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Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions8
Date Range
1952-1988
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
19901039000
Physical Description
3.3 m. of textual records. -- 17 photographs.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of executive and annual general meetings of the Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge, financial records, correspondence, and project files pertaining to activities of the Council and its member groups.
Date Range
1952-1988
Fonds
Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge
Physical Description
3.3 m. of textual records. -- 17 photographs.
History / Biographical
The Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge was established in 1952 to coordinate and support the development of the arts in Lethbridge. The Council operates the Bowman Arts Centre.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of executive and annual general meetings of the Allied Arts Council of Lethbridge, financial records, correspondence, and project files pertaining to activities of the Council and its member groups.
Notes
Title based on the contents of the fonds.
Accession No.
19901039000
Category
Arts
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
1.5
Description
BRASS METAL BROOCH WITH BAR-PIN CLASP; BROOCH HAS GOLD-COLOURED RECTANGULAR BAR FOR FRONT, WITH BLUE CROSS IN CENTER. CROSS HAS GOLD BANNER RUNNING ACROSS THE FRONT WITH BLUE TEXT “S M H”. BACK OF BROOCH HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STER 3 OF G, G.F.”. BROOCH HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN AND ON BACK OF CROSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE BROOCH, KIMERY RECALLED, “YOU [GOT THE BROOCH] AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR. IT’S CALLED A BANDING BARRING CEREMONY AND IT FASTENED AT THE TOP OF YOUR COLLAR OF YOUR UNIFORM. AND THAT JUST SHOWED THAT YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE FIRST YEAR AND THAT YOU HAVE A BAND AND A BROOCH NOW…YOU WORE IT UNTIL YOU GRADUATED.” “[IT SIGNIFIED RANK AND SENIORITY] BECAUSE YOUR FIRST YEAR YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING, YOU DON’T HAVE A BAND ON THE CAP, YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING. AFTER FIRST YEAR YOU GET THIS AND A YELLOW BAND AND THEN A BLUE ONE AND THEN A BLACK.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Materials
GOLD
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
1.8
Width
1.9
Description
GOLD RING WITH TAPERED BANDS AND OVAL FACE; THE RING FACE HAS AN OVAL WITH THE EMBOSSED PROFILE OF A NURSE, AND WIDE BANDS THAT TAPER FROM SIDES OF THE RING FACE. BAND HAS TWO SMALL, ENGRAVED LEAVES ON SIDES OF THE RING FACE. INSIDE RING BAND HAS MINOR STAINING AND WEAR; RING FACE HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND THE EMBOSSED PROFILE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE O.R. NURSE’S RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST MADE BECAUSE WE JUST WANTED PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT WE WERE O.R. NURSES, A SELECT BRAND OF NURSES THAT HAD CHOSEN THIS PATH. AND WE WANTED IT NOT TO BE FOR EVERYONE SO SOMEONE SAID, ‘WELL, LET’S GET SOMETHING DESIGNED.’ SO WE THOUGHT THE BEST DESIGN WOULD BE AN O.R. HEAD WITH THE MASK AND THE TURBAN. SO WE TOOK IT TO FOSTER’S JEWELRY AND THEY MADE THIS UP FOR US. NOW I KNOW THAT PROBABLY EVERY O.R. NURSE AT ST. MIKE’S AT THAT TIME BOUGHT ONE. I’M NOT SO SURE THAT IT WENT TO THE GALT OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I CAN’T VOUCH FOR THAT. I JUST KNOW THAT THE STAFF, AT THAT TIME, WE ALL GOT ONE JUST BECAUSE IT WAS A SIGNATURE OF WHAT WE WERE AND WHAT WE DID.” “[THERE WERE] 15, APPROXIMATELY [MADE]…[THE RING IS] 10 CARAT [GOLD]…I THINK ONE PERSON DESIGNED IT AND SAID, ‘WHAT DO YOU THINK?’ AND WE SAID, ‘GOOD, PERFECT.’ SO SHE WENT AHEAD WITH IT.” “[I WORE THE RING] ALL THE TIME…SOCIALLY, WEAR IT TO WORK, PUT IT ON THE SHELF, PUT IT BACK ON WHEN YOU LEFT WORK, 24-7…WHEN YOU’RE OUT AND ABOUT…WE WORE THEM ALL THE TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN I STOPPED [WEARING THE RING]. I PRESUME WHEN I WENT TO MONTREAL I STOPPED. AND I PROBABLY WORE IT WHEN I CAME BACK…IT WAS IN A BOX WITH THE OTHER [PIECES FROM MY TIME AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FUR, PLASTIC, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20190027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
FUR, PLASTIC, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
115.2
Width
60.5
Description
BROWN-BLACK FOX FUR STOLE WITH SILVER TIPS TO FUR; STOLE INCLUDES THE HEAD, PAWS, TAIL, AND FULL BODY. FRONT AND BACK LEFT PAWS HAVE TIED BLACK STRING KNOTS WITH BRASS BUTTON CLASPS EMBEDDED; PAWS HAVE CLAWS INTACT. UNDERSIDE OF THE FOX’S JAW HAS A LONG, BLACK PLASTIC FITTING; FOX FACE HAS TAXIDERMIED GLASS EYES; TAIL HAS WHITE FUR TIP. STOLE IS SHEDDING FUR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON OCTOBER 22, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON APPELT REGARDING HER DONATION OF A SILVER FOX FUR STOLE. APPELT’S GRANDPARENTS, HESPIRIA AND FRED JOHNSTON, OPERATED A FOX FARM NEAR COMMERCE, ALBERTA. ON THE FUR STOLE, APPELT RECALLED, “[THE FUR STOLE HAS BEEN IN MY POSSESSION] PROBABY THIRTY-FIVE YEARS [I PROBABLY GOT IT AROUND 1985]. MY MOTHER HAD IT BEFORE THAT TIME, PROBABLY FOR TWENTY YEARS. AT THAT TIME SHE HAD GOTTEN IT FROM HER MOTHER PROBABLY IN THE ‘60S.” “I THINK MY MOM [DOROTHY FILMER] JUST WANTED ME TO HAVE IT AS THE NEXT GENERATION AND MY OTHER TWO SISTERS DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHILDREN AND I HAD CHILDREN, SO SHE PROBABLY THOUGHT IT WOULD BE SOMETHING WE WOULD PASS DOWN THE LINE ON MY SIDE…I JUST REMEMBER MY MOM ALWAYS SAYING THAT IT WAS SUCH A PERFECT STOLE BECAUSE IT HAD THE CROSS ON IT, THE SILVER FOX CROSS THAT WAS QUITE DISTINCTIVE ON ITS BACK SO YOU KNOW IT WAS NOT JUST DIFFERENT SHADES, IT HAD THE CROSS ON IT THAT WAS MORE RARE.” “I ACTUALLY WORE [THE STOLE] A COUPLE OF TIMES JUST KIND OF DURING HALLOWEEN GET TOGETHERS AND I WAS ALWAYS GLAD TO HAVE IT IN MY POSSESSION…I WAS LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE AT A DIFFERENT HOUSE [WHEN I GOT IT]…[I WORE IT] PROBABLY WHEN MY CHILDREN WERE TEENAGERS. IT WAS FUN TO PULL IT OUT AND REMEMBER GRANDPARENTS AND GREAT GRANDPARENTS…[I WORE IT FOR HALLOWEEN] PROBABLY NOT SO MUCH AN OUTFIT BUT JUST DRESS UP WITH THE STOLE AND MAYBE A HAT AND SPECIAL PURSE. HAD THE PARTIES GOING AROUND THE HOUSE.” “[THE STOLE WAS STORED] JUST IN MY HOPE CHEST, A CEDAR HOPE CHEST…IT WAS A FUN THING TO LOOK AT ALSO AS A LITTLE GIRL. PULL IT OUT AND PUT IT ON…WE’D JUST FOOL AROUND WITH IT. IT’S IN THE TICKLE TRUNK I GUESS THEY CALLED IT…I’M BORN IN ’56 SO [I PLAYED WITH IT] PROBABLY UP UNTIL 1966 OR ’68.” “[THE STOLE CREEPED ME OUT] A LITTLE BIT BECAUSE WE ALWAYS LOOKED AT THE NOSE PART WITH THE PLASTIC THING UNDER IT THAT WOULD OPEN UP AND IT WOULD LOOK LIKE IT’S WAS GOING TO BITE YOU AND IT HAD A CLASP THAT YOU COULD WRAP IT AROUND YOUR NECK AND WEAR IT JUST LIKE IT IS, LIKE A STOLE.” APPELT ELABORATED ON HER GRANDPARENT’S FOX FARM, NOTING, “I DIDN’T KNOW MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THEY PASSED WHEN I WAS QUITE YOUNG, SO TO HAVE ANYTHING OF THEIRS IN MY POSSESSION WAS SOMETHING THAT I ACKNOWLEDGED AND WAS GRATEFUL TO LEARN ABOUT. I HAVE ALL THEIR DIARIES, MY GRANDMA’S DIARIES, FROM BACK IN 1917 SO IT TALKED A LOT ABOUT HER LIFE ON THE FARM, THE HARDSHIPS…KNOWING THAT THEY WERE HOMESTEADERS AND THAT THE ONLY THING THEY COULD DO WAS GROW CROPS AT THAT TIME. HAVING THE SILVER FOX FARM FOR EXTRA INCOME WAS PROBABLY VERY BENEFICIAL FOR THEM.” “[MY MOTHER’S] FATHER HAD PASSED AWAY IN I THINK IN 1960 OR ‘61 AND THEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL AND DIED IN ’65 SO AT THAT TIME MY UNCLE WOULD HAVE BROUGHT IT IN TO HER HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE…[MY GRANDPARENTS WERE] HESPIRIA AND FRED JOHNSTON…[MY UNCLE, GORDON JOHNSTON] STAYED ON THE FARM UNTIL ABOUT 1998…” APPELT NOTED THAT HER GRANDPARENTS WERE FARMING FOXES WHEN HER MOTHER LIVED ON THE FARM, RECALLING, “THE PICTURE I BELIEVE IS FROM WHEN [MY MOTHER] WAS PROBABLY IN HER TWENTIES THAT THEY WERE DOING THAT SO SHE WAS BORN IN 1917. THOSE PICTURES ARE PROBABLY IN THE ‘30S AND ‘40S AND SHE WAS STILL LIVING ON THE FARM AT THAT TIME…[THE FOX FARM WAS OPERATING] PROBABLY IN THE ‘30S AND ‘40S BECAUSE THEY HOMESTEADED THERE I THINK IN 1908 THAT MY GRANDFATHER GOT THE FARM AND THEN MY GRANDMOTHER CAME IN ’17 WHEN THEY WERE MARRIED, SO IT WAS PROBABLY DURING THE ‘30S I WOULD SAY, MAYBE INTO THE ‘40S. IT’S HARD TO SAY HOW LONG THEY HAD IT.” “[MY MOM SAID] JUST THAT IT WAS THERE AND THAT THEY RAISED [THE FOXES] AS WELL AS THE ANGORA RABBITS THAT WERE IN CAGES THERE SO SHE DIDN’T REALLY SAY TOO MUCH MORE. IT WAS JUST I GUESS SURVIVAL TO SUPPLEMENT INCOME WITH THE CROPS AND DURING THE DEPRESSION AND IT WAS TOUGH TIMES…I DON’T KNOW [IF SUCH FARMS WERE COMMON]. I NEVER HEARD ANYTHING MORE ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE HAVING THOSE FARMS.” “[I DON’T REMEMBER] TOO MUCH OF MY GRANDFATHER BECAUSE I WAS JUST FIVE. MY GRANDMOTHER HAS THREE SISTERS, WE GOT TO GO OUT TO THEIR FARM IN THE SUMMER TIME AND SPEND A WEEK OR TWO. MY OLDER SISTERS WOULD GET TO SPEND MORE TIME THERE BECAUSE THEY WERE OLDER. I DIDN’T GET TO SPEND AS MUCH TIME BECAUSE I WAS YOUNGER AND MAYBE IT WAS A LOT TO HAVE THREE LITTLE KIDS RUNNING AROUND BUT IT WAS A PLACE TO GO IN THE SUMMER. THEY LIVED A MILE AND A HALF EAST OF PARK LAKE SO WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN PARK LAKE SWIMMING…[THE FOX PENS] WEREN’T THERE THAT I NOTICED IN THE ‘90S WHEN THEY HAD A BIG AUCTION THERE BUT THEY COULD HAVE BEEN I JUST DON’T KNOW WHAT I WOULD HAVE BEEN LOOKING AT.” “IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN SOMETHING THAT WAS RARE BACK THEN TO RAISE SILVER FOXES IN THAT AREA. I NEVER EVER HEARD OF ANYBODY ELSE SAYING THAT SILVER FOXES WERE PART OF THEIR GRANDPARENT’S FARM, SO I THINK IT WAS PRETTY SPECIFIC TO SAYING THAT IT WAS A GREAT THING THAT [MY GRADPARENTS] DID TO SUPPLEMENT [THEIR] INCOME BACK THEN ESPECIALLY WHEN THE CROPS WERE BAD. THEY DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MONEY, THEY PROBABLY GOT SOME GOOD MONEY FROM OUT OF THESE.” ON HER MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE STOLE TO THE MUSEUM, APPELT SHARED, “I’M JUST SORTING THROUGH SOME THINGS IN MY HOME AND I SAW IT SITTING THERE, BEING THAT I HAVE TWO CHILDREN BUT NO GRANDCHILDREN I THOUGHT IT WAS TIME TO MAYBE PASS IT DOWN TO FURTHER PEOPLE THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO ENJOY IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PHOTOGRAPHS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE JOHNSTON FOX FARM, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190027000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190027000
Acquisition Date
2019-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190008005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
82
Width
47
Description
