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Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Diameter
12.5
Description
AWARD TROPHY, “ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING CJLH-TV LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 1960-61”. CAST METAL PEBBLED, LAUREL LEAF BASE, FINISHED IN GOLD. PEDESTAL CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND POLISHED STONE. GREEN FELT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD FINISH SCUFFED IN SOME AREAS WITH SOME SCRATCHES ON THE BASE AND DUST BUILD UP. MINOR LOSS TO THE BLACK PAINT AROUND THE BASE AND SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FELT BOTTOM.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY AND THE COUNTRY CAPERS - TO WHOM THE TROPHY WAS AWARDED IN 1961. EVERAL MET JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.” THIS TROPHY IS REPRESENTATIVE OF JOE HORHOZER’S TIME AS PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS. PRIOR TO THAT, HE WAS A PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN 1937 AND HAD SEEN SUCCESS ON BOTH THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AROUND 1955, THE GROUP HAD SLOWED DOWN FROM THEIR TOURING SCHEDULE, AS A RESULT HORHOZER AND A FELLOW BAND MEMBER, REMO BACEDA, WERE ABLE TO JOIN A GROUP FORMING IN LETHBRIDGE THAT CAME TO BE THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS.' THIS GROUP CONSISTED OF THE POTTS FAMILY ON VOCALS, EDDIE, BETTY (WAGGONTAIL), AND TWINS SHIRLEY ANN (PETRAK) AND SHARON (SCOVILLE), AS WELL AS DONN PETRAL ON VOCALS AND GUITAR, HERB URANO ON BASS, REMO BACEDA ON FIDDLE, AND HORHOZER WITH HIS ACCORDION. HORHOZER SAYS OF THAT TIME, “WELL, THE POTTS ALWAYS SIGNED TOGETHER. THERE WERE THREE SISTERS AND THEN EDDIE, THE BROTHER, AND THEY WERE VERY GOOD SINGERS, BUT THEY WANTED SOMEBODY THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL TO KIND OF TEACH THEM HOW TO SING IN HARMONY. REMO WAS GOOD AT THAT ‘CAUSE HE WAS THE HEAD OF A CHOIR AND [KNEW] HOW TO DO GROUP MUSIC, ‘CAUSE [THE POTTS] WERE GREEN. THEY DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING. THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE AND PRACTICE TOGETHER, AND THEN DONN PETRAK, I GUESS, GOT THE RADIO STATION TO HIRE THEM. THEY’VE GOT TO -THEY’VE GOT TO HEAR YOU PLAY FIRST, SO THEY HAD THIS BAND CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS AND THEY ALL PLAYED TOGETHER FOR QUITE A LONG TIME ON THE RADIO. I THINK THEY WERE ON THE RADIO FOR MAYBE TWO YEARS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT – CJOC.” HORHOZER’S DAUGHTER, MELODEE “MEL” MUTCH, WHO WAS ALSO IN THE ROOM FOR THE INTERVIEWS WITH MACLEAN, ADDED, “… IT WAS A TELEVISION SHOW. THAT’S WHAT THEY WERE KNOWN FOR.” ON MARCH 1, 1998, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD’S “THE WAY WE WERE” COLUMN FEATURED A HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CAPERS WRITTEN BY GARRY ALLISON. THIS ARTICLE STATES, “THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE FEATURED ON CJOC RADIO WITH THEIR OWN SHOW AND ON CJLH-TV FOR FIVE YEARS. THEY ALSO TRAVELED TO CALGARY EACH WEEK FOR A CROSS-CANADA RADIO SHOW ON CBC IN 1958. THEIR LOCALLY-PRODUCED TV SHOW WAS SHOWN EACH TUESDAY NIGHT AT FIRST, THEN LATER ON THURSDAY NIGHT.” CJLH-TV WON SEVEN LIBERTY MAGAZINE AWARDS IN TOTAL DURING THE 1950S AND 1960S. THESE AWARDS INCLUDED THE 1960 – 1961 AWARD FOR BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING, WHICH THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE A PART OF, AND IN 1962 THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE PRESENTED WITH THE AWARD FOR BEST STATION MUSIC SHOW. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT [THE TROPHY], EXCEPT THIS IS WHEN THEY PLAYED ON TV, THEY ALWAYS GIVE AN AWARD FOR THE BEST MUSICAL BAND ON TV OR SOMETHING. THAT’S WHEN THEY GOT THAT." FOR AN ARTICLE WRITTEN ABOUT JOE HORHOZER IN 2002 FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, JOE STATED, “[MUSIC’S] MY LIFE – OUTSIDE OF MY FAMILY. [WITHOUT IT], I’D BE LOST.” MUTCH REAFFIRMS HER FATHER’S STATEMENT BY SAYING, “… HIS HANDS WERE ALWAYS TAPPING. HE WAS ALWAYS TAPPING. YOU COULD SEE THAT IN HIS HEAD. PLUS HE HELD DOWN A FULL TIME JOB. AND WHEN THEY NEEDED ENTERTAINMENT – LIKE GARY KIRK. GOSH, IT’S GOT TO BE 50 YEARS AGO, SAID TO MY DAD AND BUCK, 'WOULD YOU COME DOWN TO PLAY AT THIS CABIN?' – LONG LOST RANCH, OR WHEREVER THEY WERE HAVING A FAMILY REUNION – SO THEY WERE THE ENTERTAINMENT. HE WAS … SOUGHT-AFTER, LET’S PUT IT THAT WAY. AND WHEN HE WOULD PLAY MUSIC UNTIL YOU’D WANT TO THROW UP. HE’D COME HOME FROM A DANCE; POUR HIMSELF ANOTHER ONE; AND THEN THE RECORDS WOULD START TO COME OUT. THAT IS HOW THE NIGHT WENT. I’D EVEN COME HOME SOME NIGHTS AND MY MOM AND DAD WOULD BE DANCING. WHEN YOU ARE A TEENAGER, THAT’S HORRIFIC. SO, THERE IS THE HENDERSON LAKE HOTEL, WHATEVER – THE DANCE HALL. THAT WAS VERY MUCH A PART OF THEIR LIVES AS WELL.” JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COUNTRY CAPERS, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
28.5
Length
30.5
Description
A-B: RED COWBOY BOOTS (LEFT AND RIGHT BOOT). THE LEATHER BOOT BODIES ARE RED WITH GOLD ACCENTS AND GOLD OPENING TRIMS. LEATHER SOLES HAVE BEEN RE-HEELED. INTERIORS LABELLED “ACME BOOT” AND INK STAMPED, “MADE IN THE USA”. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH BOOTS, THERE IS A RED DYE LOSS IN VARIOUS PLACES, ESPECIALLY AT THE TOES. SOME OF THE GOLD ACCENTS ARE SCUFFED. REGULAR WEAR TO THE BOTTOM SOLES. THERE IS WEAR TO THE INSIDE SOLES (MORE SEVERELY ON BOOT A). BOTH BOOTS ARE MISSHAPEN (BOOT B TO A GREATER EXTENT). ON BOOT A, THERE IS A LOOSE THREAD ON THE TOE DESIGN. THERE IS A LOOSE YELLOW THREAD ON THE INSIDE HEEL ON BOOT B.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER EXPLAINED SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. WHEN DESCRIBING HER HUSBAND'S MUSIC CAREER, HORHOZER SAID, “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, WELL, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” THESE RED COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE COSTUME JOE HORHOZER WORE WHEN HE PERFORMED WITH THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND LATER THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS,' A LETHBRIDGE-BASED BAND FOR WHICH HE PLAYED THE ACCORDION BEGINNING IN 1958. IT WAS EVERAL WHO DYED THEM THE BRIGHT RED COLOUR: “HE ASKED ME [TO DYE THE BOOTS]. HE SAID HE WANTED TO CHANGE, THEY WERE GETTING TO LOOK KIND OF SHABBY, AND I DON’T KNOW WHY HE PICKED RED, BUT THAT’S WHAT HE DID SO, THAT’S WHAT I - ACTUALLY THESE STOOD UP QUITE WELL [LAUGHS]. THE REGULAR COLOUR WAS - I THINK THEY WERE BLACK-LIKE. BLACK WITH WHITE... THOSE WERE THE ONLY BOOTS THAT HE HAD.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON THEN, I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHES] - LIKE THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM SHIRT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20150016006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM SHIRT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
78
Width
38
Description
COLLARED MEN’S SHIRT. TAILOR-MADE WITH LONG-SLEEVED, OFF-WHITE SYNTHETIC SILK BODY AND NAVY BLUE FABRIC ACCENTS EDGING FRONT CLOSURE, ON SHOULDERS, AND BORDERING CUFFS. OPEN CRESCENT POCKETS AT BREASTS. BLUE IRIDESCENT SNAP CLOSURES. 5 SNAPS ON THE CUFFS AND 7 SNAPS DOWN THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT. THE LENGTH IS 78 CM, THE WIDTH ACROSS THE BACK IS 38 CM, AND THE SLEEVES ARE 60 CM LONG. FAIR CONDITION. AT LEAST 11 STAINS ON THE FRONT. DARK BROWN STAIN ON THE BOTTOM OF THE LEFT SLEEVE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
LEISURE
