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Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Date
1968
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.25
Length
18.5
Width
10
Description
RECTANGULAR BOX WITH HINGED LID, MADE OF SILVER WITH WOOD INTERIOR LINING. SCROLLWORK ON UPPER AND LOWER EDGES, WITH SCALLOPED SHAPE ON LIP OF LID. LID IS ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “PRESENTED TO HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS MARRIAGE JANUARY TWENTY FOURTH NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY EIGHT BY THE COMMANDING OFFICER AND OFFICERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY (MILITIA)”. BOTTOM OF BOX HAS FOUR CIRCLES OF GREEN FELT GLUED ON AT THE BOX’S CORNERS. A FAINT MAKERS’ STAMP AND SILVER HALLMARK ARE BARELY VISIBLE AT THE CENTER OF THE BOX’S BOTTOM – ONLY THE WORDS “OLD”, “MADE IN CANADA” AND “98” ARE LEGIBILE. BOX’S WOOD INTERIOR HAS SOME AREAS OF WHITE STAINING FROM REMNANTS OF SILVER POLISH. EXTERIOR IS TARNISHED. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
CONTAINER
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THIS BOX WAS GIVEN TO FRED KING TO COMMEMORATE HIS MARRIAGE TO NANCY TIDMARSH ON JANUARY 24, 1968, FROM THE OFFICERS OF THE 18TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. AFTER KING’S DEATH IN 1986, NANCY KEPT THE BOX, PASSING IT ALONG TO FAMILY FRIENDS CAROLE AND JACK ROBERTS, THE DONORS. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE ROBERTS ABOUT THEIR POSSESSION OF THE BOX ON JANUARY 19, 2015. CAROLE SAID: “WE BECAME GOOD FRIENDS [WITH NANCY]. WE HELPED HER MOVE [BECAUSE] SHE WAS ON HER OWN – HER HUSBAND HAD PASSED AWAY YEARS AGO AND SHE WAS A LADY THAT HAD MOVED HERE AS A YOUNG ENGLISH GIRL AFTER THE WAR TO WORK AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL… WE CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF THE BOX] BECAUSE SHE THOUGHT WE SHOULD GIVE IT TO THE MUSEUM OR GIVE IT TO THE LEGION. WE WERE DOWNSIZING FOR HER... I POLISHED IT AND PUT IT IN A PLACE OF HONOUR.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON FRED KING WAS FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P19790097000 - KING’S RCA SERGE UNIFORM. ACCORDING TO FREDERICK “FRED” THOMAS KING’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, “KING PASSED AWAY ON SATURDAY MARCH 8TH 1986, AT THE AGE OF 82 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. NANCY KING OF 1416, 15TH AVENUE SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE. BORN IN LONDON ENGLAND IN 1904, THE LATE MR. KING IMMIGRATED TO CANADA IN 1919 TO MAPLE CREEK SASKATCHEWAN. HE LATER MOVED TO WINNIPEG, MANITOBA WHERE HE TRAINED AS A MECHANIC FOR THE CPR. FRED LATER MOVED TO ALBERTA WHERE HE BECAME INVOLVED IN THE AUTOMOBILE BUSINESS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1927, FORMING FRED KING MOTOR CO. LTD., IN 1945, AND OPERATED A SUCCESSFUL AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP UNTIL RETIRING IN 1971. MR. KING WAS APPOINTED HONORARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL 18TH FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1965 AND HONORARY COLONEL 1969-1977. HE WAS ALSO APPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ARMY CADET LEAGUE OF CANADA FROM 1971-1977 AND SERVED ON THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ALBERTA ARMY CADET LEAGUE FROM 1971-78 AND WAS PRESIDENT FROM 1975-1976.” ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHY IN THE PERMANENT FILE, “KING ENLISTED AS GUNNER 112TH FIELD BATTERY, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1940 AND WAS COMMISSIONED LIEUTENANT 41ST FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1944. KING WAS ALSO AN HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL STEWART BRANCH OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION (AT THE TIME OF DONATION IN 1982).” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING SERVICE RECORDS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P19790097000. OTHER COLLECTED ARTIFACTS RELATED TO KING INCLUDE: P19820020000, P19820021000, P19820022001-6, P19820023000, P19820024000, AND P19860039000.
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
Acquisition Date
2013-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BOXED, “B-D YALE, REGULAR POINT”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140027001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOXED, “B-D YALE, REGULAR POINT”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Materials
CARDBOARD, PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
4
Height
1.25
Length
7
Width
6.25
Description
SQUARE CARDBOARD BOX CONTAINING STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES IN PLASTIC TUBES. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. .A – BOX LID – BLUE AND WHITE WITH TEXT READING “B-D YALE, ONE DOZEN 25G ½”, REGULAR POINT HYPODERMIC NEEDLES”. TWO LIGHT BLUE PRICE STICKERS IN THE LOWER LEFT CORNER OF THE LID ARE STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “WOODWARD’S” AND TWO DIFFERENT PRICES. 1.1 X 7 X 6.25 .B – BOX BOTTOM – WHITE CARDBOARD WITH A NUMBER STAMPED IN BLUE INK ON BOTTOM: “37863C”. 1 X 6.8 X 6 .C – NEEDLES – SIX STAINLESS STEEL NEEDLES CLIPPED INTO THREE CLEAR PLASTIC TUBES, POINTED ENDS FACING INWARD, THAT ARE HELD TOGETHER WITH BEADS OF PLASTIC ALONG INNER EDGES. 0.75 X 6.5 X 2.75 .D – NEEDLES – TWO STAINLESS STEEL NEEDLES CLIPPED INTO ONE CLEAR PLASTIC TUBE, POINTED ENDS FACING INWARD. 0.75 X 6.5 X 0.75
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THIS BOX OF HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BELONGED TO THE DONOR, JIM JORDAN, WHO USED THEM AS PART OF HIS TREATMENT FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES FROM THE 1960S THROUGH THE 1980S. ON JULY 14, 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JORDAN ABOUT HIS PERSONAL HISTORY WITH THE DISEASE AND THE EVOLUTION OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS. JORDAN SAID: “I WAS BORN AND RAISED IN BELLEVUE IN THE CROWSNEST PASS… THEN I MOVED TO CALGARY [IN 1958]. I WORKED THERE FOR APPROXIMATELY A YEAR AND THEN THE ECONOMY CRASHED AND THERE WAS ACTUALLY NO EMPLOYMENT, SO I JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY FOR THREE YEARS… BEING RELEASED IN JUNE 1963 I RETURNED TO CALGARY AND WENT TO WORK FOR THE CITY OF CALGARY… I WASN’T FEELING TOO WELL. I HAD A COUPLE OF SORES ON MY FOOT SO I WENT TO THE DOCTOR AND HE DID SOME CHECKS ON ME… HE SAYS TO ME “I WANT YOU TO REPORT TO THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL THIS AFTERNOON AND WE’LL START DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT FOR WHAT WE CONTEMPLATE IS TYPE 1 DIABETES.”… I WAS ONLY 20 YEARS OLD. IN THOSE DAYS, THE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR A PERSON DIAGNOSED WITH DIABETES WAS APPROXIMATELY 20 YEARS, SO, I THOUGHT WELL, I’VE LIVED HALF MY LIFE ALREADY… THINGS IN THE WAY THEY TREATED DIABETES IN THOSE DAYS HAVE REALLY CHANGED SIGNIFICANTLY. SO MUCH SO THAT HERE I AM AT AGE 71. I’VE EXCEEDED WHAT THEY TOLD ME WAS MY LIFE EXPECTANCY, AND THAT’S BECAUSE OF THE IMPROVEMENTS THEY MADE IN SUGAR DIABETES CARE OVER THE YEARS.” JORDAN CONTINUED: “WHEN I WAS IN THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL, I BEFRIENDED A YOUNG WOMAN WHO WAS JUST A STUDENT NURSE, AND HER AND I BECAME CLOSE AND DATED FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER THAT… SHE WAS ON MY CASE EVERY TIME WE WENT ANYWHERE AND DID ANYTHING. IF I FELL OFF THE WAGON AT ALL [WITH DIET OR TREATMENT] SHE WAS ON MY CASE, AND IT EVENTUALLY GOT THROUGH TO ME WHAT SHE WAS SAYING… SOME OF THE PROBABILITIES OF WHAT COULD OCCUR TO YOU… YOUR KIDNEYS FAILING, YOUR EYES FAILING… I DIDN’T LIKE THE SOUNDS OF THINGS LIKE THAT… I BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT IF I WANTED TO LIVE PAST FORTY, I’D BETTER START MAKING SOME OF THESE CHANGES… YOU KNEW THAT IF YOU WENT OUT AT NIGHT AND HAD THAT HAMBURGER AND THAT BEER WITH THE GUYS… YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE DONE THAT… THE TYPES OF INSULIN THEY WERE USING WERE CHANGING, THE AMOUNT OF INSULIN THAT YOU WERE TAKING [AND] THE TIMES YOU WERE TAKING THE INSULINS… THEY WERE REFINING IT SO IT WORKED BETTER… WHEN I FIRST CAME DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE, IN THE 1980S] I WAS TAKING INSULIN ONCE A DAY. I WOULD WAKE IN THE MORNING, AND I WOULD READ TO MY BEDSIDE TABLE, AND THESE SYRINGES AND HYPODERMIC NEEDLES WERE SITTING THERE… PICK UP THE NEEDLES AND TAKE YOUR SHOT… THE GLASS SYRINGES AND STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BECAME A THING OF THE PAST [BY THE LATE 1980S]. THANK GOD FOR THAT BECAUSE THE NEW STUFF WAS A LOT EASIER TO USE… THEY ARE ANCIENT HISTORY AND I’M SURE IF THEY TRIED TO TREAT SOMEBODY TODAY WITH THOSE TYPE OF THINGS THEY WOULD SAY ‘WHOA, I DON’T LIKE THE LOOKS OF THOSE THINGS’, BECAUSE THEY’RE ALMOST LIKE PUNCHING YOURSELF WITH A TOOTHPICK RATHER THAN A NEEDLE… YOU HAD TO PROCESS THOSE GLASS SYRINGES… I WOULD TAKE THE APART AND PUT THEM IN A BATH OF WATER AND VINEGAR, AND BOIL THEM FOR ABOUT FIVE MINUTES… IT STERILIZED THEM, BUT IT ALSO KEPT THE SCALE FROM BUILDING UP ON THE PLUNGER OF THE SYRINGE SO THEY WORKED PROPERLY. THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLES… THEY WERE VERY EXPENSIVE… I USED TO USE THEM FOR APPROXIMATELY TWO WEEKS, AND THEY WOULD GET DULL BY THE END OF TWO WEEKS. THEY WERE ‘OUCH’ TO USE…” WHEN ASKED WHY HE SAVED THE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES LONG AFTER THEY HAD BEEN REPLACED BY NEW MEDICAL EQUIPMENT, JORDAN SAID: “I GUESS THEY SORT OF BECAME LIKE A KEEPSAKE. IN THOSE BOXES IS MY LIFE. IF I DIDN’T HAVE THOSE, I WOULDN’T BE HERE TODAY… AFTER I CHANGED FROM THOSE OLD GIMMICKS TO THE NEWER STYLE, I’D TAKE THEM OUT ABOUT ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS, AND LOOK AT THEM, AND SAY ‘I SHOULD JUST GET RID OF THOSE THINGS’… IT’S LIKE AN OLD POCKET KNIFE… I’M GOING TO HANG ONTO IT EVEN THOUGH IT’S DULL AND NO LONGER ANY USE… THERE IS A RITUAL. YOU GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND YOU WASH, AND YOU TAKE YOUR SHOTS, AND YOU GO DOWN AND EAT, AND THEN YOU START THE CLOCK TICKING… I THINK IT’S IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE SEE SOME HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL PROGRESS THAT’S BEEN MADE, IN THIS ONE PARTICULAR AREA… [THESE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES] ARE AN INTERESTING [ARTIFACT] OF HISTORY ABOUT DIABETES, AND HOW IT’S BEEN PROGRESSED AND LOOKED AFTER…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20140027001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASED, “CAUTION - PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140027002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASED, “CAUTION - PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS”
Date Range From
1963
Date Range To
1980
Materials
GLASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Height
4.25
Length
14.5
Width
7.75
Description
OVAL-SHAPED PLASTIC CASE CONTAINING TWO GLASS SYRINGES, CUSHIONED WITH PIECE OF PINK TISSUE. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. .A – CASE – CLEAR PLASTIC LID HINGED TO WHITE PLASTIC BOTTOM. WHITE LABEL ON LID IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED FROM MOISTURE EXPOSURE, WITH BLACK TEXT READING “CAUTION – PERIODICALLY FLUSH PUMP WITH HOT SOAPY WATER TO CLEAN MECHANISM. DO NOT USE ‘CONCENTRATED’ ACIDS IODINE OR SILVER NITRATE – PRESSURE SENSITIVE LABELS – ALCOHOL BORIC SOL. ACETONE TR – METAPHEN M.E.K. TR – MERTHIOLATE – PERCHLOROETHYLENE 5% PHENOL BENZINE MERCUROCHROME CARBON TET TR – MERCRESIN ETHER TR – ZEPHIRAN”. BOTTOM OF CASE HAS RAISED LOGO READING “DUPONT”. 4.25 X 14.5 X 7.75 .B – SYRINGE – CLEAR GLASS SYRINGE WITH PLUNGER. BROWN VOLUME MARKINGS ALONG LENGTH OF BARREL, AND TEXT READING “B-D YALE INSULIN, MADE IN U.S.A., N 3608, FOR USE WITH U-100 INSULIN ONLY”. 1 X 11 X 1.25 .C - SYRINGE – CLEAR GLASS SYRINGE WITH PLUNGER. BROWN VOLUME MARKINGS ALONG LENGTH OF BARREL, AND TEXT READING “B-D YALE INSULIN, MADE IN U.S.A., O 3720, FOR USE WITH U-100 INSULIN ONLY”. 1 X 11 X 1.25