A. UNIFORM, 82CM LONG X 47CM WIDE. YELLOW GARMENT WITH SHORT SLEEVES AND ROUNDED COLLAR; SLEEVES AND COLLAR HAVE RED AND YELLOW PATTERNED FABRIC STITCHED ON. GARMENT HAS ELASTIC WAIST WITH DISCOLORED WHITE ELASTIC LOOPS ON SIDES OF WAIST. TOPS OF SHOULDERS HAVE OPENINGS WITH BRASS BUTTONS AND BUTTON-HOLES, AND LEFT SHOULDER HAS A BRASS CLOSED LOOP ON TOP. INSIDE OF GARMENT IS YELLOW FABRIC; GARMENT IS MACHINE-STITCHED; GARMENT HAS STITCHED TAG INSIDE, “FRONT M.C. LILLEY”. GARMENT HAS STAINING ON FRONT, BACK, AND INSIDE; GARMENT HAS THREADS WORN AND TORN ON FRONT AND BACK OF RED COLLAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BELT, 117.2CM LONG X 7.1CM WIDE. BELT HAS YELLOW AND RED LINEAR, SQUARE “U N” ALTERNATING PATTERN ON FRONT, WITH YELLOW BORDERS ALONG TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES; BELT HAS THREE ROWS OF DOUBLE SILVER SNAP-BUTTONS. BELT IS MACHINE-STITCHED; ENDS OF BELT TAPER TO POINTS. BACK OF BELT IS SOLID YELLOW WITH TWO SILVER BUTTON CLASPS AT END. BELT HAS MINOR FRAYING AND STAINING ON FRONT; BACK OF BELT HAS FADED RED IMPRINTS FROM THE FRONT TRANSFERRED THROUGH; BACK OF BELT IS CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008005
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20190008004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
COTTON, METAL, BRASS
No. Pieces
3
Length
98.9
Width
42.5
Description
A. UNIFORM ROBE, 98.9 CM L X 42.5 CM W. RED COTTON ROBE WITH FULL SLEEVES; ROBE OPENS AT THE BACK AND HAS SIX BRASS AND SILVER BUTTON WITH BUTTON-HOLES; SILVER BUTTONS HAVE IMAGE OF BIRD IN THE CENTER WITH TEXT AROUND, “NOSTRA ES DEVS SPES”. ROBE HAS PURPLE BANDS AT THE COLLAR AND THE WAIST; PURPLE BANDS HAVE GOLD RIBBON TRIM; ROBE HAS GOLD RIBBON TRIM ALONG HEM AND CUFFS. FRONT OF ROBE HAS ROUND SILVER DISCS COVERING THE CHEST AND SHOULDERS, AND ONE ROUND SILVER DISC ON EACH SHOULDER. INSIDE OF ROBE HAS PINK STRIPED LINING; INSIDE OF CHEST HAS RED STITCHING IN THE SHAPE OF A SQUARE, WITH MISSING TAG. BACK OF ROBE IS STAINED; FRONT OF ROBE HAS TEAR UNDER PURPLE WAIST BAND; ROBE HAS FRAYING THREADS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BELT, 122.6CM LONG X 9.8CM WIDE. FRONT IS PURPLE WITH PATTERN OF RED FLOWERS AND GOLD LINES STITCHED, AND GOLD STITCHING ALONG EDGES. ONE END OF THE BELT IS ROUNDED; ONE END OF THE BELT HAS A SILVER METAL BELT BUCKLE SET IN BROWN LEATHER BASE; LEATHER HAS A BRASS STUD ATTACHED. BACK OF BELT IS PURPLE WITH GOLD STITCHING ALONG EDGES; BELT HAS A BRASS BUTTON SNAP FROM FRONT. BELT BUCKLE IS RUSTED; BRASS STUD IN LEATHER HAS WHITE-GREEN TARNISHING; BELT HAS MINOR CREASING ON BACK; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. HELMET, 25.5 CM H X 24 CM L X 19.3 CM W. BROWN HELMET WITH OUTER LINING OF MOHAIR FABRIC, WITH TAN LEATHER TRIM AROUND THE EDGES; HELMET HAS VISOR ON FRONT WITH THREE GOLD CIRCLES APPLIED AND TWO SILVER FITTINGS ATTACHING THE VISOR TO THE HELMET SIDES. HELMET HAS SILVER SPIKE ON TOP; INSIDE OF HELMET IS LINED WITH PINK CLOTH, GREEN CLOTH AT BACK,, AND BROWN LEATHER INSIDE RIM; RIM HAS WHITE TEXT STAMPED ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE, “MILITARY & SOCIETY GOODS, PETTIBONE BROS. MFG. CO., CINCINNATI, O, U.S.A.”. HELMET HAS WEAR, STAINING, AND BROWN DISCOLORATION ON INSIDE; LEATHER TRIM ON EXTERIOR IS CRACKED WITH LOSS; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008004
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL, FELT
Catalogue Number
P20190008003
  6 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
COTTON, METAL, FELT
No. Pieces
3
Length
151.8
Width
45
Description
A. ROBE, 151.8 CM L X 45 CM W. BLACK ROBE THE OPENS AT FRONT, AND FASTENS CLOSED WITH SIX BLACK METAL HOOKS RUNNING VERTICALLY DOWN FRONT. ROBE HAS BLACK STITCHED LINEAR PATTERN ON FRONT AND BACK OF CHEST. ROBE HAS CREAM LINING INSIDE WITH BLACK STITCHING ON BACK. ROBE HAS FRAYING THREADS; ROBE HAS RIPS AT THE BOTTOM HOOK AND LOOP, ON THE RIGHT WEARING SLEEVE, AND SMALL TEARS IN FRONT AND BACK; ROBE HAS STAINING ON INSIDE AND OUTSIDE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. BIB, 116.5 CM L X 23.5 CM W. CREAM COLOURED BIB WITH BRONZE-GOLD TRIM ALONG EDGES; BIB HAS COLLAR AT TOP WITH WHITE WOODEN BUTTON TO FASTEN; BIB HAS LONG, NARROW NECK THAT WIDENS AT THE BASE. BIB HAS BRONZE-GOLD FRINGE ALONG BOTTOM EDGE; FRONT HAS EMBELLISHED GLOWING, OPEN BOOK EMBROIDERED ON WITH BRONZE-GOLD WRAPPED THREAD, WITH TEXT ACROSS THE BOOK “HOLY BIBLE”. BACK OF BIB IS LINED WITH WHITE FABRIC; BACK OF BIB HAS STAMPED BLACK TEXT BELOW COLLAR “MILITARY & SOCIETY GOODS, THE PETTIBONE BROS MFG. CO., CINCINNATI, O, PRELATE”. BIB IS YELLOWED ON FRONT AND BACK; BIB HAS STAINING ON BACK AND COLLAR; BIB HAS MINOR FRAYING THREADS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. CAP, 14 CM L X 15.3 CM W X 13 CM H. BLACK VELVET SQUARE CAP WITH TASSLE ATTACHED TO THE TOP. CAP HAS CREAM AND GOLD STITCHED IMAGE OF A GLOWING BOOK WITH TEXT “HOLY BIBLE”. CAP CORNERS HAS BLACK, BRAIDED TRIM RUNNING UP AND MEETING AT THE CENTER OF THE CAP’S TOP. CAP HAS BROWN LEATHER LINING INSIDE OF RIM; CAP HAS CREAM CLOTH LINING. CAP HAS STAMPED TEXT INSIDE, “PRELATE, MILITARY & SOCIETY GOODS, THE PETTIBONE BROS. MFG. CO., CINCINNATI, O, U.S.A.”. CAP IS HEAVILY STAINED AND DISCOLORED BROWN INSIDE; LEATHER INSIDE CAP IS CRACKED AND WORN; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008003
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK, COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190008006
  5 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
SILK, COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
5
Length
44
Width
43.5
Description
A. JACKET, 44 CM L X 43.5 CM W. GOLD SILK JACKET WITH BLACK AND GOLD LINES RUNNING DOWN THE FRONT, AROUND THE WAIST, AND AROUND CUFFS; JACKET OPENS AT THE FRONT. JACKET HAS WHITE CLOTH TAG PINNED TO THE INSIDE OF THE RIGHT-WEARING SHOULDER WITH BLACK TEXT, “W. CURRIE”. JACKET HAS MINOR FRAYING THREADS; JACKET HAS LIGHT RUB AND WEAR MARKS ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. PANTS, 103.5 CM L X 27 CM W. MAROON SILK PANTS WITH ELASTIC WAIST AND ANKLES; PANTS HAVE WHITE COTTON TAG PINNED INSIDE WAIST WITH BLACK TEXT “W. CURRIE”. PANTS HAVE BLACK COTTON LOOP INSIDE ANKLES. PANTS HAVE MINOR FRAYING THREADS; PANTS HAVE CREASING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SASH, 211 CM L X 16 CM W. CREAM SILK SASH WITH POINTED, DIAMOND ENDS; SASH HAS STITCHING ALONG EDGES. SASH HAS CREASING ON EDGES; SASH HAS MINOR STAINING; SASH HAS MINOR RUB AND WEAR MARKS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. TIE-CLIP, 18.3 CM L X 2 CM W. GOLD TIE-CLIP WITH TWO CURLED RIBBON-SHAPED END PIECES, WITH FASTENERS ON BACK; TIE-CLIP HAS GOLD CHAIN CONNECTING END PIECES. CURLED RIBBON PIECES HAVE TEXTURED FRONTS; FASTENERS HAVE TEETH ON UNDERSIDE; FASTENERS HAVE INDENTED, TEXTURED GRIPS. TIE-CLIP HAS MINOR TARNISHING ON FASTENERS AND END PIECES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. TIE, 84 CM L X 11.5 CM W. GOLD SILK TIE WITH POINTED DIAMOND ENDS; TIE IS SOLID GOLD FABRIC WITH GOLD STITCHING ALONG EDGES. TIE HAS CREASING IN CENTER; TIE HAS RUB AND WEAR MARKS ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008006
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPUDNUTS
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WAX PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20200012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPUDNUTS
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WAX PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
25.2
Width
12.5
Description
RECTANGULAR WAX PAPER BAG WITH AN OPENING ON TOP. THE FRONT HAS AN ORANGE VERTICAL LINE DESIGN FROM TOP TO BOTTOM. THERE IS A BROWN BLOCK LETTERED “SPUDNUTS” AT THE MID-PART OF THE BAG ON ORANGE BACKGROUND. THE BAG HAS A SERRATED TOP EDGE, AND A BACK FLAP SLIGHTLY LONGER THAN FRONT. ON THE BOTTOM IT SAYS “SPUDNUT OF CANADA LTD.” AND “VANCOUVER, B.C.” UNDERNEATH. BOTTOM HAS “INGREDIENTS: WHEAT FLOUR…(CAROTENE A).” THE BACK HAS A SERRATED TOP AND A SQUARE BOTTOM FOLDED. THE BASE SAYS “REED 4” AND HAS ORANGE STRIPE DESIGN.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 12, 2020 GALT MUSEUM CURATOR, AIMEE BENOIT, MET WITH FORMER LOCAL SPUDNUT SHOP OWNER WOLFGANG OTTO, AS WELL AS DENISE HAMMON— FORMER OWNER OF CRAZY CAKES. ACCORDING TO A MAY 8TH, 2009 LETHBRIDGE HERALD SEGMENT, THE SPUDNUT SHOP BUILDING LOCATED AT 1102 5TH AVENUE SOUTH WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT AS A MUSIC CONSERVATORY IN 1909. WOLFGANG STARTED MAKING SPUDNUTS IN 1965. HE THEN PURCHASED THE BUSINESS IN 1966 AND RAN IT UNTIL 2000, AND LATER CONTINUED TO MAKE SPUDNUTS AT CRAZY CAKES FROM 2007 UNTIL ITS CLOSING IN OCTOBER 2019. HE DESCRIBED THE SWEET SECRET BEHIND SPUDNUTS AS “THE INGREDIENTS [HAVE] TO BE [THE] SAME ALL THE TIME. THE TRICK IS THE POTATO FLOUR. THAT’S THE TRICK... IT’S ALL ABOUT POTATO.” WOLFGANG DONATED THE BAGS THE SPUDNUTS WERE SERVED IN TO THE MUSEUM, AND THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE INTERVIEW. FROM 1950 UNTIL 1956, THE SPUDNUT BUILDING WAS CALLED BABE’S SPUDNUT & ICE CREAM BAR. IT WAS BRIEFLY TAKEN OVER BY BYRON SCHURTZ WHO THEN SOLD IT TO GUNTHER LEBRO IN 1958. THEN, THE LEGACY WAS TAKEN UP BY WOLFGANG OTTO AND HIS WIFE ANGIE, ALSO KNOWN AS MR. AND MRS. SPUDNUT, IN 1966. WOLFGANG DESCRIBED HOW HE CAME TO LIVE AND WORK IN LETHBRIDGE AFTER GROWING UP IN GERMANY: “...I WAS BORN IN GERMANY…AT A TOWN THAT’S [CALLED] HUSUM...RIGHT ON THE NORTH SEA COAST… IN 1956, I MADE UP MY MIND TO COME TO CANADA…I ARRIVE[D] HERE...IN WINNIPEG AND THREE DAYS LATER, WAS A TRAINED DAIRY BUTTER MAKER WHICH I DID IN KENORA AND [THE OWNERS] WERE….DUTCH PEOPLE BUT BORN IN CANADA… [THEY] WERE VERY NICE TO ME… [I DID NOT KNOW ENGLISH]...THAT ARRIVED AFTER 1945. [KNOWING] THE DUTCH [PEOPLE]...HELPED ME A LOT BECAUSE I SPEAK HIGH AND LOW GERMAN… I CAME IN [1961]...TO LETHBRIDGE… I NEEDED A PLACE AND I FOUND AN APARTMENT UPSTAIRS AT THE SPUDNUT SHOP...AND THAT’S WHEN EVERYTHING STARTED… GUNTHER LEBRO…HAD THE SPUDNUTS SHOP [AND] WANTED TO GO BACK TO GERMANY... HE SAID, ‘ARE YOU INTERESTED?’ I SAID, ‘WELL LET ME SEE,’... SO, ONE DAY I START ROLLING HIS DOUGH AND HE SAID, ‘YOU MUST HAVE DONE IT BEFORE!’ THE WAY I WAS WORKING AT IT. I SAID ‘NO, MAYBE BECAUSE I PLAY ACCORDION.’… THAT’S THE WAY IT STARTED. THEN, WITHIN...SIX MONTH[S]...I TOOK OVER HIS SPUDNUTS SHOP.” WOLFGANG OUTLINED HIS INTERACTIONS WITH GUNTHER LEBRO AND HIS FAMILY. HE AT FIRST WORKED FOR LEBRO FOR: “SIX MONTHS…AND THEN HE WORKED FOR ME…AND THEN HE OPENED A SPUDNUTS SHOP IN CALGARY… AT THAT TIME HE HAD ONLY ONE [CHILD] AND THEN THEY HAD TWO MORE KIDS…I MET THE TWO…THEY WANTED TO SEE THEIR [PARENTS] BACKGROUND…WHERE THEY LIVED…WHICH I DID [SHARE WITH THEM]… BUT MRS. AND MR. LEBRO DIED...BUT THE KIDS [HAVE] BEEN OVER HERE, TWICE... NOT THE [OLDER CHILD] THAT WAS BORN HERE…THE OTHER [TWO]…KIDS [WERE] VERY HAPPY TO SEE THE BACKGROUND [AND] WHAT THEIR PARENTS DID HERE...[AND] WHERE THEY LIVED…” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE WOLFGANG DECIDE TO TAKE OVER THE BUSINESS, HE RESPONDED: “TO BE ON MY OWN BECAUSE I HAD A BAD EXPERIENCE WITH THE DAIRY…THAT’S WHEN I TOOK UP GARBUTT BUSINESS COLLEGE. THEN I WORKED FIRST FOR THE…BUILDING SUPPLIES; CONSTRUCTION. I WORKED THERE TWO YEARS. [I] DID THE BOOKS…” WOLFGANG DESCRIBED THE DAY-TO-DAY AND YEARLY ROUTINE AT THE SHOP: “...I CAME IN [AT]…TWO [OR] THREE O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING… [I ALSO WORKED FOR] MCGAVINS... I REALLY SAT DOWN AND FIGURED IT OUT THAT WAS JUST PENNIES WHAT I MADE THERE... I EVEN BAKED FOR THEM ON SUNDAY. THERE WAS NOTHING IN IT... THEN, WHEN I HAD MY FIRST CHILD...WE STARTED HAVING SUNDAY OFF...OTHERWISE IT WAS SUNDAY ‘TIL SUNDAY...FOR TEN YEARS. THEN, AFTER THAT...