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THIS DRESS SHIRT WAS PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER DESCRIBED HOW SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. JOE HORHOZER WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. HORHOZER SAYS OF HER HUSBAND: “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE, IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “THEY WORE [THE SAME UNIFORM] WHEN THEY PLAYED AT THE TRIANON FOR A WHILE AND THEY JUST STARTED TO USE SUITS … WELL HE DIDN’T WANT - SEE, WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON. THEN I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHING] - LIKE, THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN. ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY, AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016006
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM PANTS
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20150016007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM PANTS
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
104.5
Width
35.5
Description
MEN’S PANTS, COMMERCIALLY MADE. KHAKI-COLOURED, SYNTHETIC FABRIC BODY WITH BLUE FABRIC ACCENTS AT SEAT, THE BELT LOOPS, SCALLOPED POCKET FLAPS AND CENTER LEG STRIPE. INSIDE WAISTBAND AND POCKET LINING DISPLAY MULTIPLE HAND INK MARKINGS, INCLUDING NUMBERS AND “HORHOZER”. ATTACHED TO THE HEM OF THE PANTS ARE ELASTIC STIRRUPS (ONE BLACK AND ONE KHAKI-COLOURED). THERE IS A STRONG CREASE DOWN THE CENTER OF THE PANTS. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. ON THE RIGHT SIDE THERE IS A STAIN AND SLIGHT TEARING AT THE BOTTOM HEM. THERE IS A STAIN AT THE KNEE, AND TEARING AT THE POCKET. THE BOTTOM BUTTON OF THE FLY HAS BEEN LOST. THERE IS TEARING AT THE CROTCH SEAM. ON THE LEFT SIDE, THERE IS TEARING NEAR THE POCKET. THERE IS SLIGHT STAINING ON THE OVERALL SURFACE OF THE PANTS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
LEISURE
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE PANTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER DESCRIBED HOW SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. JOE HORHOZER WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. HORHOZER SAYS OF HER HUSBAND: “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE, IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “THEY WORE [THE SAME UNIFORM] WHEN THEY PLAYED AT THE TRIANON FOR A WHILE AND THEY JUST STARTED TO USE SUITS … WELL HE DIDN’T WANT - SEE, WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON. THEN I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHING] - LIKE, THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN. ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY, AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016007
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
TIN, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.6
Width
25.8
Description
METAL SIGN WITH DOUBLE-SIDED PRINTING ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND. SIGN SHOWS BLACK SQUARE BACKGROUND WITH RED TRIM AND LIGHT BROWN TEXT WITH RED TRIM READING “AGENT FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD HERE, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD SERVES THE SOUTH”; SIGN HAS SMALL BLACK TEXT PRINTED AT BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER “TMOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. LTD. MONTREAL”. BACK OF SIGN IS PRINTED THE SAME. SIGN HAS JAGGED METAL EDGE BENT DOWN ON LEFT SIDE; SIGN IS RUSTED FRONT AND BACK AND FADED; SIGN IS SCRATCHED IN FRONT UPPER RIGHT CORNER AND CORRODED LOWER LEFT CORNER. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MARCH 19TH, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONTACTED DAN PLOURDE, THE "AGENT FOR...HERALD" SIGN'S SELLER. THE SIGN WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM AT URBAN PRAIRIE ANTIQUE MALL ON MARCH 21, 2018. PLOURDE, A PICKER, LEASES MALL SPACE AT URBAN PRAIRIE AS A LOCATION TO SELL HIS PICKS. PLOURDE TOLD MACLEAN THAT THE HERALD SIGN CAME FROM A RURAL PROPERTY NEAR CHIN LAKE. THE RURAL LOCATION FEATURED "QUONSETS" FULL OF OTHER ITEMS, INCLUDING GAS MEMORABILIA AND FURNITURE. THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE SIGN, WHO LIVED AT THE PROPERTY WAS NO LONGER LIVING. THE OWNER, CONTINUED PLOURDE, CONDUCTED HIS OWN PICKING "IN BACK ALLEYS IN LETHBRIDGE 60 YEARS AGO". PLOURDE ATTEMPTED TO SELL THE SIGN IN FORT MACLEAD BEFORE RECOGNIZING THAT ITS MARKET WAS GREATER IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR COPIES OF INFORMATION REGARDING THE SIGN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
