD A DARK BROWN COLOUR – A “BROWNING AGENT”. THE PRODUCT WAS FIRST DEVELOPED IN THE 1880S BY JULES L. TOURNADE’S PALISADE MANUFACTURING COMPANY IN WEST HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY. IT WAS ORIGINALLY MARKETED AS “TOURNADE’S KITCHEN BOUQUET”. IN 1923 KITCHEN BOUQUET BECAME A PART OF THE FOULDS COMPANY AS A RESULT OF A MERGER, AND SIX YEARS LATER BECAME ENCOMPASSED IN ANOTHER FOOD CONGLOMERATE, GROCERY STORE PRODUCTS INC. IN 1971 GROCERY STORE PRODUCTS INC. WAS PURCHASED BY THE CLOROX COMPANY, WHICH STILL PRODUCES AND DISTRIBUTES KITCHEN BOUQUET AT THE TIME OF THIS ARTIFACT’S ACQUISITION BY THE GALT MUSEUM. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS, FAMILY HISTORY, AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIALS.
Catalogue Number
P20130029002
Acquisition Date
2013-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BABY BOTTLE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20150013002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BABY BOTTLE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
17
Diameter
5
Description
CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE WITH NARROW NECK AND WIDE LIP. GRADUATED IN 1 TO 8 OUNCES. MULTI-FACETED WITH 6 SIDES. "PYREX" EMBOSSED VERTICALLY DOWN ONE SIDE AND HORIZONTALLY ACROSS 3 SIDES. THE 'R' IN 'PYREX' IS SHARED AND MARKS THE INTERESECTION OF THE TWO. FAINTLY EMBOSSED ALONG THE BOTTOM "58 N T.M. REG. U.S. PAT. OFF." AND ON BASE OF BOTTLE "MADE IN U.S.A."
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS NURSING BOTTLE BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013002
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150013005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
1
Diameter
3.3
Description
LIGHT BLUE PACIFIER WITH RUBBER NIPPLE. SIMPLE BLUE DISK WITH NIPPLE IN CENTRE. RUBBER NIPPLE HAS COLLAPSED ONTO ITSELF AND IS NOW STUCK TO THE BLUE DISK. SURFACE OF DISK HAS MANY SMALL SCRATCHES.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS PACIFIER WAS USED BY ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS AN INFANT AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN NOVEMBER 2015. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013005
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
53.5
Length
33.2
Width
25.5
Description
CREAM AND BLUE PLAID, TERRY CLOTH BIB. BOTTOM HALF OF BIB HAS A 9.5CM BLUE STRIPE. IN THE CENTRE OF THE STRIPE ARE THE WORDS "GOOD BOY" WITH FLOWERS ON EITHER SIDE. BIB TIES AROUND NECK WITH TWO ATTACHED CREAM COLOURED TIES. MEASUREMENTS OF BIB FROM TIE TIP TO BOTTOM IS 53.5CM, WHILE BIB ITSELF IS ONLY 33.2CM. SOME STAINING ON BIB, ESPECIALLY IN THE CENTRE, ABOVE 'GOOD BOY'.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS BIB BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
2010
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
43
Width
8.9
Description
WHITE ARMBAND WITH DIAGONAL STRIPES OF LIGHT BLUE, MEDIUM BLUE ON ONE SIDE AND GREEN ON THE OTHER END. IN CENTRE OF ARMBAND IS A SILK-SCREEN OF THE VANCOUVER 2010 OLPYMICS: "TORCH RELAY/RELAIS DE LA FLAMME - VANCOUVER 2010 - PRESENTED BY/PRESENTE PAR COCA-COLA, RBC, CANADA". FASTENS WITH BLACK VELCRO, WITH A LARGER LOOP SECTION (MEASURES 10.2CM WHILE THE HOOK SECTION IS ONLY 4CM). ON REVERSE OF HOOK SECTION IS ANOTHER SILK-SCREEN: "HUDSON'S BAY CO." WITH HBC COAT OF ARMS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
History
THIS ARMBAND RELATES TO THE 2010 OLYMPICS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, ANINE VONKEMAN, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JUNE 2015, ANINE SAID I “WAS HONOURED TO BE ACCEPTED AS A VOLUNTEER, A MEDIA HANDLER VOLUNTEER, ALONG WITH BOB COONEY FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNICATIONS AT THE TIME, WHO I REALLY RESPECT AND HE’S RESPECTED BY THE LOCAL MEDIA. AND SO HE AND I WORKED TOGETHER TO BE THE MEDIA HANDLERS FOR THE TORCH RELAY, WHICH IS A HUGE EVENT ... FROM A LOGISTICAL POINT OF VIEW AND IN TERMS OF DEALING WITH MEDIA IN THAT WAY. LIKE WE DO MEDIA PREVIEWS OF OUR EXHIBITS AND THEY’RE JUST TINY COMPARED TO WHAT AN UNDERTAKING THIS IS, BECAUSE IT WAS TELEVISED NATIONALLY AND ALL OF THAT AND ALL THE INFRASTRUCTURE THAT WAS SET UP FOR THE CELEBRATION AT HENDERSON LAKE.” THE ARMBAND ALLOWED ANINE ENTRY TO THE MEDIA PIT AND VOLUNTEER TENT AT HENDERSON LAKE. ANINE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT SHE WAS “EXCITED ABOUT BEING PART OF THE TORCH RELAY AND BECAUSE THE OLYMPICS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE AND SPORTS EVENTS IN GENERAL, DUTCH PEOPLE GO A LITTLE NUTS. SO, YOU KNOW, TO BE ABLE TO BE A PART OF THAT AND ALSO TO DEAL WITH THE MEDIA IN THAT WAY, WHICH WAS A BIG DEAL, WAS KIND OF REALLY INTERESTING.” ANINE KEPT THE ARMBAND, SAYING “IT’S AN IMPORTANT REMINDER OF BEING PART OF THAT. AND IT WAS AN IMPORTANT EVENT IN LETHBRIDGE TO BE ON THE TORCH RELAY ROUTE FOR THE OLYMPIC FLAME.” ANINE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1967 AND EMIGRATED TO CANADA WITH HER PARENTS (WIM AND TRUDY) AND TWO BROTHERS (ALWIN AND HERWIN) IN NOVEMBER 1981, FOLLOWING A FAMILY VACATION TO CANADA IN 1979. HER FAMILY SETTLED IN THE PICTURE BUTTE AREA TO FARM. HER FATHER HELPED TO ESTABLISH THE DUTCH-CANADIAN CLUB AND THE GALT 8 MINE SOCIETY. ANINE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1986 TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) AND STARTED WORKING AT SAAG IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004 ANINE WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND SEE P20150005000 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, RIBBON, SEQUINS, FOIL, STYROFOAM, FELT, COTTON, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20150022004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1998
Materials
PAPER, RIBBON, SEQUINS, FOIL, STYROFOAM, FELT, COTTON, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