[WE] EVEN CLOSED FOR TWO WEEKS [AND] FLEW TO GERMANY…WE WENT IN THE SUMMER-TIME; [WE] USED [TO GO] ALWAYS AROUND CHRISTMAS, JUST SHUT DOWN [THE SHOP]. BUT THEN, I WAS BE ABLE TO DO THAT IN THE SUMMER-TIME, TOO, SO THAT’S WHEN WE DID CHANGE IT FROM THE WINTER TO THE SUMMER, WHICH IS FAR NICER..." WOLFGANG TALKED ABOUT THE SPUDNUT FRANCHISE AND DONATED BAGS, “THAT’S THE CONTROL OF THE NAME OF THE INGREDIENTS…AND THAT [RECIPE] STARTED IN SALT LAKE CITY... [IT WAS MADE WITH] POTATOES, WHICH I BOUGHT HERE. I DON’T HAVE ANYMORE...AND THEY MADE A MISTAKE…[WHEN THEY INITIALLY] PRINTED THAT [BAG] IN WINNIPEG. I HAD ONE MILLION BAGS ORDERED IN THE 60’S, AND THEN I SEE THAT…ONE MISTAKE…POTATO FLOUR…I HAD TO SHIP THEM THERE...UNBELIEVABLE HOW MANY. BUT THEN I GOT ANOTHER DISCOUNT BECAUSE THEY MADE A MISTAKE… I’VE SENT TWICE TEN DOZEN BY AIRPORT TO OTTAWA... THERE [WAS] ONE [SPUDNUTS BAKERY] IN MEDICINE HAT, ONE IN REGINA, THEN LATER, IN CALGARY. BUT [IT] WAS NOT THE SAME. THEY DIDN’T GET…THE SAME FLOUR… I HAD THE FLOUR COMING IN FROM SALT LAKE CITY IN THOSE DAYS. THEN THEY FINALLY GAVE UP, BUT I HAD THE RECIPE SO I...[GOT THE INGREDIENTS ELSEWHERE]. THEN THEY GAVE UP. THEN I HAD [SUPPLIERS] IN CALGARY AND REGINA. HALF THERE, HALF IN CALGARY...” WOLFGANG TALKED ABOUT HOW HE ENJOYED RUNNING THE BUSINESS, “...[I NEVER KNEW] THAT I WOULD BE A BAKER... IT IS DIFFERENT WHEN YOU’RE ON YOUR OWN... I WOULD ONCE A WEEK DRIVE OUT TO COALDALE. FROM TEN ‘TIL ELEVEN-THIRTY, THERE WERE ABOUT 10-12 GERMANS, ALWAYS AT THE SAME TABLE... AND THEY [SAW] ME ON TV... WHEN I TOOK OVER IN [1966]...COALDALE GAVE ME ONLY SIX MONTHS… I EVEN HAD A GUY FROM THE GOVERNMENT CHECK MY BOOKS AND HE SAID, ‘CAN I ASK YOU?’ AND I SAID, ‘WELL SURE, GO AHEAD.’ [AND THEN HE ASKED] ‘HOW CAN YOU MAKE A LIVING ON WAGES…?’ I SAID, ‘LISTEN, I’M NOT [GOING] IN A RESTAURANT [TO] EAT.’ I SAID, ‘[MY WIFE COOKS FOR ME] SECONDLY, I DON’T HAVE A STEAK EVERY DAY. I HAVE A SPUDNUT.’ GUESS WHAT? NEXT DAY HE CAME BACK AND SAID, ‘...I UNDERSTAND YOU’… I SAID ‘BEFORE I PAY MYSELF, I PAY [FOR MY SUPPLIES].’” WOLFGANG ELABORATED ON THE TASTY OFFERINGS AT THE SHOP: “[SPUDNUTS WERE] THE MAIN [PRODUCT]...AND [I] MADE MY OWN ICE CREAM...” WOLFGANG DESCRIBED HOW CUSTOMERS WOULD COME FROM SWIMMING AT THE FRITZ SICK POOL TO THE SPUDNUTS SHOP: “...THEY CAME IN FOR THE OLD SPUDNUT, [THAT WAS] TWO FOR FIVE CENTS...AND THE FAMOUS DRINK...[CALLED] …GRAVEYARD…[WHICH HAD] SIX-SEVEN DIFFERENT SHOTS...[OF] STRAWBERRIES OR RASPBERRY...FROM THE GARDEN..." WOLFGANG SPOKE ABOUT SELLING HIS BUSINESS: "...I SHUT DOWN IN THE YEAR 2000, IN JUNE…I NEVER HAD A SALE SIGN ON THE WINDOW THAT I WILL SELL THE BUSINESS, BUT IT WAS FOR SALE– THE BUILDING…THEN I SAW...BILL [AND] DENISE… I SHOWED BILL ALL THE UPSTAIRS... THE [CONNECTION] WITH BILL AND DENISE, IT WAS AS IF I HAD SEEN THEM BEFORE...” “...WITHIN A WEEK [BILL AND DENISE INQUIRED] ‘HOW MUCH?’ I SAID [A PRICE]. [IT WAS ONLY] TWO [OR] THREE DAYS [BEFORE] I HAD MY CHEQUE IN MY HAND... I STARTED CRYING...BECAUSE I [HAD] BEEN IN THERE FOR SO LONG; NOW IT’S GONNA BE OVER... [THE PEOPLE WHO BOUGHT THE BUILDING] SAID TO ME, ‘YOU WANT TO HAVE IT ALL OR HALF?’ I SAID NO ‘…HALF NOW AND HALF LATER.’ THEN WITHIN TWO DAYS I HAVE THE CHEQUE, [I] CRADLED [AND] CARRIED [THE CHEQUE] LIKE A LITTLE BABY… THAT’S WHY WE ARE FRIENDS STILL TODAY... I SAID TO DENISE, ‘IF YOU GO BACK INTO THE SPUDNUT BUSINESS AND ICE CREAM, I [WILL] SHOW YOU,’ WHICH I DID [AND I STAYED ON]… I SEE BILL EVERY MORNING FOR MY COFFEE…” WOLFGANG RECALLED HOW HE FELT COMING BACK TO MAKE SPUDNUTS AT CRAZY CAKES: “OH! IN MY GLORY!... BILL KNEW MY TRICKS, TOO… HE PUT OPEN THE CURTAINS...BECAUSE...I GOTTA SEE THE AIR... IF THAT’S CLOSED, I COULDN’T WORK FOR YOU. GOT TO...CONNECT ME WITH NATURE..." DENISE HAMMON ADDED ON HER EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH WOLFGANG: “...WE’D ALL MEET THERE AT ABOUT TWO O’CLOCK OR TWO-THIRTY IN THE MORNING AND WE’D HAVE COFFEE, PUT THE DOUGH ON… IF THERE WAS SNACKS LEFT OVER FROM THE NIGHT BEFORE, FROM CRAZY CAKES, THEN WE’D HAVE A LITTLE TREAT OR SOMETIMES THE GIRLS WOULD LEAVE TREATS FOR US TO TRY... SO WE’D DO THAT IN THE MORNING, THEN WE’D GET TO WORK… WE WOULD DANCE IN THE MORNINGS. WOLFGANG WOULD BE ROLLING THE SPUDNUTS AND I’D GO AND PUT ON THE...MUSIC... A SONG WOULD COME ON AND I’D BE FRYING SO I’D PUT MY SPUDS IN THE FRYER AND RUN OUT AND WE’D HAVE A QUICK TWIRL AROUND IN THE FRONT OF THE SHOP... THEN I’D GO, ‘OKAY I HAVE TO RUN BACK.’ HE’D GO BACK TO ROLL AND I’D GO BACK TO SPUDS…” DENISE SPOKE ON CHANGES TO THE SPUDNUT BUILDING: “...WHEN WOLFGANG WAS THERE, EVERYTHING WAS GRANDFATHERED IN. HE WAS ABLE TO KEEP THE FRYER THE WAY IT WAS...EVERYTHING WAS OKAY... BUT, BECAUSE HE WAS CLOSED FOR SO LONG, AND WE BOUGHT IT, WE DIDN’T HAVE THE GRANDFATHER CLAUSE SO WE HAD TO RENOVATE; BECAUSE THE BATHROOM WAS IN THE KITCHEN WHEN WOLFGANG HAD IT AND THAT’S A NO-NO... WE GOT NEW EQUIPMENT, TOO… [THE MIXER] JUST DIED…NOT LONG BEFORE WE CLOSED… HER NAME WAS BETSY… [THE MIXER] USED TO BE GUNMETAL GREY AND MY DAUGHTER SPRAY-PAINTED HER PINK.” WOLFGANG SHARED WHAT HE THOUGHT SPUDNUTS WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR: “...WE TREATED CUSTOMERS LIKE FAMILY... I HAD ONE CUSTOMER, FROM CALGARY…BUT YOU COULD TELL HE WAS SHY... HE ASKED FOR A DOZEN DOUGHNUTS… I SAID, ‘YOU’RE IN THE WRONG PLACE.’ BUT HE WAS SHOCKED THE WAY I SAID IT… I SAID, ‘IF YOU SAY ‘SPUDNUTS’ YOU’RE IN THE RIGHT PLACE'... BUT YOU COULD TELL I NEVER SHOULD HAVE MENTIONED IT... I WOULD ALWAYS GO UP TO THE FRONT WHEN THE CHILDREN [CAME TO THE SHOP]... I [WOULD] GIVE THE SPUDNUT OUTSIDE, THE SPUDNUT HOLES... YOU GOTTA TREAT THEM RIGHT, THE LITTLE KIDS... LATER, THEY COME BACK AND TELL YOU THAT…YOU DID THAT... THE CONNECTION, ESPECIALLY WITH CHILDREN…I STILL MISS IT. BUT, I HAVE TO GIVE UP.” WOLFGANG CLOSED DOWN THE SHOP IN 2000: “WELL, MY WIFE, SHE SAID ‘WOLFGANG YOU HAVE TO QUIT’ I SAID ‘NO [I'LL] KEEP ON GOING,’ AND THEN...[THE] KIDS [WERE] GETTING OLDER TOO...AND I WAS 68.” WOLFGANG COMMENTED ON THE INFLUENCE OF SPUDNUTS, “I HAVE A LOT OF DREAMS THAT I’M STILL MAKING THE SPUDNUTS... I DID IT FOR TOO MANY YEARS... WHEN I WOULD MAKE ICE CREAM...[IF A MOTHER AND A CHILD CAME INTO THE SHOP I WOULD GIVE THEM]...ICE CREAM...IN A CONE, THEN PUT…SPRINKLES ON IT...JUST TO MAKE [THEM] HAPPY… I WAS KNOWN FOR THAT. TOWARDS THE END...WHEN THEY WOULD GO TO THE YMCA, AND THE KIDS TO KINDERGARTEN, I WOULD RUN OUT [AND] GIVE EACH ONE A SPUDNUT HOLE. KIDS...WOULD LOOK IN [THE SHOP FROM OUTSIDE]...[TO SEE IF] IF I WOULD COME OUT BECAUSE KIDS, THEY USE THEIR BRAINS; YOU GET SOMETHING FOR FREE... I WAS VERY WELL KNOWN FOR THAT AND I GAVE FAR MORE THEN I SHOULD BUT...I DID IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200012001
Acquisition Date
2020-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WALL TROPHY
Date Range From
1964
Date Range To
1972
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20200006005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WALL TROPHY
Date Range From
1964
Date Range To
1972
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.5
Length
30.5
Width
23
Description
A. WOOD AND METAL WALL MOUNTING TROPHY WITH GOLD ENGRAVED PLATES ATTACHED. ONE LARGE PLATE ON THE TOP READS “LETH. DIST. FISH + GAME ASSOC. GUN CLUB WESTERN METALS FABRICATORS LADIES HIGH”. THE SMALL PLATES READ: “S BRENNAN 98 X 100 1964 CALGARY” “SANDY BRENNAN 85 X 100 1965” (THIS PLATE IS COMPONANT PART B) “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 100 X 9 1966” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 1971” “SHEILA KEARNS CALGARY 1967” “1968 EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 100 X 7 LETH MARKSMEN” “S. TIMMERMAN 1969” “E. LEFFINGWELL 1970” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 1972” THERE IS A GOLD TROPHY FIGURE PIECE ATTACHED, FEATURING A PERSON SHOOTING A RIFLE. ON THE BACK THERE ARE TWO METAL LOOPS ATTACHED TO THE TOP WITH BLUE AND WHITE CORD STRUNG AND TIED BETWEEN THEM. THERE ARE TWO ADDITIONAL HOLES IN THE WOOD NEAR THE BOTTOM WITH SCREWS FOR MOUNTING THE FIGURE PIECE ON THE FRONT. ONE SMALL PLATE FROM THE LEFT SIDE AND THE SECOND IN THE COLUMN HAS FALLEN OFF. IT HAS BEEN INCLUDED AS A COMPONENT PART. B. LENGTH 5 CM WIDTH 2.5 CM GOLD PLATE ENGRAVED WITH “SANDY BRENNAN 85 X 100 1965”. THE PLATE WAS ATTACHED ON THE LEFT SIDE SECOND IN THE COLUMN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON FEBRUARY 27TH AND MARCH 5TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHINICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH EVELYN LEFFINGWELL IN HER LETHBRIDGE HOME ALONG WITH HER DAUGHTER, LYNDA BARANIECKI. EVELYN AND HER LATE HUSBAND FRANK WERE PROMINENT LOCAL MARKSMEN, TAUGHT YOUNG PEOPLE THE SKILL, WON MANY AWARDS WHILE COMPETING, AND WERE INDUCTED INTO THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. THEY WERE BOTH VERY INVOLVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES, AND SHOOTING CLUBS. EVELYN DONATED A COLLECTION OF ITEMS RELATED TO THE COUPLE’S SPORTING DAYS TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE TWO AFOREMENTIONED INTERVIEWS. LYNDA CLARIFIED THE DIFFERENCE AND OVERLAP BETWEEN THE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION AND THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMEN CLUB: “…THE FISH AND GAME REALLY ISN’T A SHOOTING CLUB. THE FISH AND GAME INVOLVES IT ALL… CERTAINLY, IT’S FISHING, IT’S HUNTING, IT’S SAFETY OF GUNS, ALL THAT KIND OF THING. THEIR MARKSMAN CLUB WAS JUST THEIR COMPETITION.” LYNDA EXPLAINED THE LABEL ON THE TROPHY: “…[THE LADIES HIGH] JUST MEANT THAT SHE WAS THE HIGHEST SCORER IN THE ’22. WHEN THEY SHOT ’22, THEY’D SHOOT FROM KNEELING, SITTING, AND STANDING… SO SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN THE COMBINATION SCORE, THE AGGREGATE SCORE OF THE WOMAN’S.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE DONATED WALL TROPHY: “…THIS IS THE ‘LADIES HIGH’. I’VE WON IT QUITE A FEW TIMES AND REPLACED IT. THAT’S WHAT THE DEAL WAS, IF YOU WIN IT THREE TIMES, YOU CAN TAKE IT OUT OF CIRCULATION [AND] PUT A NEW ONE IN… OUR LADIES TEAM, WE’VE DONE THAT.” EVELYN’S REACTION TO WINNING THE LADIES HIGH WAS: “...ANYTIME YOU CAN WIN IT, IT’S LOVELY…” WHEN ASKED WHAT EVELYN THOUGHT ABOUT WHEN LOOKING AT THE AWARD, SHE RESPONDED: “HOW I USED TO BE ABLE TO SHOOT.” LYNDA ADDED: “WHEN SHE WAS GOOD.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “THAT’S RIGHT. NOWADAYS, IF I GOT DOWN I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP ANYMORE.” “I’M 85 YEARS OLD, YOU KNOW… IT WAS ALWAYS AN HONOUR WHEN YOU COULD WIN…” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE OUTLINED EVELYN’S ACHIEVEMENTS, NOTING THAT “EVELYN WAS THE CANADIAN WOMEN’S CHAMPION IN 1967 FOR .22 RIFLE POSTAL MATCHES AND THIRD IN KNEELING. SHE WON THE RIFLEMAN’S RODEO TITLE A NUMBER OF TIMES AND SET CANADIAN BENCHREST RECORDS THREE TIMES. IN 1983 SHE SET THE 100-YARD AGGREGATE HUNTER SCORE MARK AND IN 1984 THE 100-200 YARD AGGREGATE HUNTER SCORE. IN 1987 SHE SET THE VARMIT HUNTER, 200-YARD GROUP RECORD WHICH STILL STANDS.” WHEN ASKED WHAT THE COMPETITION WAS LIKE, EVELYN REPLIED: “WELL, SOME PRETTY TOUGH COMPETITION WE WOULD HAVE. WE HAD A COUPLE OF GIRLS FROM CALGARY, THEY WERE REALLY GOOD… THERE’S A LOT OF GOOD LADY SHOOTERS. IT WAS FUN TO JUST...BE FRIENDS AND HAVE FUN AND TRY [AND] BEAT [THEM].” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT HELPED HER WIN: “[I] HAD MY HUSBAND [TELLING] ME WHAT TO DO. HE TRAINED ME.” LYNDA ADDED: “AND…SOMETIMES IT’S JUST LUCK OF THE DRAW. YOU KNOW, THE WIND HAPPENS TO BLOW THE RIGHT WAY.” LYNDA COMMENTED THAT HER MOM WAS ALSO SKILLFUL: “BUT…IT’S NOT LIKE IT’S A LUCKY THING, SHE WON LOTS. IT WASN’T LIKE IT WAS JUST ALL LUCK, EITHER.” WHEN ASKED IF EVELYN WAS INTO ANY SPORTS EARLIER IN LIFE, EVELYN RESPONDED: “…SPORTS? NOPE. NEVER, UNTIL I STARTED SHOOTING.” EVELYN SAID THAT SHE WAS MOTIVATED TO GET GOOD AT THE SPORT BY HER HUSBAND: “‘…FRANK DID IT ALL THE TIME, WE JUST DID IT TOGETHER, AND HE TAUGHT ME WHAT TO DO…” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT WHAT SHE GAINED FROM THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[WHAT I GAINED THROUGH SHOOTING WAS] FRIENDSHIP… WE WERE ALL IN THE SAME THING. WE WERE ALL FRIENDS. WE TRAVELED TOGETHER TO THE DIFFERENT SHOOTS… WE ALL WANTED EVERYBODY ELSE TO WIN. IT WAS ENJOYABLE. I LOVED IT. IN FACT, I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO [GO TO THE] SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. I SHOT IN THE FIRST ONE… FRANK AND I, WE STARTED DOWN AT THE LETHBRIDGE RANGE WITH OUR KIDS, [GETTING THEM] READY, AND US, TO GO TO THE GAMES... I’D GO TO A LOT OF SMALL TOWNS THAT WERE HAVING [THEM], THAT DIDN’T KNOW QUITE WHAT TO DO; GET THEM ALL SET UP FOR THE GAMES. GO IN AND GET THEIR TARGETS… I ALWAYS HAD THEIR TARGETS ALL READY AND THE RANGE READY FOR PEOPLE TO COME IN. I JUST WON A VERY SPECIAL AWARD, ‘HEART OF A CHAMPION’, FROM THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. [WE ALSO WON THE] MAX GIBB AWARD THAT FRANK AND I BOTH WON. IT’S WORTH IT. PEOPLE APPRECIATE YOU FOR WHAT YOU DO.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY SHE FOUND IN THE SHOOTING CLUBS AND COMPETITIONS: “…I FIND WHEREVER I GO AND WHENEVER THE MEMBERS…ARE THERE, THEY’RE ALWAYS UP, THEY’RE [HUGGING] ME… WHEN WE USED TO HOLD THE SHOOTS…AND KIDS WOULD SHOOT, THEY’D ALWAYS SHOOT THEIR TARGETS AND RUN [THEM] OVER TO ME…SO THAT I COULD CHECK [THEM] OUT BEFORE ANYTHING HAPPENED… [WHEN] WE WERE AT A SHOOT, EVEN IF I WASN’T IN CHARGE OF IT, I WAS THERE, AND…[SOMEBODY] SHOT A TARGET AND THEY DIDN’T FIGURE IT WAS RIGHT, THEY’D BRING IT TO ME. I’D CHECK IT OVER AND THEN I’D GO TO THE SCORERS AND SAY, ‘WILL YOU CHECK THIS OVER, AGAIN?’ IT’S JUST THE TOGETHERNESS THAT I THINK THAT WE FIND.” LYNDA ADDED: “IT’S DEFINITELY A FAMILY... MY DAD WAS A COWBOY…THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT... HE WORE HIS COWBOY BOOTS, HE WORE HIS COWBOY HAT, THAT’S WHAT HE DID. HE WAS JUST A DOWN TO EARTH PERSON… THERE WAS NO AIRS...AND THAT’S HOW I FIND THAT THE SHOOTERS ARE… THEY DON’T HAVE TO PUT ON AIRS FOR ANYBODY… THEY LOVED WHAT THEY DID…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO BE RICH AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE MONEY…AND EVEN IF YOU HAD MONEY, YOU COULD STILL COME…AND I THINK THE FACT THAT MY DAD WAS A MENTOR… HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN SEEING HIS JUNIOR SHOOTERS WIN A COMPETITION THAN WINNING IT HIMSELF. HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN WATCHING…[MY MOM] WIN.” “…EVEN IN THE WINTERTIME WE DIDN’T SHOOT…BUT THEY STILL MET ALL THE TIME... THEY’D GO FOR COFFEE. THIS WAS THEIR GROUP…IT WAS THEIR FAMILY…” EVELYN CONTINUED: “[IT WAS] THE FRIENDSHIP.” “…AFTER FRANK PASSED AWAY, I HAD FRIENDS THAT WOULD PHONE ME EVERY DAY, TELL ME A JOKE TO MAKE ME LAUGH AND THEY JUST DIDN’T FORGET…[YOU]… THAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER DAD’S LEGACY IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “THEY HAVE A MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR MY DAD IN AUGUST, ONCE A YEAR, AS WELL…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER [SHOOT IN THE MEMORIAL]. PEOPLE THAT DON’T KNOW HIM, THOUGH, COME BECAUSE THEY’VE HEARD OF HIM… THE PEOPLE THAT DID KNOW HIM…THEY’RE THE ONES THAT CAN TELL THE STORIES.” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE FRANK UNIQUE IN HIS COMMUNITY, EVELYN RESPONDED: “HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN PROPER WAY OF SHOOTING, OF TEACHING THE JUNIORS—” “—AND EVERYBODY ELSE…TO SHOOT AND HOW…[TO] BE CAREFUL.” EVELYN WENT ON: “…THAT WAS HIS LIFE. HE LOVED SHOOTING, HE LOVED TO TEACH. GARY ELLISON WROTE A STORY ABOUT HIS SON; HE COULD REMEMBER HOW THANKFUL HIS SON WAS THAT HE WAS DOWN THE RANGE ONE DAY AND FRANK HAD HAD HIM USE HIS GUN TO SHOOT. EVERYBODY RESPECTED HIM BECAUSE OF HIS SAFETY.” LYNDA ADDED: “PROPER HANDLING OF GUNS.” “HE WAS A MASTER IN WHAT HE DID, DEFINITELY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…HE JUST HAD [AN] EXTREME KNOWLEDGE… HE WANTED TO LEARN AND HE LEARNED ALL THE TIME.” WHEN ASKED WHAT VALUES EVELYN AND FRANK TRIED TO INSTILL IN THE YOUNG PEOPLE THEY TAUGHT, SHE REPLIED: “SAFETY FIRST. KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]. WATCH WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]… IN THE ROOM THERE…I HAVE A BARREL THAT I TAKE DOWN WHENEVER WE HAVE OUR JUNIOR SHOOTERS SO THAT WE TEACH [THEM] YOU DON’T PUT IT DOWN [TO] GET THROUGH THE FENCE; YOU DON’T PUT YOUR RIFLE DOWN, YOUR BARREL, [BECAUSE] IT’S JUST BLOWN ALL APART… I’VE BEEN AT SHOOTS WHERE GUYS HAVE LAID DOWN AND PUT THE WRONG AMMUNITION IN THEIR GUN AND IT BLOWS UP… [IT] MAKES A DIFFERENCE. YOU…[HAVE TO] REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING] AND HOW TO DO IT. SAFETY IS THE FIRST THING.” EVELYN COMMENTED ON BEING REMEMBERED FOR TEACHING JUNIORS THE SPORT: “…I HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE FROM THE FISH AND GAME THAT COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘YOU TAUGHT ME AS JUNIOR’ …IT’S…REALLY AMAZING HOW PEOPLE REMEMBER YOU.” LYNDA ELABORATED ON THE MEANING BEHIND HER PARENTS BEING INDUCTED INTO THE HALL OF FAME: “MY DAD WAS INDUCTED AS A BUILDER, NOT AS AN ATHLETE. [MY MOM] WAS INDUCTED AS AN ATHLETE, SO THERE WERE TWO DIFFERENT CATEGORIES… TO ME, MY DAD WAS A MENTOR. HE TAUGHT, THAT WAS HIS FIELD. THAT’S…WHERE HE SHONE… I MEAN, HE WAS A SHOOTER, THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT, HE WAS A MASTER OF WHAT HE DID, BUT IT’S THE TEACHING THAT WAS SO IMPORTANT TO HIM. NOT THAT IT WASN’T TO HER BUT…THAT’S WHY.” EVELYN OFFERED HER CLOSING THOUGHTS ON BEING IN THE HALL OF FAME: “I FEEL…ABSOLUTELY HONOURED. I’VE BEEN THINKING OF THIS FOR A LONG TIME AND TO ME, IT’S GREAT. [FRANK] DESERVES IT. I HEAR EVERYBODY ELSE GOING IN THERE, WHY CAN’T HE? WE GOT OUR ROCK BUT NOBODY SEES THAT. BUT, IT IS AN HONOUR.” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE MADE REFERENCE TO THE ROCK EVELYN MENTIONED. THE ARTICLE STATED THAT “A CAIRN AT THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME TARGET RANGE, IN MEMORY OF FRANK LEFFINGWELL, ONE OF THE MAIN FORCES BEHIND THE RANGE WILL BE UNVEILED…” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT MOTIVATED HER TO DONATE THE MEMORABILIA TO THE MUSEUM: “…I HAVE SO MUCH STUFF AND FRANK HAS BEEN AWARDED…AND WORKED SO HARD TO GET EVERYTHING THAT HE GOT. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION. HE DID AN AWFUL LOT THROUGH CONSTRUCTION OF THE RANGE DOWN THERE, AND ALL OF THE AWARDS THAT HE HAS WON, HE’S THE GREATEST… THIS WAY, I FIGURED OTHER PEOPLE CAN…SEE JUST WHAT A KIND OF A GENTLEMAN HE WAS…AND HOW GREAT HE WAS AT SHOOTING.” “…I’M [GETTING] OLDER ALL THE TIME AND THERE COULD BE A TIME WHEN I’M…[GOING TO] HAVE TO LEAVE OUR HOME. WHAT AM I…[GOING TO] DO WITH THIS STUFF…? I’VE HAD PEOPLE COME AND I’LL SEE IF THERE’S ANYTHING THAT YOU’D REALLY LIKE TO REMEMBER HIM BY, BY ALL MEANS TAKE IT HOME WITH YOU. BUT THE THING IS, WHAT’S MY FAMILY…[GOING TO] DO WITH EVERYTHING THAT’S HERE? NOBODY WANTS IT. THE TROPHIES, YOU CAN’T DO…[ANYTHING] WITH THEM; THEY END UP IN THE DUMP, WHICH IS SAD TO SAY.” EVELYN WENT ON: “I DON’T THINK YOU’LL SEE [ANYTHING LIKE MY BASEMENT]…AGAIN. THIS IS ALL THE AWARDS AND THINGS THAT WE HAVE WON THROUGH THE YEARS. WE STARTED SHOOTING IN…[1966].” EVELYN PROVIDED THE ORIGINS OF HOW SHE STARTED SHOOTING: “[I STARTED SHOOTING] JUST TO BE WITH HIM, THAT’S ALL.” “…IT WAS JUST THAT WE TRAVELED TOGETHER AND…THAT’S WHY HE HAD ME WITH HIM. IF ANYTHING HAPPENED, IT WAS BOTH OF US TOGETHER. [THAT’S] JUST THE WAY IT WAS.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT LEARNING TO HUNT FROM FRANK: “…IT WAS JUST NICE TO BE OUT THERE, TO BE ABLE TO JUST BE OUT IN THE COUNTRY AND SEE THE ANIMALS. IT’S VERY FUNNY, THE FIRST TIME I WENT OUT WITH HIM AND HE SHOT A DEER… HE DECIDED HE’S…[GOING TO] CLEAN IT… HE SAID, ‘HOLD THIS LEG FOR ME.’ SO I HELD THIS LEG AND THEN PRETTY SOON, ‘HOW ABOUT THIS ONE?’ …BEFORE LONG, I’M…LOOKING DOWN INTO IT. HE DIDN’T WANT ME TO DO IT BECAUSE HE THOUGHT I’D GET SICK, BUT, HERE I WAS. [THAT] WAS A GOOD WAY TO TEACH ME.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER AND FRANK SHARED A COMMITMENT TO THE SPORT OVER TIME: “…THEN IT JUST SEEMED LIKE BEING INVOLVED WITH GOING DOWN TO THE RANGE AND HAVING THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME RANGE... HIS DAD AND MOM LIVED WITH US. HIS DAD AND HIM WOULD LOAD ALL THE TIME AND GO DOWN SHOOTING AND THEN WHEN DAD PASSED AWAY…FRANK JUST CONTINUED ON… THEN…A BUNCH OF US…GOT TOGETHER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME AND WE WERE UNDER THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS CLUB. PERCY BUTLER…WANTED TO START THE SHOOTING PROGRAM AND WE GOT INVOLVED IN THAT, AND THAT WAS THE START OF IT; WE JUST CONTINUED ON.” “…IT WAS ALSO THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS [THAT PROMPTED FRANK TO START TARGET SHOOTING]… THEY WANTED TO START A JUNIOR PROGRAM SO SOME OF OUR MEMBERS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME, THEY WERE IN THERE, THEY WERE…[GOING TO] TEACH THE PROPER WAY OF HANDLING GUNS AND EVERYTHING AND FRANK AND I [WERE] WITH [THEM]. SO WE JUST WENT IN…[TO TEACHING] THEM AND CONTINUED ON. WE HAD PROGRAMS WHERE WE HAVE SENIORS, WE USED TO SHOOT IN THE RCMP INDOOR RANGE. THAT WAS BELOW THE GARAGE. [THAT] WAS MANY YEARS AGO…” “…WE STARTED WITH…TEACHING JUNIORS [SHOOTING]…AND THEN JUST WENT ON TO COMPETITION-SHOOTING. [WE] TRAVELED ALL OVER AND, LUCKY ENOUGH, THAT WE WERE GOOD ENOUGH TO DO IT. BUT WE DID IT TOGETHER. [THAT] WAS THE MAIN THING. WE LOADED BEFORE WE WENT TO A SHOOT, RIGHT UP UNTIL TWELVE O’CLOCK AT NIGHT, JUMP INTO THE TRUCK, AND DROVE TO WHEREVER WE WERE GOING TO COMPETE. WE PRACTICED TOGETHER, WE SHOT TOGETHER, WE DID JUNIORS TOGETHER, WE DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER… THAT’S THE MAIN THING… I WANT HIS MEMORY TO GO ON. THAT’S WHY I’M…[DONATING THE ITEMS TO MUSEUM].” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT THE COUPLE’S COMMON PASSION FOR SHOOTING: “…THEY’D BE TOGETHER… IT WOULD ALWAYS BE FRANK AND EVELYN. THAT’S THE WAY THAT PEOPLE THINK OF THE WHOLE THING… NOW…THERE ARE OTHER KIDS THAT ARE COMING UP, THE ONES THAT SHE TEACHES IN THE SUMMERTIME THAT ARE DIFFERENT… BUT ANY OF THE SHOOTERS, IT WAS ALWAYS FRANK AND EVELYN; ‘WE DID THIS WITH FRANK AND EVELYN.’ IT WAS ALWAYS TOGETHER.” LYNDA OFFERED A STORY AS TO HOW HER DAD STARTED TARGET SHOOTING, WANTING TO BECOME A BETTER SHOT: “...THERE IS AN ARTICLE WHERE DAD IS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE WAS DOWN AT THE RANGE SIGHTING IN ON ONE OF HIS GUNS TO GO HUNTING… GENE SCULLY, WHO WAS ALSO ONE OF THE INSTRUCTORS FOR THE YOUNG KIDS SAID TO HIM, ‘WELL, WHY DON’T YOU SHOOT AT THIS TARGET?’ AND [DAD] SAID, ‘I SHOT TEN ROUNDS. THAT’S WHEN I FIGURED OUT I BETTER LEARN HOW TO SHOOT. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED DOING TARGET SHOOTING.’ SO THAT…[WAS] HIS INSPIRATION, [IT] WAS THAT, ‘I’M NOT QUITE AS GOOD AS I THINK I AM. MAYBE I BETTER PRACTICE A LITTLE BIT MORE’.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT THE CLUB NAME SHE WAS A PART OF: “THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMAN, WE WERE. [IN THE 1970S].” EVELYN REVEALED HOW THE VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE SHOOTING RANGE LOCATIONS CHANGED OVER TIME: “…ALLAN JARVIE WAS A VETERAN… HE OPENED A RED ASH COMPANY DOWN IN THE RIVER, BUT EVERYBODY CONTINUED TO GO DOWN AND SHOOT ALL HIS MACHINERY… WE KNEW ALLAN AND HIS WIFE AND FAMILY FROM THE TIME THEY WERE KIDS. BUT HE WENT TO THE [LETHBRIDGE] FISH AND GAME [ASSOCIATION] AND HE SAID, ‘I’LL MAKE YOU A DEAL. I OWN SO MUCH PROPERTY DOWN HERE, I’LL GIVE YOU THIS PARCEL OF LAND IF YOU WILL AGREE TO KEEP IT CLEAN AND HAVE IT SHOOTING SO PEOPLE WON’T COME DOWN AND SHOOT MY STUFF SO MUCH.’ AND THAT WAS THE START OF…[THE FIRST SHOOTING RANGE].” “THAT WAS THE FIRST RANGE. THEN, PEENAQUIM PARK DECIDED THEY WANTED TO MOVE IN THERE. THEY WANTED TO MAKE A WALKING TRAIL WHERE WE WERE…” “…SO THAT’S WHAT THEY WANT– THEY COME TO US TO SEE IF THAT PROPERTY WAS OPEN, IF WE WOULD MOVE. WELL, WE WENT TO UMPTEEN DOZEN MEETINGS WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE TRYING TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS TO GET OUR RANGE MOVED. FINALLY, THE CITY…[CAME] TO US AND THEY SAID, ‘WE’VE GOT A COULEE THAT IS FALLING DOWN. WE’LL TAKE THAT DIRT AND WE WILL BUILD YOU NINE-FEET BERMS BETWEEN EACH DISCIPLINE OF SHOOTING, IF YOU’LL AGREE TO MOVE.’ WELL, IT SOUNDED PRETTY GOOD. IT WAS A LOT BIGGER THAN WHAT WE HAD.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT THE GENDER MAKEUP IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[THERE WAS] PROBABLY MORE MEN [SHOOTING] BUT THERE’S A LOT OF WOMEN THAT ARE IN THERE NOW, TOO. A LOT OF KIDS.” LYNDA ESTIMATED THE RATIO AT: “FIVE [MEN] TO ONE [WOMAN], I BET YOU ANYWAY.” LYNDA ELABORATED: “I MEAN, WHEN YOU’D GO TO A SHOOT THERE’D MAYBE BE SIX OR SEVEN WOMEN BUT THERE’D BE THIRTY MEN…” EVELYN ORGANIZED AND VOLUNTEERED IN THE COMMUNITY: “[WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, I WAS A PART OF THE] BANQUET COMMITTEE, BINGO COMMITTEE. ANYTIME THEY HAD ONE THAT THEY WERE TAKING THE KIDS OUT [I WAS INVOLVED]… WE’D TAKE KIDS OUT FISHING AND THEN GO SOMEWHERE AND HAVE LUNCH AND EVERYTHING… JUST ANYTHING TO DO PRIMARILY WITH KIDS, I WAS WILLING TO DO IT. AND I STILL AM.” “…I USED TO GO HELP ALL THE SMALLER TOWNS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO AND THINGS. I’D GO [AND] HELP WITH THE SCORING AND GETTIN’ PEOPLE TO WORK, SET UP THE RANGES, GET THEIR TARGETS READY AND SO I ENJOYED IT, I LOVED IT…” WHEN ASKED WHAT TIME PERIOD THE FAMILY HAD PEAK MEMORIES AND INVOLVEMENT IN THE SPORT, LYNDA RESPONDED: “70S.” TO THE SAME QUESTION AS ABOVE, EVELYN REPLIED: “YEAH, 70S, ’75, ‘80S.” WHEN ASKED HOW EVELYN GOT SO GOOD AT SHOOTING, SHE ANSWERED: “WE PRACTICED ALL THE TIME.” LYNDA ADDED: “SPEND HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS AT THE RANGE.” EVELYN SAID SHE PRACTICED REGULARILY: “SOMETIMES EVERY EVENING, AFTER WORK.” “…ALWAYS HAD TIME FOR IT… I’M NOT DOING THAT MUCH NOW BECAUSE I’M OLDER...” “…BUT I’LL HELP WHEREVER I CAN. I ENJOY IT. IT’S A GOOD ORGANIZATION. I’VE MADE A LOT OF FRIENDS…” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER FATHER’S COMMITMENT TO SHOOTING: “…EVEN INTO THE ‘80S, WHEN [MY PARENTS] WERE STILL GOING TO ALL [THEIR] SHOOTS, WHEN MY DAD FIRST GOT SICK…HE WAS STILL DOING JUNIOR SHOOTERS AND…THAT’S BASICALLY WHEN HE WAS SETTING UP THE NEW RANGE, IN THAT AREA… HE WAS BUSY…DOING THAT STILL AND HE [HAD A SURGERY]…DONE AND WAS STILL DOWN AT THE RANGE PROBABLY TWO WEEKS LATER.” FRANK WAS ALSO ALWAYS PRACTICING, ACCORDING TO EVELYN: “…IF HE WAS SITTIN’ HERE NOW AND HE’D HAVE A GUN IN HIS HAND, HE’D BE AIMING AT SOMETHING...PRACTICING... NO MATTER WHERE IT WAS… HE’D ALWAYS SAY, ‘WELL, PICK IT UP AND TRY IT. AIM AT SOMETHING.’ HE HAD HIS OWN, SPECIAL WAY OF [DOING] THINGS… HE WAS GREAT.” LYNDA CONFIRMED THE FREQUENCY OF HER PARENT’S SHOOTING PRACTICE: “DEFINITELY EVERY EVENING AFTER WORK, SOMETIMES TWICE A DAY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT’S LIKE ANY SPORT, I SUPPOSE… IT GETS IN…[YOU], IT’S YOURS… YOU STRIVE TO BE BETTER AND YOU WORK HARDER TO BE BETTER… THEN YOU [ALSO] GO DOWN THERE [TO THE SHOOTING RANGE] TO SEE WHO’S DOWN THERE [BECAUSE] YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS ANYBODY.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER DAD DID THE PREPARATION WORK OF LOADING BULLETS: “…[THE COST WAS] WHY THEY LOADED THEIR OWN BULLETS… DAD USED TO HAVE, IN THAT BEDROOM THERE, WAS…WHERE HIS LOADING ROOM WAS… IN THAT ARTICLE I READ THIS MORNING, HE SAYS THAT…IT WAS PROBABLY A THIRD OF THE COST TO LOAD HIS OWN BUT HE ALSO TALKS IN THAT ARTICLE ABOUT HOW PRECISE [LOADING WAS]… HE HAD TO LEARN, OVER THE YEARS, HOW…[TO LOAD]… YOU HAD TO HAVE EXACT AMOUNT OF POWDER, YOU LEARNED THE BETTER THINGS TO USE… HE USED CASTOR OIL RATHER THAN THE MANUFACTURER’S OIL… HE LEARNED DIFFERENT THINGS AND HOW PERFECT IT WAS… IT’S AN ART JUST TO DO THE LOADING ITSELF… HE WOULD BE DOWN HERE FOR HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS, LOADING BULLETS… HE’D HAVE FIVE HUNDRED OF [THEM] AND A HUNDRED OF [THEM] MIGHT BE GOOD AND THE OTHER FOUR HUNDRED HE’D DUMP OUT AND START ALL OVER AGAIN… IT’S QUITE AN ART JUST DOING THAT.” “IN THE EVENINGS. HE’D BE DOWN LOADING, EVERY NIGHT. HE’D BE DOWN WORKING IN HIS LOADING ROOM, [DOING] THINGS… THIS WAS IS SPECIALTY…” EVELYN STILL IS INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY: “…I STILL GO DOWN [TO THE RANGE]… A FRIEND OF MINE THAT IS A FISH AND GAME MEMBER, WE TEACH…FISH AND GAME MEMBER JUNIORS ALL THE TIME. WE HAVE ABOUT A FOUR TO FIVE-WEEK COURSE EVERY YEAR AND WHEN THE COURSE IS FINISHED, I RECYCLE MY TROPHIES AND GIVE EACH CHILD A TROPHY AND IT MEANS A LOT TO [THEM].” “IT WAS A GOOD SPORT. I REALLY ENJOYED IT WHILE I WAS IN AND I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE, SO IT’S TOO BAD IF I GOT DOWN THERE I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP AGAIN. I CAN’T GET DOWN IN THE PROPER POSITION ANYMORE.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT HAVING TO SELL HER GUNS: “...[IT] BROKE MY HEART TO HAVE TO GET RID OF [THEM] ALL.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “I HAD SPECIAL…[FIREARMS] THAT…[FRANK] HAD BUILT JUST FOR ME.” LYNDA ADDED ON THE TOPIC OF GETTING RID OF THE FIREARMS A DECADE AGO FOLLOWING FRANK’S DEATH: “…DAD BUILT HIS OWN GUNS. HE DID BUILD FOR HER, HE BUIL[T] THE STOCKS…AND PAINTED ON [THEM] AND HAD WRITINGS... IT WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO KEEP SOME OF THE STOCKS BUT IT’S HARD…[TO] JUST SELL A BARREL.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING WITH THEM. SOMEONE NEEDS TO ENJOY THEM LIKE DAD DID… THERE ARE PEOPLE OUT THERE THAT WANTED THESE THINGS AND…WE JUST HAD TO DO IT…” EVELYN REFLECTED ON RETIRING FROM THE SPORT: “IT’S TOUGH WHEN YOU CAN’T DO IT ANYMORE. BUT WHEN YOU MAKE UP YOUR MIND YOU CAN’T, YOU DON’T WANNA GET OUT THERE AND MAKE A FOOL OUT OF YOURSELF, SO IT’S EASIER TO WATCH OR WORK.” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT HER MOM STILL PARTAKING THE THE MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR HER FATHER: “SHE STILL SHOOTS ONCE A YEAR WHICH I DON’T REALLY THINK SHE SHOULD BUT SHE DOES, AT MY DAD’S MEMORIAL SHOOT… SO SHE HASN’T GIVEN THAT UP COMPLETELY EVEN THOUGH SHE WANTS TO TELL YOU SHE HAS, SHE HASN’T.” EVELYN ADDED: “…I WILL CONTINUE SHOOTING IT UNTIL THEY PUT ME IN MY CASKET.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200006005
Acquisition Date
2020-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1969
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20200006006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1969
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
48.5
Length
30.8
Width
15
Description
A. WOOD AND METAL TROPHY WITH THREE PEDESTALS. ATOP THE SIDE PEDESTALS THERE ARE GOLD STARS. AT THE CENTRE PEDESTAL THERE IS A GOLD ANGEL FIGURE. AT THE CENTRE ATTACHED TO THE BASE THERE IS A GOLD PERSON SHOOTING. THE TROPHY HAS A LARGE ENGRAVED PLATE THAT READS “WHITNEY TROPHY LETHBRIDGE FISH & GAME SMALLBORE CLUB”. THERE ARE 5 SMALLER ENGRAVED SHIELDS THAT READ: “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 397 X 400 1965” “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 395 X 400 1966” “EARL J. MILLER 316 X 400 1967” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1968” “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1969” THE LAST ENGRAVED SHIELD IN THE ROW HAS FALLEN OFF AND IS INCLUDED AS A COMPONENT PART. THERE ARE THREE SCREWS IN THE BASE ON THE BOTTOM SIDE. B. LENGTH 4 CM WIDTH 3.6 CM SHIELD SHAPED GOLD PLATE ENGRAVED WITH “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1969”. THE ENGRAVING WAS ATTACHED ON THE FAR RIGHT OF THE ROW OF SHIELDS.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON FEBRUARY 27TH AND MARCH 5TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHINICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH EVELYN LEFFINGWELL IN HER LETHBRIDGE HOME ALONG WITH HER DAUGHTER, LYNDA BARANIECKI. EVELYN AND HER LATE HUSBAND FRANK WERE PROMINENT LOCAL MARKSMEN, TAUGHT YOUNG PEOPLE THE SKILL, WON MANY AWARDS WHILE COMPETING, AND WERE INDUCTED INTO THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. THEY WERE BOTH VERY INVOLVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES, AND SHOOTING CLUBS. EVELYN DONATED A COLLECTION OF ITEMS RELATED TO THE COUPLE’S SPORTING DAYS TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE TWO AFOREMENTIONED INTERVIEWS. LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT FRANK’S TROPHY FROM 1965: “IT’S HARD TO READ. THAT WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES THOUGH, THE WHITNEY TROPHY…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…THAT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST ONES, I BET…” “...THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN IN LETHBRIDGE.” EVELYN ADDED ON THE LIKELY ORIGIN OF THE TROPHY: “PROBABLY THE FISH AND GAME. THEY HAD A WHOLE BUNCH OF TROPHIES…” LYNDA CLARIFIED THE DIFFERENCE AND OVERLAP BETWEEN THE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION AND THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMEN CLUB: “…THE FISH AND GAME REALLY ISN’T A SHOOTING CLUB. THE FISH AND GAME INVOLVES IT ALL… CERTAINLY, IT’S FISHING, IT’S HUNTING, IT’S SAFETY OF GUNS, ALL THAT KIND OF THING. THEIR MARKSMAN CLUB WAS JUST THEIR COMPETITION.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT WHAT SHE GAINED FROM THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[WHAT I GAINED THROUGH SHOOTING WAS] FRIENDSHIP… WE WERE ALL IN THE SAME THING. WE WERE ALL FRIENDS. WE TRAVELED TOGETHER TO THE DIFFERENT SHOOTS… WE ALL WANTED EVERYBODY ELSE TO WIN. IT WAS ENJOYABLE. I LOVED IT. IN FACT, I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO [GO TO THE] SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. I SHOT IN THE FIRST ONE… FRANK AND I, WE STARTED DOWN AT THE LETHBRIDGE RANGE WITH OUR KIDS, [GETTING] [THEM] READY, AND US, TO GO TO THE GAMES... I’D GO TO A LOT OF SMALL TOWNS THAT WERE HAVING [THEM], THAT DIDN’T KNOW QUITE WHAT TO DO; GET THEM ALL SET UP FOR THE GAMES. GO IN AND GET THEIR TARGETS… I ALWAYS HAD THEIR TARGETS ALL READY AND THE RANGE READY FOR PEOPLE TO COME IN. I JUST WON A VERY SPECIAL AWARD, ‘HEART OF A CHAMPION’, FROM THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. [WE ALSO WON THE] MAX GIBB AWARD THAT FRANK AND I BOTH WON. IT’S WORTH IT. PEOPLE APPRECIATE YOU FOR WHAT YOU DO.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY SHE FOUND IN THE SHOOTING CLUBS AND COMPETITIONS: “…I FIND WHEREVER I GO AND WHENEVER THE MEMBERS…ARE THERE, THEY’RE ALWAYS UP, THEY’RE [HUGGING] ME… WHEN WE USED TO HOLD THE SHOOTS…AND KIDS WOULD SHOOT, THEY’D ALWAYS SHOOT THEIR TARGETS AND RUN [THEM] OVER TO ME…SO THAT I COULD CHECK [TH]EM OUT BEFORE ANYTHING HAPPENED… [WHEN] WE WERE AT A SHOOT, EVEN IF I WASN’T IN CHARGE OF IT, I WAS THERE, AND…[SOMEBODY] SHOT A TARGET AND THEY DIDN’T FIGURE IT WAS RIGHT, THEY’D BRING IT TO ME. I’D CHECK IT OVER AND THEN I’D GO TO THE SCORERS AND SAY, ‘WILL YOU CHECK THIS OVER, AGAIN?’ IT’S JUST THE TOGETHERNESS THAT I THINK THAT WE FIND.” LYNDA ADDED: “IT’S DEFINITELY A FAMILY... MY DAD WAS A COWBOY…THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT... HE WORE HIS COWBOY BOOTS, HE WORE HIS COWBOY HAT, THAT’S WHAT HE DID. HE WAS JUST A DOWN TO EARTH PERSON… THERE WAS NO AIRS...AND THAT’S HOW I FIND THAT THE SHOOTERS ARE… THEY DON’T HAVE TO PUT ON AIRS FOR ANYBODY… THEY LOVED WHAT THEY DID…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO BE RICH AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE MONEY…AND EVEN IF YOU HAD MONEY, YOU COULD STILL COME…AND I THINK THE FACT THAT MY DAD WAS A MENTOR… HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN SEEING HIS JUNIOR SHOOTERS WIN A COMPETITION THAN WINNING IT HIMSELF. HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN WATCHING…[MY MOM] WIN.” “…EVEN IN THE WINTERTIME WE DIDN’T SHOOT…BUT THEY STILL MET ALL THE TIME... THEY’D GO FOR COFFEE. THIS WAS THEIR GROUP…IT WAS THEIR FAMILY…” EVELYN CONTINUED: “[IT WAS] THE FRIENDSHIP.” “…AFTER FRANK PASSED AWAY, I HAD FRIENDS THAT WOULD PHONE ME EVERY DAY, TELL ME A JOKE TO MAKE ME LAUGH AND THEY JUST DIDN’T FORGET…[YOU]… THAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER DAD’S LEGACY IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “THEY HAVE A MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR MY DAD IN AUGUST, ONCE A YEAR, AS WELL…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER [SHOOT IN THE MEMORIAL]. PEOPLE THAT DON’T KNOW HIM, THOUGH, COME BECAUSE THEY’VE HEARD OF HIM… THE PEOPLE THAT DID KNOW HIM…THEY’RE THE ONES THAT CAN TELL THE STORIES.” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE FRANK UNIQUE IN HIS COMMUNITY, EVELYN RESPONDED: “HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN PROPER WAY OF SHOOTING, OF TEACHING THE JUNIORS—” “—AND EVERYBODY ELSE…TO SHOOT AND HOW…[TO] BE CAREFUL.” EVELYN WENT ON: “…THAT WAS HIS LIFE. HE LOVED SHOOTING, HE LOVED TO TEACH. GARY ELLISON WROTE A STORY ABOUT HIS SON; HE COULD REMEMBER HOW THANKFUL HIS SON WAS THAT HE WAS DOWN THE RANGE ONE DAY AND FRANK HAD HAD HIM USE HIS GUN TO SHOOT. EVERYBODY RESPECTED HIM BECAUSE OF HIS SAFETY.” LYNDA ADDED: “PROPER HANDLING OF GUNS.” “HE WAS A MASTER IN WHAT HE DID, DEFINITELY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…HE JUST HAD [AN] EXTREME KNOWLEDGE… HE WANTED TO LEARN AND HE LEARNED ALL THE TIME.” WHEN ASKED WHAT VALUES EVELYN AND FRANK TRIED TO INSTILL IN THE YOUNG PEOPLE THEY TAUGHT, SHE REPLIED: “SAFETY FIRST. KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]. WATCH WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]… IN THE ROOM THERE…I HAVE A BARREL THAT I TAKE DOWN WHENEVER WE HAVE OUR JUNIOR SHOOTERS SO THAT WE TEACH [THEM] YOU DON’T PUT IT DOWN [TO] GET THROUGH THE FENCE; YOU DON’T PUT YOUR RIFLE DOWN, YOUR BARREL, [BECAUSE] IT’S JUST BLOWN ALL APART… I’VE BEEN AT SHOOTS WHERE GUYS HAVE LAID DOWN AND PUT THE WRONG AMMUNITION IN THEIR GUN AND IT BLOWS UP… [IT] MAKES A DIFFERENCE. YOU…[HAVE TO] REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING] AND HOW TO DO IT. SAFETY IS THE FIRST THING.” EVELYN COMMENTED ON BEING REMEMBERED FOR TEACHING JUNIORS THE SPORT: “…I HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE FROM THE FISH AND GAME THAT COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘YOU TAUGHT ME AS JUNIOR’ …IT’S…REALLY AMAZING HOW PEOPLE REMEMBER YOU.” LYNDA ELABORATED ON THE MEANING BEHIND HER PARENTS BEING INDUCTED INTO THE HALL OF FAME: “MY DAD WAS INDUCTED AS A BUILDER, NOT AS AN ATHLETE. [MY MOM] WAS INDUCTED AS AN ATHLETE, SO THERE WERE TWO DIFFERENT CATEGORIES… TO ME, MY DAD WAS A MENTOR. HE TAUGHT, THAT WAS HIS FIELD. THAT’S…WHERE HE SHONE… I MEAN, HE WAS A SHOOTER, THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT, HE WAS A MASTER OF WHAT HE DID, BUT IT’S THE TEACHING THAT WAS SO IMPORTANT TO HIM. NOT THAT IT WASN’T TO HER BUT…THAT’S WHY.” EVELYN OFFERED HER CLOSING THOUGHTS ON BEING IN THE HALL OF FAME: “I FEEL…ABSOLUTELY HONOURED. I’VE BEEN THINKING OF THIS FOR A LONG TIME AND TO ME, IT’S GREAT. [FRANK] DESERVES IT. I HEAR EVERYBODY ELSE GOING IN THERE, WHY CAN’T HE? WE GOT OUR ROCK BUT NOBODY SEES THAT. BUT, IT IS AN HONOUR.” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE MADE REFERENCE TO THE ROCK EVELYN MENTIONED. THE ARTICLE STATED THAT “A CAIRN AT THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME TARGET RANGE, IN MEMORY OF FRANK LEFFINGWELL, ONE OF THE MAIN FORCES BEHIND THE RANGE WILL BE UNVEILED…” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT MOTIVATED HER TO DONATE THE MEMORABILIA TO THE MUSEUM: “…I HAVE SO MUCH STUFF AND FRANK HAS BEEN AWARDED…AND WORKED SO HARD TO GET EVERYTHING THAT HE GOT. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION. HE DID AN AWFUL LOT THROUGH CONSTRUCTION OF THE RANGE DOWN THERE, AND ALL OF THE AWARDS THAT HE HAS WON, HE’S THE GREATEST… THIS WAY, I FIGURED OTHER PEOPLE CAN…SEE JUST WHAT A KIND OF A GENTLEMAN HE WAS…AND HOW GREAT HE WAS AT SHOOTING.” “…I’M GETTIN[G] OLDER ALL THE TIME AND THERE COULD BE A TIME WHEN I’M…[GOING TO] HAVE TO LEAVE OUR HOME. WHAT AM I…[GOING TO] DO WITH THIS STUFF…? I’VE HAD PEOPLE COME AND I’LL SEE IF THERE’S ANYTHING THAT YOU’D REALLY LIKE TO REMEMBER HIM BY, BY ALL MEANS TAKE IT HOME WITH YOU. BUT THE THING IS, WHAT’S MY FAMILY…[GOING TO] DO WITH EVERYTHING THAT’S HERE? NOBODY WANTS IT. THE TROPHIES, YOU CAN’T DO…[ANYTHING] WITH THEM; THEY END UP IN THE DUMP, WHICH IS SAD TO SAY.” EVELYN WENT ON: “I DON’T THINK YOU’LL SEE [ANYTHING LIKE MY BASEMENT]…AGAIN. THIS IS ALL THE AWARDS AND THINGS THAT WE HAVE WON THROUGH THE YEARS. WE STARTED SHOOTING IN…[1966].” EVELYN PROVIDED THE ORIGINS OF HOW SHE STARTED SHOOTING: “[I STARTED SHOOTING] JUST TO BE WITH HIM, THAT’S ALL.” “…IT WAS JUST THAT WE TRAVELED TOGETHER AND…THAT’S WHY HE HAD ME WITH HIM. IF ANYTHING HAPPENED, IT WAS BOTH OF US TOGETHER. [THAT’S] JUST THE WAY IT WAS.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT LEARNING TO HUNT FROM FRANK: “…IT WAS JUST NICE TO BE OUT THERE, TO BE ABLE TO JUST BE OUT IN THE COUNTRY AND SEE THE ANIMALS. IT’S VERY FUNNY, THE FIRST TIME I WENT OUT WITH HIM AND HE SHOT A DEER… HE DECIDED HE’S…[GOING TO] CLEAN IT… HE SAID, ‘HOLD THIS LEG FOR ME.’ SO I HELD THIS LEG AND THEN PRETTY SOON, ‘HOW ABOUT THIS ONE?’ …BEFORE LONG, I’M…LOOKING DOWN INTO IT. HE DIDN’T WANT ME TO DO IT BECAUSE HE THOUGHT I’D GET SICK, BUT, HERE I WAS. [THAT] WAS A GOOD WAY TO TEACH ME.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER AND FRANK SHARED A COMMITMENT TO THE SPORT OVER TIME: “…THEN IT JUST SEEMED LIKE BEING INVOLVED WITH GOING DOWN TO THE RANGE AND HAVING THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME RANGE... HIS DAD AND MOM LIVED WITH US. HIS DAD AND HIM WOULD LOAD ALL THE TIME AND GO DOWN SHOOTING AND THEN WHEN DAD PASSED AWAY…FRANK JUST CONTINUED ON… THEN…A BUNCH OF US…GOT TOGETHER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME AND WE WERE UNDER THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS CLUB. PERCY BUTLER…WANTED TO START THE SHOOTING PROGRAM AND WE GOT INVOLVED IN THAT, AND THAT WAS THE START OF IT; WE JUST CONTINUED ON.” “…IT WAS ALSO THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS [THAT PROMPTED FRANK TO START TARGET SHOOTING]… THEY WANTED TO START A JUNIOR PROGRAM SO SOME OF OUR MEMBERS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME, THEY WERE IN THERE, THEY WERE…[GOING TO] TEACH THE PROPER WAY OF HANDLING GUNS AND EVERYTHING AND FRANK AND I [WERE] WITH [THEM]. SO WE JUST WENT IN…[TO] TEACHIN[G] THEM AND CONTINUED ON. WE HAD PROGRAMS WHERE WE HAVE SENIORS, WE USED TO SHOOT IN THE RCMP INDOOR RANGE. THAT WAS BELOW THE GARAGE. [THAT] WAS MANY YEARS AGO…” “…WE STARTED WITH…TEACHING JUNIORS [SHOOTING]…AND THEN JUST WENT ON TO COMPETITION-SHOOTING. [WE] TRAVELED ALL OVER AND, LUCKY ENOUGH, THAT WE WERE GOOD ENOUGH TO DO IT. BUT WE DID IT TOGETHER. [THAT] WAS THE MAIN THING. WE LOADED BEFORE WE WENT TO A SHOOT, RIGHT UP UNTIL TWELVE O’CLOCK AT NIGHT, JUMP INTO THE TRUCK, AND DROVE TO WHEREVER WE WERE GOING TO COMPETE. WE PRACTICED TOGETHER, WE SHOT TOGETHER, WE DID JUNIORS TOGETHER, WE DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER… THAT’S THE MAIN THING… I WANT HIS MEMORY TO GO ON. THAT’S WHY I’M…[DONATING THE ITEMS TO MUSEUM].” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT THE COUPLE’S COMMON PASSION FOR SHOOTING: “…THEY’D BE TOGETHER… IT WOULD ALWAYS BE FRANK AND EVELYN. THAT’S THE WAY THAT PEOPLE THINK OF THE WHOLE THING… NOW…THERE ARE OTHER KIDS THAT ARE COMING UP, THE ONES THAT SHE TEACHES IN THE SUMMERTIME THAT ARE DIFFERENT… BUT ANY OF THE SHOOTERS, IT WAS ALWAYS FRANK AND EVELYN; ‘WE DID THIS WITH FRANK AND EVELYN.’ IT WAS ALWAYS TOGETHER.” LYNDA OFFERED A STORY AS TO HOW HER DAD STARTED TARGET SHOOTING, WANTING TO BECOME A BETTER SHOT: “...THERE IS AN ARTICLE WHERE DAD IS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE WAS DOWN AT THE RANGE SIGHTING IN ON ONE OF HIS GUNS TO GO HUNTING… GENE SCULLY, WHO WAS ALSO ONE OF THE INSTRUCTORS FOR THE YOUNG KIDS SAID TO HIM, ‘WELL, WHY DON’T YOU SHOOT AT THIS TARGET?’ AND [DAD] SAID, ‘I SHOT TEN ROUNDS. THAT’S WHEN I FIGURED OUT I BETTER LEARN HOW TO SHOOT. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED DOING TARGET SHOOTING.’ SO THAT…[WAS] HIS INSPIRATION, [IT] WAS THAT, ‘I’M NOT QUITE AS GOOD AS I THINK I AM. MAYBE I BETTER PRACTICE A LITTLE BIT MORE’.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT THE CLUB NAME SHE WAS A PART OF: “THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMAN, WE WERE. [IN THE 1970S].” EVELYN REVEALED HOW THE VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE SHOOTING RANGE LOCATIONS CHANGED OVER TIME: “…ALLAN JARVIE WAS A VETERAN… HE OPENED A RED ASH COMPANY DOWN IN THE RIVER, BUT EVERYBODY CONTINUED TO GO DOWN AND SHOOT ALL HIS MACHINERY… WE KNEW ALLAN AND HIS WIFE AND FAMILY FROM THE TIME THEY WERE KIDS. BUT HE WENT TO THE [LETHBRIDGE] FISH AND GAME [ASSOCIATION] AND HE SAID, ‘I’LL MAKE YOU A DEAL. I OWN SO MUCH PROPERTY DOWN HERE, I’LL GIVE YOU THIS PARCEL OF LAND IF YOU WILL AGREE TO KEEP IT CLEAN AND HAVE IT SHOOTING SO PEOPLE WON’T COME DOWN AND SHOOT MY STUFF SO MUCH.’ AND THAT WAS THE START OF…[THE FIRST SHOOTING RANGE].” “THAT WAS THE FIRST RANGE. THEN, PEENAQUIM PARK DECIDED THEY WANTED TO MOVE IN THERE. THEY WANTED TO MAKE A WALKING TRAIL WHERE WE WERE…” “…SO THAT’S WHAT THEY WANT– THEY COME TO US TO SEE IF THAT PROPERTY WAS OPEN, IF WE WOULD MOVE. WELL, WE WENT TO UMPTEEN DOZEN MEETINGS WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE TRYING TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS TO GET OUR RANGE MOVED. FINALLY, THE CITY…[CAME] TO US AND THEY SAID, ‘WE’VE GOT A COULEE THAT IS FALLING DOWN. WE’LL TAKE THAT DIRT AND WE WILL BUILD YOU NINE-FEET BERMS BETWEEN EACH DISCIPLINE OF SHOOTING, IF YOU’LL AGREE TO MOVE.’ WELL, IT SOUNDED PRETTY GOOD. IT WAS A LOT BIGGER THAN WHAT WE HAD.