No. Pieces
6
Height
2
Length
18.2
Width
9.5
Description
A. CASE, 18.2 CM LONG X 9.5 CM WIDE; CASE IS COMPRISED OF WOODEN PANELS BOUND WITH CLOTH SPINE; BROWN SYNTHETIC-LEATHER OUTSIDE WITH BLUE VELVET LINING. TOP HAS WORN SILVER NUMBERS IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “12 [ILLEGIBLE] 4”. INSIDE OF CASE HAS CLOTH TAG ADHERED TO LID WITH BLACK TEXT “L.E. SALKELD”. TOP OF CASE HAS BLUE STAIN AT RIGHT SIDE; CASE EXTERIOR IS SEVERELY WORN WITH FINISH PEELED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. DRAFTING COMPASS, 14.1CM LONG X 1.4CM WIDE. SILVER COMPASS WITH A POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND ROUNDED, ADJUSTABLE DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HAS TURN-KNOB FOR ADJUSTING LEAD IN THE DRAWING LEG. MID-SECTION OF COMPASS IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF COMPASS HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. COMPASS STRAIGHT LEG IS BLACKENED ON THE TIP AND DRAWING LEG IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. DRARFTING DIVIDER, 14.2 CM LONG X 1.4 CM WIDE. SILVER DIVIDER WITH TWO POINTED LEGS; MID-SECTION OF DIVIDER IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF DIVIDER HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. DIVIDER IS TARNISHED ON INSIDE OF LEGS AND HAS ADHERED SOILING ON BACK OF LEGS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. BOW COMPASS, 9.4 CM LONG X 2.9 CM WIDE. SILVER BOW COMPASS WITH ADJUSTABLE TURN KNOBS ON POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HINGE RUNS ACROSS MID-SECTION WITH RING ATTACHED TO TOP AS THE BASE FOR HANDLE. HINGE HAS ADJUSTABLE TURN-KNOB ON SIDE. LEGS ARE TARNISHED ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. EXTENSION ROD, 10.5 CM LONG X 0.7 CM WIDE. SILVER EXTENSION ROD WITH NARROW LEG AND CUT-OUT UP CENTER OF ROD END. TOP OF ROD HAS ADJUSTABLE KNOB ND CUT-OUT DOWN CENTER OF ROD TOP. ROD HAS TARNISHING AROUND ADJUSTABLE KNOB; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. RULING PEN, 13 CM LONG X 1.2 CM WIDE. SILVER RULING PEN WITH DARKER ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED HANDLE. END TIP HAS ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB ACROSS POINTS. INSIDE OF RULING PEN END POINTS ARE TARNISHED; ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB IS TARNISHED AND RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DRAFTING T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
ON FEBRUARY 18, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE MCENTEE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A DRAFTING SET. THE SET WAS USED BY HER FATHER, LEONARD E.SALKELD, THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER AS AN ENGINEER. ON HER MEMORIES OF THE DRAFTING SET, MCENTEE RECALLED, “[THE SET] WOULD HAVE BEEN HIS FOR HIS LIFETIME, THROUGH UNIVERSITY, AND ALL THE TIME.” “I DIDN’T SEE THEM TILL LATER. THEY ALSO HAD, GROWING UP [IN BRITISH COLUMBIA]…THEY DID THEIR DRAFTING AND THEIR MAPS/BLUEPRINTS, BUT HE DID MAPS THAT [WERE] ON LINEN, AND THEN IT WAS WAXED. WHEN THEY WERE DONE WITH THOSE MAPS, MOM WOULD WASH THEM, WASH THE WAX OUT, AND USE THE LINEN. I STILL HAVE SOME OF THAT LINEN. THE OTHER THING THAT I REMEMBER IS - OUR SCRAP PAPER THAT WE DREW ON, WAS OLD MAPS, (THE DRAFTING MAPS THEY DREW UP ALL BY HAND), AND MOM WOULD IRON THEM. SHE’D TAKE THESE ROLLS [OF PAPER], IRON THEM FLAT, CUT THEM IN SQUARES, AND THAT’S WHAT WE DREW ON AS KIDS.” “[MY FATHER, LEONARD SALKELD] HAD A CIVIL ENGINEERING DEGREE. HE FOUGHT IN WORLD