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
History
THESE GLASS SYRINGES BELONGED TO THE DONOR, JIM JORDAN, WHO USED THEM AS PART OF HIS TREATMENT FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES FROM THE 1960S THROUGH THE 1980S. ON JULY 14, 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JORDAN ABOUT HIS PERSONAL HISTORY WITH THE DISEASE AND THE EVOLUTION OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS. JORDAN SAID: “I WAS BORN AND RAISED IN BELLEVUE IN THE CROWSNEST PASS… THEN I MOVED TO CALGARY [IN 1958]. I WORKED THERE FOR APPROXIMATELY A YEAR AND THEN THE ECONOMY CRASHED AND THERE WAS ACTUALLY NO EMPLOYMENT, SO I JOINED THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY FOR THREE YEARS… BEING RELEASED IN JUNE 1963 I RETURNED TO CALGARY AND WENT TO WORK FOR THE CITY OF CALGARY… I WASN’T FEELING TOO WELL. I HAD A COUPLE OF SORES ON MY FOOT SO I WENT TO THE DOCTOR AND HE DID SOME CHECKS ON ME… HE SAYS TO ME “I WANT YOU TO REPORT TO THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL THIS AFTERNOON AND WE’LL START DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT FOR WHAT WE CONTEMPLATE IS TYPE 1 DIABETES.”… I WAS ONLY 20 YEARS OLD. IN THOSE DAYS, THE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR A PERSON DIAGNOSED WITH DIABETES WAS APPROXIMATELY 20 YEARS, SO, I THOUGHT WELL, I’VE LIVED HALF MY LIFE ALREADY… THINGS IN THE WAY THEY TREATED DIABETES IN THOSE DAYS HAVE REALLY CHANGED SIGNIFICANTLY. SO MUCH SO THAT HERE I AM AT AGE 71. I’VE EXCEEDED WHAT THEY TOLD ME WAS MY LIFE EXPECTANCY, AND THAT’S BECAUSE OF THE IMPROVEMENTS THEY MADE IN SUGAR DIABETES CARE OVER THE YEARS.” JORDAN CONTINUED: “WHEN I WAS IN THE HOLY CROSS HOSPITAL, I BEFRIENDED A YOUNG WOMAN WHO WAS JUST A STUDENT NURSE, AND HER AND I BECAME CLOSE AND DATED FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER THAT… SHE WAS ON MY CASE EVERY TIME WE WENT ANYWHERE AND DID ANYTHING. IF I FELL OFF THE WAGON AT ALL [WITH DIET OR TREATMENT] SHE WAS ON MY CASE, AND IT EVENTUALLY GOT THROUGH TO ME WHAT SHE WAS SAYING… SOME OF THE PROBABILITIES OF WHAT COULD OCCUR TO YOU… YOUR KIDNEYS FAILING, YOUR EYES FAILING… I DIDN’T LIKE THE SOUNDS OF THINGS LIKE THAT… I BEGAN TO REALIZE THAT IF I WANTED TO LIVE PAST FORTY, I’D BETTER START MAKING SOME OF THESE CHANGES… YOU KNEW THAT IF YOU WENT OUT AT NIGHT AND HAD THAT HAMBURGER AND THAT BEER WITH THE GUYS… YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE DONE THAT… THE TYPES OF INSULIN THEY WERE USING WERE CHANGING, THE AMOUNT OF INSULIN THAT YOU WERE TAKING [AND] THE TIMES YOU WERE TAKING THE INSULINS… THEY WERE REFINING IT SO IT WORKED BETTER… WHEN I FIRST CAME DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE, IN THE 1980S] I WAS TAKING INSULIN ONCE A DAY. I WOULD WAKE IN THE MORNING, AND I WOULD READ TO MY BEDSIDE TABLE, AND THESE SYRINGES AND HYPODERMIC NEEDLES WERE SITTING THERE… PICK UP THE NEEDLES AND TAKE YOUR SHOT… THE GLASS SYRINGES AND STAINLESS STEEL HYPODERMIC NEEDLES BECAME A THING OF THE PAST [BY THE LATE 1980S]. THANK GOD FOR THAT BECAUSE THE NEW STUFF WAS A LOT EASIER TO USE… THEY ARE ANCIENT HISTORY AND I’M SURE IF THEY TRIED TO TREAT SOMEBODY TODAY WITH THOSE TYPE OF THINGS THEY WOULD SAY ‘WHOA, I DON’T LIKE THE LOOKS OF THOSE THINGS’, BECAUSE THEY’RE ALMOST LIKE PUNCHING YOURSELF WITH A TOOTHPICK RATHER THAN A NEEDLE… YOU HAD TO PROCESS THOSE GLASS SYRINGES… I WOULD TAKE THE APART AND PUT THEM IN A BATH OF WATER AND VINEGAR, AND BOIL THEM FOR ABOUT FIVE MINUTES… IT STERILIZED THEM, BUT IT ALSO KEPT THE SCALE FROM BUILDING UP ON THE PLUNGER OF THE SYRINGE SO THEY WORKED PROPERLY. THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLES… THEY WERE VERY EXPENSIVE… I USED TO USE THEM FOR APPROXIMATELY TWO WEEKS, AND THEY WOULD GET DULL BY THE END OF TWO WEEKS. THEY WERE ‘OUCH’ TO USE…” WHEN ASKED WHY HE SAVED THE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES LONG AFTER THEY HAD BEEN REPLACED BY NEW MEDICAL EQUIPMENT, JORDAN SAID: “I GUESS THEY SORT OF BECAME LIKE A KEEPSAKE. IN THOSE BOXES IS MY LIFE. IF I DIDN’T HAVE THOSE, I WOULDN’T BE HERE TODAY… AFTER I CHANGED FROM THOSE OLD GIMMICKS TO THE NEWER STYLE, I’D TAKE THEM OUT ABOUT ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS, AND LOOK AT THEM, AND SAY ‘I SHOULD JUST GET RID OF THOSE THINGS’… IT’S LIKE AN OLD POCKET KNIFE… I’M GOING TO HANG ONTO IT EVEN THOUGH IT’S DULL AND NO LONGER ANY USE… THERE IS A RITUAL. YOU GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND YOU WASH, AND YOU TAKE YOUR SHOTS, AND YOU GO DOWN AND EAT, AND THEN YOU START THE CLOCK TICKING… I THINK IT’S IMPORTANT THAT PEOPLE SEE SOME HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL PROGRESS THAT’S BEEN MADE, IN THIS ONE PARTICULAR AREA… [THESE SYRINGES AND NEEDLES] ARE AN INTERESTING [ARTIFACT] OF HISTORY ABOUT DIABETES, AND HOW IT’S BEEN PROGRESSED AND LOOKED AFTER…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20140027002
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SCHOOL BOOK, “BEGINNERS’ BOTANY”
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20130029001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SCHOOL BOOK, “BEGINNERS’ BOTANY”
Date
1916
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.75
Length
19.75
Width
13
Description
HARDCOVER BOOK WITH HANDMADE DUST JACKET OF PURPLE COTTON FABRIC WITH WHITE FLOWERS. JACKET IS STITCHED TOGETHER WITH WHITE THREAD. RECTANGULAR PAPER LABEL STUCK TO FRONT COVER HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT READING “BOTANY – CHRISTINE NELSON – 643 8TH ST. S. – LETHBRIDGE – GRADE IX”. HANDWRITTEN TEXT IS REPEATED ON THE INNER FRONT COVER. TITLE PAGE OF BOOK HAS PRINTED TEXT READING “MACMILLAN’S CANADIAN SCHOOL SERIES – BEGINNERS’ BOTANY – BY L. H. BAILEY…” WITH A BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPH OF WHEAT REPRODUCED ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE. BODY OF TEXT CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT AND ILLUSTRATIONS OF VARIOUS PLANT LIFE. FABRIC DUST JACKET IS FADED, STAINED, AND WORN ALONG EDGES; PAGES OF BOOK ARE YELLOWED. GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
EDUCATION
History
THIS BOOK BELONGED TO CHRISTINE NELSON HERRIOT, THE MOTHER-IN-LAW OF THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT HERRIOT AND HER FAMILY’S CONNECTION TO LETHBRIDGE WAS DEVELOPED WITH A GENEALOGY DOCUMENT PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT TIME OF DONATION, ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE W.F. NELSON FONDS AT GLENBOW ARCHIVES. CHRISTINE NELSON WAS BORN IN 1903 IN RUTLAND, VERMONT TO WILLIAM FREDRICK NELSON AND SARAH CROMWELL BRYAN. IN 1911 WILLIAM TOOK THE POSITION OF MANAGER AT THE ALBERTA LOAN AND INVESTMENT CO., AND THE FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. BY 1918 THE COMPANY HAD FAILED, AND WILLIAM OPENED A REAL ESTATE OFFICE, W.F. NELSON & CO., BUT DIED SUDDENLY OF HEART FAILURE THE FOLLOWING YEAR. SUSAN AND CHRISTINE WERE MENTIONED IN THE OCTOBER 19, 1920 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AS RELOCATING TO CALGARY, WHERE CHRISTINE WOULD MEET AND MARRY WILLIAM HAROLD HERRIOT IN 1928. THEIR DAUGHTER JOANNE LATER WED THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE HANDWRITTEN LABEL ON THE FRONT COVER OF THIS BOOK READS “BOTANY – CHRISTINE NELSON – 643 8TH ST. S. – LETHBRIDGE – GRADE IX”, DATING IT TO 1917 WHEN CHRISTINE WAS 14 YEARS OLD. L. H. BAILEY’S ‘BEGINNERS’ BOTANY’ WAS FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1909 AND USED IN THE SCHOOL CURRICULUMS OF SEVERAL CANADIAN PROVINCES, BEING REPRINTED BY MACMILLAN COMPANY OF CANADA (TORONTO) IN 1916 AND 1921 AS PART OF THE ‘MACMILLAN CANADIAN SCHOOL SERIES’. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS AND FAMILY HISTORY SOURCE MATERIALS.
Catalogue Number
P20130029001
Acquisition Date
2013-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT W/ TUBE
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CARDBOARD, FOIL
Catalogue Number
P20130029002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT W/ TUBE
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1920
Materials
GLASS, CARDBOARD, FOIL
No. Pieces
4
Height
7
Diameter
3
Description
.A – TUBE – TIN CYLINDRICAL TUBE, LINED WITH CARDBOARD, WITH THREADED TOP RIM AND METAL BASE. A PAPER SHIPPING LABEL IS GLUED AROUND THE OUTSIDE, WITH PRINTED TEXT READING “FROM THE PALISADE MFG. CO. – 247-249 CLINTON AVENUE – WEST HOBOKEN, N. J.” AND TYPEWRITTEN TEXT READING “MRS. C. NELSON – 643 8TH ST., S. – LETHBRIDGE, ATLA.”. A RED STAMP WITH MALE FACE IN PROFILE AND TEXT READING “U.S. POSTAGE – 2 CENTS” IS GLUED ONTO THE LABEL. INSIDE CARDBOARD OF TUBE IS WORN; LABEL IS FADED AND PEELING AT EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 7 X 3 X 3 .B – TUBE CAP – TIN CIRCULAR CAP WITH THREADED EDGE. STAMPED TEXT CIRCLES AROUND TOP SIDE AND READS “IMPROVED MAILING CASE CO. – NEW YORK. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH GREY FELT. SOME WEAR AND DISCOLORATION; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 0.75 X 3 X 3 .C – BOTTLE – CLEAR GLASS BOTTLE STOPPED WITH CORK AND FILLED WITH DARK BROWN LIQUID. RAISED TEXT ON BOTTOM READS “TOURNADES KITCHEN BOUQUET”. GLUE AND PAPER RESIDUE ON SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 6.5 X 2.2 X 2.2 .D – BOTTLE CAP – FOIL CAP WRAPPER, PRINTED WITH BLUE TEXT ON WHITE BACKGROUND, READING “KITCHEN BOUQUET” ON TOP AND “GUARANTEED GENUINE – J. L. TOURNADE”. BOTTOM EDGE IS IRRIDESCENT PINK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 1.5 X 1.75 X 1.75
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THIS BOTTLE OF “KITCHEN BOUQUET” CONDIMENT SAUCE BELONGED TO CHRISTINE NELSON HERRIOT, THE MOTHER-IN-LAW OF THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT HERRIOT AND HER FAMILY’S CONNECTION TO LETHBRIDGE WAS DEVELOPED WITH A GENEALOGY DOCUMENT PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT TIME OF DONATION, ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE W.F. NELSON FONDS AT GLENBOW ARCHIVES. CHRISTINE NELSON WAS BORN IN 1903 IN RUTLAND, VERMONT TO WILLIAM FREDRICK NELSON AND SARAH CROMWELL BRYAN. IN 1911 WILLIAM TOOK THE POSITION OF MANAGER AT THE ALBERTA LOAN AND INVESTMENT CO., AND THE FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. BY 1918 THE COMPANY HAD FAILED, AND WILLIAM OPENED A REAL ESTATE OFFICE, W.F. NELSON & CO., BUT DIED SUDDENLY OF HEART FAILURE THE FOLLOWING YEAR. SUSAN AND CHRISTINE WERE MENTIONED IN THE OCTOBER 19, 1920 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AS RELOCATING TO CALGARY, WHERE CHRISTINE WOULD MEET AND MARRY WILLIAM HAROLD HERRIOT IN 1928. THEIR DAUGHTER JOANNE LATER WED THE DONOR, JIM HAWKES. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF “KITCHEN BOUQUET” WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FOUND ON WWW.COOKSINFO.COM. KITCHEN BOUQUET WAS DEVELOPED TO BE USED AS AN INGREDIENT IN COOKING, RATHER THAN AS A TABLE CONDIMENT. IT IS PRIMARILY USED FOR ITS ABILITY TO ADD A DARK BROWN COLOUR – A “BROWNING AGENT”. THE PRODUCT WAS FIRST DEVELOPED IN THE 1880S BY JULES L. TOURNADE’S PALISADE MANUFACTURING COMPANY IN WEST HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY. IT WAS ORIGINALLY MARKETED AS “TOURNADE’S KITCHEN BOUQUET”. IN 1923 KITCHEN BOUQUET BECAME A PART OF THE FOULDS COMPANY AS A RESULT OF A MERGER, AND SIX YEARS LATER BECAME ENCOMPASSED IN ANOTHER FOOD CONGLOMERATE, GROCERY STORE PRODUCTS INC. IN 1971 GROCERY STORE PRODUCTS INC. WAS PURCHASED BY THE CLOROX COMPANY, WHICH STILL PRODUCES AND DISTRIBUTES KITCHEN BOUQUET AT THE TIME OF THIS ARTIFACT’S ACQUISITION BY THE GALT MUSEUM. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS, FAMILY HISTORY, AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIALS.