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT THE GENDER MAKEUP IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[THERE WAS] PROBABLY MORE MEN [SHOOTING] BUT THERE’S A LOT OF WOMEN THAT ARE IN THERE NOW, TOO. A LOT OF KIDS.” LYNDA ESTIMATED THE RATIO AT: “FIVE [MEN] TO ONE [WOMAN], I BET YOU ANYWAY.” LYNDA ELABORATED: “I MEAN, WHEN YOU’D GO TO A SHOOT THERE’D MAYBE BE SIX OR SEVEN WOMEN BUT THERE’D BE THIRTY MEN…” EVELYN ORGANIZED AND VOLUNTEERED IN THE COMMUNITY: “[WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, I WAS A PART OF THE] BANQUET COMMITTEE, BINGO COMMITTEE. ANYTIME THEY HAD ONE THAT THEY WERE TAKING THE KIDS OUT [I WAS INVOLVED]… WE’D TAKE KIDS OUT FISHING AND THEN GO SOMEWHERE AND HAVE LUNCH AND EVERYTHING… JUST ANYTHING TO DO PRIMARILY WITH KIDS, I WAS WILLING TO DO IT. AND I STILL AM.” “…I USED TO GO HELP ALL THE SMALLER TOWNS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO AND THINGS. I’D GO [AND] HELP WITH THE SCORING AND GETTIN’ PEOPLE TO WORK, SET UP THE RANGES, GET THEIR TARGETS READY AND SO I ENJOYED IT, I LOVED IT…” WHEN ASKED WHAT TIME PERIOD THE FAMILY HAD PEAK MEMORIES AND INVOLVEMENT IN THE SPORT, LYNDA RESPONDED: “70S.” TO THE SAME QUESTION AS ABOVE, EVELYN REPLIED: “YEAH, 70S, ’75, ‘80S.” WHEN ASKED HOW EVELYN GOT SO GOOD AT SHOOTING, SHE ANSWERED: “WE PRACTICED ALL THE TIME.” LYNDA ADDED: “SPEND HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS AT THE RANGE.” EVELYN SAID SHE PRACTICED REGULARILY: “SOMETIMES EVERY EVENING, AFTER WORK.” “…ALWAYS HAD TIME FOR IT… I’M NOT DOING THAT MUCH NOW BECAUSE I’M OLDER...” “…BUT I’LL HELP WHEREVER I CAN. I ENJOY IT. IT’S A GOOD ORGANIZATION. I’VE MADE A LOT OF FRIENDS…” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER FATHER’S COMMITMENT TO SHOOTING: “…EVEN INTO THE ‘80S, WHEN [MY PARENTS] WERE STILL GOING TO ALL [THEIR] SHOOTS, WHEN MY DAD FIRST GOT SICK…HE WAS STILL DOING JUNIOR SHOOTERS AND…THAT’S BASICALLY WHEN HE WAS SETTING UP THE NEW RANGE, IN THAT AREA… HE WAS BUSY…DOING THAT STILL AND HE [HAD A SURGERY]…DONE AND WAS STILL DOWN AT THE RANGE PROBABLY TWO WEEKS LATER.” FRANK WAS ALSO ALWAYS PRACTICING, ACCORDING TO EVELYN: “…IF HE WAS SITTIN’ HERE NOW AND HE’D HAVE A GUN IN HIS HAND, HE’D BE AIMING AT SOMETHING...PRACTICING... NO MATTER WHERE IT WAS… HE’D ALWAYS SAY, ‘WELL, PICK IT UP AND TRY IT. AIM AT SOMETHING.’ HE HAD HIS OWN, SPECIAL WAY OF [DOING] THINGS… HE WAS GREAT.” LYNDA CONFIRMED THE FREQUENCY OF HER PARENT’S SHOOTING PRACTICE: “DEFINITELY EVERY EVENING AFTER WORK, SOMETIMES TWICE A DAY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT’S LIKE ANY SPORT, I SUPPOSE… IT GETS IN…[YOU], IT’S YOURS… YOU STRIVE TO BE BETTER AND YOU WORK HARDER TO BE BETTER… THEN YOU [ALSO] GO DOWN THERE [TO THE SHOOTING RANGE] TO SEE WHO’S DOWN THERE [BECAUSE] YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS ANYBODY.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER DAD DID THE PREPARATION WORK OF LOADING BULLETS: “…[THE COST WAS] WHY THEY LOADED THEIR OWN BULLETS… DAD USED TO HAVE, IN THAT BEDROOM THERE, WAS…WHERE HIS LOADING ROOM WAS… IN THAT ARTICLE I READ THIS MORNING, HE SAYS THAT…IT WAS PROBABLY A THIRD OF THE COST TO LOAD HIS OWN BUT HE ALSO TALKS IN THAT ARTICLE ABOUT HOW PRECISE [LOADING WAS]… HE HAD TO LEARN, OVER THE YEARS, HOW…[TO LOAD]… YOU HAD TO HAVE EXACT AMOUNT OF POWDER, YOU LEARNED THE BETTER THINGS TO USE… HE USED CASTOR OIL RATHER THAN THE MANUFACTURER’S OIL… HE LEARNED DIFFERENT THINGS AND HOW PERFECT IT WAS… IT’S AN ART JUST TO DO THE LOADING ITSELF… HE WOULD BE DOWN HERE FOR HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS, LOADING BULLETS… HE’D HAVE FIVE HUNDRED OF [THEM] AND A HUNDRED OF [THEM] MIGHT BE GOOD AND THE OTHER FOUR HUNDRED HE’D DUMP OUT AND START ALL OVER AGAIN… IT’S QUITE AN ART JUST DOING THAT.” “IN THE EVENINGS. HE’D BE DOWN LOADING, EVERY NIGHT. HE’D BE DOWN WORKING IN HIS LOADING ROOM, [DOING] THINGS… THIS WAS IS SPECIALTY…” EVELYN STILL IS INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY: “…I STILL GO DOWN [TO THE RANGE]… A FRIEND OF MINE THAT IS A FISH AND GAME MEMBER, WE TEACH…FISH AND GAME MEMBER JUNIORS ALL THE TIME. WE HAVE ABOUT A FOUR TO FIVE-WEEK COURSE EVERY YEAR AND WHEN THE COURSE IS FINISHED, I RECYCLE MY TROPHIES AND GIVE EACH CHILD A TROPHY AND IT MEANS A LOT TO [THEM].” “IT WAS A GOOD SPORT. I REALLY ENJOYED IT WHILE I WAS IN AND I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE, SO IT’S TOO BAD IF I GOT DOWN THERE I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP AGAIN. I CAN’T GET DOWN IN THE PROPER POSITION ANYMORE.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT HAVING TO SELL HER GUNS: “...[IT] BROKE MY HEART TO HAVE TO GET RID OF [THEM] ALL.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “I HAD SPECIAL…[FIREARMS] THAT…[FRANK] HAD BUILT JUST FOR ME.” LYNDA ADDED ON THE TOPIC OF GETTING RID OF THE FIREARMS A DECADE AGO FOLLOWING FRANK’S DEATH: “…DAD BUILT HIS OWN GUNS. HE DID BUILD FOR HER, HE BUIL[T] THE STOCKS…AND PAINTED ON [THEM] AND HAD WRITINGS... IT WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO KEEP SOME OF THE STOCKS BUT IT’S HARD…[TO] JUST SELL A BARREL.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING WITH THEM. SOMEONE NEEDS TO ENJOY THEM LIKE DAD DID… THERE ARE PEOPLE OUT THERE THAT WANTED THESE THINGS AND…WE JUST HAD TO DO IT…” EVELYN REFLECTED ON RETIRING FROM THE SPORT: “IT’S TOUGH WHEN YOU CAN’T DO IT ANYMORE. BUT WHEN YOU MAKE UP YOUR MIND YOU CAN’T, YOU DON’T WANNA GET OUT THERE AND MAKE A FOOL OUT OF YOURSELF, SO IT’S EASIER TO WATCH OR WORK.” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT HER MOM STILL PARTAKING THE THE MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR HER FATHER: “SHE STILL SHOOTS ONCE A YEAR WHICH I DON’T REALLY THINK SHE SHOULD BUT SHE DOES, AT MY DAD’S MEMORIAL SHOOT… SO SHE HASN’T GIVEN THAT UP COMPLETELY EVEN THOUGH SHE WANTS TO TELL YOU SHE HAS, SHE HASN’T.” EVELYN ADDED: “…I WILL CONTINUE SHOOTING IT UNTIL THEY PUT ME IN MY CASKET.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200006006
Acquisition Date
2020-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
No. Pieces
7
Height
30
Diameter
31
Description
A: PRESSURE COOKER POT: STEEL POT WITH TWO BLACK WOODEN HANDLES. HANDLES ARE SCREWED TO LIP OF POT WITH TWO SCREWS EACH. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. BLACK RESIDUE, WATER STAINS, AND SCRATCHES ON OVERALL SURFACE OF POT FROM USE. THERE IS A FULL CRACK SEPARATING THE BACK END OF THE RIGHT HANDLE FROM THE POT. B: LID: STEEL LID 31.9CM (D) X 3.8CM (H). LID HAS ONE BLACK WOODEN HANDLE HELD IN PLACE BY TWO SCREWS. BOTH SIDES OF HANDLES HAVE VALVES FOR LETTING OFF/MANAGING PRESSURE. THE CENTER HAS A ROUND GAUGE WHICH READS BOTH PRESSURE (0 TO 20) AND TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT (228° TO 259°). IT READS "WARNING OPEN PETCOCK, EXHAUST STEAM…” GAUGE HAS SINGLE RED NEEDLE. IN FRONT OF GAUGE ON TOP OF LID READS, “IMPROVED KOOK / KWICK STEAM PRESSURE COOKER 22”. LID IS SECURED TO POT WITH REMOVABLE RING THAT IS TIGHTENED BY TURNING A SMALL HANDLE AT THE FRONT. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF LID AND BACKGROUND OF GAUGE IS YELLOWED. C: SEALING RING: 36 CM IN DIAMETER UNTIGHTENED. STEEL WITH A RUBBER KNOB AT THE OPENING. HINGE AT THE BACK SIDE OF THE RING. CLAMP AT FRONT IS TIGHTENED BY A METAL HANDLE. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF THE STEEL. D: COOKING RACK: 26.5 CM IN DIAMETER. CIRCULAR, METAL RACK WITH A CIRCLE OPENING AT THE CENTER AND A CURVED PATTERN OF TWO ROWS AROUND. THE RACK HAS 6 SECTIONS AROUND. THERE ARE RIDGES ALONG THE VERTICAL LINES ON ONE SIDE. THE OPPOSITE SIDE IS FLAT. THREE OF THE RIDGES HAVE SCREW HOLES ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE. E-G: 3 MASON JAR LID BANDS: ALL 8.5 CM IN DIAMETER. E IS MADE OUT OF A SILVER-COLOURED METAL. F AND G ARE MADE OUT OF GOLD-COLOURED METAL. POOR TO FAIR CONDITION FOR COMPONENTS D THROUGH G. ALL COMPONENTS ARE RUSTING WITH SIGNIFICANT MINERAL BUILD UP ON THEM. THERE IS FURTHER MATERIAL BUILD UP ON COMPONENTS E-G.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS PRESSURE COOKER IS EXTRACTED FROM A SEPTEMBER 2016 INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WITH THE ARTIFACT'S DONOR, JEANNETTE HOUTEKAMER: HOUTEKAMER CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE PRESSURE COOKER FROM HER AUNT, EUGENE SICOTTE: “WELL, FIRST OF ALL, I KNOW IT’S VERY OLD. IT CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT, WHO CAME TO THIS COUNTRY AS A YOUNG GIRL AND WAS LOCATED AROUND THE BEAVER MINE AREA… MUST [HAVE BEEN] LUNDBRECK. SHE WAS THERE WITH HER HUSBAND... SHE ALSO WAS A WONDERFUL COOK, AND SHE COOKED IN A LUMBER CAMP … HER FIRST MARRIED NAME WAS EUGENE (SIC) SICOTTE, MARRIED TO A PETE SICOTTE. [N.B. ALTERNATIVE SPELLING OF FIRST NAME EUGINE OR EUGENIE FROM OBITUARY AND LEGAL NOTICE] … SHE WAS WITH HIM FOR 17 YEARS... HOW SHE MET GEORGE ANDERSON, I’M NOT SURE, BUT HE WAS A FARMER PAST COALDALE - BARNWELL. THEY HAD A FARM UP THERE. AND SHE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER THAN HIM, BUT THEY MARRIED, AND DID VERY WELL. THEN THEY RETIRED AND MOVED TO THE CITY HERE… I IMAGINE THEY BOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] DOWN IN GREAT FALLS, BECAUSE HE HAD A SISTER WHO WAS DOWN IN SHELBY. AT THE TIME, IT WAS CONSIDERED MORE EXPENSIVE.” OF THE RELATIONSHIP SHE HAD WITH HER AUNT, HOUTEKAMER STATED: “[W]E WERE VERY CLOSE. THEY HAD NO FAMILY, SO THEY KIND OF ADOPTED MY HUSBAND [MARTIN HOUTEKAMER] AND I... WE DID A LOT OF THINGS FOR THEM WHEN THEY GOT OLDER... SHE WAS A FABULOUS COOK.” HOUTEKAMER’S AUNT’S NAME BECAME EUGENE ANDERSON UNDER HER SECOND MARRIAGE. SOMETIME DURING THE PERIOD AFTER THE EUGENE AND GEORGE ANDERSON MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND BEFORE THE PASSING OF MRS. ANDERSON IN 1968, HOUTEKAMER CAME TO ACQUIRE THE PRESSURE COOKER: “WELL, SHE JUST GOT TO THE POINT WHERE SHE WAS GETTING OLDER, AND SHE DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE. SHE HAD DONE A LOT PREVIOUS TO THAT. SHE CANNED EVERYTHING, EVEN MUSHROOMS … [SHE WAS A] FABULOUS COOK … SHE KNEW THAT I DID A LOT OF CANNING, SO SHE THOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD HELP." "MY HUSBAND DID A LOT OF FISHING, SO [WE] CANNED FISH, WHICH WAS THE BEST THING FOR IT. WHEN YOU CAN IT IN THERE, IT’S GOING TO BE GOOD… [HE CAUGHT FISH FROM] ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA. BEAVER MINES WAS ONE OF THE SPECIALS. IN FACT, HIS ASHES ARE IN POLICE LAKE. HE DID A LOT THERE AT POLICE LAKE AND LEE’S CREEK. DEPENDING [ON] HOW MANY FISH YOU HAD TO MAKE IT WORTHWHILE, I WOULD DO A CANNER OF IT. I USED THE SMALL FISH JARS, SO I COULD PACK THEM UP. I DID QUITE A FEW…” PRIOR TO OWNING A PRESSURE COOKER, HOUTEKAMER SAID SHE “USED A BIG CANNER. I HAD ONE THAT HELD 7 OR 8 QUARTS. THAT’S WHAT I DID - MOSTLY FRUIT. I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF VEGETABLES BECAUSE, BY THEN, YOU COULD START FREEZING STUFF. YOU KNOW, IT WAS STARTING TO GET MORE POPULAR.” HOUTEKAMER DID NOT LEARN A GREAT DEAL OF COOKING FROM HER AUNT, “BECAUSE I HAD LEARNED A LOT FROM MY MOTHER. SHE WAS A GOOD COOK. SHE EVEN MADE LEFTOVERS TASTE GOOD. SHE HAD HAD A LOT OF EXPERIENCE… WE DID A LOT OF PRESERVING IN HER DAY. THAT WAS ALL WE HAD AND IT WAS ALWAYS DONE IN A BOILER - A GOOD COPPER BOILER. THAT’S THE WAY YOU LEARNED. … FOR SOME THINGS [THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS BETTER THAN THE COPPER BOILER] BECAUSE MY VEGETABLES TAKE A VERY LONG TIME TO PRESERVE THROUGH BOILING. AND FISH, OH MY GOD, YOU WOULD BE THERE FOREVER TO BOIL, SO THIS [PRESSURE COOKER] IS MUCH BETTER, MUCH FASTER [AND] SAFER, AS WELL. IT WAS HEAVY WORK, MIND YOU. WHEN YOUR COOKER WAS DONE, WHEN YOUR TIME WAS DONE, IF YOU COULD LIFT IT AND TAKE IT OUTDOORS, YOU COULD THROW COLD WATER ON IT AND OPEN IT RIGHT AWAY. THEN YOU WOULD THROW THE CANS IN COLD WATER. FOR JARS, YOU HAD TO WAIT UNTIL IT WENT DOWN BY ITSELF. YOU COULDN’T OPEN IT UNTIL THEN OR ALL THE LIDS WOULD COME OFF.” FOR HOUTEKAMER, CANNING TOOK PLACE MOSTLY DURING THE FALL. SHE WAS ABLE TO PRESERVE A VARIETY OF FOOD WITH THIS PRESSURE COOKER: “I [CANNED] CHICKEN