7
Height
17
Diameter
8
Description
ALL CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS HAVE A ROUND STYROFOAM CENTRE. A: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. GOLD PAPER ON BODY, GATHERED AT THE TOP, WITH NARROW GOLD RIBBON (WITH PURPLE SPOTS PAINTED ON) AND WITH WIDE, FLEXIBLE GOLD RIBBON, WITH SMALL STARS IN THE FABRIC. SMALL SILVER COLOURED BUTTERFLY EARRING AFFIXED ON ONE OF FOUR PIECES OF WIDE GOLD RIBBON. HAND DRAWN MISTLETOE ALL THE WAY AROUND ORNAMENT, BELOW THE RIBBON. METAL WIRE FOR HANGING ORNAMENT. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "LYNNE GREGSON 'CAN YOU FIND THE BUTTERFLY?'" DESIGNED BY LYNNE GREGSON, AN ARTIST KNOWN FOR HIDING BUTTERFLIES WITHIN HER WORKS. VERY GOOD CONDITION. B: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. GOLD SEQUINS ON BODY, WITH BLACK SEQUINS FORMING A JUDO BELT AROUND CENTRE OF ORNAMENT. TOPPED WITH FLEXIBLE GOLD FABRIC RIBBON AND FLEXIBLE GOLD WIRE WITH PLASTIC GOLD COLOURED STARS ATTACHED. CANADIAN OLYMPIC PIN ON GOLD FABRIC RIBBON, ABOVE TIE OF BLACK BELT. METAL WIRE FOR HANGING ORNAMENT. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "JOE MELI". DESIGNED BY JOE MELI, A FOUR TIME OLYMPIAN. VERY GOOD CONDITION. C: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. GOLD AND SILVER COLOURED. BODY PRIMARILY MADE OF SILVER COLOURED STRAIGHT PINS, PUSHED INTO STYROFOAM BALL. VERTICLE STRIPES AROUND BALL: EIGHT STRIPES OF A SILVER/GOLD/BLACK RIBBON, FOUR STRIPES OF SILVER STRAIGHT PINS, AND FOUR STRIPES OF SILVER STRAIGHT PINS, WITH GOLD COLOURED THUMB TACKS. GOLD THREAD WOVEN ALL AROUND BALL. SILVER COLOURED CORDING FOR HANGING ORNAMENT. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "LESLIE ROBINSON-GREENE '98" DESIGNED BY LESLIE ROBINSON-GREENE, A COSTUMER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DRAMA DEPARTMENT. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD THREAD LOOSE IN PLACES, BUT IS STILL ATTACHED TO ORNAMENT. D: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. GREEN SEQUINS WITH WHITE STRAIGHT PINS PUSHED INTO STYROFOAM BALL. WHITE SATIN ROSETTES AT TOP OF ORNAMENT. METAL WIRE FOR HANGING ATTACHED TO VERY NARROW WHITE SATIN RIBBON. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "FIRST SNOWFLAKES - DORY ROSSITER" DESIGNED BY DORY ROSSITER, A BROADCASTER WITH CTV NEWS. VERY GOOD CONDITION. E: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. BLUE FOIL PAPER BODY. SINGLE PIECE OF NARROW SILVER COLOURED RIBBON VERTICALLY AROUND ORNAMENT. STRAND OF PLASTIC CHRISTMAS LIGHTS VERTICALLY AROUND ORNAMENT, PERPENDICULAR TO SILVER RIBBON. LIGHTS ARE RED, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, AND PURPLE. STRAND OF LIGHTS GATHERED AT THE TOP OF ORNAMENT, WITH FIVE METAL BELLS (2 VERY SMALL, 2 SMALL, 1 MEDIUM SIZED), AND TWO PLASTIC, GOLD-COLOURED VIOLINS. SEVENTEEN SILVER COLOURED 16TH-NOTES STUCK ONTO BLUE FOIL. SILVER RIBBON FOR HANGING. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "MIKE LEBLANC CJOC" DESIGNED BY MIKE LEBLANC, WHO WORKED FOR CJOC. VERY GOOD CONDITION. APPEARS THAT SEVERAL 16TH-NOTES HAVE FALLEN OFF OVER THE YEARS. FOIL IS SILVER WHERE THESE NOTES HAVE FALLEN OFF. SOME GLUE REMAINS IN THESE LOCATIONS. F: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. BLUE SPARKLES, WITH GOLD COLOURED "CFCN - CTV" PINS STUCK INTO THE STYROFOAM BALL. SEVERAL ITEMS DEOCRATE THE TOP OF THE ORNAMENT: GOLD COLOURED PINECONE; THREE PLASTIC PINE SPRIGS; GREEN PLASTIC LEAVES WITH SPARKLES; BLUE PLASTIC APPLE WITH SPARKLES; FOUR BLUE BERRIES ON LONG GREEN STEMS; GOLD COLOURED MICROPHONE; AND A SMALL, BLUE, FOIL WRAPPED (WITH GOLD STRING RIBBON) GIFT. NO HANGING SYSTEM. SMALL PAPER TAG ATTACHED READS: "TERRY VOGT, CFCN-TV" DESIGNED BY TERRY VOGT, WHO WORKED AT CFCN. (AS OF 2016, HE REMAINS WITH CTV NEWS) GOOD CONDITION. SPARKLES COME OFF WITH MINIMAL HANDLING. G: CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT. OFF-WHITE COTTON FABRIC, STRAIGHT PINNED ONTO STYROFOAM BALL AT TOP. FABRIC HANGS DOWN, LEAVING STYROFOAM EXPOSED AT BOTTOM OF ORNAMENT. PIECE OF BLACK STRING TIED WITH A SQUARE KNOT, HORIZONTALLY AROUND ORNAMENT. TOPPED WITH A LARGE WHITE POM-POM, ON TOP OF WHICH IS A HAT MADE OF RED FELT, A SMALL WHITE POM-POM, AND WHITE PIPE CLEANER. GIVES THE APPEARANCE OF SANTA WEARING A JUDOGI. WRITTEN ON FRONT OF JUDOGI: "LETHBRIDGE JUDO CLUB" WITH JAPANESE CHARACTERS ON REVERSE. NO PAPER TAG ATTACHED. DESIGNED BY YOSH SENDA, FOUNDER OF THE LETHBRIDGE KYODOKAN JUDO CLUB. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: LARGE POM-POM VERY LOOSELY ATTACHED TO MAIN PART OF ORNAMENT.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THESE CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS CAME FROM A HOLIDAY ARTISTAN MARKET HELD AT THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY (SAAG) WHERE THE DONOR WORKED (FROM 1992-2003). IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, ANINE VONKEMAN, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JUNE 2015, ANINE EXPLAINED THAT THE ORNAMENTS CAME FROM A “CELEBRITY CHRISTMAS TREE RAFFLE … WE WOULD GO INTO THE COMMUNITY AND ASK LOCAL CELEBRITIES … TO DECORATE AN ORNAMENT OF CHOICE ... AND SO THIS PARTICULAR YEAR, IT WAS A STYROFOAM BALL.” THE TREE AND ORNAMENTS WERE RAFFLED OFF AND ANINE’S FATHER, WIM, WON. SHE RECOUNTED THE EVENT SAYING: “MY PARENTS CAME TO THE SALE RELIGIOUSLY EVERY YEAR AND THEY WOULD BUY THEIR RAFFLE TICKET. AND BRIAN GALLANT WAS SANTA, WHO’S A VOLUNTEER FOR SAAG … AND IT WAS HIS JOB TO PULL THE RAFFLE TICKET OUT TO ANNOUNCE THE WINNTER. AND AT THIS PARTICULAR EVENT, MASON [DONOR’S SON] WAS THERE, AND HE WAS JUST LITTLE AND SO SANTA LET MASON PULL THE NAME … AND SANTA GAVE IT TO ME TO ANNOUNCE ON THE MIC TO EVERYBODY WHO WAS THERE WHO HAD WONT THE TREE AND IT WAS MY DAD. SO INSTEAD OF SAYING, ‘AND THE WINNER OF THE TREE IS WIM VONKEMAN’ I SAID ‘THE WINNER OF THE TREE IS’ – AND THEN I LOOKED AT THE PIECE OF PAPER – ‘MY DAD!’ AND I GOT SOME FLACK OVER THAT FROM MY BOSS, JOAN STEBBINS AT THE TIME, BUT WHATEVER, IT WAS LEGITIMATE.” ANINE CONTINUED, SAYING “SO MY PARENTS PUT THE TREE UP IN THEIR HOUSE IN PICTURE BUTTE FOR YEARS AND THEN WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY AND MY MOM MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE IN 2008 SHE NEEDED TO DOWNSIZE SO SHE GAVE ME THE TREE. AND SOME OF THE ORNAMENTS HAD DETERIRORATED AND THEN AT MY HOUSE SOME OF THEM DETERIORATED EVEN FURTHER … THE ONES THAT I SALVAGED ARE OF PEOPLE THAT I THOUGHT WERE OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE TO THE COMMUNITY.” ANINE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1967 AND EMIGRATED TO CANADA WITH HER PARENTS (WIM AND TRUDY) AND TWO BROTHERS (ALWIN AND HERWIN) IN NOVEMBER 1981, FOLLOWING A FAMILY VACATION TO CANADA IN 1979. HER FAMILY SETTLED IN THE PICTURE BUTTE AREA TO FARM. HER FATHER HELPED TO ESTABLISH THE DUTCH-CANADIAN CLUB AND THE GALT 8 MINE SOCIETY. ANINE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1986 TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) AND STARTED WORKING AT SAAG IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004 ANINE WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND SEE P20150005000 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20150022004
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
No. Pieces
3
Height
34.5
Width
27
Diameter
21.5
Description
A: LARGE, GREEN AND SILVER PORTABLE THERMAL JUG. MAIN BODY OF THE JUG IS FOREST GREEN, WITH THE UPPER PORTION MADE OF SILVER COLOURED METAL. LARGE SILVER HANDLE ON SIDE AND TWO SILVER POSTS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, (POSSIBLY FOR A STRAP TO BE ATTACHED). INTERIOR IS LINED WITH GLASS. "WILLOUGHBY" WRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER ON BOTTOM. B: REMOVABLE LID IS METAL AND CORK, WITH A METAL SECTION ON THE INSIDE TO PROTECT THE CORK FROM THE LIQUID WITHIN. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ON TOP HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE SCREWED INTO THE LID, TO KEEP THE LID IN PLACE. C: SMALL CORK STOPPER IN THE SPOUT ON THE LID. JUG HAS BEEN WELL USED. GREEN PORTION IS IN GOOD CONDITION, WITH ONLY A FEW SPOTS WHERE THE FINISH HAS WORN OFF. UPPER SILVER PORTION HAS SEVERAL SEVERAL DENTS, SCUFF MARKS, AND A LARGE DRIP OF GREY PAINT. SIDE HANDLE HAS A YELLOW SUBSTANCE ON THE METAL. CORK IN LID DARK AND DISCOLOURED ON LOWER PORTION. INTERIOR METAL PORTION OF LID HAS COME AWAY FROM THE CORK SLIGHTLY. CORK STOPPER WELL WORN AND APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN HAND CARVED, POSSIBLY FROM A WINE CORK. INTERIOR GLASS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS WATER COOLER/THERMAL JUG USUALLY HELD LEMONADE, EITHER FROZEN OR POWERED “LEMON SQUASH”. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “DAD WOULD SELL POWDERED LEMON SQUASH. HE HAD A BIN OF IT IN THE BASEMENT OF THE STORE … HE WOULD PROVIDE IT FOR THE SOUTHMINSTER SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNICS … BUT WE HAD THE FROZEN LEMONADE TOO, THAT WAS A TREAT.” BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT. WE WOULD HAVE BUNS FROM ERICKSEN’S AND CARROT AND CELERY STICKS. THERE WAS OFTEN POTATO SALAD, BUT I DIDN’T CARE FOR IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS DESSERT, EVEN ON PICNICS – USUALLY HOMEMADE COOKIES. I’M SURE THERE WAS MORE, AS MUM WAS A GREAT COOK, BUT THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT STAND OUT.” THIS WATER COOLER IS PART OF A PICNIC SET, WHICH WAS USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
7
Height
36
Width
32.3
Diameter
29.5
Description
RED PLAID, 4-GALLON, CLYINDRICAL COOLER WITH RED HANDLE, REMOVABLE LID, PLASTIC SHELF INSERT, AND ICE PACKS. A: COOLER BODY. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE BOTTOM AND TOP OF COOLER IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. RED PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED ON ONE SIDE WITH A BLACK SCREW (MISSING ON OTHER SIDE). INSIDE OF COOLER IS SILVER COLOURED AND HAS A SMALL LIP 4.2CM DOWN FROM EDGE FOR THE SHELF (C) TO SIT ON. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. BLACK SCREW FOR ONE SIDE OF HANDLE MISSING. LARGE DENT IN CENTRE OF COOLER ON ONE SIDE. DENT DOES NOT EXTEND TO THE INSIDE OF THE COOLER. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS AND SCRATCHES IN THE PLAID SURFACE ALL OVER BODY OF COOLER. SILVER COLOURED LINING SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED. RUST MARKS ON THE BOTTOM OF COOLER FROM ICE PACKS. B: COOLER LID. CIRCULAR. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE OUTSIDE IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. SLIGHT INDENDATIONS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER MAKE HAND GRIPS TO REMOVE LID. INSIDE OF LID IS SILVER COLOURED. STAMPED ONTO INSIDE OF LID: "HAMILTON - THE SKOTCH KOOLER* - A PETRA CABOT DESIGN - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO, PAT. APP. FOR" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SURFACE HAS SOME SMALL SCRATCHES. A FEW WATER MARKS ON THE SURFACE. A FEW VERY SMALL DENTS ON THE INSIDE SURFACE. C: SHELF. CLEAR PLASTIC, CIRCULAR, REMOVABLE SHELF. HAS TWO INDENTED SECTIONS, OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, TO FACILITATE THE REMOVAL OF THE SHELF. GOOD CONDITION. PLASTIC IS SLIGHTLY OPAQUE FROM SCRATCHES. SMALL CRACK (5.5CM LONG) IN PLASTIC. SOME CIRCULAR RUST SPOTS ON SHELF. D-G: ICE PACKS. SMALL METAL CANS, RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AT JOINT OF CAN, THERE IS A 2.1CM STRIPE OF UNFINISHED METAL. TOPS AND BOTTOMS ARE TAN AND HAVE A YELLOW DOTTED LINE AROUND THE OUTSIDE. IN THE CENTRE READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - FREEZE AGAIN AND AGAIN - DO NOT OPEN". OTHER END READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOME SMALL SCRATCHES IN PLAID FINISH. EVIDENCE OF RUST ON TOPS AND BOTTOMS AND ALONG EXPOSED METAL SURFACE OF CAN.