Catalogue Number
P20130029002
Acquisition Date
2013-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT DIAMOND FARE BOX
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2012
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140018000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT DIAMOND FARE BOX
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2012
Materials
STEEL, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
58.5
Length
16
Width
15
Description
CYLINDER WITH STEEL BASE BOLTED TO CLEAR PLASTIC CANISTER, TOPPED WITH ROUNDED ALUMINIUM CAP WITH BEVELED SLOT THAT OPENS INTO PLASTIC CANISTER WITH TWO TOOTHED, METAL, ANGLED FLAPS. BASE HAS TWO IRREGULAR METAL SHAPES EMERGING FROM ONE SIDE, AND A RED, WHITE, AND YELLOW LABEL STUCK TO THE OPPOSITE SIDE THAT READS “CASH FARES – PLEASE OBTAIN A TRANSFER WHEN PAYING FARE… L.A. TRANSIT…”. BASE BOTTOM IS STOPPED WITH BRASS PLUG, STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “DIAMOND MFG. CO. – KANSAS CITY, MO.” AND “47” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER. GENERAL WEAR, NICKS IN METAL, CLOUDING OF PLASTIC, SCUFFS AND TEARS ON LABEL, TAPE RESIDUE ALONG BOTTOM EDGE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
RETAIL TRADE
History
THIS FARE BOX WAS PRODUCED BY DIAMOND MANUFACTURING IN KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI, AND USED IN LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT BUSES BETWEEN 1970 AND 2012. ON APRIL 23, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED DIANE BOULTON, AN EMPLOYEE WITH LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT FROM 1975 TO 2014. BOULTON SAID: “I WAS A BUS DRIVER AND THEN WENT ON TO BECOME PART OF MANAGEMENT… [THIS TYPE OF FARE BOX] WAS IN SERVICE WHEN I STARTED WITH THE DEPARTMENT IN 1975 AND HAD PROBABLY BEEN IN SERVICE FOR MAYBE FIVE TO 10 YEARS [ALREADY]. IT IS CALLED A DIAMOND FARE BOX… IT WOULD BE MOUNTED ON A STANCHION NEXT TO THE DRIVER’S COMPARTMENT… IT’S A STAINLESS STEEL CYLINDER THAT IS OPEN… AND WE WOULD SLIDE A SOLID BRASS CYLINTER UP INSIDE OF IT THAT WAS A LOCKING MECHANISM FOR THE FARE BOX… THERE WAS A LOCKING MECHANISM ON [THE] FLANGE THAT WOULD LOCK IT IN PLACE AND [IT] REQUIRED A TWO-KEY SYSTEM TO GET IN AND OUT OF… AT THE TOP, IT’S AN OPEN CYLINDER, SO SOMEBODY COULD COME IN WITH A HANDFUL OF CASH AND… YOU ARE GOING TO GET MULTIPLE TYPES OF COINS… IT’S REALLY HARD TO COUNT THE PHYSICAL FARE… SO YOU’RE TAKING THE CUSTOMER ON THEIR HONESTY… THE DRIVERS [ALSO] HAD TO PHYSICALLY COUNT WHEN WE WERE DOING PASSENGER COUNTS TO TRY AND GET SOME SORT OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF HOW MANY PEOPLE WERE RIDING, WHAT FARE CATEGORIES WERE RIDING… WITH THE ELECTRONIC FARE BOX [ADOPTED BY LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT IN 2012], IT TELLS EXACTLY WHEN IT’S GOT THE ALLOTTED FARE [AND] AT THE SAME TIME IT’S TAKING YOUR FARE, IT’S COUNTING YOU AS A PASSENGER… THE ELECTRONIC FARE BOX GIVES US A HUGE AMOUNT OF DATA, THAT VERY EASILY IT OBTAINED, WHILE THIS ONE WAS MORE ONEROUS… [ANOTHER REASON] THAT WE STARTED TO SWITCH OUT WAS THAT WE STARTED TO GET DIFFICULTY IN GETTING PARTS BECAUSE THE [DIAMOND] FARE BOX ITSELF WAS FAIRLY OLD.” BOULTON CONTINUED: “BECAUSE IT’S WHAT I USED ALL THE TIME [AS A BUS DRIVER] THERE’S SOME NOSTALGIA THERE… THE SIMPLICITY OF IT… AS THINGS CHANGE AND MOVE FORWARD… IT’S KINDA NEAT… I THINK WHEN I FIRST STARTED IT WAS… $0.65 FOR AN ADULT FARE, AND $0.25 OR $0.35 FOR 17 OR UNDER CHILD FARE, AND SENIORS HAD A PASS THAT THEY RODE FREE… THERE WAS THE ODD TIME WHERE PEOPLE WOULD TRY AND FIGURE OUT A WAY TO GET THE CYLINDER OUT OF A BOTTOM OF IT… AND OCCASIONALLY THE CYLINDERS WOULD FALL OUT IF [YOU] WERE IN A HURRY WHEN YOU WERE PUTTING THEM IN AND YOU DIDN’T QUITE GET THE LOCKING MECHANISM SHUT… YOU’D BE DRIVING DOWN THE ROAD AND ALL OF A SUDDEN, BOOM! THE CYLINDER WOULD DROP OUT OF THE BOTTOM… WE HAD 50-60 OF THE DIAMOND FARE BOXES [AND] THE ACTUAL COIN CYLINDERS THAT WENT UP INSIDE, WE PROBABLY HAD 120-150 OF THOSE BECAUSE, FOR EVERY [FULL] ONE YOU DROPPED OUT, YOU HAD TO PUT ANOTHER UP AND THEY WOULD GET DROPPED OUT AT NIGHT, SO THEY WOULDN’T GET OPENED UNTIL THE NEXT MORNING [FOR FARES TO BE COUNTED].” ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE “DIAMOND FAREBOXES ARE FOREVER”, PUBLISHED IN FEBRUARY 2013 ON BUSRIDE.COM, DIAMOND MANUFACTURING HAS PRODUCED ROUND FAREBOXES FOR COIN FARES SINCE 1947. DIAMOND-BRAND FAREBOXES ARE USED BY TRANSIT SYSTEMS IN EVERY AMERICAN STATE, THROUGHOUT CANADA, AND IN MEXICO, VENEZUELA, BERMUDA AND GUAM. THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN OF A DIAMOND FAREBOX IS 30 YEARS, WITH LITTLE MAINTENANCE REQUIRED DUE TO THE SIMPLICITY OF THE DESIGN. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140018000
Acquisition Date
2014-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OVERDUE LIBRARY BOOK FINE CALCULATOR
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OVERDUE LIBRARY BOOK FINE CALCULATOR
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1985
Materials
WOOD, PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.5
Length
17.5
Width
7.5
Description
RECTANGULAR PIECE OF WOOD WITH ANGLED METAL BRACKET FIXED TO BACK AS A STAND, TO PROP UP WOOD AT AN ANGLE. PAPER CARD WITH DESCENDING NUMERICAL VALUES AND TEXT READING “GAYLORD FINE CALCULATOR” IS FIXED TO TOP SIDE OF WOOD WITH A SHEET OF CLEAR PLASTIC AND SIX METAL SLOTTED SCREWS. A STRIP OF METAL HOLDS SQUARE PIECES OF BLACK PLASTIC IN A VERTICAL ROW ALONG THE RIGHT SIDE; EACH PLASTIC PIECE HAS A NUMBER FROM 1 TO 31 STAMPED IN WHITE INK. MINOR WEAR ON BOTTOM EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
History
THIS FINE CALCULATOR WAS USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY SAID: “THIS [WOULD HAVE BEEN USED] FOR CALCULATING OVERDUE FINES AND THESE WOULD BE THE NUMBERS OF THE MONTH… IF [THE BOOK] WAS DUE BACK ON THE 30TH THEN THAT’S HOW MUCH YOU OWED… UNTIL ’92 WE ONLY HAD ONE [CIRCULATION] DESK SO… WE’RE ASSUMING THAT WAS USED AT THE MAIN CIRCULATION DESK… IT WOULD HAVE BEEN USED [PRIOR TO THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY’S SYSTEM] BECAUSE WE HAD NO OTHER WAY TO CALCULATE [FINES] BUT ONCE THE COMPUTER CAME ALONG THE CIRCULATION MODULES ALWAYS CALCULATED FINES SO IT WASN’T [NEEDED ANYMORE] - ANOTHER THING THAT BECAME REDUNDANT AT THAT POINT.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025002
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
31
Height
100.75
Length
103.25
Width
46
Description
.1 – WOOD CABINET CONTAINING 30 DRAWERS IN SIX ROWS (.2 - .31). CABINET’S FOUR LEGS AND EDGES ARE SQUARED, WITH THREE METAL ANGLED BRACKETS AND TWO WOODEN CORNER BRACES ATTACHING THE CABINET BODY TO THE LEGS. WOOD IS STAINED BLONDE. STAMPED TEXT IN BLUE INK ON UNDERSIDE OF CABINET READS "MADE IN CANADA". GENERAL WEAR AND SCUFFS OVERALL, ESPECIALLY ALONG TOP FRONT EDGE AND BOTTOM FRONT SKIRTING PANEL. DRIPS OF WHITE PAINT ON EDGES OF BOTH FRONT LEGS AND CABINET BACK EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 100.75 X 46 X 103.25 ALL DRAWERS (.2 - .31) ARE WOOD WITH BRASS LABELPLATES AND MEASURE 9.75 X 14.5 X 41. .2 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .3 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .4 – EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .5 – HALF FULL OF LOOSE CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .6 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .7 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .8 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. DRAWER ROD BRACKET IS MISSING ONE SCREW AND HANGS LOOSE. .9 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .10 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .11 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL; DRAWER ROD IN PLACE. .12 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .13 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .14 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .15 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .16 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .17 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1990”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .18 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .19 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 A-J”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .20 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 J-S”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .21 – HALF FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 S-Z”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .22 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1990 A-K DONE”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .23 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .24 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .25 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .26 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .27 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .28 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .29 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “CDN… PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .30 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .31 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK.
Subjects
FURNITURE
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS CARD CATALOGUE WAS PRODUCED AND USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY EXPLAINED THE CATALOGUING PROCESS AND SUGGESTED THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN HOUSED IN THE LIBRARY’S SENATOR BUCHANAN ROOM (A REFERENCE RESOURCE OF LOCAL HISTORIES AND GENEALOGIES) AT ONE TIME. MCELRAVY SAID: “WE USED [CARD CATALOGUES] PRIOR TO AUTOMATING OUR CATALOGUE WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘80S… THERE ARE AT LEAST THREE INDEXES [INSIDE THIS SPECIFIC CATALOGUE]… WE USED TO CREATE CARD INDEXES FOR COLLECTIONS AND THINGS THAT YOU COULDN’T FIND… THROUGH NORMAL CATALOGUING PROCESSES. SO, THE FIRST ONE IS… THE SONG INDEX AND THAT WAS MADE UP OF ANALYTICS OF SHEET MUSIC MAGAZINE AND COLLECTIONS AND SONGS – ALL MUSIC AS OPPOSED TO JUST THE LYRICS. SO WE WOULD TAKE COLLECTIONS OF SONGS IN OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION, WE DIDN’T USE ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY – SO IT WASN’T A GENERAL THING IT WAS SPECIFIC, A SPECIFIC TOOL TO OUR COLLECTION… IF SOMEONE WANTED A PARTICULAR PIECE OF MUSIC… WE WOULD BE ABLE TO FIND THAT HERE RATHER THAN PEOPLE STANDING AT THE SHELF, LEAFING THROUGH ALL OF THAT… [AT] THE OTHER END OF THE BANK OF CARDS IS THE PLAY INDEX AND THAT’S THE SAME IDEA – THERE WOULD BE ‘AUTHOR’, ‘PLAYWRIGHT’ AND ‘TITLE’ CARDS PUT IN FOR EACH OF THE PLAYS IN COLLECTIONS THAT WE HAD AT LPL. AND THE MIDDLE ONE WAS THE INDEX TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD – I THINK SOME OF IT GOES BACK TO ’99 AND BEFORE AND FOR THAT ONE THE STAFF WOULD CUT OUT ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT SUBJECT HEADINGS ON THEM AND MAKE A CORRESPONDING CARD FOR THE CATALOGUE SO THAT THAT WOULD GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO THAT [FILE]...” MCELRAVY CONTINUED: “I THINK [THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY CATALOGUE] WAS IN THE MID ‘80S… [AFTER THAT PROCESS] I’M NOT SURE HOW OFTEN THEY USED [THE CARD CATALOGUES] ANYMORE… PERHAPS IT WAS JUST A QUESTION OF HANGING ON TO IT FOR THE SAKE OF HANGING ON TO IT.. I DON’T SUPPOSE REALLY FOR TOO LONG AFTER THAT IT WOULD [HAVE BEEN] USEFUL… [THE CARD CATALOGUE] REPRESENTS A LOT OF WORK… IT WAS EXPENSIVE TIME-WISE, IT WAS EXPENSIVE MATERIALS-WISE AND IT WAS EXPENSIVE SPACE-WISE… EVEN WITH THE DIGITIZED, AUTOMATED CATALOGUE, THOSE GENERIC ENTRIES DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE ANALYTICS… SO THAT’S WHY WE CONTINUED WITH THIS FOR A WHILE AND THEN EVENTUALLY IT JUST SEEMED TO BE NOT WORTH THE EFFORT TO DO IT… IT JUST SEEMED SAD TO ME THAT IT WAS ALMOST LIKE IT WASN’T RECOGNIZED BECAUSE IT WAS TOO OLD – IT HAD HAD ITS DAY BUT THERE’S NO PURPOSE FOR IT ANYMORE… I THINK THAT THIS CERTAINLY SERVED ITS PURPOSE FOR ITS TIME AND IT’S PART OF THE CONTEXT OF THE PERIOD… I OFTEN THINK TODAY WITH INTERNET AND WITH ALL THE ONLINE ACCESS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO INFORMATION… WHEN YOU HAVE A QUESTION WHAT DO PEOPLE DO NOW? THEY PULL OUT THEIR PHONE, AND THEY GOOGLE, AND THEY GET THE ANSWER. WHEREAS, BEFORE ANY OF THIS HAPPENED THAT WAS WHAT THE LIBRARY DID, THAT WAS THE ROLE OF THE REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. THE LIBRARY IS THERE NOT JUST TO PROVIDE RECREATIONAL READING BUT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION. I’M NOT SAYING THEY’RE NOT DOING THAT ANYMORE, THEY ARE, IN A VERY MUCH MORE SOPHISTICATED WAY BUT THIS WAS ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE HANDLED THE NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO PEOPLE.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANON “EOS 650” W/ ACCESSORIES