ONE YEAR, AND THAT WAS ENOUGH. WE ALWAYS HAD CHICKEN AROUND [AND] IT WAS BETTER FRESH. MY HUSBAND LOVED HIS FRESH CHICKENS. WE HAD OUR OWN GARDEN, AND SOMETIMES WE WOULD GET SOME CORN IN THE FALL [WHEN THE FARMERS WERE DOING THEIR THRESHING].” OF HER FAVOURITE VEGETABLES TO PRESERVE, HOUTEKAMER SAID, “BEANS, I GUESS. I WOULD GET A LOT OF BEANS. BEETS – I DID SOME – NOT CANNED. [I] DID A LOT OF PICKLES. BEANS WERE THE MAIN THING, AND CHICKEN, AND FISH. AND THAT WAS IT. I DID A LOT OF TOMATOES, BUT THEY WERE SIMPLER TO DO IN THE CANNER, BECAUSE THEY ONLY TAKE ABOUT 20 MINUTES… [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD BE PLACED ON [A] GAS OR ELECTRIC [STOVE]. WHEN THE TIME WAS DONE, YOU JUST SHUT THE STOVE OFF AND LET IT COME DOWN BY ITSELF… I USED TO JUST KNOW WHERE TO PUT THE STOVE AT, THE BURNER, TO KEEP [THE PRESSURE WHERE NEEDED]. YOU HAD TO BE CAREFUL. YOU COULDN’T JUST TURN YOUR BACK ON IT. YOU WOULDN’T WANT THAT. THAT WHOLE THING WOULD COME OFF, AND YOU WOULD HAVE ONE BIG MESS. … NO [THAT NEVER HAPPENED]. I ALWAYS WAS VERY CAREFUL – WATCHED IT CLOSE. I DON’T THINK [MESSES] EVER HAPPENED TO MY AUNT EITHER THAT I’M AWARE OF… MOST OF THE COOKBOOKS IN THOSE DAYS HAD INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT HOW MANY POUNDS TO USE FOR VEGETABLES. I THINK MY FISH WAS 15 POUNDS. FOLLOW THOSE INSTRUCTIONS AND IT WORKED FINE – [IT] DID A VERY GOOD JOB.” HOUTEKAMER WOULD USE THE PRESSURE COOKER AT HER HOME ON THE RESEARCH STATION AND THEN LATER AT HER HOME ON THE NORTH SIDE OF LETHBRIDGE: “… AT THE TIME WE LIVED ON THE RESEARCH STATION FOR TWENTY YEARS. AND I USED IT THERE. MY HUSBAND WORKED THERE, IN POULTRY RESEARCH. WE WERE POOR. WE DID A LOT OF CANNING AND ALWAYS HAD A GARDEN. THAT’S HOW IT CAME ABOUT … WE HAD A PLACE TO LIVE AND OUR OWN GARDEN.” THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS ACTIVELY USED BY HOUTEKAMER UNTIL HER HUSBAND’S DEATH IN 2005: “WELL, I DON’T THINK I’VE USED IT IN THE LAST 10 YEARS BECAUSE I’VE BEEN LIVING IN A CONDO. I JUST HAD IT SITTING AROUND, TOO HEAVY TO MOVE… I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE…” THIS ARTIFACT BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HER LATE HUSBAND: “WE ALWAYS DID A LOT OF FISHING TOGETHER. WHEN HE RETIRED, HE BOUGHT HIS BOAT. WE HAD A CAMPER VAN, SO WE COULD GO OUT AND STAY OVERNIGHT. WE HAD [THE] BOAT, SO WE COULD GO ONTO THE WATER [AND] TRY TO GET SOME FISH. THOSE DAYS, THERE WERE SO MANY FISH... IF YOU WERE LUCKY, YOU HAD A NICE BIG ONE THAT WOULD FILL ABOUT FIVE OR SIX JARS.” CANNING WAS A NECESSITY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION: “WELL, I GUESS IT’S OK IF YOU CAN AFFORD IT, BUT WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER, WE WERE VERY POOR, SO YOU DID WHAT HAD TO DO. KEEP GOING. EAT… MY GIRLS STILL DO SOME, BUT NOW, WITH THE NEW FANCY STOVES, YOU COULD NEVER USE THIS – TOO HEAVY. THE NEW STOVES – THEY JUST CAN’T PUT ANYTHING HEAVY ON THERE. I THINK IT’S KIND OF TOO BAD, BECAUSE A GARDEN IS NOT THAT HARD TO HAVE, AND YOU CAN GET AN AWFUL LOT OF GOOD FOOD OUT OF THERE – NATURAL FOOD, AND VERY HEALTHY FOOD. SOME PEOPLE JUST CAN’T BE BOTHERED. [IT'S] SIMPLER TO GO TO THE STORE… [MY AUNT] COULD HAVE PROBABLY SAID MORE, SHE DID A GREAT DEAL OF CANNING. SHE ALWAYS MADE SURE, WHEN THEY BUILT THEIR HOUSES, THAT THEY HAD A PLACE FOR PUTTING HER CANNED STUFF, WHERE SHE COULD KEEP IT COOLER IN THE SUMMER.” ACCORDING TO HER LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, MRS. EUGINE ANDERSON PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON JANUARY 18, 1968 AT THE AGE OF 85. HER SECOND HUSBAND, MR. GEORGE ANDERSON, PASSED AWAY IN CALGARY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1972 AT THE AGE OF 79. MRS. ANDERSON’S FIRST HUSBAND, MR. PETE SICOTTE, PASSED AWAY IN CAMROSE, ALBERTA ON FEBRUARY 15, 1966 AT THE AGE OF 92. A MEMORIAM IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD INDICATES THAT THE DONOR’S HUSBAND, MR. MARTIN HOUTEKAMER PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 21, 2005. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
24
Length
7.4
Width
7.2
Description
CARDBOARD MILK CARTON. SIDE ONE HAS “HOMOGENIZED MILK” ON TOP FOLD IN GREEN BLOCK LETTERING. FADED, BLACK INK STAMP ON THIS FOLD SAYS “?A 2 -45.” ON THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS SIDE THERE IS THE PURITY LOGO (“PURITY” IN PURPLE CURSIVE FONT), A PURPLE AND GREEN FLOWER, AND THE WORDS “CREAM IN EVERY DROP” IN PURPLE CURSIVE. ON THE BASE OF THIS PANEL IT SAYS “… HEAD OFFICE LETHBRIDGE.” THE OPPOSING SIDE (SIDE 3) IS SIMILAR, BUT WITH THE INDICATION OF “NET CONTENTS ONE QUART” AT THE BASE OF THE PANEL. SIDE 2’S TOP FOLD SAYS, “THE CONTAINER COVERED BY CANADIAN PATENTS 1941 – 395.645 1957 – 542-432… MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM EX-CELL-O CORPORATION.” THE MAIN SECTION HAS THE PURITY LOGO AND THE SLOGANS “IT’S PURE. THAT’S SURE” AND “YOURS TO LOVE. OURS TO PROTECT.” ADDITIONALLY THIS SIDE INDICATED THAT THE MILK IS “PASTURIZED” AND IS “NOT LESS THAN 3.25% B.F.” PARALLEL TO THAT IS SIDE 4 WITH A TOP FOLD THAT HAS “SPOUT” MARKED ON IT. ON THE TOP FOLD, IT SAYS “PUREPAK” “YOUR PERSONAL MILK CONTAINER.” THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS HAS A GREEN ILLUSTRATION OF A CHURCH WITH “ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE…” ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CARTON, THERE ARE NUMBERS AND/OR LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED INTO THE BOTTOM. A “W” IS VISIBLE. GOOD CONDITION. COLOUR OF CARDBOARD HAS YELLOWED OVERALL. THERE ARE VARIOUS STAINS ON THE SURFACE. BLACK STAINING AROUND THE CHURCH ILLUSTRATION. THE TOP FLAP OF THE CARTON IS DETERIORATING (BENT/TORN) WITH NOTICEABLE LOSS OF MATERIAL ON ONE SIDE’S CORNER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, HANK VROOM, FOUND THE MILK CARTON IN LETHBRIDGE APPROXIMATELY A DECADE BEFORE THE DATE OF DONATION (JULY 2016), AS A RESULT OF HIS CITY EMPLOYMENT AS A GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER. THE LOCATION OF THE FIND IS UNKNOWN. IN THE TIME SINCE HIS POSSESSION, THE CARTON HAS BEEN IN A PLASTIC BAG IN A CUPBOARD. ACCORDING TO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH INTO THE EXISTENCE OF THIS TYPE OF MILK CARTON AND BRAND, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THIS CARTON ORIGINATED PRIOR TO THE MID-1970S BECAUSE MILK MEASUREMENTS WERE CHANGED FROM QUARTS TO LITERS AROUND THAT TIME AND THIS CARTON’S MEASUREMENT IS INDICATED IN QUARTS. IN THE LATE 1950’S, PURITY DAIRY ADVERTISED BEING 100% PURE-PAK, MEANING THAT ALL MILK PRODUCTS CAME IN CARDBOARD CARTONS. BLOW MOLD PLASTIC CONTAINERS REPLACED CARDBOARD SHORTLY AFTER. WITH THE INDICATION OF THE 1957 PATENT NUMBER ON THE CARTON, THIS PLACES THE DATE OF THE MILK CARTON BETWEEN 1957 AND THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT PURITY DAIRY IS FROM THE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P20070013001: SIMONIE (SAM) FABBI STARTED FABBI DAIRY IN 1923 IN LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS AN ITALIAN IMMIGRANT WHO BEGAN THE BUSINESS WITH THREE COWS AND SOME LARD BUCKETS. THE DAIRY WAS LOCATED AT 12 STREET B NORTH. AT THAT TIME, MILK WAS TRANSPORTED USING LARD PAILS OR CANS, WHICH, WITH THE HELP OF SAM’S SONS, WOULD BE LADLED INTO CUSTOMER’S CONTAINERS. FABBI DAIRY EXPANDED TO THE SOUTHSIDE DAIRY HILL IN THE EARLY 1930S. SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT CITY DAIRY. SONS STAN AND ROMEO BOUGHT THE BUSINESS FROM THEIR FATHER IN 1936. AT THIS POINT, MILK WAS PACKAGED AND SOLD IN GLASS BOTTLES IN PINT, QUART OR GALLON SIZES. THE DAIRY HAD ITS OWN COWS, WHICH WERE MILKED DAILY AND WOULD PASTURE IN THE COULEES. BY 1936, HOWEVER, MILK AND CREAM WERE BROUGHT IN FROM OFFSITE. BETWEEN 1939 AND 1944, THE FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT PAVAN DAIRY AND THE BELLEVUE DAIRY. AT THAT POINT IN TIME, MANY SMALL DAIRIES WERE SUBJECT TO PASTEURIZATION LAWS, AND CHOSE TO CLOSE DOWN RATHER THAN CONVERT. FABBI DAIRY PURCHASED MAJESTIC THEATRE IN THE LATE 1930S OR EARLY 1940S FOR $10,000 FROM MAYOR SHACKERFORD, CONVERTING IT INTO A MILK BOTTLING PLANT. FABBI DAIRY CHANGED ITS NAME TO PURITY DAIRY, AND EXPANDED THROUGHOUT THE LATE 1940S AND 1950S, OPENING UP BUSINESSES IN MEDICINE HAT (1948), CALGARY (1950), EDMONTON (1950), CRANBROOK (1958), RED DEER AND TABER. ALL THESE LOCATIONS HAD DAIRIES EXCEPT FOR TABER, WHICH HAD A DEPOT. ACCORDING TO KEN FABBI, STAN FABBI’S SON, STAN AND ROMEO ESTABLISHED A DAIRY IN CALGARY WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE ONLY WAY TO OBTAIN A LICENSE FOR A DAIRY AT THAT TIME WAS TO BUY OUT AN EXISTING DAIRY. EXPANSION WAS SEEN AS NECESSARY TO THE FABBI BROTHERS, IF THEY WERE TO REMAIN IN BUSINESS. THE PURITY DAIRY IN CALGARY WAS DEEMED ILLEGAL, AND IN THE EARLY 1960S, STAN AND ROMEO FABBI WERE HANDCUFFED AND ARRESTED. PUBLIC SYMPATHY FOR THE FABBI BROTHERS ENABLED THEM TO PURCHASE A LICENSE AFTER THE INCIDENT. PURITY DAIRY HAD MANY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS THAT OTHER DAIRIES IN TOWN DID NOT HAVE, LIKELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE DAIRY’S POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC. PURITY DAIRY WAS THE FIRST DAIRY IN WESTERN CANADA TO RELY SOLELY ON THE USE OF MILK TANKERS, WHICH VISITED VARIOUS LOCALS TO PICK UP MILK AND BRING IT TO THE DAIRY. PRIOR TO 1957, FARMERS WERE REQUIRED TO DELIVER MILK IN CANS TO THE DAIRY THEMSELVES. PURITY DAIRY HAD A SUBSTANTIAL FLEET OF RETAIL DELIVERY VEHICLES. IN ITS EARLY DAYS, HORSES WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DELIVERY SYSTEM. AT ONE POINT, 17 HORSES WERE BEING USED FOR DELIVERY PURPOSES. IN 1959, PURITY DAIRY REPLACED ITS LAST THREE HORSES WITH DELIVERY TRUCKS. IN THE 1950S, PURITY DIARY BEGAN TO STREAMLINE PRODUCTION. BUTTER WAS PRODUCED IN MEDICINE HAT, WHILE THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH PRODUCED ICE CREAM, NOVELTIES, BUTTER MILK, AND SOUR CREAM, IN ADDITION TO MILK AND COTTAGE CHEESE. THE EDMONTON PLANT SHARED MILK PRODUCTION WITH LETHBRIDGE, AND BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF BLOW MOLD PLASTIC FOR PURITY DAIRY. BUSINESS BEGAN TO FALL IN THE 1960S, AND IN 1971 STAN AND ROMEO FABBI SOLD PURITY DAIRY TO CO-OP DAIRY, WHICH WAS SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS PURITY CO-OP LTD. BEFORE THE SALE, PURITY DAIRY EMPLOYED ABOUT 200 FULL-TIME STAFF AND SUPPLIED MILK PRODUCTS TO THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS DAILY. THE LETHBRIDGE PLANT EMPLOYED ABOUT 70 PEOPLE, AND MANUFACTURED ICE CREAM CONFECTIONS, COTTAGE CHEESE, BUTTER, YOGURT, BUTTERMILK, SOUR CREAM, AND FRUIT DRINKS. STAN’S WIFE, NETTI, SAID OF THE SALE, “WE LOST EVERYTHING…WE EXPANDED TOO FAST. I TOLD STAN ‘WHO CARES? I’VE GOT YOU AND WE STILL HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.’” IN 1972, PURITY CO-OP LTD WAS BOUGHT OUT BY PALM DAIRY, WHICH WAS CLOSED DOWN FOLLOWING A DRAMATIC EXPLOSION IN 1978. IT REOPENED AT A DIFFERENT LOCATION ONE YEAR LATER. IN THE INTERIM, PRODUCTS WERE SHIPPED IN FROM THE CALGARY PLANT. STAN AND ROMEO FABBI DIED IN 1992 AND 1991, RESPECTIVELY. THIS INFORMATION WAS GATHERED IN 2008-09 FROM ANTOINETTE AND KEN FABBI, STAN’S WIFE AND SON, RESPECTIVELY, AND FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20070013001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20160019000 FOR ADDITIONAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS, PRINT RESEARCH, AND PATENT DOCUMENTS.
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
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