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Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.08
Width
12.4
Description
BLACK, CERAMIC ASHTRAY. THE INSIDE OPENING OF THE ASHTRAY IS 6.4 CM. THE LETTERING ON THE TOP SAYS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA.” THERE IS AN ABSTRACTED FLORAL DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF THIS LETTERING. THE FLOWERS ARE PAINTED RED AND THEIR STEMS PAINTED GREEN. THIS WORDING AND DESIGN REPEATS ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. THE LETTERING ON THE BOTTOM SAYS, “MADE IN JAPAN 29.” VERY GOOD CONDITION. USED WITH SOME WEAR APPARENT. BLACK PAINT IS WEARING OFF ON SOME PARTS OF THE SURFACE. SIGNIFICANT WEAR TO THE RED AND GREEN PAINT OF THE DECALS.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 16, 2015, DONOR CHRIS MORRISON INFORMED COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT SHE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE ASHTRAY WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BECAME STEWARDS OF A WATERTON CABIN IN 1976. THE CABIN, LOCATED AT 103 CAMERON FALLS, WAS OWNED BY HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY MORRISON (D. 1995). IT WAS AMONG ASSORTED FURNISHINGS LEFT BEHIND WHEN DOROTHY MOVED OUT AND CHRIS MOVED IN. THE DONOR’S RECOLLECTION OF THE ASHTRAY’S USE IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO IT BECOMING HER PROPERTY WAS AS A CONTAINER. MORRISON SAID, “IT WAS IN A [CABIN] WASHSTAND AND USED TO HOLD LITTLE OBJECTS LIKE ROLLED UP KEROSENE LANTERN TAPE WICKS”. ACCORDING TO MORRISON, IT WAS ALSO KNOWN AS “GRANDPA’S ASHTRAY”. GRANDPA REFERS TO JAMES J. MORRISON OF LETHBRIDGE. “HE ONLY SMOKED CIGARS” SAID THE DONOR, WHEREAS HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY DID NOT SMOKE AT ALL. THE ASHTRAY’S USE AS A CONTAINER FOR LANTERN WICKS AND SMALL ITEMS CONTINUED RIGHT UP TO THE DAY THAT IT WAS OFFERED TO THE GALT IN 2015. ACCORDING TO HER OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DOROTHY MORRISON, PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON NOVEMBER 26, 1995 AT THE AGE OF 83 YEARS. JAMES JACOB MORRISON, DOROTHY’S FATHER-IN-LAW, PASSED ON FEBRUARY 18TH, 1975 AT AGE 93. THE ASHTRAY IS MARKED WITH “MARQUIS HOTEL,” WHICH COULD REFER TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL THAT OPENED IN JUNE 1928. REALIZING A NEED FOR A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN LETHBRIDGE, ESPECIALLY ONE WITH A BANQUET HALL, THE BUSINESSMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRADE COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE HOTEL IN 1927. AFTER ITS OPENING, THE BOARD OF TRADE WOULD HOLD THEIR REGULAR, NOON-HOUR MEETINGS AT THE HOTEL FOR MANY YEARS TO COME. THE HOTEL CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1985 AND THE BUILDING WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A WRITE-UP ABOUT THE HOTEL IN THE PUBLICATION TITLED "WHERE WAS IT? A GUIDE TO EARLY LETHBRIDGE BUILDINGS," BY IRMA DOGTEROM. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A COPY OF THE INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION CITED ABOVE.
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RAILWAY SWITCH / C.P.R.
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, COPPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150023000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAILWAY SWITCH / C.P.R.