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS COOLER SET WAS ACQUIRED SOMETIME IN THE LATE 1950s. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER, KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB AND KIT BELIEVE THAT THE COOLER CAME FROM A WHOLESALE STORE LOCATED ON 5TH STREET, AND THAT THE STOREFRONT IS NOW OCCUPIED BY BREAD, MILK, AND HONEY (FORMERLY THE ROUND STREET CAFÉ). BARB RECALLED THAT “BECAUSE DAD HAD A RETAIL STORE HE COULD GO AND BUY THINGS THERE … AND THIS MAY HAVE COME FROM THERE OR IT MAY HAVE BEEN A PROMOTION THAT IF YOU BOUGHT SO MANY ITEMS FROM A PARTICULAR WHOLESALER, THAT THEY WOULD GIVE YOU STUFF … I DON’T THINK WE EVER ASKED WHERE IT CAME FROM. BUT IT WOULD BE IN THE LATE ‘50s THAT WE STARTED USING IT.” IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB SPECULATED THAT THE COOLER WAS “A PROMOTIONAL GIFT RECEIVED THROUGH THE DRUG STORE (LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOLTEL), BUT IT MAY HAVE BEEN PURCHASED IN THE LATE 50s.” THIS COOLER SET IS PART OF A LARGER SET OF PICNIC ITEMS THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WICKER, LEATHER, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
24.3
Length
51.5
Width
38.7
Description
RECTANGULAR, UNPAINTED WICKER PICNIC BASKET. TWO ADJUSTABLE HANDLES, ATTACHED TO BASKET WITH WICKER. HINGED LID, CLOSES WITH SIMPLE HOOK AND EYE CLOSURE. THERE ARE TWO THIN LEATHER STRIPS, WITH METAL BUCKLES, ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE LID. THESE STRAPS CONTINUE INTO THE BASKET AND HOLD A WOODEN ORGANIZATION INSERT TO THE UNDERSIDE THE INSIDE OF THE LID. INSERT HAS LEATHER STRAPS FOR PLATES AND CUTLERY. TWO PIECES OF LEATHER, AT EITHER END OF BASKET, ATTACH LID TO BASE. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD/EXCELLENT CONDITION. FRONT LEFT HANDLE ATTACHED WITH LEATHER STRING, RATHER THAN WICKER. BACK RIGHT HANDLE HAS A FEW SPOTS OF WHITE PAINT. LEATHER STRAPS HAVE A FEW MOISTURE STAINS.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS PICNIC BASKET WAS USED TO HOLD ALL OF THE GLASSES, DISHES, TABLECLOTH, ETC. NECESSARY FOR A PICNIC. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “WE DIDN’T HAVE THIS WHEN WE WERE KIDS … THEY ACQUIRED THAT, I THINK, WHEN WE STARTED HAVING FAMILY PICNICS IN THE ‘70s, ‘80s.” IN A SHORT NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB EXPLAIND THAT "I DON'T HAVE AS MANY MEMORIES OF THE PICNIC BASKET, AS I THINK THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ACQUIRED AFTER I LEFT HOME. IN MY CHILDHOOD, OUR PLATES AND OTHER SUPPLIES WERE SIMPLY PACKED IN A CARDBOARD BOX." THESE PICNIC ITEMS WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049003
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
52
Height
2.1
Length
27.1
Width
9.2
Diameter
0.4
Description
A: BOX OF STRAWS. BOX IS CARDBOARD, WITH A SMALL CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW. BACKGROUND OF BOX IS A LIGHT BROWN WOOD GRAIN PATTERN. "EXTRA-LONG STRAWS FOR EXTRA-TALL BOTTLED DRINKS - SWEETHEART EXTRA-LONG DRINKING STRAWS - 100-10 1/2" SWEETHEART STRAWS. MANUFACTURED BY THE IMPERIAL CONE COMPANY, LONDON - CANADA". ON REVERSE: "THE CONVENIENT SANITARY WAY TO DRINK ... MILK, ICED DRINKS, BOTTLED BEVERAGES". PRICE STAMPED ONTO TOP OF BOX, VERY FADED, APPEARS TO READ "2/35 CENTS". BOTTOM LEFT CORNER IS AN IMAGE OF A BOY IN A RED SHIRT DRINKING FROM A GLASS BOTTLE. BEHIND HIM ARE THREE ADULTS, 2 WOMEN IN DRESSES AND APRONS AND ONE MAN WITH A CHEF'S HAT. B-AAA: BOX CONTAINS 52 STRAWS: 18 ARE OFF-WHITE; 16 ARE LIGHT PINK; 15 ARE MEDIUM-LIGHT GREEN AND; 3 ARE BRIGHT ORANGE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THESE STRAWS ARE PART OF A PICNIC SET THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT "MOM ALWAYS HAD HER THERMOS OF COFFEE". BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT." THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB ELABORATED WRITING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
No. Pieces
7
Height
30
Diameter
31
Description
A: PRESSURE COOKER POT: STEEL POT WITH TWO BLACK WOODEN HANDLES. HANDLES ARE SCREWED TO LIP OF POT WITH TWO SCREWS EACH. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. BLACK RESIDUE, WATER STAINS, AND SCRATCHES ON OVERALL SURFACE OF POT FROM USE. THERE IS A FULL CRACK SEPARATING THE BACK END OF THE RIGHT HANDLE FROM THE POT. B: LID: STEEL LID 31.9CM (D) X 3.8CM (H). LID HAS ONE BLACK WOODEN HANDLE HELD IN PLACE BY TWO SCREWS. BOTH SIDES OF HANDLES HAVE VALVES FOR LETTING OFF/MANAGING PRESSURE. THE CENTER HAS A ROUND GAUGE WHICH READS BOTH PRESSURE (0 TO 20) AND TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT (228° TO 259°). IT READS "WARNING OPEN PETCOCK, EXHAUST STEAM…” GAUGE HAS SINGLE RED NEEDLE. IN FRONT OF GAUGE ON TOP OF LID READS, “IMPROVED KOOK / KWICK STEAM PRESSURE COOKER 22”. LID IS SECURED TO POT WITH REMOVABLE RING THAT IS TIGHTENED BY TURNING A SMALL HANDLE AT THE FRONT. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF LID AND BACKGROUND OF GAUGE IS YELLOWED. C: SEALING RING: 36 CM IN DIAMETER UNTIGHTENED. STEEL WITH A RUBBER KNOB AT THE OPENING. HINGE AT THE BACK SIDE OF THE RING. CLAMP AT FRONT IS TIGHTENED BY A METAL HANDLE. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF THE STEEL. D: COOKING RACK: 26.5 CM IN DIAMETER. CIRCULAR, METAL RACK WITH A CIRCLE OPENING AT THE CENTER AND A CURVED PATTERN OF TWO ROWS AROUND. THE RACK HAS 6 SECTIONS AROUND. THERE ARE RIDGES ALONG THE VERTICAL LINES ON ONE SIDE. THE OPPOSITE SIDE IS FLAT. THREE OF THE RIDGES HAVE SCREW HOLES ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE. E-G: 3 MASON JAR LID BANDS: ALL 8.5 CM IN DIAMETER. E IS MADE OUT OF A SILVER-COLOURED METAL. F AND G ARE MADE OUT OF GOLD-COLOURED METAL. POOR TO FAIR CONDITION FOR COMPONENTS D THROUGH G. ALL COMPONENTS ARE RUSTING WITH SIGNIFICANT MINERAL BUILD UP ON THEM. THERE IS FURTHER MATERIAL BUILD UP ON COMPONENTS E-G.