WAR TWO, CAME HOME, AND GOT HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, [HE WANTED] HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, HE HAD TO FIGHT FOR THAT, BECAUSE HE CAME HOME ‘SHELL-SHOCKED’, AND THEY DIDN’T KNOW ENOUGH ABOUT THAT THEN. BECAUSE HE WASN’T PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED, THEY THOUGHT HE DIDN’T DESERVE ANY VETERAN’S BENEFITS. ONE OF HIS FAMILY MEMBERS WAS A M.P., SO THEY WENT TO THE MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, GOT HIM HIS VETERAN’S BENEFITS, AND, AT THAT POINT, HE DIDN’T WANT TO FARM. HE’D COME FROM A FARM, AND HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, SO HE CHOSE THE UNIVERSITY AND TOOK HIS DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING” MCENTEE ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S EXPERIENCES IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, NOTING, “HE DID WORK FOR THE PFRA – A LOT OF WORK HERE, AND A LOT OF WORK ON THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT. WE LIVED IN ARROWWOOD FOR 4 OR 5 YEARS, TILL WE MOVED TO B.C. DAD WORKED ON A SIPHON OUT OF VAUXHALL. THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN IN [1951-1955]. IT WAS AFTER THE DROUGHT ON THE PRAIRIES, AND THEY WERE PUTTING IN THE IRRIGATION, AND REHABILITATING THE PRAIRIES. SO HE DID THAT, AND THEN HE WENT ON TO WORK ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER SYSTEM, IN ALL OF B.C. WE SPENT 5 YEARS HERE. [I REMEMBER] I WAS 2, AND HE TOOK ME TO WORK LOTS, BECAUSE MOM WOULD COME AND STAY IN A MOTEL NEAR THE CAMP, WHERE THE GUYS WERE ALL WORKING OR BOARDING AT HOMES.” “SHE TRAVELED WITH HIM UNTIL I STARTED SCHOOL. SO I KNEW THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT HE DROVE. BY THE TIME I WAS 3, I COULD SAY ALL THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT THEY USED TO MOVE THE LAND, AND DIG THE CANALS. I SAW DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATERWAYS TURNED OFF, AND WATERWAYS TURNED ON, AND GREW UP KNOWING THAT, FOR 5 YEARS, UNTIL I WENT TO SCHOOL. LATER, I MET MY HUSBAND, AND HE IS FROM MONTREAL. HE TOLD ME THAT ONE YEAR THEY TURNED OFF NIAGARA FALLS TO REPAIR THEM. HE DID NOT KNOW MY DAD WAS A CIVIL ENGINEER, AND THAT I HAD SEEN DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATER MOVING, AND TURBINES, AND TURBINES RUNNING, AND SOME NOT RUNNING. IT WAS TOTALLY WITHIN MY BRAIN POWER TO PERCEIVE THAT NIAGARA FALLS COULD BE TURNED OFF, AND HE JUST THOUGHT THAT WAS SUCH A HILARIOUS JOKE, UNTIL I TOLD HIM WHAT MY DAD DID, AND ALL THAT I HAD SEEN AS I WAS GROWING UP. JUST RECENTLY THEY HAD THE CELEBRATION OF THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT, AND I WAS GOING TO ASK MY MOM IF SHE WANTED TO COME OUT AND PARTICIPATE IN IT, IF DAD HAD WORKED ON IT OR NOT. SHE SAID, “OH, MAN, I WOULD HAVE COME…YOUR DAD DID WORK ON IT.”” “BECAUSE WE TRAVELED WITH DAD, AND MOVED AROUND WITH HIM ON HIS WORKSITES, UNTIL I WAS 5, I SAW HIS WORK, AND I KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING, AT A YOUNG AGE. FOR THAT REASON [THE DRAFTING SET] WAS IMPORTANT TO ME.” “[NOW] I’M PACKING, AND MOVING – AND FOUND [THE DRAFTING SET] AGAIN. I HAD BROUGHT IT HOME FROM MY MOM’S PLACE, AFTER DAD’S FUNERAL. I NEVER REALLY KNEW WHAT I WAS GOING TO DO WITH IT, BUT I FOUND IT AGAIN, AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, HE WORKED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HERE.” SO I BROUGHT IT IN [TO THE MUSEUM]…I THINK THEY WOULD BE WELL-CARED-FOR, AND APPRECIATED [HERE]. TO DO ANYTHING ELSE WITH THEM – I DON’T KNOW. NOBODY’S GOING TO BUY THEM AT A GARAGE SALE…I DON’T KNOW THAT THEY’D EVEN KNOW HOW TO USE THEM ANYMORE. I WANT THEM TO GO SOMEWHERE THEY’RE APPRECIATED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180002000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
Acquisition Date
2018-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
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