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BRASS, COPPER, METAL
No. Pieces
5
Length
12.3
Width
2.1
Description
5 RAILWAY KEYS OR SWITCHES ON A KEYRING. .A: BRASS. 5.0CM X 2.4CM (L X W). SKELETON KEY. ROUND TOP, WITH A SQUARE HOLE IN THE MIDDLE. AROUND THE TOP EDGE OF THE CIRCLE, STAMPED "C.P.R.". "T" STAMPED BELOW AND TO THE LEFT OF THE "C". ILLEGIBLE MAKER'S MARK ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE KEY. .B: SILVER COLOURED METAL. 5.3CM X 2.5CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A SMALL ROUND HOLE NEAR THE TOP. EMBOSSED "103" ON ONE SIDE OF THE ROUND TOP AND STAMPED "CPR" ON THE OTHER. .C: COPPER. 5.2CM X 2.3CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. AROUND THE EDGE, EMBOSSED WITH "R. M. CO." OPPOSITE SIDE HAS "C.P.R." EMBOSSED ALONG THE TOP, WITH AN "S" EMBOSSED BELOW AND TO THE LEFT OF THE "C". .D: BRASS. 5.0CM X 2.2CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. AROUND THE EDGE, STAMPED WITH "C.P.R.". MAKER'S MARK STAMPED ON REVERSE: "...ITCHE... CANADA" .E: COPPER. 12.3CM X 2.1CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. NO IDENTIFYING MARKS. TEETH OF KEY FORM A SIDEWAYS 'E'. ALL KEYS IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. TWO COPPER KEYS HAVE TARNISHED.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THESE RAILWAY SWITCH KEYS WERE USED BY THE DONOR, ARNOLD “RED” ERVIN, WHEN HE WORKED ON THE RAILWAY. IN JULY 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH ARNOLD AND HIS WIFE JOYCE ERVIN. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ARNOLD WAS BORN IN 1932 IN NIPIWIN, SK AND CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO PLAY JUNIOR HOCKEY IN 1950. HE GOT A GOOD JOB WITH THE RAILWAY AND DECIDED TO STAY IN LETHBRIDGE. JOYCE WAS BORN IN 1931 IN FOREMOST, AB, ATTENDED MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE IN CALGARY AND WORKED FOR SEVERAL YEARS IN CALGARY. SHE WORKED FOR THE GOVERNMENT, IN DEFENCE PRODUCTION, THEN WENT ON TO SHELL OIL. SHE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1954 TO BE CLOSER TO HOME AND SHE GOT A JOB WITH THE RAILROAD. ARNOLD AND JOYCE MET THROUGH THEIR WORK AND WERE MARRIED IN 1955. THE FIVE KEYS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF ARNOLD’S JOB ON THE RAILWAY, ALLOWING HIM TO CHANGE SWITCHES AND HE RECEIVED THEM WHILE WORKING AS AN ENGINEER. HE KEPT THEM BECAUSE “THESE WERE OF NO INTEREST TO ANYBODY EXCEPT [THOSE WHO] WORKED ON THE RAILROAD … THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO HAVE TO BE AN ENGINEER ON THE RAILROAD.