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS PRESSURE COOKER IS EXTRACTED FROM A SEPTEMBER 2016 INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WITH THE ARTIFACT'S DONOR, JEANNETTE HOUTEKAMER: HOUTEKAMER CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE PRESSURE COOKER FROM HER AUNT, EUGENE SICOTTE: “WELL, FIRST OF ALL, I KNOW IT’S VERY OLD. IT CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT, WHO CAME TO THIS COUNTRY AS A YOUNG GIRL AND WAS LOCATED AROUND THE BEAVER MINE AREA… MUST [HAVE BEEN] LUNDBRECK. SHE WAS THERE WITH HER HUSBAND... SHE ALSO WAS A WONDERFUL COOK, AND SHE COOKED IN A LUMBER CAMP … HER FIRST MARRIED NAME WAS EUGENE (SIC) SICOTTE, MARRIED TO A PETE SICOTTE. [N.B. ALTERNATIVE SPELLING OF FIRST NAME EUGINE OR EUGENIE FROM OBITUARY AND LEGAL NOTICE] … SHE WAS WITH HIM FOR 17 YEARS... HOW SHE MET GEORGE ANDERSON, I’M NOT SURE, BUT HE WAS A FARMER PAST COALDALE - BARNWELL. THEY HAD A FARM UP THERE. AND SHE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER THAN HIM, BUT THEY MARRIED, AND DID VERY WELL. THEN THEY RETIRED AND MOVED TO THE CITY HERE… I IMAGINE THEY BOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] DOWN IN GREAT FALLS, BECAUSE HE HAD A SISTER WHO WAS DOWN IN SHELBY. AT THE TIME, IT WAS CONSIDERED MORE EXPENSIVE.” OF THE RELATIONSHIP SHE HAD WITH HER AUNT, HOUTEKAMER STATED: “[W]E WERE VERY CLOSE. THEY HAD NO FAMILY, SO THEY KIND OF ADOPTED MY HUSBAND [MARTIN HOUTEKAMER] AND I... WE DID A LOT OF THINGS FOR THEM WHEN THEY GOT OLDER... SHE WAS A FABULOUS COOK.” HOUTEKAMER’S AUNT’S NAME BECAME EUGENE ANDERSON UNDER HER SECOND MARRIAGE. SOMETIME DURING THE PERIOD AFTER THE EUGENE AND GEORGE ANDERSON MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND BEFORE THE PASSING OF MRS. ANDERSON IN 1968, HOUTEKAMER CAME TO ACQUIRE THE PRESSURE COOKER: “WELL, SHE JUST GOT TO THE POINT WHERE SHE WAS GETTING OLDER, AND SHE DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE. SHE HAD DONE A LOT PREVIOUS TO THAT. SHE CANNED EVERYTHING, EVEN MUSHROOMS … [SHE WAS A] FABULOUS COOK … SHE KNEW THAT I DID A LOT OF CANNING, SO SHE THOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD HELP." "MY HUSBAND DID A LOT OF FISHING, SO [WE] CANNED FISH, WHICH WAS THE BEST THING FOR IT. WHEN YOU CAN IT IN THERE, IT’S GOING TO BE GOOD… [HE CAUGHT FISH FROM] ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA. BEAVER MINES WAS ONE OF THE SPECIALS. IN FACT, HIS ASHES ARE IN POLICE LAKE. HE DID A LOT THERE AT POLICE LAKE AND LEE’S CREEK. DEPENDING [ON] HOW MANY FISH YOU HAD TO MAKE IT WORTHWHILE, I WOULD DO A CANNER OF IT. I USED THE SMALL FISH JARS, SO I COULD PACK THEM UP. I DID QUITE A FEW…” PRIOR TO OWNING A PRESSURE COOKER, HOUTEKAMER SAID SHE “USED A BIG CANNER. I HAD ONE THAT HELD 7 OR 8 QUARTS. THAT’S WHAT I DID - MOSTLY FRUIT. I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF VEGETABLES BECAUSE, BY THEN, YOU COULD START FREEZING STUFF. YOU KNOW, IT WAS STARTING TO GET MORE POPULAR.” HOUTEKAMER DID NOT LEARN A GREAT DEAL OF COOKING FROM HER AUNT, “BECAUSE I HAD LEARNED A LOT FROM MY MOTHER. SHE WAS A GOOD COOK. SHE EVEN MADE LEFTOVERS TASTE GOOD. SHE HAD HAD A LOT OF EXPERIENCE… WE DID A LOT OF PRESERVING IN HER DAY. THAT WAS ALL WE HAD AND IT WAS ALWAYS DONE IN A BOILER - A GOOD COPPER BOILER. THAT’S THE WAY YOU LEARNED. … FOR SOME THINGS [THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS BETTER THAN THE COPPER BOILER] BECAUSE MY VEGETABLES TAKE A VERY LONG TIME TO PRESERVE THROUGH BOILING. AND FISH, OH MY GOD, YOU WOULD BE THERE FOREVER TO BOIL, SO THIS [PRESSURE COOKER] IS MUCH BETTER, MUCH FASTER [AND] SAFER, AS WELL. IT WAS HEAVY WORK, MIND YOU. WHEN YOUR COOKER WAS DONE, WHEN YOUR TIME WAS DONE, IF YOU COULD LIFT IT AND TAKE IT OUTDOORS, YOU COULD THROW COLD WATER ON IT AND OPEN IT RIGHT AWAY. THEN YOU WOULD THROW THE CANS IN COLD WATER. FOR JARS, YOU HAD TO WAIT UNTIL IT WENT DOWN BY ITSELF. YOU COULDN’T OPEN IT UNTIL THEN OR ALL THE LIDS WOULD COME OFF.” FOR HOUTEKAMER, CANNING TOOK PLACE MOSTLY DURING THE FALL. SHE WAS ABLE TO PRESERVE A VARIETY OF FOOD WITH THIS PRESSURE COOKER: “I [CANNED] CHICKEN ONE YEAR, AND THAT WAS ENOUGH. WE ALWAYS HAD CHICKEN AROUND [AND] IT WAS BETTER FRESH. MY HUSBAND LOVED HIS FRESH CHICKENS. WE HAD OUR OWN GARDEN, AND SOMETIMES WE WOULD GET SOME CORN IN THE FALL [WHEN THE FARMERS WERE DOING THEIR THRESHING].” OF HER FAVOURITE VEGETABLES TO PRESERVE, HOUTEKAMER SAID, “BEANS, I GUESS. I WOULD GET A LOT OF BEANS. BEETS – I DID SOME – NOT CANNED. [I] DID A LOT OF PICKLES. BEANS WERE THE MAIN THING, AND CHICKEN, AND FISH. AND THAT WAS IT. I DID A LOT OF TOMATOES, BUT THEY WERE SIMPLER TO DO IN THE CANNER, BECAUSE THEY ONLY TAKE ABOUT 20 MINUTES… [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD BE PLACED ON [A] GAS OR ELECTRIC [STOVE]. WHEN THE TIME WAS DONE, YOU JUST SHUT THE STOVE OFF AND LET IT COME DOWN BY ITSELF… I USED TO JUST KNOW WHERE TO PUT THE STOVE AT, THE BURNER, TO KEEP [THE PRESSURE WHERE NEEDED]. YOU HAD TO BE CAREFUL. YOU COULDN’T JUST TURN YOUR BACK ON IT. YOU WOULDN’T WANT THAT. THAT WHOLE THING WOULD COME OFF, AND YOU WOULD HAVE ONE BIG MESS. … NO [THAT NEVER HAPPENED]. I ALWAYS WAS VERY CAREFUL – WATCHED IT CLOSE. I DON’T THINK [MESSES] EVER HAPPENED TO MY AUNT EITHER THAT I’M AWARE OF… MOST OF THE COOKBOOKS IN THOSE DAYS HAD INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT HOW MANY POUNDS TO USE FOR VEGETABLES. I THINK MY FISH WAS 15 POUNDS. FOLLOW THOSE INSTRUCTIONS AND IT WORKED FINE – [IT] DID A VERY GOOD JOB.” HOUTEKAMER WOULD USE THE PRESSURE COOKER AT HER HOME ON THE RESEARCH STATION AND THEN LATER AT HER HOME ON THE NORTH SIDE