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, GLASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140041000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANON “EOS 650” W/ ACCESSORIES
Date
1988
Materials
PLASTIC, GLASS, METAL
No. Pieces
17
Height
11
Length
15
Width
6.5
Description
.A – CAMERA BODY (2 PCE) – BLACK PLASTIC AND METAL CAMERA BODY, WITH ROUND PLASTIC LENS CAVITY CAP. HINGED DOOR AT BACK OPENS TO FILM COMPARTMENT. ROUND DIAL WITH SYMBOLS AND LETTERS AT TOP RIGHT, BEHIND TWO BUTTONS WITH TEXT READING “MODE” AND “EXP.COMP”. MAKER’S BRANDING READS “CANON EOS 650”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 11 X 15 X 6.5 .B – CAMERA LENS (3 PCE) – BLACK PLASTIC, METAL AND GLASS LENS, WITH ROUND PLASTIC LENS CAPS ON BOTH ENDS. TEXT ALONG THE PERIMETER READS “CANON ZOOM LENS EF 35-105MM 1 : 3.5-4.5”. OUTER LENS CAP HAS SOME ADHESIVE RESIDUE UNDER MAKER’S BRANDING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 11 X 6.5 .C – CAMERA FLASH (2 PCE) – BLACK PLASTIC AND METAL FLASH, STORED IN BLACK FAUX LEATHER POUCH WITH SNAP CLOSURE. POUCH IS STAMPED WITH MAKER’S BRANDING, “CANON”. FLASH IS HINGED AT CENTRE, WITH SCREEN AND BUTTONS AT BACK, ABOVE CONTACT POINTS AND SCREW FASTENER TO ATTACHED FLASH TO CAMERA BODY. MAKER’S BRANDING READS “SPEEDLITE 420EZ”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 5.5 X 18 X 8 .D – LENS FILTERS (5 PCE) – THREE ROUND GLASS FILTERS WITH BLACK PLASTIC RIMS. STORED IN BLACK FAUX LEATHER CASE WITH RED FELT LINING, ALONG WITH FOLDED PIECE OF PRINTED BLUE PAPER TITLED “EFFECT OF CROWN FILTERS”. FILTERS ARE EACH PRINTED WITH WHITE TEXT ALONG OUTER RIM READING “CROWN CLOSE UP… 58MM”, ONLY DIFFERENTIATED AS “NO.1”, “NO. 2” AND “NO. 4”. OVERALLY VERY GOOD CONDITION. 8 X 7.75 X 4 .E – MANUALS AND PAPERWORK (5 PCE) – TWO SOFTCOVER MANUALS FOR “CANON EOS 620 – 650” AND “CANON SPEEDLITE 420EZ”; TWO LOOSE SHEETS OF PRINTED GREEN CARD, TITLED “IDENTIFICATION OF ARTICLES FOR TEMPORARY EXPORTATION”, STAMPED BY CANADA CUSTOMS AND SIGNED BY THE DONOR; THREE CANON WARRANTY CARDS STAPLED TO A RECEIPT PRINTED “WOODWARD’S – YOUR FAMILY SHOPPING CENTRES”. RECEIPT IS WRINKLED AND DISCOLOURED; CORNERS OF MANUALS ARE DOGEARED. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 1.25 X 16 X 12
Subjects
PHOTOGRAPHIC T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THIS CAMERA AND ASSOCIATED ACCESSORIES WERE OWNED AND USED BY THE DONOR, MARCEL ST. ONGE. ON OCTOBER 14, 2014 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ST. ONGE ABOUT THE CAMERA AND ITS USE IN DOCUMENTING HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY FROM 1988 TO 2006/2007, WHEN HE REPLACED IT WITH HIS FIRST DIGITAL CAMERA. ST. ONGE SAID: “THE CANON WAS USED [FOR] FAMILY PICTURES, AND IT WAS PURCHASED AT WOODWARD’S CAMERA STORE… SNAPSHOTS OF KIDS GROWING UP, MOMENTOS AND FAMILY COMING TO VISIT… THERE WAS ALWAYS FAMILY AT CHRISTMAS, THANKSGIVING, EASTER, AND WE’D ALWAYS MAKE SURE [TO TAKE PHOTOS]… FAMILY WAS THE MOST IMPORTANT… MY MOTHER USED TO TAKE PICTURES WAY BACK WITH AN OLD KODAK CAMERA, BLACK AND WHITE, AND SHE ALWAYS TOOK PICTURES OF THE FAMILY… AND MY BROTHER TOOK PICTURES AS WELL… AND MYSELF, THE SAME… PRETTY WELL THE WHOLE FAMILY TAKES PICTURES… I LIKE TO RECORD… THE TECHNOLOGY OF THE CAMERAS, AS IT EVOLVED, MADE IT EASIER TO BE ABLE TO FRAME YOUR PICTURES AND HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING, THAT YOU COULD TAKE THEM A LITTLE QUICKER… WHEN I GOT THE CANON, IT ALLOWED TAKING PICTURES IN THE DARK; WHILE IT WAS SENSING, IT WOULD TAKE THE PICTURE… AS [MY WIFE AND I] PROGRESSED ALONG THE ROAD, WE BOTH REALIZED THAT IT’S IMPORTANT TO LOOK AT WHERE WE WERE TAKING THE PICTURES… WE’D TRY TO POSITION THE SUBJECT SO THERE WAS EITHER A TREE IN THE BACKGROUND OR AWAY FROM SHADE, SO THE FACE EXPOSURE, WHICH IS WHAT YOU USUALLY WANT, IN VISIBLE AND CLEAR… THE [LONGER] LENSES GAVE YOU A TERRIFIC ADVANTAGE OVER A SHORT SNAP AND SHOOT CAMERA… SOME PLACES YOU COULD USE THE FLASH [THOUGH] THE NATURAL LIGHT WAS ALWAYS BETTER… I WENT TO A FEW SESSIONS TO LEARN THE CONTRAST AND COMPOSITION AND USING A TRIPOD… JUST TO GET A LITTLE MORE FAMILIAR WITH THE QUALITY OF THE CAMERA AND WHAT THE CAMERA COULD ACTUALLY DO… I WANTED [TO BE] BETTER AT PRODUCING QUALITY PHOTOS OF OUR FAMILY… IT WAS A HOBBY.” ST. ONGE CONTINUED: “WE WERE CAREFUL [WHILE SHOOTING FILM] BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE. WE COULDN’T AFFORD TO JUST GO AND SHOOT ALL OVER THE PLACE… COMPARED TO NOW WITH THE DIGITAL STUFF [WHERE] YOU CAN TAKE A HUNDRED PICTURES AND YOU MIGHT GET FIVE BEAUTIFUL ONES OUT OF THE WORKS… [IN 2006/07] WHEN I GOT THE DIGITAL [CAMERA], I WAS ACTUALLY TAKING MORE PICTURES THAN WHEN I FIRST HAD [THE] CANON… NOW EVERYBODY IN THE FAMILY HAS A CELL PHONE WITH A CAMERA IN IT… THE PICTURES WE TAKE NOW, WE PRINT OUR OWN… JUST PLUG THE LITTLE CARD IN THE COMPUTER, AND THERE’S THE PICTURE… IF WE LOOK BACK ON THE LAST FIVE YEARS… THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF FAMILY PICTURES, INDIVIDUAL PICTURES, SPORTS, EVENTS, GRADUATIONS [ON SOCIAL MEDIA] THAT PEOPLE ARE POSTING… A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE NOT GETTING PICTURES DEVELOPED [AND] PRINTED; IT’S ALL ON [SOCIAL] MEDIA.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND COPIES OF THE SPEC SHEETS FOR THE CANON EOS 650.
Catalogue Number
P20140041000
Acquisition Date
2014-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANON “POWERSHOT A610”
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, GLASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140044000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANON “POWERSHOT A610”
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2014
Materials
PLASTIC, GLASS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
6.75
Length
11
Width
4.8
Description
SILVER-COLOURED METAL CAMERA WITH RETRACTABLE LENS, HINGED VIEWING SCREEN AT BACK, AND WOVEN CLOTH STRAP CONNECTED TO A METAL LOOP AT TOP LEFT. CIRCULAR DIAL WITH SYMBOLS AND LETTERS AT TOP LEFT BEHIND SHUTTER RELEASE BUTTON. BATTERY COMPARTMENT AT BOTTOM LEFT, BELOW MEMORY CARD SLOT. MAKER’S BRANDING READS “CANON POWERSHOT A610 AIAF”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PHOTOGRAPHIC T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS CAMERA WAS OWNED AND USED BY THE DONOR, CHRIS MORRISON. MORRISON IS AN AUTHOR AND HISTORIAN OF WATERTON-GLACIER INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK, ABOUT WHICH SHE HAS WRITTEN NUMEROUS BOOKS. MORRISON PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT HER USE OF THE CAMERA AT THE TIME OF DONATION: “THIS CAMERA, NO LONGER OPERATIONAL DUE TO MANUFACTURER’S PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE, WAS A TURNING POINT IN MY INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY. I PURCHASED IT IN 2006 FOR $395.99 FROM COSTCO ONLINE, MY FIRST PURCHASE USING THAT METHOD. HAVING DONE A FAIRLY THOROUGH SEARCH OF CONSUMER REVIEWS, I FELT THIS CAMERA MET ALL MY NEEDS. WHAT I DIDN’T KNOW WAS JUST HOW GOOD IT WOULD BE. DURING ITS SEVEN YEARS OF LIFE, I TOOK THOUSANDS OF PHOTOGRAPHS IN A VARIETY OF SETTINGS AND LOCATIONS FROM JASPER, ALBERTA TO GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. OFTEN REFERRED TO AS A ‘POINT AND SHOOT’ THIS CAMERA HAD FEATURES WHICH MADE EXPOSURE AND FOCUS AUTOMATIC OR COULD BE OVERRIDDEN TO SUIT THE SITUATION.” MORRISON CONTINUED: “WITHIN ONE YEAR OF BUYING THE CAMERA, I WAS ABLE TO MORE THAN PAY FOR IT BY SELLING FREELANCE PHOTOS TO A NUMBER OF PUBLICATIONS. SINCE DIGITAL CAMERAS DO NOT USE FILM, RESULTS WERE IMMEDIATE AND COULD BE CORRECTED OR RESHOT AS NEEDED. GETTING THE PHOTOS TO BUYERS WAS VERY FAST BY USE OF THE INTERNET. WITH MORE THAN 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH TWO CAMERAS (A YASHICA D TWIN LENS REFLEX AND A 35MM MINOLTA SINGLE LENS REFLEX) I HAD A THOROUGH UNDERSTANDING OF THE BASICS OF BOTH BLACK AND WHITE, AND COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY REQUIRED SOME ADDITIONAL LEARNING TO MAXIMIZE THE MANY FEATURES NOT FOUND ON FILM CAMERAS.” MORRISON CONCLUDED: “I BECAME INTERESTED IN DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ABOUT 2003 WHEN I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BORROW A NEIGHBOUR’S CAMERA FOR SEVERAL WEEKS. THIS WAS A CAMERA THAT REQUIRED SQUARE FLOPPY DISKS WHICH DIDN’T HAVE MUCH MEMORY. THE PHOTO RESOLUTION WAS ALSO LIMITED. HOWEVER, WITHIN A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME, NOT ONLY DID DIGITAL CAMERAS GET BETTER AND BETTER, THEY BECAME CHEAPER. WHEN I REPLACED THIS $395.99 CAMERA IN 2014, I GOT ADDITIONAL FEATURES AT HALF THE PRICE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140044000
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SHIRT, LONG-SLEEVED, “LETHBRIDGE POLICE”
Date Range From
1996
Date Range To
2004
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20100048001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SHIRT, LONG-SLEEVED, “LETHBRIDGE POLICE”
Date Range From
1996
Date Range To
2004
Materials
POLYESTER, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
89
Width
49
Description
LONG SLEEVED NAVY POLYESTER SHIRT WITH COLLAR AND BUTTON AND ZIPPER CLOSURE DOWN FRONT. EPAULETS AT SHOULDERS AND BUTTONED POCKETS AT CHEST. EMBROIDERED PATCHES ON BOTH SHOULDERS DEPICT A CROWNED CREST IN YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE AND RED WITH TEXT READING “LETHBRIDGE POLICE” IN WHITE. BRAND TAG AT INNER COLLAR READS “SWAT – R. NICOLLS”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS STYLE OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE UNIFORM SHIRT WAS IN USE BETWEEN 1995 AND 2004. ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE IN THE FEBRUARY 22, 1996 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE DEPARTMENT TRANSITIONED FROM LIGHT BLUE TO DARK NAVY SHIRTS THAT YEAR TO REFLECT CHANGING TRENDS AND FURTHER DIFFERENTIATE OFFICERS FROM OTHER UNIFORMED OCCUPATIONS SUCH AS COMMISSIONAIRES AND POSTAL WORKERS. THE SHOULDER PATCHES ON THIS SHIRT READ “LETHBRIDGE POLICE”, DEMONSTRATING THAT THE SHIRT PREDATES THE DECEMBER 2004 UNVEILING OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE CREST, WHEN COALDALE WAS ADDED TO THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE JURISDICTION. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE LRPS UNIFORM AND BADGE DESIGN. FOR A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE COLLECTION, SEE RECORD P19960112001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF INTERVIEWS AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH CURRENT AND FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112000.
Catalogue Number
P20100048001
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DROP LEG HOLSTER W/ BATON HOLDER, “CAT”
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC, VELCRO
Catalogue Number
P20100048002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DROP LEG HOLSTER W/ BATON HOLDER, “CAT”
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC, VELCRO
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.5
Length
50
Width
67.5
Description
PIECE OF BLACK NYLON FOLDED INTO A TRIANGULAR SHAPED POCKET WITH A FLAP CLOSURE AND PLASTIC BUCKLE CLASP. TWO BLACK WOVEN NYLON STRAPS ARE SEWN HORIZONTALLY TO BACK OF POCKET WITH PLASTIC BUCKLES AT THEIR ENDS. TWO BLACK WOVEN NYLON STRAPS ARE SEWN VERTICALLY TO THE UPPER BACK OF POCKET AND CONNECTED TO A RECTANGULAR BLACK NYLON SLEEVE. LOOSE ENDS OF STRAPS ARE TAPED DOWN WITH BLACK DUCT TAPE. PIECE OF BLACK VELCRO GLUED TO BACK OF POCKET, WITH EXCESS GLUE RESIDUE VISIBLE AROUND EDGES. INSIDE OF FLAP IS MARKED WITH LETTER “ C A T” IN WHITE INK. MINOR WEAR ALONG OUTER SEAMS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS DROP LEG HOLSTER WAS USED BY MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT. SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN, WHO SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012, DESCRIBED THE USE OF THIS HOLSTER AS SUCH: “THIS IS ONE OF THE HOLSTERS FROM THE TACTICAL TEAM… I CAN SEE BY THE STYLE OF IT THAT IT IS LIKE ONE THAT I HAD… LOOKS LIKE [THE OFFICER] HAD DONE SOME MODIFICATIONS TO THAT, WHICH MAKES TOTAL SENSE, WHERE THEY’VE GOT THE GLUE [AND VELCRO] ON THERE… TO MAKE IT MORE RETENTIVE, SO IT STICKS TO YOU [AND] DOESN’T MOVE AROUND… THE DEXTERITY THAT YOU [NEED], EVEN WITH GLOVES ON, THIS WOULD BE A PRETTY DIFFICULT THING TO TRY TO GET [A WEAPON] OUT OF. YOU [HAVE TO] UNDO THE FLAP, AND THEN YOU GRAB YOUR PISTOL. THE NEW HOLSTERS, YOU JUST [HIT THE SIDE]. THERE’S A COUPLE OF DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES TO GET THE PISTOL OUT A LITTLE BIT QUICKER, AND IF YOU HAVE GLOVES ON, IT’S WAY EASIER… BUT GENERALLY ALL PISTOLS ARE SECONDARY WEAPONS IN TACTICAL OPERATIONS.” FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT SGT. CARSCADDEN’S SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT, SEE RECORD P20100050001. SEE PERMANENT FILE P20100050001-GA FOR FULL CARSCADDEN INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100048002
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SHIRT, “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE”
Date Range From
2008
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20100050003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SHIRT, “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE”
Date Range From
2008
Date Range To
2010
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
74.5
Width
50
Description
NAVY SHORT-SLEEVED, COLLARED POLYESTER SHIRT WITH BUTTON AND ZIPPER CLOSURE DOWN FRONT. EPAULETS AT SHOULDERS AND BUTTONED POCKETS AT CHEST. EMBROIDERED PATCHES ON BOTH SHOULDERS DEPICT A CROWNED CREST IN YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE AND RED WITH TEXT READING “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE” IN BLACK AND “POLICE LETHBRIDGE” IN WHITE, ABOVE A CANADIAN FLAG. BRAND TAG AT INNER COLLAR READS “HORACE SMALL APPAREL COMPANY”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS SHIRT WAS WORN BY SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN AS PART OF HIS DAILY SERVICE UNIFORM DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE FORCE. CARSCADDEN JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE IN 1997, AFTER WORKING WITH THE PEEL REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA FROM 1988 TO 1997. DURING HIS CAREER IN PEEL, CARSCADDEN RECEIVED SPECIAL TRAINING, INCLUDING COMPLETING THE FBI’S OBSERVER/SNIPER COURSE, WHICH INFORMED HIS APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE TO THE TACTICAL UNIT IN LETHBRIDGE. REGARDING THIS SHIRT, CARSCADDEN SAID: “THAT [IS FROM] THE PATROL WORLD… THEY HAD JUST SWITCHED A COUPLE OF MONTHS PRIOR [TO HIS JOINING THE FORCE], FROM THE LIGHT BLUE [SHIRTS] TO THE DARK BLUE… THE SHIRTS AVERAGED 2-3 YEARS [OF WEAR].” THIS SHIRT HAS THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SHOULDER PATCH THAT WAS INTRODUCED IN DECEMBER 2004 TO REFLECT THE FORCE’S REGIONALIZATION TO INCLUDE COALDALE, AND IN 2015 CARSCADDEN SAID HE HAD BEEN WEARING IT JUST PRIOR TO STARTING THE DONATION PROCESS IN 2010. ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS. CARSCADDEN SAID: ““[I STARTED OUT] IN PATROLS… I WAS VERY INTERESTED IN SOME OF THE THINGS THEY HAD IN THE TACTICAL WORLD, SO I APPLIED, AND WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET ON THEIR PART-TIME TACTICAL TEAM WITHIN LETHBRIDGE [FROM 1999 – 2012]… I WAS [ALSO] ASKED IF I COULD GO INTO THE COMMUNITY LIAISON UNIT, AND WHEN I WAS IN THAT UNIT WE HAD A NEW POLICE CHIEF [CHIEF MIDDLETON-HOPE] WHO HAD AN INTEREST IN EXPANDING SOME OF THE ROLES WITHIN THE COMMUNITY RESOURCE UNIT [SO WE FORMED] A DIVERSITY UNIT [IN 2003]… THAT HAD A HAND IN DEVELOPING [RELATIONSHIPS WITH] DIFFERENT ETHNIC GROUPS IN YOUR COMMUNITY, AND HOW YOU CAN APPROACH THEM SO THEY CAN ASSIST YOU, AND VICE-VERSA FOR THEM IF THERE’S A NEED FOR HELP WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. SO I’M VERY PROUD OF THAT, AND THERE’S A COUPLE OF THINGS I WAS INVOLVED WITH IN THAT UNIT THAT WERE ABSOLUTELY AMAZING EXPERIENCES. [WE HOLD] A TEEPEE SERVICE, AND I AM THE OFFICIAL TEEPEE KEEPER, AND VERY HONOURED WITH THE DIFFERENT RESPONSIBILITIES THAT WERE HANDED OVER TO ME BY THE ELDERS WITHIN THIS AREA. SO IT’S REALLY AMAZING DOING THE JOB – REALLY IMPACTFUL, NOT ONLY FOR YOURSELF BUT THE COMMUNITY… THEN AFTER THE DIVERSITY UNIT AND BACK OUT ONTO PATROLS [IN 2006] AND THEN I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET PROMOTED… THEY PUT ME INTO THE TRAINING UNIT AGAIN, BECAUSE OF SOME OF THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD… THEN, JUST RECENTLY, I’M BACK ON PATROLS AS PATROL SUPERVISOR, WHICH IS FANTASTIC.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050003
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CAP BADGE, “POLICE CHAPLIN”
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1997
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINIUM
Catalogue Number
P20100048003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CAP BADGE, “POLICE CHAPLIN”
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1997
Materials
ALUMINIUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.2
Length
6.25
Width
6
Description
SILVER COLOURED METAL BADGE IN THE SHAPE OF A CROWNED CREST WITH IMAGE OF A BEAVER AT THE BASE. RIBBON SHAPES AT TOP AND BOTTOM OF CREST HAVE TEXT IN BLUE READING “POLICE CHAPLIN”. BACK OF BADGE HAS VERTICAL STRAIGHT PIN WITH ROTATING CLASP CLOSURE. MAKER’S STAMP ON BACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
RELIGION
History
THIS POLICE CHAPLAIN’S CAP BADGE WAS INITIALLY SOLICITED AS A LOAN FOR THE 2008 EXHIBIT ‘BADGE MEETS BIBLE’. AT THAT TIME, RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTO THE HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE FORCE’S CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM. MACLEAN SPOKE TO FORMER CHAPLAINS RON BUTCHER AND VERN (TIM) HUNTLEY, AND FORMER POLICE CHIEF TERRY WAUTERS. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS SOURCED FROM THOSE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM THE 1970S. FOR OVER TWO DECADES, THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE FORCE OPERATED A CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM SIMILAR TO THAT OFFERED IN ALBERTA’S CORRECTIONAL SYSTEM. CHAPLAINS APPOINTED TO THE FORCE WERE RECOGNIZED AS HONORARY MEMBERS AND EVENTUALLY WORE THE FORCE’S UNIFORM. ITS FIRST CHAPLAINS, CATHOLIC PRIEST FATHER FRANK MCCARTY AND SALVATION ARMY CAPTAIN RON BUTCHER, WERE CONCURRENTLY APPOINTED IN 1973. FATHER MCCARTY WAS THE LONGEST SERVING CHAPLAIN ON THE LETHBRIDGE CITY POLICE FORCE, RECEIVING A 10 YEAR LONG SERVICE MEDAL FROM THE POLICE IN 1983. DESCRIBED AS A “GRUFF, ROUGH OLD BOSTON IRISHMAN” WITH A HEART AS BIG AS THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS, THE CATHOLIC PRIEST PREFERRED HIS CHAPLAINCY ROLE WITH THE POLICE AND THE LETHBRIDGE CORRECTIONAL CENTRE OVER WORKING WITH A CHURCH CONGREGATION. HIS DEATH IN 1985 WAS THE RESULT OF A FALL SUFFERED WHILE PERFORMING HIS DAILY ROUNDS AT THE POLICE STATION AT AGE 76. SALVATION ARMY CAPTAIN RON BUTCHER WAS APPOINTED AS A POLICE CHAPLAIN IN 1973 AND SERVED UNTIL 1979. IN 2008 HE COMMENTED THAT HE “WALKED A FINE LINE AS CHAPLAIN” DUE TO THE NEED TO BE TRUSTED BY BOTH THE POLICE AND PERSONS UNDER ARREST. TO GAIN THE RESPECT OF THE POLICE, BUTCHER STATED THAT HE WENT SO FAR AS TO PARTICIPATE IN POLICE SELF DEFENSE TRAINING IN ORDER THAT THE FORCE’S OFFICERS WOULD COME TO KNOW AND RESPECT HIM AS A PERSON. BUTCHER’S ADVOCACY AND COUNSELING SERVICES WERE AVAILABLE TO BOTH POLICE MEMBERS AND ARRESTED ALIKE. POLICE CHAPLAINS WERE UNPAID, AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 24 HOURS A DAY AND ACCOMPANIED OFFICERS – OFTEN DAILY – WHILE OUT ON PATROL. IN ADDITION TO ATTENDING TO THE SPIRITUAL AND PRACTICAL NEEDS OF PERSONS IN POLICE CELLS, THEY ENGAGED AND COMFORTED PERSONS IN CRISIS, WHETHER IT WAS SOMEONE WHO WANTED TO COMMIT SUICIDE, A VICTIM OF A CRIME OR A FAMILY GIVEN NEWS OF A LOVED ONE’S SUDDEN LOSS. IN 1995, CHAPLAIN TIM HUNTLEY COMMENTED, “I’M (HERE) FOR WHOMEVER THE POLICE FEEL SHOULD HAVE SOMEONE TO TALK WITH, BE IT THEMSELVES, THE VICTIMS OF A CRIME OR THE PEOPLE, OR FAMILIES, OF THOSE UNDER ARREST”. THE CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM WAS DISBANDED IN 1997. ITS LONGEVITY AND SUCCESS WAS OWED TO THE MUTUAL RESPECT THAT EXISTED BETWEEN THE CHAPLAINS AND THE OFFICERS. THE CHAPLAINS APPRECIATED THE “COOPERATION AND UNDERSTANDING” SHOWN BY THE OFFICERS TOWARDS THEIR WORK – WORK WHICH, MANY FELT, CONTRIBUTED TO THE FORCE’S OVERALL ABILITY TO SERVE THE PUBLIC GOOD. THE DISBANDMENT OF THE CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM IN 1997 MAY HAVE BEEN, IN PART, DUE TO THE FOUNDING OF A VICTIMS’ SERVICES UNIT WITH THE POLICE IN 1991. AT THAT TIME, UNITS OF ITS KIND WERE BECOMING FAIRLY COMMON WITH POLICE SERVICES ACROSS THE COUNTRY. OVER A ONE-YEAR PERIOD IN 1994, THE UNIT’S VOLUNTEERS HANDLED 747 FILES WHICH INCLUDED THE PROVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE VICTIMS AND FAMILIES OF ASSAULT, MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS, BREAK-INS, ROBBERIES AND SUICIDE. TODAY’S VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES PROGRAM PROVIDES, AMONG OTHER THINGS, AN EMPATHETIC EAR, PERSONAL VISITS TO HOMES AND HOSPITALS, REFERRALS, AND COURT PREPARATION INFORMATION. SEE PERMANENT FILE P19960112116 FOR INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND HARDCOPIES OF SOURCE MATERIALS.
Catalogue Number
P20100048003
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“VICTIM / WITNESS SERVICES”
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2008
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20100048004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“VICTIM / WITNESS SERVICES”
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2008
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.75
Length
49
Width
4.75
Description
LOOP OF NAVY WOVEN NYLON CORD WITH BLACK PLASTIC CLASP AT ONE END AND HINGED METAL CLIP AT OPPOSITE END. REPEATING TEXT PRINTED IN WHITE RUNS ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE CORD, READING “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE” AND “VICTIM / WITNESS SERVICES”. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS LANYARD WAS INITIALLY SOLICITED AS A LOAN FOR THE 2008 EXHIBIT ‘BADGE MEETS BIBLE’. AT THAT TIME, RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTO THE HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE FORCE’S CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM AND THE VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES UNIT. VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES WAS FOUNDED IN 1991, AND TOOK OVER SOME OF THE DUITES PREVIOUSLY PERFORMED BY POLICE CHAPLAINS WHEN THE CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM WAS DISBANDED IN 1997. DURING THE LATE 1990S VICTIMS’ SERVICES UNITS WERE BECOMING FAIRLY COMMON WITH POLICE SERVICES ACROSS THE COUNTRY. OVER A ONE-YEAR PERIOD IN 1994, THE LETHBRIDGE UNIT’S VOLUNTEERS HANDLED 747 FILES WHICH INCLUDED THE PROVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE VICTIMS AND FAMILIES OF ASSAULT, MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS, BREAK-INS, ROBBERIES AND SUICIDE. TODAY’S VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES PROGRAM PROVIDES, AMONG OTHER THINGS, AN EMPATHETIC EAR, PERSONAL VISITS TO HOMES AND HOSPITALS, REFERRALS, AND COURT PREPARATION INFORMATION. THE UNIT IS FUNDED IN PART BY THE ALBERTA SOLICITOR-GENERAL AND THE CITY OF LETHRBIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR BROCHURES PRODUCED BY VICTIM/WITNESS SERVICES.
Catalogue Number
P20100048004
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SET, “ROLLERBLADE”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, NYLON, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20100050001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SET, “ROLLERBLADE”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2010
Materials
PLASTIC, NYLON, FOAM
No. Pieces
2
Height
8
Length
25.5
Width
97
Description
PAIR OF BLACK ROUND PLASTIC SHIELDS MOUNTED TO BLACK PADDED COTTON SLEEVES. BACKING OF SLEEVES IS ELASTICIZED. STRIPS OF VELCRO ARE SEWN TO THE FRONT OF SLEEVES ABOVE AND BELOW PLASTIC SHIELDS. EACH SLEEVE HAS TWO BLACK WOVEN ELASTICIZED STRAPS WITH GREY STRIPES, ATTACHED AT TOP AND BOTTOM. ENDS OF STRAPS HAVE WHITE LABELS READING “ROLLERBLADE”, AND VELCRO SEWN TO OPPOSITE SIDES. SCUFFS AND GENERAL WEAR ON THE PLASTIC SHIELDS, AND WEAR ALONG EDGES OF FABRIC AND VELCRO. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SPORTS EQUIPMENT
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THESE KNEE PADS WERE USED BY SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN DURING HIS SERVICE WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012. CARSCADDEN JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE IN 1997, AFTER WORKING WITH THE PEEL REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA FROM 1988 TO 1997. DURING HIS CAREER IN PEEL, CARSCADDEN RECEIVED SPECIAL TRAINING, INCLUDING COMPLETING THE FBI’S OBSERVER/SNIPER COURSE, WHICH INFORMED HIS APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE TO THE TACTICAL UNIT IN LETHBRIDGE. CARSCADDEN DESCRIBED HIS USE OF THESE KNEE PADS AS SUCH: “I PUT THEM ON AND I WEAR THEM UNDERNEATH MY PANTS… THEY PROTECT YOUR KNEES. IF YOU’RE ON AN UNSTABLE PLATFORM, YOU NEED YOUR KNEES. AND THE MORE PROTECTION WE CAN MAKE FOR OURSELVES, THE LONGER YOU CAN LAST IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS… THESE ONES I BOUGHT AT THE SKATEBOARD SHOP… NOW, THEY HAVE [PROPER] TACTICAL KNEEPADS. THAT’S THE CHANGE THAT I’VE SEEN WITH GEAR AND EQUIPMENT. IT’S GOT MORE SPECIALIZED AND PURPOSEFUL FOR THE OFFICER.” ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN SAID: “FIRST OF ALL, I JUST WENT AS A QUARRY… ALL DIFFERENT SPECIALTY UNITS THAT HAVE SOME KIND OF TACTICAL SCENARIO LIKE TO HAVE QUARRIES TO [HELP TRAIN THEM] TO DO THEIR JOB BETTER, SO I THOUGHT ‘I’LL GO WORK AS A QUARRY TO SHOW THEM I’M INTERESTED’. A QUARRY IS GENERALLY A BAD GUY – YOU PRETEND YOU’RE HIDING, OR MOVING OR YELLING OR RUNNING AWAY AND TRYING TO EVADE THEM, AND THEY ARE TRYING TO CAPTURE YOU… IT TOOK A COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH… IN THE MOVEMENT OF THE TEAM THAT THERE WERE [POSITIONS OPEN]… THERE IS A PHYSICAL, AND INTERVIEW, SOME TESTS… I WENT THROUGH AND STUDIED, AND DID THE BEST THAT I COULD… MAKING SURE YOU ARE IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE BECAUSE YOU ARE CARRYING AN EXTRA 50 POUNDS OF GEAR… THAT’S JUST THE GEAR THAT YOU ARE CARRYING ON YOURSELF, NOT A RAM OR DIFFERENT TYPE OF EQUIPMENT THAT YOU MIGHT BE MOVING INTO PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS… I WAS AROUND 35 [YEARS OLD]. I WAS AN OLDER GUY APPLYING FOR THIS POSITION, BUT I WAS IN GOOD SHAPE AND HAD SOME GOOD EXPERIENCES THAT MADE ME COMPETITIVE, SO I DON’T THINK YOUR AGE TAKES YOU OUT OF THE EQUATION IF YOU ARE REALLY DETERMINED.” CARSCADDEN CONTINUED: “I’VE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS WITHIN [THE TACTICAL] UNIT… I STARTED OFF AS AN ASSAULTER… THE PERSON WHO CARRIES ALL THE GEAR, SO YOU’RE IN THE BACK… THE LAST PERSON THAT COMES IN. IT’S A GOOD POSITION TO START OFF WITH. IT MAKES IT SAFER FOR WHEN YOU’RE GOING INTO THESE HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENTS… FROM THERE I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE OBSERVER, THEN A SNIPER, THEN FROM THERE… A BREECHER. SO YOU ARE BREECHING DOORS AND WINDOWS. [THEN] I WENT TO THE FRONT OF THE TACTICAL LINE-UP, WHICH IS THE SCOUT… THEN THE LAST SIX YEARS THAT I WAS ON THE TACTICAL TEAM, I WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE, THE TEAM LEADER… AND I WAS RUNNING OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR CANINE UNIT AND OUR EXPLOSIVES DISPOSAL UNIT… THE TRAINING IS REALLY GOOD. [THE TEAM] TRAINS EVERY TWO WEEKS, AND DO LOTS OF MOVEMENTS AND SHOOTING AND TACTICS. IT’S A PERISHABLE SKILL, THAT IF YOU DON’T REPEAT AND PRACTICE IT ALL THE TIME, IT DIMINISHES… PRACTICE IS IMPORTANT. IT ALLOWS YOU TO BE BETTER AT YOUR GAME... YOU NEED TO HAVE A MINDSET [OF] BEING NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY TOUGH, BUT MENTALLY TOUGH, WHEN YOU DEAL WITH THINGS IN A HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENT… YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF DRIVE TO GET YOU THROUGH THINGS.” CARSCADDEN CONCLUDED: “ONE OF THE THINGS I’M PROUD OF ON THE TACTICAL SIDE IS THAT I WAS THE OFFICER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING LESS LETHAL CAPABILITY TO THE TEAM… [WE] MAKE THE DIFFERENCE IN SAVING SOMEBODY’S LIFE. WE HELP THEM THROUGH THAT TIME OF NEED… WE HAVE ESTABLISHED WHERE, IN THE PAST IF THAT PERSON COULD HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN SHOT AND INJURED, IF NOT FATALLY SHOT, THAT PERSON NOW CAN BE DEALT WITH A LESS LETHAL MEANS… WE ARE ABLE TO RESTRAIN, ARREST, WITH THESE LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES. THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE FOR THEM… THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD IN PEEL [SHOWED ME LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES] IN OPERATION AND HOW IT WORKED… THEY WERE ONE OF THE FIRST SERVICES IN CANADA TO HAVE THE RUBBER BULLET… WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING AT DIFFERENT TACTICS AND HOW YOU CAN DO IT BETTER, THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I RECOGNIZED, THAT [LETHBRIDGE] COULD BRING THIS ON. IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR OUR TEAM AND OUR COMMUNITY: AS OPPOSED TO SHOOTING SOMEBODY AND STOPPING THEM THAT WAY, WE COULD USE THE [RUBBER BULLET] OR BEANBAG ROUND AND THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO HELP STOP THESE PEOPLE [BUT] SAVE THEIR LIVES… IT REALLY OPENS PEOPLE’S EYES WHEN THEY SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT OF OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO PUT IN PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS. AND WHEN PEOPLE SEE THERE’S ANOTHER WAY OF DOING BUSINESS, IT’S HELPFUL FOR US TO PROGRESS AND PUSH FORWARD… THESE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ARE HERE TO ALLOW US TO KEEP THINGS CONTROLLED AND TO MAKE US DO OUR JOB BETTER… I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE INVOLVED WITH A VERY SPECIALIZED UNIT AND I’M VERY PROUD OF IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050001
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BALLISTIC SUNGLASSES W/ CASE, “BOLLE”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20100050002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BALLISTIC SUNGLASSES W/ CASE, “BOLLE”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2010
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER
No. Pieces
4
Height
7
Length
17
Width
6.5
Description
.A –BLACK LEATHER SEMI-CIRCLE SHAPED CASE WITH SUEDE INTERIOR. VELCRO TAB CLOSURE. MULTI-COLOURED STITCHING ALONG EDGES. MULTICOLOURED TEXT ON CASE FRONT READING “EYEZONE – BOLLE – MICROEDGE”. SLEEVE FOR SPARE ARMS SEWN INSIDE TOP EDGE OF CASE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 7 X 17 X 6.5 .B – SUNGLASSES WITH BLACK PLASTIC ARMS, TOP FRAME AND NOSE PIECE, WITH YELLOW PLASTIC LENSES. TEXT READING “BOLLE” IS PRINTED IN WHITE AT CENTRE ABOVE LENSES AND ON EACH ARM. 14 SMALL HOLES ARE DRILLED INTO THE TOP EDGE OF THE LENSES. MINOR SCRATCHES ON LENSES. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. 5 X 16.5 X 15.5 .C & .D – PAIR OF SPARE GLASSES ARMS. BLACK PLASTIC LENGTHS WITH HOOK-SHAPED ENDS. HOOK ENDS ARE SLEEVED IN CLEAR PLASTIC. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL. 0.5 X 8.5 X 5
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THESE BALLISTIC SUNGLASSES WERE USED BY SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN DURING HIS SERVICE WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012. CARSCADDEN JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE IN 1997, AFTER WORKING WITH THE PEEL REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA FROM 1988 TO 1997. DURING HIS CAREER IN PEEL, CARSCADDEN RECEIVED SPECIAL TRAINING, INCLUDING COMPLETING THE FBI’S OBSERVER/SNIPER COURSE, WHICH INFORMED HIS APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE TO THE TACTICAL UNIT IN LETHBRIDGE. CARSCADDEN DESCRIBED HIS USE OF THESE SUNGLASSES AS SUCH: “EYEWEAR IS PROTECTION FOR WHEN YOU ARE DOING ENTRIES, SO YOU DON’T GET ANY PARTICULATE STUFF IN YOUR EYES… IF YOU HAVE TO OUT THROUGH A WINDOW OR A DOOR… THESE ARE GLASSES THAT I’D HAVE, MADE TO NOT GET FOGGED UP. I DRILLED HOLES IN THESE ONES, SO [THEY ARE A] MAKESHIFT PIECE OF GEAR… NOW THEY HAVE DEDICATED TACTICAL GLASSES THAT ARE ANTI-FOG… BALLISTIC GOGGLES [HAVE] DRASTICALLY IMPROVED THE PROTECTION FOR THE OFFICER’S FACES…THAT’S THE CHANGE THAT I’VE SEEN WITH GEAR AND EQUIPMENT. IT’S GOT MORE SPECIALIZED AND PURPOSEFUL FOR THE OFFICER.” ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN SAID: “FIRST OF ALL, I JUST WENT AS A QUARRY… ALL DIFFERENT SPECIALTY UNITS THAT HAVE SOME KIND OF TACTICAL SCENARIO LIKE TO HAVE QUARRIES TO [HELP TRAIN THEM] TO DO THEIR JOB BETTER, SO I THOUGHT ‘I’LL GO WORK AS A QUARRY TO SHOW THEM I’M INTERESTED’. A QUARRY IS GENERALLY A BAD GUY – YOU PRETEND YOU’RE HIDING, OR MOVING OR YELLING OR RUNNING AWAY AND TRYING TO EVADE THEM, AND THEY ARE TRYING TO CAPTURE YOU… IT TOOK A COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH… IN THE MOVEMENT OF THE TEAM THAT THERE WERE [POSITIONS OPEN]… THERE IS A PHYSICAL, AND INTERVIEW, SOME TESTS… I WENT THROUGH AND STUDIED, AND DID THE BEST THAT I COULD… MAKING SURE YOU ARE IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE BECAUSE YOU ARE CARRYING AN EXTRA 50 POUNDS OF GEAR… THAT’S JUST THE GEAR THAT YOU ARE CARRYING ON YOURSELF, NOT A RAM OR DIFFERENT TYPE OF EQUIPMENT THAT YOU MIGHT BE MOVING INTO PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS… I WAS AROUND 35 [YEARS OLD]. I WAS AN OLDER GUY APPLYING FOR THIS POSITION, BUT I WAS IN GOOD SHAPE AND HAD SOME GOOD EXPERIENCES THAT MADE ME COMPETITIVE, SO I DON’T THINK YOUR AGE TAKES YOU OUT OF THE EQUATION IF YOU ARE REALLY DETERMINED.” CARSCADDEN CONTINUED: “I’VE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS WITHIN [THE TACTICAL] UNIT… I STARTED OFF AS AN ASSAULTER… THE PERSON WHO CARRIES ALL THE GEAR, SO YOU’RE IN THE BACK… THE LAST PERSON THAT COMES IN. IT’S A GOOD POSITION TO START OFF WITH. IT MAKES IT SAFER FOR WHEN YOU’RE GOING INTO THESE HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENTS… FROM THERE I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE OBSERVER, THEN A SNIPER, THEN FROM THERE… A BREECHER. SO YOU ARE BREECHING DOORS AND WINDOWS. [THEN] I WENT TO THE FRONT OF THE TACTICAL LINE-UP, WHICH IS THE SCOUT… THEN THE LAST SIX YEARS THAT I WAS ON THE TACTICAL TEAM, I WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE, THE TEAM LEADER… AND I WAS RUNNING OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR CANINE UNIT AND OUR EXPLOSIVES DISPOSAL UNIT… THE TRAINING IS REALLY GOOD. [THE TEAM] TRAINS EVERY TWO WEEKS, AND DO LOTS OF MOVEMENTS AND SHOOTING AND TACTICS. IT’S A PERISHABLE SKILL, THAT IF YOU DON’T REPEAT AND PRACTICE IT ALL THE TIME, IT DIMINISHES… PRACTICE IS IMPORTANT. IT ALLOWS YOU TO BE BETTER AT YOUR GAME... YOU NEED TO HAVE A MINDSET [OF] BEING NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY TOUGH, BUT MENTALLY TOUGH, WHEN YOU DEAL WITH THINGS IN A HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENT… YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF DRIVE TO GET YOU THROUGH THINGS.” CARSCADDEN CONCLUDED: “ONE OF THE THINGS I’M PROUD OF ON THE TACTICAL SIDE IS THAT I WAS THE OFFICER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING LESS LETHAL CAPABILITY TO THE TEAM… [WE] MAKE THE DIFFERENCE IN SAVING SOMEBODY’S LIFE. WE HELP THEM THROUGH THAT TIME OF NEED… WE HAVE ESTABLISHED WHERE, IN THE PAST IF THAT PERSON COULD HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN SHOT AND INJURED, IF NOT FATALLY SHOT, THAT PERSON NOW CAN BE DEALT WITH A LESS LETHAL MEANS… WE ARE ABLE TO RESTRAIN, ARREST, WITH THESE LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES. THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE FOR THEM… THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD IN PEEL [SHOWED ME LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES] IN OPERATION AND HOW IT WORKED… THEY WERE ONE OF THE FIRST SERVICES IN CANADA TO HAVE THE RUBBER BULLET… WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING AT DIFFERENT TACTICS AND HOW YOU CAN DO IT BETTER, THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I RECOGNIZED, THAT [LETHBRIDGE] COULD BRING THIS ON. IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR OUR TEAM AND OUR COMMUNITY: AS OPPOSED TO SHOOTING SOMEBODY AND STOPPING THEM THAT WAY, WE COULD USE THE [RUBBER BULLET] OR BEANBAG ROUND AND THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO HELP STOP THESE PEOPLE [BUT] SAVE THEIR LIVES… IT REALLY OPENS PEOPLE’S EYES WHEN THEY SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT OF OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO PUT IN PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS. AND WHEN PEOPLE SEE THERE’S ANOTHER WAY OF DOING BUSINESS, IT’S HELPFUL FOR US TO PROGRESS AND PUSH FORWARD… THESE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ARE HERE TO ALLOW US TO KEEP THINGS CONTROLLED AND TO MAKE US DO OUR JOB BETTER… I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE INVOLVED WITH A VERY SPECIALIZED UNIT AND I’M VERY PROUD OF IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050002
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HANDGUN CONVERSION BARREL W/ CASE, “SIMUNITION”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2009
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, CARDBOARD, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20100050004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HANDGUN CONVERSION BARREL W/ CASE, “SIMUNITION”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2009
Materials
STEEL, CARDBOARD, FOAM
No. Pieces
5
Height
3.25
Length
19
Width
9.25
Description
.A – RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD LID, PRINTED IN BLACK, WHITE AND RED. TEXT ALONG THE TOP READS “SIMUNITION – DIVISION OF SNC INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES INC. – CONVERSION KIT S&W 594X SERIE – FOR USE IN MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT – TRAINING UNDER DIRECTION OF QUALIFIED INSTRUCTOR – CQT FX”. “UBJ 9746” IS WRITTEN ON TOP IN BLACK PEN. EDGES OF LID HAVE MINOR WEAR. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 3.25 X 19 X 9.25 .B – RECTUANGULAR SHEET OF GREY FOAM, WITH SEMI-CIRCLE SHAPE CUT INTO ONE LONG EDGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 1 X 18 X 8.5 .C – HOLLOW STEEL CYLINDER, TAPERED AT ONE END WITH A MOLDED TRIANGULAR SHAPE AT THE OPPOSITE END. STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “S&W 594X SNCSC 0392-06 – WARNING: FX AND CQT AMMO ONLY – NO STD AMMO”. MINOR OXIDATION ON STEEL; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 2 X 11.5 X 2.25 .D – RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD BOX BASE WITH FOAM-LINED INSIDE. FOAM HAS RECESSED CAVITY RESEMBLING THE IRREGULAR SHAPE OF .C. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS WORN ALONG BOTTOM AND HAS BROWN STAIN ON ONE SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 3.5 X 18.5 X 9
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS SIMUNITION BARREL CONVERSION KIT WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT DURING TRAINING PROCEDURES. SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN, WHO SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012, DESCRIBED THE USE OF THIS BARREL CONVERTER AS SUCH: “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN BOUGHT FOR THE TEAM EARLIER ON WHEN THEY HAD SMITH AND WESSON [PISTOLS]… [SIMUNITION IS] A PAINT PELLET ROUND, BUT SMALLER, AND FITS INTO YOUR PISTOL AND OPERATES SIMILAR LIKE A BULLET WOULD. IT MAKES A SOUND, AND EJECTS THE ROUND, AND FIRES A PAINT PELLET PROJECTILE [THAT] LEAVES A RED OR BLUE MARKING ON THE INDIVIDUAL TO INDICATE WHERE YOU WERE HIT. THAT WAY IT MAKES IT MORE REALISTIC WHEN DEALING WITH DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCENARIOS FOR THE OFFICERS AND FOR THE BAD GUYS [KNOWN AS QUARRY IN TRAINING PROCEDURES]. AS WE GOT MORE OF THESE [SIMUNITION CONVERTERS], WE WOULD THEN GIVE SIMUNITION TO THE BAD GUYS. AT THE BEGINNING, IT WAS US, THE TACTICAL TEAM OPERATORS, THAT WOULD HAVE THEM, AND THE QUARRIES WOULD NOT… IT WAS GOOD FOR [QUARRIES] TO HAVE IT, BECAUSE IT SHOWS THAT THE OFFICER MAY HAVE… TO GET OUT OF THE WAY AS WELL, SO IT IS REALLY GOOD ADVANCED TRAINING FOR TEACHING [OFFICERS] HIGHER LEVEL SKILL… A PERSON [WHO IS] RUNNING AROUND, OR MOVING, TO BE ABLE TO SHOOT THEM – THIS SHOWS THAT IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT. IT’S A GREAT ADVANCEMENT IN TRAINING.” ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN SAID: “FIRST OF ALL, I JUST WENT AS A QUARRY… ALL DIFFERENT SPECIALTY UNITS THAT HAVE SOME KIND OF TACTICAL SCENARIO LIKE TO HAVE QUARRIES TO [HELP TRAIN THEM] TO DO THEIR JOB BETTER, SO I THOUGHT ‘I’LL GO WORK AS A QUARRY TO SHOW THEM I’M INTERESTED’. A QUARRY IS GENERALLY A BAD GUY – YOU PRETEND YOU’RE HIDING, OR MOVING OR YELLING OR RUNNING AWAY AND TRYING TO EVADE THEM, AND THEY ARE TRYING TO CAPTURE YOU… IT TOOK A COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH… IN THE MOVEMENT OF THE TEAM THAT THERE WERE [POSITIONS OPEN]… THERE IS A PHYSICAL, AND INTERVIEW, SOME TESTS… I WENT THROUGH AND STUDIED, AND DID THE BEST THAT I COULD… MAKING SURE YOU ARE IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE BECAUSE YOU ARE CARRYING AN EXTRA 50 POUNDS OF GEAR… THAT’S JUST THE GEAR THAT YOU ARE CARRYING ON YOURSELF, NOT A RAM OR DIFFERENT TYPE OF EQUIPMENT THAT YOU MIGHT BE MOVING INTO PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS… I WAS AROUND 35 [YEARS OLD]. I WAS AN OLDER GUY APPLYING FOR THIS POSITION, BUT I WAS IN GOOD SHAPE AND HAD SOME GOOD EXPERIENCES THAT MADE ME COMPETITIVE, SO I DON’T THINK YOUR AGE TAKES YOU OUT OF THE EQUATION IF YOU ARE REALLY DETERMINED.” CARSCADDEN CONTINUED: “I’VE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS WITHIN [THE TACTICAL] UNIT… I STARTED OFF AS AN ASSAULTER… THE PERSON WHO CARRIES ALL THE GEAR, SO YOU’RE IN THE BACK… THE LAST PERSON THAT COMES IN. IT’S A GOOD POSITION TO START OFF WITH. IT MAKES IT SAFER FOR WHEN YOU’RE GOING INTO THESE HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENTS… FROM THERE I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE OBSERVER, THEN A SNIPER, THEN FROM THERE… A BREECHER. SO YOU ARE BREECHING DOORS AND WINDOWS. [THEN] I WENT TO THE FRONT OF THE TACTICAL LINE-UP, WHICH IS THE SCOUT… THEN THE LAST SIX YEARS THAT I WAS ON THE TACTICAL TEAM, I WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE, THE TEAM LEADER… AND I WAS RUNNING OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR CANINE UNIT AND OUR EXPLOSIVES DISPOSAL UNIT… THE TRAINING IS REALLY GOOD. [THE TEAM] TRAINS EVERY TWO WEEKS, AND DO LOTS OF MOVEMENTS AND SHOOTING AND TACTICS. IT’S A PERISHABLE SKILL, THAT IF YOU DON’T REPEAT AND PRACTICE IT ALL THE TIME, IT DIMINISHES… PRACTICE IS IMPORTANT. IT ALLOWS YOU TO BE BETTER AT YOUR GAME... YOU NEED TO HAVE A MINDSET [OF] BEING NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY TOUGH, BUT MENTALLY TOUGH, WHEN YOU DEAL WITH THINGS IN A HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENT… YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF DRIVE TO GET YOU THROUGH THINGS.” CARSCADDEN CONCLUDED: “ONE OF THE THINGS I’M PROUD OF ON THE TACTICAL SIDE IS THAT I WAS THE OFFICER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING LESS LETHAL CAPABILITY TO THE TEAM… [WE] MAKE THE DIFFERENCE IN SAVING SOMEBODY’S LIFE. WE HELP THEM THROUGH THAT TIME OF NEED… WE HAVE ESTABLISHED WHERE, IN THE PAST IF THAT PERSON COULD HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN SHOT AND INJURED, IF NOT FATALLY SHOT, THAT PERSON NOW CAN BE DEALT WITH A LESS LETHAL MEANS… WE ARE ABLE TO RESTRAIN, ARREST, WITH THESE LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES. THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE FOR THEM… THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD IN PEEL [SHOWED ME LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES] IN OPERATION AND HOW IT WORKED… THEY WERE ONE OF THE FIRST SERVICES IN CANADA TO HAVE THE RUBBER BULLET… WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING AT DIFFERENT TACTICS AND HOW YOU CAN DO IT BETTER, THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I RECOGNIZED, THAT [LETHBRIDGE] COULD BRING THIS ON. IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR OUR TEAM AND OUR COMMUNITY: AS OPPOSED TO SHOOTING SOMEBODY AND STOPPING THEM THAT WAY, WE COULD USE THE [RUBBER BULLET] OR BEANBAG ROUND AND THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO HELP STOP THESE PEOPLE [BUT] SAVE THEIR LIVES… IT REALLY OPENS PEOPLE’S EYES WHEN THEY SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT OF OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO PUT IN PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS. AND WHEN PEOPLE SEE THERE’S ANOTHER WAY OF DOING BUSINESS, IT’S HELPFUL FOR US TO PROGRESS AND PUSH FORWARD… THESE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ARE HERE TO ALLOW US TO KEEP THINGS CONTROLLED AND TO MAKE US DO OUR JOB BETTER… I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE INVOLVED WITH A VERY SPECIALIZED UNIT AND I’M VERY PROUD OF IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050004
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JACKET AND PANTS, DESERT CAMOUFLAGE, “TACTICAL”
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20100050005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JACKET AND PANTS, DESERT CAMOUFLAGE, “TACTICAL”
Date Range From
2006
Date Range To
2010
Materials
CANVAS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Length
76.5
Width
52
Description
.A – LONG SLEEVED, COLLARED CANVAS JACKET IN IRREGULAR PATTERN IN SHADES OF BROWN, WITH GREY AND BLACK SPOTS. BUTTON CLOSURE DOWN FRONT. CHEST AND HIP POCKETS ON BOTH SIDES. BLACK EMBROIDERED PATCHES ON BOTH SHOULDERS DEPICT A CROWNED CREST IN GREY WITH TEXT READING “LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE” AND “POLICE LETHBRIDGE” ABOVE A CANADIAN FLAG. PATCH ABOVE LEFT CHEST POCKET READS “TACTICAL”. TAG AT INNER COLLAR READS “LARGE – REGULAR” AND LISTS SIZE SPECIFICATIONS. THIS NUMBER “8048” IS WRITTEN BENEATH TAG IN PERMANENT MARKER. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 76.5 X 52 .B – CANVAS PANTS IN IRREGULAR PATTERN IN SHADES OF BROWN, WITH GREY AND BLACK SPOTS. BUTTON FLU CLOSURE WITH BUCKLED STRAPS ALONG WAISTBAND. DRAWSTRINGS AT ANKLES. HIP, SEAT, AND THIGH POCKETS. TAG AT INNER WAISTBAND READS “LARGE – REGULAR” AND LISTS SIZE SPECIFICATIONS. THE NUMBER “8048” IS WRITTEN INSIDE UNDER WAISTBAND IN PERMANENT MARKER. GENERAL WEAR THROUGHOUT, ESPECIALLY AT KNEES. STAINS OF PINK INK ALONG OUTER FLY. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 108 X 48
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS DESERT CAMOUFLAGE (ALSO KNOWN AS “CHOCOLATE CHIP” PATTERN) UNIFORM WAS WORN BY SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN DURING HIS SERVICE WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN JOINED THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE IN 1997, AFTER WORKING WITH THE PEEL REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA FROM 1988 TO 1997. DURING HIS CAREER IN PEEL, CARSCADDEN RECEIVED SPECIAL TRAINING, INCLUDING COMPLETING THE FBI’S OBSERVER/SNIPER COURSE, WHICH INFORMED HIS SERVICE WITH THE TACTICAL UNIT IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1999 TO 2012. CARSCADDEN DESCRIBED HIS USE OF THIS UNIFORM AS SUCH: “THERE WERE A COUPLE OF CALLS WHERE I’VE WORN THAT UNIFORM… WHEN WE HAD BLACK, AND THAT WAS THE ONLY UNIFORM WE HAD, IN DAYTIME OPERATIONS YOU COULD SEE US LIKE FLIES IN SOUP. HAVING THIS TYPE OF UNIFORM MADE US MORE CONCEALABLE, AND THAT HELPS OUT IN DIFFERENT PLACES. THERE’S LOTS OF THINGS WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY WHERE THIS WOULD BLEND IN, IN THE DAYTIME… OUR TERRAIN IS MORE SANDY, A MORE DESERT-STYLE ENVIRONMENT. WE DON’T HAVE A LOT OF TALL TREES. WE DON’T NEED TO HAVE URBAN CAMO. WE RAN A COUPLE OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF CLOTHING THAT WE WERE COMPARING, AND THIS WAS THE BEST FOR WHAT OUR BACKGROUND WAS… IT’S ALL ABOUT IF WE CAN GET IN POSITION AND NOT BE EASILY OBSERVED. THAT PUTS YOURSELF AT LESS OF A RISK, AND THAT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE OFFICERS.” ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN SAID: “FIRST OF ALL, I JUST WENT AS A QUARRY… ALL DIFFERENT SPECIALTY UNITS THAT HAVE SOME KIND OF TACTICAL SCENARIO LIKE TO HAVE QUARRIES TO [HELP TRAIN THEM] TO DO THEIR JOB BETTER, SO I THOUGHT ‘I’LL GO WORK AS A QUARRY TO SHOW THEM I’M INTERESTED’. A QUARRY IS GENERALLY A BAD GUY – YOU PRETEND YOU’RE HIDING, OR MOVING OR YELLING OR RUNNING AWAY AND TRYING TO EVADE THEM, AND THEY ARE TRYING TO CAPTURE YOU… IT TOOK A COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH… IN THE MOVEMENT OF THE TEAM THAT THERE WERE [POSITIONS OPEN]… THERE IS A PHYSICAL, AND INTERVIEW, SOME TESTS… I WENT THROUGH AND STUDIED, AND DID THE BEST THAT I COULD… MAKING SURE YOU ARE IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE BECAUSE YOU ARE CARRYING AN EXTRA 50 POUNDS OF GEAR… THAT’S JUST THE GEAR THAT YOU ARE CARRYING ON YOURSELF, NOT A RAM OR DIFFERENT TYPE OF EQUIPMENT THAT YOU MIGHT BE MOVING INTO PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS… I WAS AROUND 35 [YEARS OLD]. I WAS AN OLDER GUY APPLYING FOR THIS POSITION, BUT I WAS IN GOOD SHAPE AND HAD SOME GOOD EXPERIENCES THAT MADE ME COMPETITIVE, SO I DON’T THINK YOUR AGE TAKES YOU OUT OF THE EQUATION IF YOU ARE REALLY DETERMINED.” CARSCADDEN CONTINUED: “I’VE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS WITHIN [THE TACTICAL] UNIT… I STARTED OFF AS AN ASSAULTER… THE PERSON WHO CARRIES ALL THE GEAR, SO YOU’RE IN THE BACK… THE LAST PERSON THAT COMES IN. IT’S A GOOD POSITION TO START OFF WITH. IT MAKES IT SAFER FOR WHEN YOU’RE GOING INTO THESE HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENTS… FROM THERE I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE OBSERVER, THEN A SNIPER, THEN FROM THERE… A BREECHER. SO YOU ARE BREECHING DOORS AND WINDOWS. [THEN] I WENT TO THE FRONT OF THE TACTICAL LINE-UP, WHICH IS THE SCOUT… THEN THE LAST SIX YEARS THAT I WAS ON THE TACTICAL TEAM, I WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE, THE TEAM LEADER… AND I WAS RUNNING OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR CANINE UNIT AND OUR EXPLOSIVES DISPOSAL UNIT… THE TRAINING IS REALLY GOOD. [THE TEAM] TRAINS EVERY TWO WEEKS, AND DO LOTS OF MOVEMENTS AND SHOOTING AND TACTICS. IT’S A PERISHABLE SKILL, THAT IF YOU DON’T REPEAT AND PRACTICE IT ALL THE TIME, IT DIMINISHES… PRACTICE IS IMPORTANT. IT ALLOWS YOU TO BE BETTER AT YOUR GAME... YOU NEED TO HAVE A MINDSET [OF] BEING NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY TOUGH, BUT MENTALLY TOUGH, WHEN YOU DEAL WITH THINGS IN A HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENT… YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF DRIVE TO GET YOU THROUGH THINGS.” CARSCADDEN CONCLUDED: “ONE OF THE THINGS I’M PROUD OF ON THE TACTICAL SIDE IS THAT I WAS THE OFFICER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING LESS LETHAL CAPABILITY TO THE TEAM… [WE] MAKE THE DIFFERENCE IN SAVING SOMEBODY’S LIFE. WE HELP THEM THROUGH THAT TIME OF NEED… WE HAVE ESTABLISHED WHERE, IN THE PAST IF THAT PERSON COULD HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN SHOT AND INJURED, IF NOT FATALLY SHOT, THAT PERSON NOW CAN BE DEALT WITH A LESS LETHAL MEANS… WE ARE ABLE TO RESTRAIN, ARREST, WITH THESE LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES. THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE FOR THEM… THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD IN PEEL [SHOWED ME LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES] IN OPERATION AND HOW IT WORKED… THEY WERE ONE OF THE FIRST SERVICES IN CANADA TO HAVE THE RUBBER BULLET… WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING AT DIFFERENT TACTICS AND HOW YOU CAN DO IT BETTER, THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I RECOGNIZED, THAT [LETHBRIDGE] COULD BRING THIS ON. IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR OUR TEAM AND OUR COMMUNITY: AS OPPOSED TO SHOOTING SOMEBODY AND STOPPING THEM THAT WAY, WE COULD USE THE [RUBBER BULLET] OR BEANBAG ROUND AND THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO HELP STOP THESE PEOPLE [BUT] SAVE THEIR LIVES… IT REALLY OPENS PEOPLE’S EYES WHEN THEY SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT OF OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO PUT IN PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS. AND WHEN PEOPLE SEE THERE’S ANOTHER WAY OF DOING BUSINESS, IT’S HELPFUL FOR US TO PROGRESS AND PUSH FORWARD… THESE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ARE HERE TO ALLOW US TO KEEP THINGS CONTROLLED AND TO MAKE US DO OUR JOB BETTER… I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE INVOLVED WITH A VERY SPECIALIZED UNIT AND I’M VERY PROUD OF IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050005
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“CRAFT SMART”
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130030001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“CRAFT SMART”
Date Range From
2012
Date Range To
2013
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
1
Length
21
Width
7.25
Description
STAINLESS STEEL SCISSORS WITH BLUE PLASTIC HANDLES. ONE BLADE IS STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “STAINLESS STEEL”; THE OTHER WITH TEXT READING “CRAFTSMART”. MINOR SPOTS OF DISCOLOURATION ON BLADES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THESE SCISSORS WERE USED DURING THE RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY CELEBRATING THE OPENING OF CASA, LETHBRIDGE’S COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE, ON MAY 14, 2013, AT 230 8 ST SOUTH. ACCORDING TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER LORI HARASEM, SEVEN REPRESENTATIVES HELPED CUT THE RIBBON: STEPHEN GRAHAM (ROTARY CLUBS OF LETHBRIDGE), KRIS HODGSON (PRESIDENT, ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL), GLENN MILLER (ASSISTANT TO LETHBRIDGE EAST MLA BRIDGET PASTOOR), DR. MIKE MAHON (PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE), MAYOR RAJKO DODIC, GREG WEADICK (LETHBRIDGE WEST MLA), AND JIM HILLYER (LETHBRIDGE MP). IN AN EMAIL TO COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, HARASEM DESCRIBED THE DAY’S EVENTS, WRITING: “[THE CEREMONY], ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE ON THE ROTARY PLAZA ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE BUILDING, WAS MOVED INDOORS DUE TO THE STRONG WINDS THAT DAY. ONCE THE SPEECHES WERE DONE, AND THE RIBBON WAS CUT, THE BUILDING WAS OPEN FOR TOURS WITH ALL SPACES BEING UTILIZED BY ARTISANS TO DEMONSTRATE TO THE PUBLIC THE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES THAT WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE FACILITY… THE RIBBON WAS IN MY POSSESSION AS I WAS PART OF THE PLANNING COMMITTEE [FOR THE OPENING CEREMONY]… ONCE THE RIBBON CUTTING WAS OVER, I ASSISTED WITH MOVING THE STANCHIONS AND RIBBONS OUT OF THE WALKWAY, AND REALIZED THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE RIBBON… [I] SUGGESTED WE PROVIDE IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT CASA WAS EXCERPTED FROM THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL WEBSITE. CASA IS A COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVE OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. THIS UNIQUE FACILITY SETS A NEW STANDARD FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTRES, AND PROMOTES EXPERIMENTATION, INCUBATION, AND LEARNING. CASA WAS BUILT TO SERVE A MULTI-GENERATIONAL COMMUNITY, WITH VARYING ART SKILL SETS AND INTERESTS IN A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES. FUNDING FOR THE 42,000 SQUARE FOOT CENTRE WAS PROVIDED BY THE FEDERAL BUILD CANADA FUND, THE ALBERTA MUNICIPAL SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE FUND, AND THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. IN ADDITION TO PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL ARTS PROGRAMMING, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS, PERFORMING ARTS SPACES, AND AN EXHIBITION GALLERY, CASA ALSO HOUSES THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. ON SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SUZANNE LINT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL, ABOUT THE OPENING OF CASA AND THE FACILITY’S IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY. LINT SAID: “IT WAS A PRETTY SIGNIFICANT DAY… YOU OPEN YOUR DOORS AND YOU EXPECTED TO HAVE PEOPLE BUT WE HAD THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE. THERE WERE ABOUT 3000 PEOPLE AND AS THAT RIBBON WAS CUT, THERE WERE PEOPLE ON THE STAIRWELLS AND PACKED IN EVERY HALLWAY AND HANGING OVER THE BALCONY LOOKING DOWN INTO THE FOYER WHERE THE ACTUAL RIBBON CUTTING OCCURRED. IT WAS PRETTY AWESOME, A PRETTY EXCITING DAY… IT’S THE FULL BREADTH OF THE ARTS ARE IN THAT BUILDING, AND THAT PRESENCE IS FABULOUS TO HAVE ALL OF THE DISCIPLINES INTERMIXING TOGETHER FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S HUGE. SO THAT RATHER INNOCUOUS PIECE OF RED SATIN RIBBON AND A PAIR OF RECEPTIONIST’S SCISSORS DON’T LOOK LIKE MUCH BUT THEY ARE PART OF THE OPENING OF SOMETHING THAT IS PRETTY SIGNIFICANT.” LINT CONTINUED: “WE WAITED A LONG TIME FOR A BUILDING LIKE THAT… A PURPOSE-BUILT CIVIC ARTS CENTRE FOR CREATING ARTWORK IN MANY DISCIPLINES, WHICH IS ALMOST NOT HEARD OF. I DON’T THINK ANYTHING LIKE IT EXISTS OFF A UNIVERSITY OR COLLEGE CAMPUS… IT IS A PROJECT THAT THE ARTS COMMUNITY [IN LETHBRIDGE] HAS WORKED ON FOR 20 – 30 YEARS… WE HAVE ENGAGED A WHOLE NEW COMMUNITY THAT WASN’T REALLY ACTIVE OR PARTICIPATING AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE… THE BOWMAN, WHICH SERVED THE COMMUNITY AMAZINGLY WELL, [WAS] REALLY BUILT ON A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES AND SPACES, [WHEREAS CASA] WAS DESIGNED TO BE AN OPEN CONCEPT AND REALLY INCLUSIVE SO THAT INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS AND OTHER DISCIPLINES WOULD HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE BUILDING… ANYBODY CAN COME… YOU TAKE YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND YOU CAN COME IN AND WORK… THIS BUILDING IS BUSY, WITH NEW GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL ARTIST AND IT’S ALSO ATTRACTING PEOPLE FROM AWAY… WE’RE SEEING A DIVERSITY OF PROGRAMMING THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE BEFORE; THE VERY NATURE OF THE BUILDING WE HAVE THE COMMUNITY ROOM WHICH ALLOWS FOR CERTAIN THINGS TO HAPPEN, THERE’S THE DANCE STUDIO, VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS AND ALL THE SPACES FOR MUSIC… WE’RE SEEING PEOPLE WHO WEREN’T ENGAGED IN THE GENERAL COMMUNITY BECOMING ENGAGED. WE’VE GOT A WHOLE BRAND NEW GROUP OF ARTISTS AND MUCH BROADER DEMOGRAPHIC GROUP OF ARTISTS FROM ALL AGES COMING IN… WE’RE OFFERING MORE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES. THE BOWMAN HAD THE CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS BUT WE ARE NOW DOING SOME WORK WITH HOUSING FIRST CLIENTS WHO ARE TRANSITIONING. WE’VE GOT A RELATIONSHIP AND SOME FUNDING FROM ATB THAT IS ALLOWING US TO TRY AND BUILD SOME FIRST NATIONS PROGRAMING… ARTISTS ARE DEVELOPING PROGRAMS AND WE ARE FACILITATING THEM AND DELIVERING THEM. SO IT’S REALLY GRASSROOTS… IT’S A MUCH BIGGER COMMUNITY. NOT JUST THE SIXTY PEOPLE THAT USED TO BE BOWMAN ATTENDERS. [NOW] THERE’S 100,000 PEOPLE [WHO] VISITED THE BUILDING IN ITS FIRST YEAR OF OPERATION.” LINT CONCLUDED: “THAT BUILDING, SEEING IT RISE AND THE NATURE OF WHAT IT IS, IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PIECES OF WORK THAT I’VE WORKED ON, BUT IT ALSO REPRESENTS A TIME IN HISTORY WHERE THERE WAS THIS SERENDIPITOUS GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WORKED TOGETHER AROUND AN IDEA. SO THE COUNCIL WAS RIPE, THE CITY ADMINISTRATION WAS RIPE. WE HAD A FABULOUS BOARD THAT REALLY WENT TO THE WALL AROUND ARTS IN THIS COMMUNITY ENSURING THAT THEY SURVIVED… I THINK THAT’S THE KIND OF COMMUNITY IT IS. I THINK WE’RE ISOLATED ENOUGH THAT WE DO SOME FAIRLY CRAZY AND WILD THINGS. WE CAN BE PRETTY INVENTIVE AND PROGRESSIVE. THERE’S A REAL COMPONENT OF THAT AND A CREATIVE KIND OF COMMUNITY WHICH WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE IN. THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT IT IS SURROUNDED BY THE MOST SOCIALLY CONSERVATIVE PEOPLE. SO IT SOMETIMES FEELS TO ME LIKE A SPLIT COMMUNITY, [BUT] THERE IS THIS REALLY STRONG PROGRESSIVE, CREATIVE, INTUITIVE GROUP OF PEOPLE THAT ARE HERE, LOVE IT, AND CONTINUE TO BE HERE.” ON OCTOBER 8, 2015 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL THIBERT, FORMER CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY SERVICES PROGRAM CO-ORDINATOR. THIBERT WAS THE CITY LIAISON TO THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL DURING THE PLANNING, CONSTRUCTION, AND OPENING OF CASA. THIBERT SAID: “PART OF MY JOB WAS ORGANIZING THE OPENING CEREMONIES… [THE RIBBON CUTTING] WAS EXTREMELY WELL RECEIVED. THE COMMUNITY WAS VERY, VERY EXCITED. IT WAS FULL – THE MEZZANINE, THE MAIN AREA, AND PEOPLE LOOKING DOWN… THE DIFFERENT LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT WERE THERE TO SPEAK, SO IT WAS A GALA AFFAIR… IT WAS A LONG TIME COMING. I WAS ON THE COMMITTEE THAT STARTED LOOKING INTO WHAT A COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE WOULD LOOK [LIKE]. WE WENT TO CALGARY AND EDMONTON AND DID TOURS OF [THEIR] FACILITIES, AND [CASA] IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, AMAZING, FORWARD-THINKING COMMUNITY ART CENTRES IN OUR PROVINCE, MAYBE EVEN IN CANADA. SO IT’S SOMETHING TO BE VERY PROUD OF.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND HARDCOPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND PRESS RELEASES ABOUT CASA.
Catalogue Number
P20130030001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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