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THIS IS THE OLD RAILROAD KEYS, UNLOCKED EVERY SWITCH FROM HERE TO VANCOUVER. YOU PUT THAT KEY IN THERE TO GET THE SWITCH TO COME UP … YOU DIDN’T GO ANYWHERE WITHOUT SWITCH KEYS … YOU HAD TO HAVE THEM WHEN YOU WERE OUT THERE WORKING.” ARNOLD STARTED WORKING FOR THE RAILWAY IN 1951 IN THE ROUND HOUSE, AFTER DECIDING TO NOT PURSUE HOCKEY BEYOND THE JUNIOR LEVEL: “THEY PUT YOU IN [THE ROUND HOUSE] TEAMED UP, STARTED UNTIL YOU WORKED YOUR WAY UP TO A FIREMAN – FROM FIREMAN TO ENGINEER.” HE CONTINUED TO PLAY HOCKEY FOR FUN: “I STILL PLAYED HOCKEY WITH A BUNCH OF PEOPLE THAT [I] KNEW AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO GO ON TO THE BIG LEAGUES BUT JUST ENTERTAINMENT. LETHBRIDGE WAS A GOOD HOCKEY PLACE. AND A NICE CITY TO LIVE IN.” IN RECALLING HIS FIRST DAYS AND WEEKS AT HIS JOB, HE SAID: “WELL, IT WAS WORKING IN THE ROUNDHOUSE. THE ENGINES WERE THERE AND YOU HAD TO GET UP AND THERE WAS COAL ENGINES AND YOU HAD TO SHOVEL THE COAL TO GET IT BACK INTO PLACES WHERE IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE, SO ALL OVER. … YEAH, TECHNICALLY THEY CALLED YOU A WIPER. YOU HAD TO GO IN AND CLEAN THE WINDOWS … FOR THE ENGINEER COMING OUT EVERYTHING HAD TO BE CLEAN OR HE CALLED YOU BACK UP AND YOU DID IT OVER AGAIN. SO, IT WAS BETTER TO DO IT GOOD AND GET IT DONE.” ARNOLD CONTINUED: “I LIKED WORKING WITH THE RAILROAD, ENJOYED IT, AND STARTED IN THAT ROUNDHOUSE AND YOU WORKED YOUR WAY UP TO A FIREMAN AND UP TO AN ENGINEER AND THEN I WAS IN CHARGE OF ALL THE ENGINEERS. SO IT WAS A CAREER FROM NOT EVEN KNOWING WHAT THE RAILROAD LOOKED LIKE TO FIFTY/FIFTY-ONE WHEN I FINISHED. … IT WAS A PRETTY COMPATIBLE BUNCH OF PEOPLE AND AS IT TURNED OUT THE MANAGER OF THE HOCKEY TEAM WAS YARDMASTER HERE SO KNOWING THE BOSS KIND OF HELPED A LITTLE BIT. HE WAS LOOKING AFTER THE YARDS AND HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM UNTIL HE RETIRED FROM THE RAILROAD. IT WAS A GOOD PLACE TO WORK, PEOPLE TREATED YOU RIGHT.” STEAM ENGINES WERE STILL IN USE WHEN HE FIRST STARTED: “[THE STEAM ENGINES] WERE WHEN I FIRST STARTED YES. FROM STARTING IN THE SHOP YOU GREW UP TO BE ON A FIRE AND THEN ENGINES AND JUST ABOUT THAT TIME THE DIESEL ENGINES WERE COMING IN AND OPERATING AND [IT WAS A] TOTALLY DIFFERENT RAILROAD FROM A HAND-FIRED COAL ENGINE TO A DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE. SO, IT WAS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT EITHER COULD BE AS GOOD AS YOU WANTED OR AS BAD AS YOU WANTED. KINDA HAD NO BOSSES IN THE RAILROAD - YOU WERE KIND OF THE CREW - YOU HAD TO LIKE THE JOB OR YOU DIDN’T STAY THERE. AND I LIKED THE RAILROAD, LIKED THE TRAVELLING, TRAVELLING IN THE ENGINES AND SOME PEOPLE WOULD GIVE THEIR EYE TEETH TO GET UP ON ONE OF THEM ENGINES, RIDE UP TO CROWSNEST AND IN THE MOUNTAINS.” HE WAS NOT DISAPPOINTED TO SEE THE STEAM LOCOMOTIVES GO OUT OF SERVICE: “IF YOU HAD YOUR CHOICE TO GO ON A STEAM ENGINE ON A TRIP, GETTING ON A DIESEL ENGINE WAS A LOT EASIER THAN GETTING ON AN OLD COAL ENGINE, COAL-FIRED ENGINE, WHERE YOU BASICALLY TOOK COAL AND THREW IT IN THE BOILER. YOU TOOK IT FROM A CAR RIGHT BEHIND YOU AND PUT THE COAL IN THE ENGINES THEN BOIL IT AND THAT’S WHERE ALL THE POWER CAME FROM.” BY 1975, ARNOLD WAS WORKING AS AN ENGINEER FIREMAN AND CONTINUED TO RECEIVE ON THE JOB TRAINING: “YEAH, ALL ON-THE-JOB TRAINING. MOST OF IT - THERE WAS OTHER