OF LETHBRIDGE: “… AT THE TIME WE LIVED ON THE RESEARCH STATION FOR TWENTY YEARS. AND I USED IT THERE. MY HUSBAND WORKED THERE, IN POULTRY RESEARCH. WE WERE POOR. WE DID A LOT OF CANNING AND ALWAYS HAD A GARDEN. THAT’S HOW IT CAME ABOUT … WE HAD A PLACE TO LIVE AND OUR OWN GARDEN.” THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS ACTIVELY USED BY HOUTEKAMER UNTIL HER HUSBAND’S DEATH IN 2005: “WELL, I DON’T THINK I’VE USED IT IN THE LAST 10 YEARS BECAUSE I’VE BEEN LIVING IN A CONDO. I JUST HAD IT SITTING AROUND, TOO HEAVY TO MOVE… I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE…” THIS ARTIFACT BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HER LATE HUSBAND: “WE ALWAYS DID A LOT OF FISHING TOGETHER. WHEN HE RETIRED, HE BOUGHT HIS BOAT. WE HAD A CAMPER VAN, SO WE COULD GO OUT AND STAY OVERNIGHT. WE HAD [THE] BOAT, SO WE COULD GO ONTO THE WATER [AND] TRY TO GET SOME FISH. THOSE DAYS, THERE WERE SO MANY FISH... IF YOU WERE LUCKY, YOU HAD A NICE BIG ONE THAT WOULD FILL ABOUT FIVE OR SIX JARS.” CANNING WAS A NECESSITY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION: “WELL, I GUESS IT’S OK IF YOU CAN AFFORD IT, BUT WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER, WE WERE VERY POOR, SO YOU DID WHAT HAD TO DO. KEEP GOING. EAT… MY GIRLS STILL DO SOME, BUT NOW, WITH THE NEW FANCY STOVES, YOU COULD NEVER USE THIS – TOO HEAVY. THE NEW STOVES – THEY JUST CAN’T PUT ANYTHING HEAVY ON THERE. I THINK IT’S KIND OF TOO BAD, BECAUSE A GARDEN IS NOT THAT HARD TO HAVE, AND YOU CAN GET AN AWFUL LOT OF GOOD FOOD OUT OF THERE – NATURAL FOOD, AND VERY HEALTHY FOOD. SOME PEOPLE JUST CAN’T BE BOTHERED. [IT'S] SIMPLER TO GO TO THE STORE… [MY AUNT] COULD HAVE PROBABLY SAID MORE, SHE DID A GREAT DEAL OF CANNING. SHE ALWAYS MADE SURE, WHEN THEY BUILT THEIR HOUSES, THAT THEY HAD A PLACE FOR PUTTING HER CANNED STUFF, WHERE SHE COULD KEEP IT COOLER IN THE SUMMER.” ACCORDING TO HER LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, MRS. EUGINE ANDERSON PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON JANUARY 18, 1968 AT THE AGE OF 85. HER SECOND HUSBAND, MR. GEORGE ANDERSON, PASSED AWAY IN CALGARY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1972 AT THE AGE OF 79. MRS. ANDERSON’S FIRST HUSBAND, MR. PETE SICOTTE, PASSED AWAY IN CAMROSE, ALBERTA ON FEBRUARY 15, 1966 AT THE AGE OF 92. A MEMORIAM IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD INDICATES THAT THE DONOR’S HUSBAND, MR. MARTIN HOUTEKAMER PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 21, 2005. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1949
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1949
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
26
Width
7.8
Description
HANDMADE, WOODEN SOUP LADLE. FINISHED WITH WOOD VARNISH. IT HAS A SKINNY HANDLE THAT IS APPROX. 1 CM IN WIDTH. A HOLE HAS BEEN DRILLED AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. GOOD CONDITION. SEVERE STAINING/DARKENING AT THE BOWL OF THE SPOON. WOOD VARNISH IS CHIPPING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF THE SPOON.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
DOMESTIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS WAS ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT AT THE TIME OF DONATION. IT EXPLAINED THAT THIS LADLE WAS HAND CARVED BY WILLIAM KONKIN C.1940. IN THE INTERVIEW MORRIS EXPLAINS: “OKAY THE LADLES ARE ALWAYS USED FOR LIFTING UP SOUP AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT HAPPENS TO BE A LIQUID. IT’S EASIER. THIS IS A SMALL ONE SO THEY WERE SMALLER HELPINGS OR WHATEVER IT WAS THAT YOU WERE DOING... THAT’S THE LAST ONE HE MADE.” OF THIS LADLE, MORRIS REMEMBERS: “OH JUST THAT WE ATE SOUP AND BORSCH WITH IT.” WILLIAM KONKIN MADE MANY ITEMS USED BY THE FAMILY AND CONSTRUCTED THE FAMILY HOMES OF VAUXHALL AND LETHBRIDGE. MORRIS STATES, ”SEE MY DAD WAS VERY GIFTED, I ONLY NOW APPRECIATING HIM.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003003
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, DYE
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1929
Materials
WOOL, DYE
No. Pieces
1
Length
182.5
Width
117.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN RUG MADE FROM HAND-DYED, HANDSPUN WOOL. THERE IS A 3-4 CM WIDE BLACK BORDER AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG, WITH FRINGE ON THE SHORT ENDS. INSIDE THE BLACK BORDER IS A SINGLE WOVEN BORDER OF LIGHT BLUE WOOL. INSIDE OF THIS BORDER IS A PATTERN SET ON A DARK BURGUNDY-COLOURED BACKGROUND. THERE IS A BLUE FLOWER IN THE CENTER OF THE RUG. ON ONE END THE DATE “1924” IS WOVEN IN RAW-COLOURED WOOL. THE “9” HAS BEEN WOVEN UPSIDE DOWN. ON THE OPPOSITE END OF THE RUG, THE INITIALS “ ” FOR THE NAME LISAVETA PETROVNA WISHLOW, ARE WOVEN IN LIGHT BLUE. THERE ARE 20 HARPS COLOURED EITHER BLUE, ORANGE, PINK, OR YELLOW AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG. UNDER THE HARPS IS A GREEN VINE PATTERN AND A RED DECORATIVE BORDER. THE DESIGN ELEMENTS ARE LAID OUT SYMMETRICALLY OVER THE RUG AND CONSIST OF FLOWERS, DUCKS, AND BUTTERFLIES. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. SLIGHT WEAR TO THE WOOL FROM USE.
Subjects
FLOOR COVERING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS RUG WAS HAND-WOVEN BY ELIZABETH KONKIN IN 1924. THE RUG WAS USED AS A WALL COVER IN THE WINTER AND ACTED AS AN INSULATOR. LATER IT WAS USED ON THE FLOOR AT CHRISTMASTIME. IT WAS INHERITED BY MORRIS PRIOR TO THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER: “I CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF IT] FROM MY MOTHER. SHE DIED IN 2003 AND I GOT THE RUG SLIGHTLY BEFORE THEN AND YES THAT WOULD BE ABOUT THE TIME… I HAVE NO OTHER SIBLINGS AND SO OBVIOUSLY EVERYTHING SHE MADE WOULD GO TO ME. MY SON SAID HE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE THE RUG, BUT CHANGED HIS MIND. HIS WIFE WAS NOT KEEN ON HAVING IT, SO I HAD TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT. TO ME IT IS A VERY BEAUTIFUL RUG AND I WANTED IT SOME PLACE WHERE IT WON’T GET TRASHED BY DOGS OR ANIMALS.” AFTER ACQUIRING THE RUG, MORRIS PLACED IT ON THE FLOOR OF HER HOME IN LETHBRIDGE: “THE LINO [ON THE FLOOR] STARTED TO WEAR OUT AND I THOUGHT YOU CAN’T PUT A RUG LIKE THAT ON ANOTHER LINO. IT JUST DOESN’T GO. BUT I DO LIKE HARDWOOD SO WE HAD HARDWOOD PUT THROUGHOUT THE BEDROOMS. THE LAST ROOM IS MY OFFICE, FIRST OF ALL, I HAD THE RUG IN THIS BEDROOM AND THEN IT WASN’T VERY CONVENIENT TO CLEAN BECAUSE THERE WASN’T THAT MUCH SPACE SO I PUT IT IN MY OFFICE WHERE I LOVED IT, BUT I KEPT STUMBLING OVER IT. I THOUGHT I MIGHT BREAK A LEG IF I DO THIS SO I BETTER GET RID OF IT… THE HARDWOOD WAS PUT IN BEFORE THE GST WENT IN. I DIDN’T HAVE THE RUG THEN BUT I THOUGHT THAT I WOULD BE GETTING THE RUG AND SO I WOULD HAVE IT HARDWOOD… WAS IT 1995? ANYWAY BEFORE GST WENT IN.” THE RUG HAD BEEN PRESENT THROUGHOUT MORRIS’ LIFE – FROM TIME SPENT ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE, ALBERTA TO LIFE ON A FARM OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL, ALBERTA: “I CAN REMEMBER WHEN I WAS BORN. THE RUG WAS IN MY PARENT’S HOME. WE LIVED ON A DOUKHOBOR COLONY, WE HAD MUD PLASTERED WALLS AND OUR HOUSE WAS WELL BUILT. MY DAD BUILT IT. SOME OF THE HOUSES ONLY HAD ONE LAYER OF WOOD AND THEY WERE VERY COLD, HOWEVER OUR BEDROOMS HAD WALLS ON THE NORTH SIDE. IN WINTER THEY GOT CHILLY, SO EVERY WINTER THEY WOULD NAIL UP THIS RUG UP AGAINST THE WALL. IT STAYED THERE FOR THE WINTER. FOR SUMMER IT CAME DOWN, I DON’T [KNOW] WHERE SHE STORED IT, I THINK POSSIBLY IN ONE OF THE BIGGER TRUNKS AND THEN TOOK IT OUT… THIS HOME [WHERE THE RUG WAS PLACED], IT’S OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL. WE LEFT THE COLONY, MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND MOVED THE HOUSE. THE HOUSE WAS EXPANDED AND THEN WE LIVED IN THAT HOUSE. I LEFT HOME AND MY PARENTS HAD A HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE WHICH DAD BUILT ALSO AND HE SOLD THE FARM. THEY ASKED IF WE WANTED TO GO AND WE DIDN’T. SO THEY SOLD THE FARM AND THERE WAS A BEAUTIFUL POND WHERE WE SWAM AND BOATED AND WE HAD LOTS OF TREES AROUND THE HOUSE. IT WAS ABOUT AN ACREAGE IF NOT MORE AND WHEN HE SOLD IT THE NEW OWNERS, VERY FRUGAL PEOPLE, [THEY] BURNT DOWN THE HOUSE, THE STEAM BATHROOM, THE GARAGE, THE WORKS. NOW MIND THEY WERE OLD STATE BY NOW AND THEY PLOWED [IT ALL INTO] IN THE POND BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO MAKE MONEY FROM THE GRAIN [FIELDS], SO WHEN I WENT THERE A COUPLE OF YEARS LATER, [I WAS] SURPRISED EVERYTHING WAS GONE, SO THAT WAS THAT." THE RUG MAY HAVE BEEN WOVEN BY MORRIS’ MOTHER ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE OR DURING THE WINTER SPENT IN COWLEY: “… IT COULD HAVE BEEN WOVEN IN COWLEY BECAUSE THEY STAYED IN COWLEY FOR THE WINTER BUT I CAN’T BE TOO SURE. IT ALSO COULD HAVE BEEN MADE ON THE COLONY… TWENTY MILES EAST OF MOSSLEIGH.” ELIZABETH KONKIN WAS MARRIED IN 1927, SO THE INITIALS WOVEN ON THE RUG ARE OF HER MAIDEN NAME: “THAT’S AN “L” [ ] THAT’S LISAVETA (SIC.) BUT HER NAME IS YALALISAVETA (SIC.) BUT SHE PUT DOWN LISAVETA. PETROVNA THAT’S A “P” [ ] THAT’S DAUGHTER OF PETRO AND WISHLOW [ ] THAT WAS HER MAIDEN NAME. ... [AFTER MAKING THE RUG] THERE WAS SOME WARP LEFT OVER. … WARP IS THE STUFF THAT RUNS DOWN AND WEFT IS WHAT YOU PUT IN BETWEEN WITH A SHUTTLE BUT THIS WASN’T PUT IN WITH A SHUTTLE. EACH INDIVIDUAL THREAD WAS KNOTTED. IT’S LIKE DIFFAGHAN (SIC.) - A SWEDISH METHOD - AND THAT’S HOW IT WAS DONE. IF THERE WAS SOME LEFT OVER AND HER MOM INSISTED THAT SHE DO ANOTHER RUG. WELL SHE DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT. SHE SAYS “YOU MAKE IT FOR YOUR BROTHER.” SHE FELT HIS WIFE SHOULD DO HER OWN HOPE CHEST BUT SHE DID AND THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT HIS RUG THEY USED IT ON THE FLOOR. MY MOTHER DIDN’T USE THIS ONE ON THE FLOOR EXCEPT AT CHRISTMAS TIME SO THE WISHLOW FAMILY WHO HAD THE OTHER RUG, THE MOTHER WASN’T TOO KEENLY INTERESTED IN IT. THEY HAD IT IN THE LIVING ROOM AND THEN IT WENT UP FOR SALE TO A PLACE THAT WAS OWNED BY A MAN NAMED, HIS LAST NAME WAS EWASHEN (SIC.) …THAT’S [THE RUG’S] TWIN, YES.” MORRIS THEN GOES ON TO DESCRIBE SOME OF THE OTHER PATTERNING FOUND ON THE RUG: “OKAY THOSE ARE HARPS. SHE HAD PATTERNS TO GET THEM FROM OTHER WEAVERS AND THEN SHE’D TRACE THEM OUT. I DON’T KNOW WHAT SHE USED TO TRACE THEM ON THE WARP [WITH] AND THEN SHE’D WEAVE AWAY WITH THE THREAD THAT WERE THE WEFT. SHE PUT THE DESIGNS HERSELF ONTO THE RUG” THE RUG WAS BROUGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WHEN ELIZABETH AND WILLIAM KONKIN RETIRED THERE: “I WAS TEACHING SCHOOL IN COALDALE WHEN THEY MOVED AND DAD MADE THE HOUSE IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE… THE HOUSE IS NICELY BUILT AND IT’S WARM, IT’S COMFORTABLE SO THERE’S NO USE PUTTING IT UP ON THE WALL. EVERY CHRISTMAS SHE’D TAKE IT OUT AND WE’D ROLL AROUND ON THIS RUG AND SHE WOULD HANG IT UP AFTER THE NEW YEAR SO I SAID TO HER ‘WHY DON’T YOU PUT IT ON THE FLOOR?’ AND SHE SAID, 'WELL I DON’T WANT TO MESS IT UP.' HOWEVER, I SAID, 'WELL I’M GOING TO PUT IT ON THE FLOOR,' SO THAT’S WHERE IT WAS UNTIL I STARTED STUMBLING OVER IT.” AMONG THE OTHER ARTIFACTS DONATED BY MORRIS THAT WERE OWNED BY HER MOTHER, THE RUG WAS A SIGNIFIER OF THE HARD WORK REQUIRED WITHIN THE DOUKHOBOR LIFESTYLE: “[THE BLANKET AND THE SPINNING WHEEL] MEANT A LOT WELL AFTER THE WAR AND THINGS WERE CHEAP. THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WEAVE THEIR OWN STUFF. PRIOR TO THAT, NOT IN MY MOTHER’S TIME EVEN BEFORE THAT MY GRANDMOTHER’S TIME, EVERY GIRL HAD TO WEAVE A TROUSSEAU FOR HERSELF TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE SHE STARTED HAVING CHILDREN AND SHE WOULDN’T HAVE THE TIME TO DO IT. THERE WERE THINGS THAT WERE ANCIENT THAT WERE USED AND USED UNTIL THEY DIED HOWEVER, IN MY MOTHER’S DAY THEY KNITTED THEIR OWN SOCKS, THEY MADE THEIR OWN QUILTS. THE MEN DID THE BUILDING AND THEY LIVED OFF THE GARDENS BECAUSE THEY WERE VEGETARIANS SO THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT MEAT. THEY BOUGHT EGGS FROM THE NEIGHBOURS WHO WERE FARMERS. THE INTERESTING THING THERE WAS THAT THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO EAT MEAT AND I ATE MEAT WHEN I WAS CLOSE TO TWENTY. WHEN I TELL MY VEGETARIAN RELATIVES WHAT ABOUT YOUR SHOES AND YOU’VE GOT LEATHER, COWHIDE WHATEVER AND THEY COULDN’T COME UP WITH AN ANSWER SO… THEY REPRESENTED HARD WORK THAT’S, THIS TAKES A LONG TIME WHEN YOU THINK OF EVERY KNOT THAT HAD TO BE TIED AND IT WAS PART OF HER TROUSSEAU. THE SPINNING WHEEL MEANT A LOT BECAUSE YOU HAD TO SPIN THE WOOL SO.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"QUEEN MARY" BURNER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1959
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"QUEEN MARY" BURNER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1959
Materials
GLASS, BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
29
Diameter
16
Description
A: GLASS KEROSENE LAMP THAT HAS A FROSTED GLASS OIL LAMP BODY, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO A RED BASE. ON OIL LAMP BODY, THERE ARE 10 BLACK SCOTTISH TERRIERS PAINTED AROUND THE DIAMETER OF THE LAMP. THERE IS A METAL COLLAR AND BURNER WITH FOUR PRONGS ATTACHED TO HOLD THE REMOVABLE, GLASS CHIMNEY IN PLACE. THERE IS A USED WICK IN THE BURNER. IT SAYS, “QUEEN MARY” ON THE BURNER. THERE ARE SEAMS CONNECTING THE GLASS AT BOTH SIDES FOR THE LAMP BODY AND THE BASE. THE BODY SEAMS AND THE BASE SEAMS DO NOT MEET. ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THE LAMP THERE IS AN EMBOSSED VINE DESIGN. GOOD CONDITION. REGULAR WEAR AT THE TOP INCLUDING SLIGHT RUSTING AND BURN MARKS. THERE IS A SMALL SCRATCH TO THE LEFT OF GLASS SEAM ON THE BASE. B: GLASS, LAMP CHIMNEY WITH 22 CM IN HEIGHT AND A TOP DIAMETER OF 5 CM AND A BOTTOM DIAMETER OF 7.4 CM. GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LIGHTING DEVICE
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON 26 OCTOBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH DIANE CÔTÉ (NEE ULLY), WHO DONATED A KEROSENE LAMP THAT HAD BEEN USED THROUGHOUT HER CHILDHOOD. THIS LAMP WAS USED ON THE ULLY FAMILY FARM IN PICTURE BUTTE, AND LATER WHEN THE FAMILY MOVED TO FISHBURN IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA. IT WAS FINALLY BROUGHT TO THE HOME WHERE CÔTÉ’S PARENTS, FREDRICK CARL ULLY AND SAIMI MARY ULLY, RETIRED IN THE TOWN OF PINCHER CREEK. CÔTÉ RECALLS, “YOU KNOW I DON’T EVEN REMEMBER IF WE HAD POWER AT PICTURE BUTTE, BUT I DON’T THINK WE DID… THE ONLY THING I CAN THINK ABOUT FROM THERE IS WE HAD SEPARATE BEDROOMS IN PICTURE BUTTE. AND I COULD SEE [MY MOM] GOING INTO MOM AND DAD’S BEDROOM WITH [THE LAMP] ONE NIGHT, BUT THAT’S ALL I SEE.” CÔTÉ REMEMBERS THE LAMP’S PRESENCE ON THEIR FARM IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA AFTER MOVING THERE IN 1952: “I CAN STILL HEAR MY MOTHER SAYING TO ME, ‘YOU DON’T TOUCH THAT LAMP,’ JUST AS PLAIN AS IF IT WAS YESTERDAY. SHE SAID SHE WAS SO WORRIED ABOUT A FIRE. I WAS TEN WHEN WE MOVED [TO FISHBURN. I LATER REALIZED SHE WAS RIGHT; I WAS] PROBABLY NOT RESPONSIBLE ENOUGH TO TOUCH THE LAMP, IN CASE IT DROPPED OR [IF I] BROKE IT. WE ONLY HAD A TWO BEDROOM HOUSE, AND I HAD A BROTHER, SO I SLEPT WITH MY MOTHER AND MY BROTHER SLEPT WITH MY DAD… I REMEMBER MY MOTHER CARRYING [THE LAMP] AROUND A LOT. WHEN I THINK OF HER, I THINK OF THE LAMP TOO. EVERY NIGHT AT BEDTIME, SHE AND I WERE USUALLY THE LAST ONES TO GO TO BED, SO I REMEMBER SHE PICKED UP THE LAMP [OFF THE KITCHEN TABLE] AND WE TROTTED OFF TO BED… WE DID THAT TRIP SO MANY TIMES - EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. THAT’S JUST SOMETHING THAT HAS STUCK WITH ME…” “WHEN WE FIRST MOVED [TO FISHBURN], IT WAS [THE ONLY SOURCE OF LIGHT IN THE HOUSE]. THEN LATER ON, THEY GOT A CAMPING LAMP THAT [HAD] A HANDLE. THE HOUSE WE MOVED [INTO] WAS AN OLD, OLD, OLD LOG HOUSE. I THINK IT WAS 100 YEARS OLD WHEN WE MOVED INTO IT. IT HAD THE ACTUAL LOGS. THEY WEREN’T PLANED; THEY WERE JUST THE ACTUAL LOGS WITH WHITEWASH ON THEM. HE PUT A THING UP THERE, SO THEN WE COULD LIGHT THIS LAMP UP AND HANG IT UP ON THE ROOF. I DON’T REMEMBER WHEN WE GOT POWER. I REMEMBER THEM PUTTING THE POSTS UP IN MY YARD, BUT I DON’T REMEMBER WHEN IT WAS. I WOULD THINK SOMEWHERE IN THE ‘50’S, AFTER THAT, AFTER WE GOT THAT LAMP, THEN THIS ONE WASN’T USED AS MUCH, BUT IT WAS STILL SITTING ON MY DRESSER… THAT WAS NORMAL FOR US, UNTIL DAD GOT THE ONE HE PUT IN THE ROOF. THE ONLY THING THE ONE ON THE ROOF DID WAS GIVE US WAY MORE LIGHT. OUR TABLE WAS HERE AND OUR CUPBOARD WAS WAY OVER [THERE], SO IF [THIS LAMP] WAS THE ONLY LIGHT YOU HAD, AND YOU NEEDED LIGHT, YOU HAD TO TAKE THAT FROM [HERE] TO THE CUPBOARD TO SEE WHAT YOU WERE DOING. THE OTHER LAMP PROVIDED US WITH LIGHT THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE TO MOVE, YOU COULD JUST TURN IT ON AND OFF.” CÔTÉ’S PARENTS THEN MOVED TO PINCHER CREEK, WHERE THE LAMP WAS MOVED WITH THEM. WHEN ASKED WHEN THEY MOVED, COTÉ RESPONDED, “PROBABLY 1970 OR ’71.” CÔTÉ ACQUIRED THE LAMP AFTER THE PASSING OF HER FATHER ON JANUARY 9, 2012. “YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE THE STUFF THEY HAD IN THEIR HOUSE. THEY GREW UP IN THE DIRTY THIRTIES, SO THEY COLLECTED EVERYTHING… I KNOW, PRIOR TO MY MOM’S PASSING [ON SEPTEMBER 21, 2004], THEY HAD A THREE BEDROOM HOUSE. AND THE SPARE BEDROOM AT THE BACK, [THE LANTERN] WAS SITTING ON THE DRESSER THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARIES FOR FRED AND SAIMI ULLY, AND FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS.
Catalogue Number
P20160037000
Acquisition Date
2016-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

48 records – page 1 of 3.