THINGS GOING ON BUT THE BASIC THING WAS DOING TRAINING AS AN ENGINEER TO BECOME AN ENGINEER. IT WAS WHERE I WANTED TO BE, WAS AN ENGINEER, AND THE RAILROAD WORKS IN SENIORITY - THEY DON’T CARE IF YOU’RE EVEN BETTER, YOU HAD TO WORK YOUR WAY THROUGH. WHEN THEY NEEDED YOU, YOU GOT THE BEST JOB WHEN YOU GOT MORE SENIORITY. IT WASN’T NECESSARILY ALWAYS THE BEST GUY [THAT] GOT IT, SENIORITY PREVAILED ON THE RAILROAD AND YOU GOT YOUR JOBS AS YOU BECAME OLDER … THE BETTER JOBS BEING MAYBE A DIESEL ENGINES ON ONE JOB AND A FIREMAN ON THE OTHER JOB.” HE RECALLED A COUPLE OF ACCIDENTS WHILE WORKING ON THE RAILROAD: WHILE WORKING AS AN ENGINEER, ARNOLD’S TRAIN HIT A CAR ON THE TRACKS NEAR BLAIRMORE AND HE RECALLED SEEING THE EYES OF THE CAR DRIVER: “I LOOKED UP AND [SAW] HER EYES LOOKING AT [ME].” ARNOLD REMEMBERED THAT ONE OF THE SCARIEST ROUTES WAS THE ONE GOING TO PINCHER CREEK, WHERE THERE WAS A HILL WITH A 2.3 GRADE, WHICH MADE CONTROLLING THE TRAIN CHALLENGING. HE SAID: “YOU’D LIKE TO KNOW IF YOU’D SET THE BRAKE, YOU HAD CONTROL OVER IT BUT IT WAS SUCH A HILL AND SUCH A HEAVY TRAIN BEHIND YOU THAT IT WAS SCARY SOMETIMES … THAT WAS A VERY INTERESTING TRIP DOWN THERE THEN WITH THE DOWN 2.3 GRADE AND THEN 100,000 TON POTASH BEHIND YOU, PUSHING YOU. … YOU KNOW TRAINS STOP BUT IT TOOK A LONG TIME TO STOP … EVERY BRAKE ON THE TRAIN IS ON AND YOU’D STILL GO ANOTHER HALF A MILE DOWN THE TRACK. NOBODY COULD BELIEVE YOU WHY YOU COULDN’T STOP THAT THING – IT DOESN’T WORK THAT WAY – YOU COULD HARDLY EXPLAIN THAT IT TAKES THAT LONG TO STOP A TRAIN, BUT IT DOES.” HE ALSO RECALLED A RUNAWAY TRAIN THAT HE WAS CALLED IN TO HELP WITH: “THEY STOPPED AT COLEMAN TO SET A CAR OFF AND DIDN’T PUT THE BRAKES ON [AND] THE AIR SLEAKED OFF [OF] THE AIRBRAKES … YOU HAD TO HAVE THE COMPRESSORS WORKING TO KEEP THE TRAINS PUMPED UP TO KEEP [THE] BRAKES ON AND IT STARTED CREEPING DOWN.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THE TRAIN STARTED “GOING BACKWARDS AND AS THE HILL GOT A LITTLE STEEPER [THE TRAIN] GOT GOING FASTER AND IT CAME DOWN TO LUNDBRECK WHERE YOU GO ACROSS THE RIVER THERE [AT] THE BRIDGE. [AT] THAT TIME, I WAS MANAGEMENT, [SO] I GOT IN A CAR AND WENT UP THERE AND TOLD THEM EXACTLY WHERE THAT TRAIN WAS GOING TO BE. [THE TRAIN WAS MOVING] TOO FAST TO GO ON THE REVERSE CURVE JUST COMING INTO LUNDBRECK AND IT FLEW LIKE A PLANE INTO THE RIVER THERE.” IT WAS ESTIMATED THAT THE TRAIN WAS TRAVELLING AT MORE THAN SEVENTY MILES PER HOUR. ARNOLD SAID: “THERE’S A REVERSE CURVE JUST BEFORE YOU GET TO LUNDBRECK. [THE TRAIN] LIFTED UP QUITE A BIT BECAUSE IT WAS GOING WAY TOO FAST AND THEN WHEN IT REVERSED THE OTHER SIDE, IT DIDN’T COME DOWN ON THE RAILS - IT LIFTED AND EVERY CAR ENDED UP IN THE LUNDBRECK RIVER.” FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING DETAILS ABOUT JOYCE ERVIN’S TIME WITH THE CPR, AND INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20150023000
Acquisition Date
2015-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail