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Other Name
COVER BAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COVER BAG
Date
2018
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
58.7
Length
45.7
Description
WHITE PLASTIC BAG WITH BLACK TEXT AND BORDER, WITH THE OPENING ACROSS THE BOTTOM. TEXT READS “PAY FOR PARKING AT YELLOW KIOSK” AND “CITY OF LETHBRIDGE” ACCOMPANIED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SEAL. THE BLACK SQUARE BORDER AROUND THE TEXT MEASURES 1CM WIDE. BAG HAS A HOLE IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER 2CM FROM THE CORNER OF THE BORDER AND GOES THROUGH BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG; THE HOLE IS RIPPED AT THE EDGES AND MEASURES 1.2CM IN DIAMETER. BAG HAS DIRT ACCRETION AND SOILING ON BOTH SIDES AND SURFACE CREASING. THE REVERSE SIDE OF THE BAG HAS TEXT IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER READING “D0218 FRIESEN PLASTIC INC.” THE INSIDE OF THE BAG HAS A BLUE AND WHITE “COVIDIEN” TAB STUCK ON THE REVERSE SIDE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
BEGINNING APRIL 2018, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REMOVED ITS EXISTING COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS TO BE REPLACED WITH MULTI-STALL KIOSKS THROUGHOUT ITS DOWNTOWN CORE. THE EXISTING COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS WERE DECOMMISSIONED AND COVERED WITH PLASTIC BAGS TO INDICATE PARKING PAYMENTS WOULD BE PROCESSED AT THE UPDATED KIOSKS. THE COVER BAG DONATED BY THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE WAS USED TO MARK DECOMMISSIONED METERS IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE, AND WAS DONATED FOLLOWING THE REMOVAL OF ALL COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS IN JUNE 2018. IN DECEMBER 2015, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE HOSTED AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION INFORMING LETHBRIDGE RESIDENTS ABOUT AN IMPENDING UPGRADE TO THE DOWNTOWN PARKING SYSTEM. VAL FELLGER WAS THE 2015 INITIATIVE’S PARKING COORDINATOR. FELLGER OUTLINED REASONS FOR UPDATING THE EXISTING PARKING SYSTEM IN A 2018 CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE. THE ANNOUNCEMENT SAYS, “THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF PAID AND TIME ZONED PARKING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE IS TO ACHIEVE PARKING TURNOVER WHICH RESULTS IN EQUITABLE AVAILABILITY OF PARKING TO SHOPPERS AND VISITORS TO DOWNTOWN…THERE ARE CURRENTLY A LITTLE OVER 1500 PARKING METERS IN THE DOWNTOWN. APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THE PARKING METER INFRASTRUCTURE, PARKING METER HOUSINGS AND SUPPORT POLES ARE GREATER THAN 25 YEARS OLD. THESE HOUSINGS AND POLES ARE STARTING TO SHOW SIGNS OF WEAR AND LOOK UNKEMPT. MANY OF THE METERS CANNOT BE REPROGRAMMED TO ACCEPT NEW COINS OR OTHER PAYMENT OPTIONS.” THE CITY PONDERED THREE OPTIONS FOR THE IMPROVED SYSTEM: 100 PERCENT SINGLE-SPACE METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT, 100 PERCENT PAY-BY-PLATE MULTI-SPACE SMART MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT, AND A HYBRID SYSTEM COMPRISED OF PAY-BY-PLATE MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT AND IN ISOLATED LOCATIONS, INCLUDING BARRIER-FREE PARKING STALLS, SINGLE-SPACE SMART METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT. IN THE DOWNTOWN PARKING METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT STAKEHOLDER & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT REPORT, 80 PERCENT OF THE PUBLIC SELECTED THE HYBRID SYSTEM. IN AUGUST 2017, THE CITY CHOSE A VENDOR, AND BY JUNE 2018 THE NEW SYSTEM WAS UP AND RUNNING. AS A RESULT, 1526 COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS WERE REMOVED FROM DOWNTOWN STREETS AND 170 MULTI-SPACE KIOSKS WERE INSTALLED. IN A CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE FROM MAY 28, 2018, MAYOR CHRIS SPEARMAN SAYS, “THIS IS ANOTHER SIGN OF HOW OUR CITY IS GROWING UP. WE TALK A LOT ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING A “SMART CITY” AND USING TECHNOLOGY TO MAKE US MORE EFFICIENT. THAT’S WHAT THIS NEW SYSTEM DOES.” FELLGER ADDED, “THE KIOSKS ARE SOLAR POWERED MAKING THEM MORE COST EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TO OPERATE THAN THE PREVIOUS PARKING METERS THAT USED AA BATTERIES.” ON DECEMBER 12, 2018, KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ACTING PARKING COORDINATOR PHILLIP BERG. BERG ASSISTED FELLGER WITH THE PLANNING OF THE NEW PARKING SYSTEM. CONCERNING THE ROLLOUT OF THE METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT, BERG SAID, “IT WAS PRETTY HECTIC. PEOPLE WERE STILL A LITTLE RESISTANT TO CHANGE. WE HAD CONDITIONED PEOPLE TO A PARKING STYLE FOR THE LAST 50 TO 60 YEARS, AND IN ONE NIGHT WE CHANGED EVERYTHING OVER. SO THERE WAS A LOT OF RESISTANCE.” TO DEAL WITH THE RESISTANCE, BERG KEPT AN OPEN DIALOGUE WITH THE PUBLIC. “THERE WERE TIMES THAT MY PHONE DIDN’T STOP RINGING FOR DAYS, BUT WE’VE MADE A LOT OF CHANGES TO SCREEN DISPLAY AND SIGNAGE. [WE’VE DONE] EVERYTHING WE CAN POSSIBLY DO TO FACILITATE THE BEST PARKING MANAGEMENT STRATEGY WE CAN.” “I DID ALL THE REPAIRS, ALL THE MAINTENANCE AND ANYTHING, ANY PROGRAMMING OR ANYTHING THAT HAPPENED WITH THESE SINGLE SPACE METERS FOR THE LAST EIGHT YEARS. SO ANYTHING FROM RE-BUILDING HOUSINGS, PUTTING THEM TOGETHER FROM DIFFERENT PIECES, TO RE-PROGRAMMING THEM IN 2013 WHEN THE NEW COIN DIMENSIONS CAME OUT. WE HAD TO DO THEM ALL INDIVIDUALLY. AGAIN THESE WERE AT THEIR MAXIMUM CAPABILITIES. THEY HAD BEEN IN PLACE SINCE ABOUT 2000, THE ELECTRONIC PARKING METERS WERE IN PLACE FROM ABOUT 2000 AND WERE WELL PAST THEIR LIFE EXPECTANCY OF ABOUT 5 YEARS. SO, IT WAS TIME TO GO ON AND TRY A NEW TECHNOLOGY. AFTER MANY OPEN HOUSES, THE CITY CITIZENS AND WITH TECHNICAL EXPERTS DECIDED TO TRY IT WITH THE NEW MULTI-SPACE KIOSKS WHICH ALLOWED US A LOT MORE TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS. IT ALLOWED US THE ABILITY TO BE ABLE TO CLEAN UP THE STREETSCAPE, ELIMINATE THE PARKING METER POLES THAT WERE DILAPIDATED AND BREAKING DOWN AND PUT IN A NEW PARKING SYSTEM.” “THE PROJECT STARTED IN 2013…IT WAS SEVERAL YEARS IN THE MAKING AND IT WAS…ABOUT 2015…WHERE THE DECISION WAS MADE AND IT WAS PASSED THROUGH THAT WE WERE GOING TO CHANGE OUT THE PARKING SYSTEM. THERE WERE SEVERAL OTHER OPTIONS. THERE WAS UPDATING IT WITH THE SAME STUFF THAT WE HAVE NOW, UPDATING IT WITH A NEW SINGLE SPACE PARKING TECHNOLOGY OR GOING TO A MULTI-SPACE PARKING KIOSK. WHEN ALL THE FACTORS WERE PUT TOGETHER, THE MULTI-SPACE PARKING KIOSKS WERE THE MOST ECONOMICAL AND ALLOWED FOR THE MOST OPTIONS IN THE FUTURE.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE SINGLE-STALL, COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS, BERG RECALLED, “APRIL THIS YEAR IT STARTED. WE STARTED INSTALLING ALL THE KIOSKS ON THE STREET, NOT HAVING THEM OPERATIONAL BUT JUST ENSURING THAT THEY WERE ALL OUT ON THE STREET WHILE STILL ALLOWING THE SINGLE SPACE METERS TO CONTINUE TO DO WHAT THEY HAD DONE FOR YEARS. AND THEN IN ONE WEEKEND WE CAME IN AND WE COVERED ALL THE SINGLE SPACE METERS. AND THAT WAS THE LAST WEEKEND IN MAY, COVERED ALL THE SINGLE SPACE PARKING METERS [WITH THE PLASTIC COVER BAGS] AND TURNED ON THE BRAND NEW PARKING KIOSKS.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180016001-GA FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASES, AND FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20180016002
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1965
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.5
Diameter
2.9
Description
GOLD PIN WITH BAR-PIN CLASP ON BACK; PIN IS ROUND WITH SHIELD IN CENTER ON FRONT. FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL BORDER WITH GOLD TEXT, “SCIENCE, SERVICE, SANCTITY, ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING”; FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL CROSS WITH SHIELD OVERLAID IN CENTER; SHIELD IN CENTER HAS BLUE ENAMEL TOP BAR WITH GOLD LAMP, AND WHITE MID-SECTION WITH A BLUE CROSS AND OVERLAID RED SHIELD IN THE CENTER WITH A GOLD CROSS. BACK OF THE PIN HAS ENGRAVED TEXT IN THE CENTER, “F. GEORGESON 1965” AND ENGRAVED TEXT AT LOWER EDGE, “[ILLEGIBLE] 10 K”. BACK OF PIN HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN; FRONT OF PIN HAS CHIPPED ENAMEL AND MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE PIN, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE PIN YOU DIDN’T GET ‘TIL YOU GRADUATED…THAT WENT ON THE UNIFORM WHEN YOU GRADUATED…[THE GRADUATION UNIFORM] WAS ALL WHITE…WHITE BIB. WHITE LONG SLEEVES. WHITE SKIRT…” “I WORE THE PIN WHEN I WORKED IN THE O.R. WHEN I GRADUATED. I WORKED IN THE O.R. FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER I GRADUATED…WE WORE IT ON OUR UNIFORMS IN THE O.R…I ONLY WORE IT ONE YEAR.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1940
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.4
Width
2.4
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACLET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SPRINGRING CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT COMPRISED ON BLUE TEXT “RCAF” SURROUNDED BY LAUREL LEAVES, WITH A CROWN ABOVE AND OUTSTRETCHED WINGS ON SIDES. “RCAF” CREST ABOVE INSCRIPTION “PERLEY-MARTIN T.H., 4309A, J3513”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “NO.5 E.F.T.S., LETHBRIDGE ALTA., CLASS NO.1, 22.7.40 TO 3.10.40, SIRKS, STRELING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC WITH METAL LOOPS ON SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE IDENTIFICATION BRACELET BELONGED TO FLYING OFFICER THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN, AND WAS FASHIONED AS AN IDENTIFER FOR THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. INFORMATION COMPILED ON THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AND OTHER FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOLS WAS SOURCED FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA’S WEBSITE SECTION ON THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN. AT THE OUTBREAK OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CANADA AND ADDITIONAL COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES, CREATED THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN TO ENHANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR ROYAL AIR FORCE OFFICERS. THE PLAN ESTABLISHED THAT COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES WOULD BUILD FLIGHT SCHOOLS TO TRAIN OFFICERS FOR THE ROYAL AIR FORCE OR COMMONWEALTH AIR FORCES TO SERVE ALONGSIDE THE ROYAL AIR FORCE, INCLUDING THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. OFFICERS WOULD TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM TO A COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY, OR ENLISTED FROM THE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY. CANADA ESTABLISHED 196 TRAINING FACILITIES AND RELIEF FIELDS, AND GRADUATED 72,835 STUDENTS, ACCORDING TO STATISTICS FROM THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S WEBSITE ON THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. IN THE SPRING OF 1940, THE ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL NO. 5 IN LETHBRIDGE OPENED, SEEING ITS FIRST RECRUITS FOR THE R.C.A.F. ENROLL AND ARRIVE ON JULY 22, 1940 FROM REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN. THE FLIGHT SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELDS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CITY. STUDENTS WERE TAUGHT TO FLY IN 7 WEEKS, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 5 WEEK EXTENSION COURSE IN MORE ADVANCED FLYING. OF THE FIRST CLASS, GRADUATING OCTOBER 1940, WAS THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS BORN ON JANUARY 9, 1921 IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA. PERLEY-MARTIN SERVED IN THE QUEEN’S OWN HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA CADETS FROM 1935-38, AND ENLISTED IN THE NON-PERMANENT ACTIVE AIR FORCE OF THE R.C.A.F. IN 1938. PERLEY-MARTIN UNDERTOOK INITIAL FLIGHT TRAINING IN TORONTO, ONTARIO, GRADUATING TO ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. GRADUATES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE E.F.T.S. WERE GIVEN, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, '…AN ENGRAVED IDENTIFICATION DISC BY THE SCHOOL', AS STATED BY DENNIS YORATH, MANAGER AT NO. 5 E.F.T.S. IT IS ONLY SPECULATION THAT THE DISC DESCRIBED BY THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IS THE ONE AFFIXED TO THE BRACELET. IN DECEMBER 1940-JANUARY 1941, THE NO. 5 E.F.T.S. WAS RELOCATED TO HIGH RIVER, ALBERTA, AND THE NO. 8 BOMBER AND GUNNERY SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELD, LETHBRIDGE, OPENING IN OCTOBER 1941. UPON COMPLETING HIS E.F.T.S. TRAINING, PERLEY-MARTIN WENT ON TO COMPLETE HIS INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED TRAINING AT THE NO. 1 SERVICE FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AT CAMP BORDEN, ONTARIO. REPORTS FROM THE SERVICE FILE OF T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN INDICATE THAT IN 1941, FOLLOWING HIS TRAINING IN CANADA, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS STATIONED IN OLD SARUM, ENGLAND. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR FLYING OR OTHER DUTIES IN 1941 FOLLOWING FLYING OFFENSES AND OUTSTANDING DEBTS, WITH THE OFFENSES RESULTING IN PERLEY-MARTIN BEING COURT MARTIALED AND TRIED. IN MARCH 1942, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS RETIRED FROM SERVICE, AND IN AUGUST 1942 HE BECAME A PILOT GENERAL WITH THE #122 SQN. ON JANUARY 7, 1945, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS KILLED DURING FLYING OPERATIONS IN JARVIS, ONTARIO, WHERE HE WAS AN INSTRUCTOR, WHILE ATTEMPTING TO LAND AN ANSON AIRCRAFT #7013 IN POOR VISIBILITY. ACCORDING TO A MEMORIAL WRITTEN ON PERLEY-MARTIN, HE WAS BURIED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. WHILE IN ENGLAND IN 1941, PERLEY-MARTIN MARRIED OLIVE CYNTHIA ROBERTS. THE COUPLE HAD ONE SON, BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. OLIVE AND BARRY RETURNED TO ENGLAND FOLLOWING THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN’S DEATH, ACCORDING TO AN EMAIL FROM MARY PERLEY-MARTIN, THE WIFE OF THE LATE BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. THE BRACELET WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM IN DECEMBER 2017 FROM T.M. SAUNDERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE FLIGHT SCHOOLS AND WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARTICLES ON T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170037000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
Acquisition Date
2017-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.7
Width
2
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACELET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SNAP LOCK CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT OF AN EAGLE WITH OUTSTRETCHED WINGS HOLDING A CIRCLE IN ITS FEET, WITH SWASTIKA IN CENTER OF CIRCLE; FRONT HAS INSCRIPTION ON SIDES CREST “CAMP 133”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “R.J. BORLAND, M2598, STERLING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC THROUGH HOLES IN SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC ARE TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE BRACELET WAS CREATED AT CAMP 133, THE LETHBRIDGE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. THE CURATOR OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM’S MILITARY AND POLITICAL HISTORY DEPARTMENT NOTED IN AN EMAIL, ON THE BRACELET, THAT THE EAGLE DID NOT APPEAR TO BE AN OFFICIAL MILITARY SYMBOL. THE EAGLE WAS POSSIBLY FASHIONED BY HAND, OR CAST AS A COPY. HISTORIAN ROBERT HENDERSON ELABORATED, “NO DOUBT A PRIVATE PURCHASE BY THE GUARD—PROBABLY [BY] ROBERT BORLAND [WHO] SAW SERVICE AT LETHBRIDGE. THE NAZI SYMBOL REPRESENTS EARLY [1933+ ERA] NAZI STYLE SYMBOL, PROBABLY OBTAINED FROM A POW IN TRADE OR FRIENDSHIP. THE LETTERING ON IT [WAS] NO DOUBT DONE BY A JEWELLER WITH APPROPRIATE EQUIPMENT, NOT BY A POW WITHIN THE CAMP. WRIST BRACELETS WERE POPULAR ITEMS TO BE GIVEN TO THE GUARDS BY FAMILY OR SWEETHEARTS, OR BY FRIENDS WHEN THE GUARD WAS POSTED AWAY FROM HOME.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING A COPY OF THE OBITUARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON LETHBRIDGE CAMP 133, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20150021000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
62
Length
68
Width
48
Description
A GREEN BASKETBALL T-SHIRT WITH WHITE TRIMMING AND WHITE PAINTED NUMBERS AND TEXT. THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT READS “55” AND “GALT ROYALS”. THE BACK READS “55”. THE WHITE TRIMMING FOLLOWS THE BOTTOM EDGE, THE SLEEVE EDGES AND THE COLLAR. THE COLLAR OPENS WITH A METAL ZIPPER, ENDING IN A SMALL SILVER CHAIN. A SMALL WHITE TAG IN THE BACK OF THE COLLAR READS “12” IN RED. EXCELLENT CONDITION: THE COLLAR IS CREASED ON ONE CORNER.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
SPORTS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SHIRT WAS A PART OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BASKETBALL UNIFORM. WHILE THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THIS ARTIFACT IS UNKNOWN, IT WOULD HAVE MOST LIKELY BEEN IN USE EARLIER THAT 1965, AS THE NURSING SCHOOL HAD GALT ROYAL UNIFORMS IN THAT YEAR THAT WERE DIFFERENT TO THIS ONE. THE UNIFORM WOULD HAVE BEEN USED BY “STUDENTS WHO WERE ON THE TEAM. BETWEEN 1965-68 ST. MICHAEL STUDENTS WERE [ON THE] TEAM ALSO.” ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT, SPORTS ACTIVITIES FOR THE STUDENTS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR LIVES DURING TRAINING. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Date
1986
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.5
Diameter
5.7
Description
BROWN GLASS BEER BOTTLE WITH A LIP FOR A TWIST-OFF CAP (NO CAP). "85" IS IN RAISED LETTERS OF GLASS AT THE BASE OF THE BOTTLE. THERE IS A SEAM VISIBLE DOWN THE CENTER HALVES OF THE BOTTLE WHERE IT HAS BEEN FUSED TOGETHER. CREAM-COLOURED RECTANGULAR LABEL WITH GOLD TRIM PASTED TO ONE SIDE OF THE BOTTLE. LABEL READS "a7" WITHIN A RED DIAGONAL STRIPE RUNNING UP THE WIDTH OF THE LABEL WITH "BEER" PRINTED BELOW. THE BOTTOM OF THE LABEL READS: "BREWED AND BOTTLED IN CARLING O'KEEFE BREWERIES CALGARY, ALBERTA" IN ALTERNATING BLACK AND RED FONT. THERE IS A STAMP THAT STATES "100 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 1886-1986" IN THE UPPER LEFT SECTION OF THE LABEL. CONDITION: SLIGHT WRINKLE VERTICALLY DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE LABEL. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE GLASS OF BOTTLE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
INDUSTRY
History
A NOTE ABOUT THIS BOTTLE WAS WRITTEN BY THE DONOR, FRANK LIGHTBOUND, AND PROVIDED TO THE MUSEUM AT THE TIME OF DONATION STATES: “THE SPECIAL LABEL ON THIS BOTTLE IS ONE OF A FEW HUNDRED PRINTED TO HELP CELEBRATE THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY (1886-1986) OF THE A7 RANCHE (OLD SPELLING), THE SOUTHERN PORTION OF WHICH BORDERS THE OLDMAN RIVER NORTH OF LUNDBRECK IN THE MAYCROFT AREA. THE RANCH WAS ESTABLISHED BY A. E. CROSS OF BIG 4 STAMPEDE FAME AND THE FORMER CALGARY BREWING/MALTING CO. (HORSESHOE AND BUFFALO LABEL). THE RANCH IS STILL OWNED BY THE CROSS FAMILY. THE BEER WAS SERVED DURING THE CELEBRATION BAR-B-Q AND THIS BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO ME BY VAL DENNIS, SOUTH RANCH FOREMAN AT THE TIME.” ON 22 MARCH 2017, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LIGHTBOUND ABOUT HIS DONATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE BOTTLE FROM A7 RANCHE BREWERY. THIS BOTTLE COMMEMORATES THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE A7 RANCHE. OF THAT, LIGHTBOUND STATES, “WELL, I MUST HAVE ACQUIRED IT SOON AFTER THAT THEN – IN 1986. IT WASN’T GIVEN TO ME DIRECTLY. I KNEW THE FOREMAN OF THE SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE A7 RANCHE [VAL DENNIS], AND HE HAD SEVERAL OF THEM, AND HE GAVE ME ONE...THE DENNIS FAMILY HAVE A RANCH ON THE OLD MAN RIVER JUST OUTSIDE THE FOREST RESERVE, WHICH IS ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE A7 RANCHE.” THE BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO LIGHTBOUND EMPTY. WHEN ASKED WHY HE WAS COMPELLED TO SAVE IT, LIGHTBOUND REPLIED, “WELL, [IT REPRESENTS] AN INTERESTING PART OF THE COUNTRY. I WAS AT THE GAP RANGER STATION FOR FIVE YEARS AND THE DENNIS FAMILY HAD THE FIRST RANCH EAST OF THE FOREST RESERVE, ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROAD, BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE RIVER. I GOT TO KNOW THE FAMILY BACK AROUND 1965 AND THIS WAS [FROM] 1985. I STILL VISIT WITH THEM AND I HELPED THEM WITH THEIR RANCHING OPERATION...I SAW ALL THE FAMILY GROW UP, ALL THE KIDS GROW UP. VAL WAS ONE. WHEN I FIRST MET HIM, HE WAS A KID IN GRADE SCHOOL, AND NOW I THINK HE’S ABOUT 60 YEARS OLD, AND HE’S NEARING RETIREMENT AS AN RCMP OFFICER. SO A LOT OF YEARS HAVE PASSED. SO, OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF HIS HEART, HE THOUGHT I’D LIKE TO HAVE THAT BOTTLE AND I TOOK IT, AND I HAD IT DISPLAYED—IT WASN’T IN THE LIVING ROOM—BUT IT WAS IN THE CUPBOARD AREA IN THE DINING AREA.” ACCORDING TO THE A7 RANCHE HISTORY PROVIDED ON THEIR WEBSITE (ACCESSED ON 4 MAY 2018), THE RANCH’S FOUNDER – ALFRED ERNEST CROSS – “PICKED THE ‘A7’ BRAND TO SYMBOLIZE HIMSELF AND HIS SIX SIBLINGS. IT IS SAID TO BE THE OLDEST RANCH IN CANADA STILL IN THE HANDS OF THE ORIGINAL OWNERS, RIGHT THROUGH TO PRESENT-DAY OWNER JOHN CROSS.” THE WEBSITE CONTINUES, “A. E. CROSS IS BEST KNOWN FOR BEING ONE OF THE “BIG FOUR” CATTLEMEN WHO FOUNDED THE CALGARY STAMPEDE IN 1912. HOWEVER, HE HAD MANY OTHER BUSINESS, PUBLIC, AND CHARITABLE INTERESTS, LIKE THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY, OIL AND GAS, AND THE BUDDING MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY. CROSS ALSO SERVED AS THE MLA FOR EAST CALGARY IN THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES...” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, A7 HISTORY AND DONOR’S NOTE.
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
Acquisition Date
2014-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"VETS" HOCKEY SWEATER
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180015000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"VETS" HOCKEY SWEATER
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
68.2
Width
48
Description
BLACK TURTLENECK SWEATER WITH OCHRE TRIM AT SLEEVES, NECK, AND WAIST. SWEATER IS WOOL-BLEND KNIT; SWEATER HAS YELLOW FELT LETTERS SEWN ON CHEST “VETS”. BACK OF SWEATER HAS YELLOW OUTLINE FROM MISSING “4” PATCH. SWEATER HAS HOLES ON RIGHT-WEARING SLEEVE BELOW ELBOW AND AT ARMPIT; SWEATER HAS HOLES ON SIDES OF NECK AND AT SIDES OF WAIST; SWEATER HAS HOLES ON LEFT-WEARING SLEEVE BELOW ELBOW, AT CUFF, AND ON FRONT AT SHOULDER. BACK OF SWEATER HAS HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SLEEVE AND RIGHT-WEARING SLEEVE. SWEATER IS SOILED AND STAINED; FRONT IS FADED ON CHEST. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SPORTS
History
ON JUNE 14, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HAROLD PALMER REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A LETHBRIDGE VETS TEAM HOCKEY SWEATER. THE SWEATER BELONGED TO HAROLD PALMER’S FATHER, MURRAY YALE PALMER. ON HIS FATHER’S CONNECTION TO THE SWEATER, HAROLD PALMER RECALLED, “IT WAS IN MY DAD’S HOCKEY BAG AND HE DIED IN 1971. I NEVER REALLY WENT THROUGH STUFF UNTIL JUST RECENTLY…I’VE HAD IT SINCE 1971 IN MY POSSESSION BUT I’VE NEVER DONE ANYTHING WITH IT. [MY FATHER’S] DAD WAS A DOCTOR IN WW I, IN THE FIELD, SO HE WOULD BE VERY FAMILIAR WITH THE WAR EFFORT. HE WOULD BE IN THE HOME AS A YOUNG BOY AND HIS DAD WAS AWAY IN THE SERVICES. HE PLAYED HOCKEY ALL HIS LIFE. HE HAD TOLD ME [ABOUT] VARIOUS TEAMS THAT HE HAD PLAYED FOR AND WHEN HE DIED AT SIXTY-SEVEN YEARS OLD, HE DIED ON THURSDAY AND THEY HAD PLAYED HOCKEY ON MONDAY NIGHT WITH THE OLDTIMERS. WE GREW UP KNOWING THAT DAD PLAYED HOCKEY AND THAT HE ALWAYS HAD A RINK IN THE BACK YARD.” “[MY SON] GOT [THE CONNECTION] THAT THERE WAS A HOCKEY TEAM BY THE NAME OF “VETS” IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1919…THIS IS WHERE THE SWEATER ORIGINATED FROM THEN, BECAUSE THERE WOULDN’T BE MANY HOCKEY CLUBS CALLED “VETS”.” “[MY FATHER] LIVED IN CLARESHOLM AT ONE TIME BECAUSE HIS DAD WAS A MEDICAL DOCTOR AND HE WOULD BE A YOUNG MAN THEN…HE WAS A RURAL DOCTOR, HE WAS A COUNTRY DOCTOR. THEY DEFINITELY LIVED IN THAT AREA AT ONE TIME.” “MY DAD HAD A RINK IN OUR BACK YARD FROM THE POINT THAT HE BOUGHT THREE LOTS IN RED DEER. [THE] FIRST [LOT] WAS THE HOUSE, THE SECOND ONE WAS PLANED OFF FOR A BASEBALL FIELD AND THEN IT WAS HOCKEY RINK IN THE WINTER TIME.” “[MY FATHER] PASSED AWAY IN RED DEER, AND HE’D BEEN IN RED DEER FROM 1939 TIL HIS PASSING.” PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA NOTES THAT THE LETHBRIDGE VETS WAS CONSIDERED A SENIOR TEAM. THE VETS WON THE 1919-1920 ALBERTA SENIOR PLAYOFFS, HOWEVER LOST IN THE 1919-1920 WESTERN CANADA ALLAN CUP PLAYOFFS. THE VETS COMPETED IN THE 1922-23 ALBERTA SENIOR PLAYOFFS AGAIN. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM 1923-1924 LIST PALMER AS A PLAYER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE VETS HOCKEY TEAM, AND IN 1926-1927 LIST MURRAY PALMER AS A PLAYER IN CLARESHOLM, ALBERTA. MURRAY YALE PALMER WAS THE SON OF SPRAGUE MURRAY PALMER AND ARLETTE PALMER. SPRAGUE PALMER WAS A DOCTOR IN LETHBRIDGE AND CLARESHOLM FOLLOWING HIS SERVICE IN WW1 AS A DOCTOR WITH THE 22ND CAVALRY FIELD AMBULANCE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA RECORDS PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180015000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180015000
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
14
Width
9
Description
WHITE PAPER CARD WITH BLUE IMAGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF ALBERTA AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA WITH LABELLED CITIES “EDMONTON, CALGARY, LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER” AND LETHBRIDGE, SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SHADED. CARD HAS RED LINES BORDER RUNNING DOWN LEFT SIDE; FRONT OF CARD HAS RED TEXT “LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA, 825-6TH STREET SOUTH, VE6ZS, “THE HEART OF THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY”, RADIO CONFIRMING QSO OF 19, AT P.M., A.M., M.S.T., UR. MC. CW. PHONE, SIGS RST, XMTR, PWR, W.INP. RCVR., QSL. VY 73, EDWARD K. REDEKOPP, OPR”. BACK OF CARD HAS BLUE BLEED IN UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SMALL STAINS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE QSL CODE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “MY CALL WAS VE6ZS. IT’S ONE OF THE OLDER CALLS-–JUST TWO-LETTER CALLS. LATER ON, THEY RAN OUT OF TWO-LETTER CALLS AND YOU COULD GO INTO THREE-LETTER CALLS…I WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES AND IT WAS A NICE, SHORT CALL AND YOU WANT TO KEEP IT. NOW, WHEN YOU FORFEIT IT, SOMEONE ELSE GETS THAT CALL. IT’S BEEN GOING AROUND THE THING MORE THAN ONCE ALREADY. SEVERAL OTHERS HAVE HAD IT SINCE. BUT IF I’D HAVE KEPT MY FEE UP, I WOULD STILL BE VE6ZS.” “[THE CARDS CAN BE MADE AT SHOPS WHERE THEY] PRINT WHATEVER YOU WANT. YOU JUST GIVE [PRINTERS] AN IDEA, AND TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT ON, ALL THE DETAILS YOU HAVE TO GIVE THEM, AND THEN THEY’LL PRINT [A CARD] UP FOR YOU IN THEIR FANCIFUL WAY, NOT MINE. THEY DID A GOOD JOB. IT’S ACCEPTABLE. BUT IF YOU LOOK AT OTHER ACKNOWLEDGMENT CARDS YOU CAN SEE THAT [IT’S] ABSOLUTELY WILD WHAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE. SOME ARE HILARIOUS; THEY’RE COMICAL. OTHERS ARE DIFFERENT.” “[I WOULDN’T MAIL CARDS OUT] EVERY DAY, NECESSARILY, BUT EVERY WEEK [I WOULD] SEND SOME. THERE’S TWO DIFFERENT WAYS OF SENDING THEM, TOO. PEOPLE WILL SEND TO [A DISTRIBUTOR] LIKE BILL SAVAGE [WHO]…RECEIVED THE CARDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD AND HE WAS A DISTRIBUTOR OF LETHBRIDGE TO ALL THE AMATEURS WHEN THEY GET THEM IN. YOU’D PICK THEM UP EVERY SO OFTEN. LIKE THE RUSSIANS. THEY WENT TO MOSCOW-–BOX 88, WAS IT? EVERYTHING WENT THROUGH MOSCOW. YOU COULD TALK DIRECTLY TO SOMEBODY BUT YOU NEVER COULD GET A CARD DIRECTLY FROM THEM. ALWAYS THROUGH MOSCOW ’CAUSE MOSCOW CENSORED EVERYTHING.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20180024000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE
Date
1949
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
18
Width
11
Description
FELT PATCH WITH COTTON EMBROIDERY; FRONT OF PATCH SHOWS MAN IN BLUE CAP ON A RED BACKGROUND WEARING A GREY AND RED SHIRT HOLDING A YELLOW BAT; IN FRONT OF MAN’S TORSO IS WHITE BASEBALL ON GREY BASE WITH BLUE AND RED TEXT “SO ALTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE, 1949, LETHBRIDGE, J.C.C.A., ATHLETIC CLUB”. BASEBALL ON FRONT HAS BLACK TRIM AND DETAILING. BACK OF PATCH HAS WHITE COTTON BACKING. BACKING IS DISCOLOURED WITH RED BLEED FROM FRONT FELT; THREADS AT EDGE OF PATCH BACK ARE FRAYED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
History
ON AUGUST 25, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN PURCHASED A SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE PATCH FOR THE GALT MUSEUM. THE PATCH WAS WORN IN 1949 BY A PLAYER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE TEAM WITHIN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE. THE LEAGUE WAS ACTIVE THROUGH THE LATE 1940S TO THE MID-1950S. THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET PATCH WAS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE TEAM AND WAS WORN AS PART OF A PLAYER’S UNIFORM. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM JUNE 7, 1949 DESCRIBES THE LETHBRIDGE TEAM MAKING AN “INAUSPICIOUS DEBUT” AT A SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEETS GAME AGAINST THE MAGRATH EVACS, WHERE THE EVACS WON 6-3. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM JUNE 30, 1949 ADVERTISES GAMES AT HENDERSON PARK FOR JULY 1, 1949 IN WHICH THE LETHBRIDGE TEAM WOULD PLAY AS PART OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE [DESCRIBED IN THE ARTICLE AS THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE LEAGUE]. ON NOVERMBER 7, 2011, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHIG NAKAGAWA AND ROY SASSA REGARDING ROY’S DONATION OF A BASEBALL UNIFORM [P20110030000-GA] FROM THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGARBEET LEAGUE, AND SPOKE WITH SASSA AND NAKAGAWA ABOUT THEIR TIME IN THE LEAGUE. SASSA SPOKE ABOUT HIS BACKGROUND WITH THE SUGARBEET LEAGUE, NOTING, “I WAS FIVE, SIX YEARS OLD WHEN WE WERE EVACUATED OUT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA AND I STARTED MY BALL HERE IN RAYMOND. WHEN I WAS SIXTEEN, I PLAYED WITH THE SENIOR GENTLEMEN IN…THE [RAYMOND] BUSSEI-–THE SUGAR BEET LEAGUE…IN THE EARLY FIFTIES TO MID-FIFTIES.” NAKAGAWA DISCUSSED HIS BACKGROUND WITH THE LEAGUE, “MY FATHER GOT INVOLVED WITH THE PARENTS OF THESE BASEBALL PLAYERS AND I WASN’T INTO BASEBALL, BUT HE DID URGE ME TO GET INTO IT…I GOT INVOLVED WITH THIS RAYMOND BUSSEI TEAM. BUT PRIOR TO THIS, I WAS AT INVOLVED WITH MAGRATH. THEIR TEAM WAS CALLED THE EVACS AND THE NAME [CAME] FROM BEING EVACUEES. I WAS WITH THIS TEAM FOR THREE YEARS BEFORE COMING TO THE BUSSEI TEAM.” ON THE HISTORY OF THE TEAM AND HIS INVOLVEMENT, SASSA ELABORATED, “THERE WERE NO LITTLE LEAGUES IN THOSE DAYS; ALL WE DID WAS PLAY IN THE BACKYARDS. A BUNCH OF US GOT TOGETHER AND THEN, LATER ON, THE [HIGH SCHOOL] SCHOOL KIDS WOULD PLAY IN THE BALL DIAMOND. I [SAW] THEM PLAYING AROUND SO I ASKED THEM IF THEY WOULD LIKE TO GET SOMETHING ORGANIZED. WE GOT MAGRATH AND A FEW OF THE TOWN’S SURROUNDING AREAS TO PLAY AGAINST [US] AND THAT’S HOW I GOT STARTED. I DON’T KNOW IF I PUSHED MY WAY INTO THIS TEAM OR…IF THEY ASKED ME…BUT I WAS ABLE TO PLAY WITH THIS TEAM, AND WE TRAVELLED ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN THIS SUGAR BEET LEAGUE.” “IT [WAS] ALL THE SUGAR BEET WORKERS THAT WERE EVACUATED FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA. WE WERE PUT OUT INTO THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS…TABER-BARNWELL WAS ONE TEAM. MAGRATH WAS ONE TEAM. PICTURE BUTTE. RAYMOND. LETHBRIDGE…AND COALDALE.” “[THE TEAMS WERE] ALL VOLUNTEER.” NAKAGAWA CONTINUED, “[IF THERE WERE COSTS TO DO THINGS] WE HAD TO GO AND WORK IN THE SUGAR BEETS.” “[FOR THE TEAM NAME] RAYMOND…TOOK THE SHORTENED VERSION OF THE YOUNG BUDDHIST ASSOCATION AND CALLED IT BUSSEI. [THE OTHER TEAM NAMES WERE] COALDALE CUBS, MAGRATH EVACS, RAYMOND BUSSEIS, PICTURE BUTTE…TABER, BARNWELL.” “I THINK THE DRIVING FORCE [FOR CREATING THE LEAGUE] WAS MOST OF THESE PLAYERS WERE A PART OF THE B.C…ASAHIS…[MOST]PARENTS WERE AFFILIATED WITH THIS ASAHI TEAM FROM VANCOUVER. THEY GOT TOGETHER AND… STARTED FORMING THIS SUGAR BEET LEAGUE.” “MOST OF THEM HAD THE DESIRE TO PLAY SO… THEY WANTED TO PLAY SO THERE [WERE] NO REQUIREMENTS [TO PLAY].” “THE LAST YEAR WAS EITHER ‘55 OR ’56. I [WAS] TWENTY-THREE [WHEN I STARTED]. I WENT ‘TIL THE YEAR OF ‘55.” “UP TO FIFTY-TWO OR -THREE, I WOULD SAY RAYMOND WAS [AT] THE TOP [OF THE LEAGUE].” SASSA ELABORATED, “THERE [WERE] NO FIGHTS. IT WAS ALWAYS COMPETITIVE. EVEN IN HIGH SCHOOL BALLS, OR HOCKEY, BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT [THERE] WAS A REAL RIVALRY. [THAT] IS WHAT IT WAS LIKE IN ALL THE SURROUNDING TOWNS. THERE’S ALWAYS COMPETITION. WHEN THERE’S A SPORT, THERE’S ALWAYS COMPETITION, EVEN IN GOLFING.” “IT WAS ONLY ON SUNDAYS THAT WE PLAYED, AND IF WE HAD TO GO OUT OF TOWN, YOU’D HAVE TO LEAVE QUITE EARLY. YOU WOULD DO A FEW ROWS OF BEETS BEFORE YOU LEFT, AND QUICKLY EAT, AND THEN GET CHANGED, AND MEET AT THE CHURCH AND AWAY WE’D GO.” ON JULY 2, 2013, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROY ASATO REGARDING HIS INVOLVEMENT IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUGAR BEET LEAGUE [SEE P20130011000-GA]. ASATO’S FAMILY BEGAN FARMING IN HARDIEVILLE PRIOR TO WORLD WAR 2, AND ASATO PLAYED FOR THE COALDALE CUBS IN THE 1950S. ON HIS INVOLVEMENT IN THE LEAGUE, ASATO ELABORATED, “WHEN [MY DAD] FIRST CAME HE WAS A DRY LAND FARMER AND HE GOT DRIED OUT, SO HE MANAGED TO GO TO JAPAN AND GET MARRIED, HAD KIDS. HE [SAID] FROM NOW ON I AM GOING TO HAVE IRRIGATION, NO DRY LAND SO HE WAS GROWING POTATOES. EVERY COUPLE OF YEARS WE HAD TO MOVE AND BUILD A ROOT CELLAR EVERY TWO YEARS. WE MOVED AROUND QUITE A BIT. WHEN [I WAS] ABOUT FOURTEEN WE STARTED GOING TO BASEBALL GAMES AND AROUND SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE [I] STARTED PLAYING BASEBALL FOR THE COALDALE CUBS IN THE SUGAR BEET LEAGUE.” “DAD PLAYED BASEBALL SO HE USED TAKE US TO THOSE GAMES. WE STARTED PLAYING BASEBALL EVERY SUNDAY AFTER WORKING ALL WEEK. [THERE WERE] SIX TEAMS, I THINK.” “[OUR FAMILY FARM WAS BY] HARDIEVILLE…MOST OF THE PARENTS HAD THREE TON TRUCKS SO WE PUT A BENCH IN THERE, AND WE JUMPED IN THE TRUCK WE WOULD GO TO VARIOUS PLACES WITH THE TRUCK…IT WAS NO BIG DEAL; HE WOULD TAKE US TO COALDALE. WE WERE PLAYING BARNWELL AGAINST TABER AND THEN THERE WAS PICTURE BUTTE, AND THE COALDALE BUSSEI. THEY WERE MOSTLY EVACUEES [AND] THEY WERE GOOD PLAYERS. “[THE TEAMS] WERE ENTIRELY JAPANESE-CANADIAN… COALDALE HAD TWO TEAMS…THE BUSSEI AND CUBS… THE BUSSEI ALWAYS SEEMED TO BEAT US.” MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HIROSHI “SPUD” KITAGAWA ON JUNE 28, 2013 [SEE P20130010001-GA]. KITAGAWA PLAYED FOR THE RAYMOND BUSSEI UNTIL 1954. KITAGAWA RECALLED HIS TIME LIVING IN RAYMOND AND PLAYING FOR THE BUSSEI’S, NOTING, “[OUR FAMILY] DIDN’T COME ON THEIR OWN. THEY HAD TO PAY. THIS WAS BEFORE THE COMMISSIONERS MEET. AT THAT TIME THEY TOLD IF YOU WANT TO GO AS A FAMILY, GET OUT RIGHT NOW. MY MOTHER DIDN’T [SPEAK] GOOD ENGLISH, SHE COULDN’T WORK SO MY FATHER COULD. MY UNCLE KNEW ONE FAMILY IN RAYMOND FROM JAPAN, I DON’T KNOW HOW, SO THEY WROTE A LETTER ASKING IF THEY COULD COME OVER. HE SAID YEAH COME ON OVER, SO WE [CAME] AS A FAMILY…TEN OF US, MY FAMILY AND MY UNCLE’S FAMILY IN ‘42. IT WAS QUITE A HARDSHIP. MY PARENTS HAD TO GET EVERYTHING PACKED IN A COUPLE OF DAYS AND JUST TAKE OFF. WE GOT ON THE TRAIN AND GOT TO CALGARY AND [THEN] TO LETHBRIDGE. MR. KOSAKA PICKED US UP IN LETHBRIDGE AND [TOOK US] TO RAYMOND.” “[I WAS] ELEVEN…[MR. KOSAKA] WAS OUR SPONSOR… WE WERE [LIVING ON HIS FARM] AND IN A COUPLE OF DAYS, WE MOVED INTO TOWN. HE FOUND US A PLACE TO RENT, A HOUSE IN THE TOWN OF RAYMOND. WE STAYED THERE A COUPLE OF MONTHS, THEN WE WENT OUT TO THE SUGAR BEET FARM.” “[WE WENT TO] ZOBELL’S [FARM], ABOUT THREE MILES OUT OF TOWN.” “IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL WE STARTED PLAYING [IN THE LEAGUE], WE GOT TO PLAY ON THE TEAM ANYWAY. MOST OF US WERE STILL IN SCHOOL PLAYING BALL…I KNOW RAYMOND HAD TWO TEAMS AND PICTURE BUTTE AND COALDALE. PICTURE BUTTE STARTED IT, I THINK.” “IT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT ‘48 OR ’49 WHEN I GOT TO PLAY…IT WAS PRETTY HARD TO GET NINE PEOPLE TO COME OUT IN THOSE DAYS. EVERYBODY HAD TO STAY HOME AND WORK THE BEETS. IT WASN’T THAT EASY TO GET [TIME] OFF. EVERYBODY WORKED SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, LONG HOURS. I JUST GOT THERE AND THEY SAID COME ON AND PLAY, SO WE STARTED PLAYING BALL AND OTHER PEOPLE JOINED US, AROUND RAYMOND. RAYMOND HAD SOME PEOPLE WHO USED TO LIVE THERE BEFORE THE WAR, OLD TIMERS. THEY HELPED US A LOT, FIXED THE GROUND UP. WE HAD A CHURCH, A YOUNG BUDDHIST SOCIETY THERE AND WE GOT TO PLAY BALL. I NEVER GOT TO GO TO MEETINGS SO I DON’T KNOW HOW THE LEAGUE GOT STARTED.” “PICTURE BUTTE, COALDALE, HAD STRONG [TEAMS], A LOT OF VETERANS THAT HAD PLAYED BEFORE AND MOST WERE STILL PLAYING THERE. THEY HAD A GOOD TEAM. RAYMOND WE STARTED GETTING BETTER IN THE ‘50S. IT GOT INTERESTING. WE WON THREE YEARS IN A ROW. THOSE YEARS WERE PRETTY GOOD.” “MR. YOSH SENDA WAS COACHING FOR US WHEN I JOINED UP…AS THE YEARS WENT BY AND WE STARTED GETTING BETTER, WE USED TO GO THE SUGAR BEETS AND [WORKED] THE BEETS FIRST THING IN THE MORNING AND GO PLAY BALL IN THE AFTERNOON. BY MONDAY MORNING WE WERE ALL TIRED AND COULDN’T DO MUCH WORK. WE USED TO PLAY A DOUBLE HEADER ON SUNDAY WHEN THE [LEAGUE] WAS GOING GOOD. WE’D STOP IN LETHBRIDGE AND IN CHINATOWN, HAVE SUPPER AND GO HOME. MONDAY MORNING WE WERE PRETTY TIRED. OUR PARENTS WONDERED WHAT THE HECK WAS GOING ON, WE COULDN’T DO BEETS TOO GOOD.” “I PLAYED ONE MORE YEAR AFTER THAT, ‘54, [FOR A TOTAL OF] ABOUT SIX OR SEVEN YEARS. THE LEAGUE FADED OFF, [WE] COULDN’T GET THE PLAYERS TO COME OUT OF TOWN. MOST OF THEM MOVED OUT OF TOWN AND WENT TO BIG CITIES.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180024000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180024000
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Materials
FELT, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
12.7
Length
12.6
Width
0.6
Description
GREEN AND YELLOW CIRCULAR TERRY CLOTH AND FELT PATCH THAT READS "LCI CLIPPERS" IN CURSIVE-STYLE FOLLOWED BY "55 56" ALL IN GREEN CHARACTERS. THE PATCH INCLUDES AN IMAGE OF A BASKETBALL NET MADE WITH YELLOW FELT AND BLACK STITCHING. THE IMAGE AND WORDS ARE SUPPORTED BY A GREEN FELT AND PALE YELLOW FELT BASE. A TERRY CLOTH-LIKE YELLOW FILLS THE CIRCLULAR CENTER OF PATCH. BACK SIDE OF STITCHING VISIBLE. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: FOUR LOOSE THREADS (ONE ON THE BACK OF THE "C" IN "LCi", ONE ON THE TOP CURVE OF PATCH, AND ONE ON THE BOTTOM CURVE OF THE "C" IN "CLIPPERS"; GENERAL DISCOLORATION AND SURFACE DIRT OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EARLY 2016, LLOYD YAMAGISHI DONATED TWO LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE (L. C. I.) CLIPPERS BADGES TO THE GALT MUSEUM. IN CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MUSEUM, YAMAGISHI STATED, “I CAME ACROSS THE BADGES A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO WHEN WE MOVED MY NOW DECEASED MOTHER FROM HER HOME TO MARTHA’S HOUSE. I DIDN’T TOSS AWAY THE BADGES THINKING THEY BELONGED TO MY OLDER SISTER, SINCE SHE WAS THE ONLY SIBLING THAT ATTENDED LCI… THE BADGES WERE NOT HERS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO THE BADGES BELONGED TO. THEY READ, “LCI CLIPPERS 55 56” AND “PROV. CHAMPS 1956”. IT IS KNOWN THAT THE CLIPPERS WAS THE GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM FOR LCI. THE 1956 LCI YEARBOOK TITLED “SPOTLITE” READS, “ON APRIL 10TH, THE CLIPPER QUEENS, COACHED BY MARGE CLARK, ENDED A TREMENDOUS BASKETBALL SEASON BY WINNING THE PROVINCIAL “A” GIRLS BASKETBALL CROWN. THE QUEENS RECORDED A LONG STRING OF PLAYOFF VICTORIES. THEY KNOCKED OVER THEIR FIRST VICTIMS, NOBLEFORD, TO GAIN THE LETHBRIDGE NORTHERN BASKETBALL LEAGUE TROPHY AND THE RIGHT TO ENTER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA PLAYOFFS. THEN THE QUEENS SWAMPED VULCAN, WARNER AND TABER IN RAPID ORDER, RACKING UP SOME OF THE MOST ONE-SIDED SCORES EVER SEEN IN THE SOUTH. THE CENTRAL ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, LACOMBE, WAS THE NEXT VICTIM TO FALL BEFORE THE QUEENS’ STEADY ATTACK, AS THE NORTHERNERS BOWED OUT IN TWO STRAIGHT GAMES. THE CLIPPER QUEENS THEN RETURNED HOME TO DEFEAT THE CAMROSE COMETS 83-24 AND 75-30 IN A TWO-OUT-OF-THREE SERIES. THIS FEAT CROWNED THEM PROVINCIAL CHAMPS OF 1955-56.” THE YEARBOOK LISTS THE PLAYERS OF THAT YEAR’S TEAM AS FOLLOWS: CAROLE PONECH (CAPTAIN), BEV COWARD (FORWARD, BETTY BEIMLER (FORWARD), BERNICE COWARD (GUARD), MAY LEISHMAN (GUARD), MARIANNE SNOWDON (FORWARD), CAROL LARSON (GUARD), SHIRON ERICKSON (CENTRE), JOYCE GOLIA (GUARD), AND DONALDA POZZI (FORWARD). THE BOOKS STATES THE COACH, MISS MARGE CLARK, WAS IN HER SECOND YEAR AS “THE QUEENS’ MENTOR.” THE TEAM MANAGER THAT YEAR WAS MYRNA VOSBURGH. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE DONOR CORRESPONDENCE. THE LCI 1956 YEARBOOK CITED ABOVE IS HOUSED IN THE GALT ARCHIVES (20001046000).
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD, TERRY CLOTH
Catalogue Number
P20160045002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date
1956
Materials
FELT, THREAD, TERRY CLOTH
No. Pieces
1
Height
15
Length
14.8
Width
0.6
Description
GREEN FELT AND TERRY CLOTH PATCH WITH YELLOW EMBROIDERY THAT READS "PROV. CHAMPS" ON THE TOP OF THE PATCH. GREEN FELT BASE SUPPORTING A GREEN TERRY CLOTH FABRIC. YELLOW-TRIMMED BANNER WITH GREEN INSIDE ON THE BOTTOM THAT READS "LCI CLIPPERS". YELLOW CIRCLE IN THE CENTRE WITH GREEN INSIDE. FEMALE BASKETBALL PLAYER IN CENTRE MADE FROM WHITE AND BLACK STITCHING. SHE IS THROWING A BASKETBALL TOWARDS A NET ABOVE THE CIRCLE. A DIAGONAL "1956" IS IN YELLOW CHARACTERS TO THE PLAYER'S RIGHT. BACK SHOWS BACKSIDE OF STITCHING (ROUGH). VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SNAGGING ON FRONT; LOOSE THREADS ON BACK.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EARLY 2016, LLOYD YAMAGISHI DONATED TWO LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE (L. C. I.) CLIPPERS BADGES TO THE GALT MUSEUM. IN CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MUSEUM, YAMAGISHI STATED, “I CAME ACROSS THE BADGES A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO WHEN WE MOVED MY NOW DECEASED MOTHER FROM HER HOME TO MARTHA’S HOUSE. I DIDN’T TOSS AWAY THE BADGES THINKING THEY BELONGED TO MY OLDER SISTER, SINCE SHE WAS THE ONLY SIBLING THAT ATTENDED LCI… THE BADGES WERE NOT HERS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO THE BADGES BELONGED TO. THEY READ, “LCI CLIPPERS 55 56” AND “PROV. CHAMPS 1956”. IT IS KNOWN THAT THE CLIPPERS WAS THE GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM FOR LCI. THE 1956 LCI YEARBOOK TITLED “SPOTLITE” READS, “ON APRIL 10TH, THE CLIPPER QUEENS, COACHED BY MARGE CLARK, ENDED A TREMENDOUS BASKETBALL SEASON BY WINNING THE PROVINCIAL “A” GIRLS BASKETBALL CROWN. THE QUEENS RECORDED A LONG STRING OF PLAYOFF VICTORIES. THEY KNOCKED OVER THEIR FIRST VICTIMS, NOBLEFORD, TO GAIN THE LETHBRIDGE NORTHERN BASKETBALL LEAGUE TROPHY AND THE RIGHT TO ENTER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA PLAYOFFS. THEN THE QUEENS SWAMPED VULCAN, WARNER AND TABER IN RAPID ORDER, RACKING UP SOME OF THE MOST ONE-SIDED SCORES EVER SEEN IN THE SOUTH. THE CENTRAL ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, LACOMBE, WAS THE NEXT VICTIM TO FALL BEFORE THE QUEENS’ STEADY ATTACK, AS THE NORTHERNERS BOWED OUT IN TWO STRAIGHT GAMES. THE CLIPPER QUEENS THEN RETURNED HOME TO DEFEAT THE CAMROSE COMETS 83-24 AND 75-30 IN A TWO-OUT-OF-THREE SERIES. THIS FEAT CROWNED THEM PROVINCIAL CHAMPS OF 1955-56.” THE YEARBOOK LISTS THE PLAYERS OF THAT YEAR’S TEAM AS FOLLOWS: CAROLE PONECH (CAPTAIN), BEV COWARD (FORWARD, BETTY BEIMLER (FORWARD), BERNICE COWARD (GUARD), MAY LEISHMAN (GUARD), MARIANNE SNOWDON (FORWARD), CAROL LARSON (GUARD), SHIRON ERICKSON (CENTRE), JOYCE GOLIA (GUARD), AND DONALDA POZZI (FORWARD). THE BOOKS STATES THE COACH, MISS MARGE CLARK, WAS IN HER SECOND YEAR AS “THE QUEENS’ MENTOR.” THE TEAM MANAGER THAT YEAR WAS MYRNA VOSBURGH. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE DONOR CORRESPONDENCE. THE LCI 1956 YEARBOOK CITED ABOVE IS HOUSED IN THE GALT ARCHIVES (20001046000).
Catalogue Number
P20160045002
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.4
Length
3.5
Width
4.6
Description
GLASS BOTTLE CONTAINING AMBER OIL, WITH CRACKED AND TORN CORK IN TOP OPENING. BOTTLE HAS ROUND NECK, DOMED TOP AND SQUARE BODY; BOTTLE HAS BLUE AND WHITE LABEL ON FRONT. FRONT LABEL BLUE BACKGROUND WITH WHITE CROWN ABOVE WHITE SHIELD WITH RED AND BLUE TEXT; LABEL IS TORN ACROSS SHIELD MAKING RED TEXT INDECIPHERABLE, BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “PURE VANILLA”; SHIELD HAS WHITE DOTS AROUND BASE AND WHITE TEXT BELOW “FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CAMPBELL BROS & WILSON LIMITED, WINNIPEG – CANADA, EST. 1882”. BACK OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “2 FL. OZ”. BASE OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “1, 4818, FDJ” WITH “D” IN A DIAMOND. CORK IS TORN OFF AT THE TOP OF THE BOTTLE NECK; LABEL IS WORN AND DISCOLORED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE GUN OIL, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
4.9
Length
7
Description
A: BRASS SECOND WORLD WAR ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE. BADGE DEPICTS THE ARTILLERY’S CREST WITH A FIELD GUN IN THE CENTER. UNDERNEATH A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE IS THE WORD “UBIQUE” EMBOSSED IN BANNER IN BRASS. BELOW THE FIELD GUN IS A BANNER THAT READS “QUO PAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BACKSIDE HAS TWO PARALLEL RINGS HORIZONTALLY IN THE BOTTOM HALF FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS CAP BADGE PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING AT ONE END WITH A LOOP AND THEN EXTENDING OUTWARD. OUTER ENDS ARE BENT AWAY FROM EACH OTHER TO FORM A WIDER V. PIN DIMENSIONS: 6.1 X 1.7 CM CONDITION: FINISH HAS DARKENED WITH MINOR WEAR TO SURFACE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE [THE DONOR] WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE RECORD, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
5.5
Length
4.8
Description
A: BRONZE SECOND WORLD WAR CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE. WREATH OF THISTLE IN BRONZE WITH ST. ANDREW’S CROSS (AN "X") MAKES UP OVERALL SHAPE OF BADGE. ON THE CENTRE OF THE CROSS, THERE IS A BEAVER ON A LOG ENCIRCLED BY A WREATH OF MAPLE LEAVES. BEAVER AND LOG ARE IN A DARKER METAL THAN REST OF BRONZE DESIGN. ON THE WREATH, BELOW THE BEAVER, IS A SCROLL OF THISTLES AND BELOW THAT IS A WHITE METAL SCROLL INSCRIBED WITH “CALGARY HIGHLANDERS”. THE CROWN IN AT THE TOP CENTER OF THE BADGE. BACK SIDE HAS A LOOP ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE, PARALLEL FROM EACH OTHER, FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS-COLOURED PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING ON ONE END IN A LOOP AND COMING OUT FROM THAT, AWAY FROM EACH OTHER, LIKE A “V”. PIN DIMENSIONS: 5.2 X 1.1 CM. CONDITION: SLIGHT TARNISHING OF METAL OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S UNCLE. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” "MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Length
12.7
Width
3.2
Diameter
3
Description
A. CIRCULAR, SILVER MEDAL. THE BRITISH ISSUE MEDALS WERE MADE OF CUPRO-NICKEL. A PLAIN, STRAIGHT NON-SWIVELING SUSPENDER WITH A SINGLE-TOED CLAW. THE OBVERSE OF THE MEDAL SHOWS THE CROWNED COINAGE EFFIGY OF KING GEORGE VI, FACING LEFT, AND THE LEGEND GEORGIVS VI D : BR : OMN : REX ET INDIAE IMP : THE REVERSE SHOWS A LION STANDING ON THE BODY OF A DOUBLE-HEADED DRAGON. THE DRAGON’S HEADS ARE THOSE OF AN EAGLE AND A DRAGON TO SIGNIFY THE PRINCIPAL OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL ENEMIES. AT THE TOP, RIGHT OF CENTRE ARE THE DATES 1939/1945 IN TWO LINES. B. ATTACHED RIBBON IS 3.2 CM WIDE WITH GREEN, BLACK, ORANGE BANDS OF COLOUR. CONDITION: RIBBON SLIGHTLY DIRTY AND ENDS HAVE FRAYED; DIRT AND SEVERE TARNISH OF THE METAL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS UNCLEAR IF THE COMPOSITE MEDAL AND RIBBON BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER OR UNCLE. THE MISMATCHED RIBBON AND MEDAL ARE CATALOGUED AS RECEIVED FROM THE DONOR. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF THE YOUNGER VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JACKET, SHIRT AND SKIRT
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180008001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JACKET, SHIRT AND SKIRT
Date
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
3
Length
60
Width
41.5
Description
A. CREAM WOMAN’S SUIT JACKET, 60 CM LONG X 41.5 CM WIDE. JACKET LINED WITH CREAM COTTON FABRIC; JACKET HAS THREE CREAM CLOTH-COVERED BUTTONS DOWN LEFT-WEARING SIDE AND THREE CREAM CLOTH-COVERED BUTTONS DOWN RIGHT-WEARING SIDE, WITH TWO STRAPS WITH SINGLE BUTTON HOLES EXTENDING FROM LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES AT WAIST. JACKET HAS STAIN BELOW BUTTON HOLE ON RIGHT-WEARING WAIST STRAP; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. B. SHIRT, 46.8 CM LONG X 39 CM WIDE. CREAM COTTON-BLEND SHIRT WITH SILVER ZIPPER RUNNING DOWN BACK; ZIPPER HAS CLOTH COVERING. SHIRT IS SLEEVELESS WITH MACHINE STITCHING ALONG HEM, NECK AND ARM HOLES. SHIRT HAS FOLDED STITCHING UP SIDES AND DIAGONALLY FROM HEM TO CENTER OF CHEST. SHIRT HAS STAINING ON FRONT AND UNDER SLEEVE HOLES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SKIRT, 58 CM LONG X 38 CM WIDE. CREAM COTTON-BLEND FABRIC WITH SILVER ZIPPER RUNNING DOWN SIDE AND TWO SILVER HOOKS INSIDE WAIST WITH TWO SILVER LOOPS ON TAB AT WAIST. SKIRT WIDENS AT HEM; SKIRT HAS CREAM INNER LINING. SEAMS ARE MACHINE STITCHED. PINK STAIN ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; CREASES DOWN FRONT AND BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON APRIL 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARB CLARKE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A WEDDING DRESS AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE. THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE WERE WORN BY CLARKE FOR HER WEDDING IN 1965. ON HER WEDDING AND HER SELECTION OF THE GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE, CLARKE RECALLED, “IT’S BEEN WORN A FEW TIMES…THE WEDDING WAS AUGUST 21, 1965. IT HAPPENED HERE IN SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH, AND REVEREND JOHN O’NEAL WAS THE MINISTER.” “MY SISTER-IN-LAW [JOAN HUGHSON] AND I HAD GONE TO UNIVERSITY TOGETHER. HER BABY WAS BORN IN JULY, AND DAVE [CLARKE] AND I WERE GETTING MARRIED IN AUGUST. SHE WAS AN EXTREMELY GOOD SEAMSTRESS, SO SHE MADE MY GOING-AWAY OUTFIT FOR ME. I BOUGHT A VOGUE PATTERN, FOUND THE FABRIC, AND SHE MADE THE DRESS, OR THE GOING-AWAY OUTFIT.” ON HER WEDDING, CLARKE ELABORATED, “[I MARRIED] DAVE CLARKE. HE GREW UP AT CASTOR, ALBERTA, WHICH IS 200 MILES NORTH OF TABER, ON HIGHWAY 36. WE MET WHEN WE WERE BOTH TEACHERS. WE MET AT CARSTAIRS. HE WAS TEACHING, AND I STARTED AN INTERNSHIP PROGRAM THERE. WE MET IN THE SPRING, AND THEN I GOT A JOB THERE THAT FALL. WE DATED THROUGHOUT THAT YEAR, AND GOT MARRIED THE FOLLOWING YEAR.” “I GREW UP EAST OF MILK RIVER, IN THE COMMUNITY OF MASINASIN BY WRITING-ON-STONE PARK. I HAD COMPLETED MY HIGH SCHOOL IN MILK RIVER, AND THEN I WENT OFF TO CALGARY TO UNIVERSITY. TWO YEARS OF UNIVERSITY…WAS ALL THAT WAS REQUIRED AT THAT TIME. THERE WAS A TEACHER SHORTAGE, SO YOU COULD GET A JOB AFTER TWO YEARS, WITHOUT YOUR DEGREE, AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. THEN I MET DAVE. WE DECIDED TO GET MARRIED. DAVE WAS HELPING OUT HIS PARENTS AT THEIR FARM IN CASTOR BECAUSE THEY WERE MOVING A HOUSE DURING THAT SUMMER, AND HE WAS HELPING GET THAT HOUSE MOVED FOR HIS PARENTS. I WAS PICKING UP SOME COURSES AT EDMONTON UNIVERSITY. IT JUST HAPPENED THAT I HAD NOT FELT THAT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO HAVE A WEDDING. I JUST THOUGHT WE WOULD JUST GET MARRIED, AND HAVE FAMILY MEMBERS THERE, AND THAT WOULD BE IT. OF COURSE, MY MOM AND DAD SAID, 'NO, WE’RE GOING TO HAVE A WEDDING.' SO, I SAID, 'WELL, I’M GOING.' AFTER MY YEAR OF SCHOOL TEACHING IN CARSTAIRS THAT FINISHED THE END OF JUNE, I WAS DUE IN EDMONTON FOR MY SUMMER SCHOOL CLASSES. SO, I SAID TO MOM AND DAD, 'I GUESS IF YOU WANT A WEDDING, WE’LL TALK BY PHONE, BUT YOU’LL HAVE TO MAKE ALL THE ARRANGEMENTS, AND THE PLANS FOR IT.' SO, THEY DID. WE HAD THE WEDDING.” “[THE WEDDING] WAS ALL THE SAME DAY. THE WEDDING WAS AT ONE O’CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON [AT SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. THEN THE RECEPTION WAS A BIT EARLIER [AT EL RANCHO, WHICH IS NOW THE COAST HOTEL]. THEN WE DROVE DOWN TO THE FARM, AND WE HAD A BIT OF AN ‘OPEN HOUSE’ THERE. THE DANCE WAS AT NINE O’CLOCK [AT THE MASINASIN SCHOOL]. I WAS IN THE [WEDDING] DRESS UNTIL TOWARDS THE END OF THE WEDDING DANCE BECAUSE AT THE WEDDING DANCE YOU HAD TO HAVE YOUR FIRST DANCE WITH YOUR DAD. THEN I WENT BACK TO THE FARM, WHICH WAS ONLY THREE MILES AWAY, AND CHANGED INTO THE GOING AWAY OUTFIT. WE CAME BACK TO THE DANCE, AND SAID GOODBYE TO EVERYBODY THERE, AND THEN WE LEFT FROM THERE.” “IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN A COMMUNITY EVENT. I WAS THE YOUNGEST IN MY FAMILY, AND THE ONLY GIRL. MOM AND DAD HAD BEEN VERY ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY, AND CERTAINLY HOSTING A WEDDING FOR YOUR DAUGHTER WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO THEM. I GREW UP THINKING, 'HUH, IT DOESN’T MATTER TO ME IF I HAVE A WEDDING OR NOT.' BUT IT CERTAINLY WAS TO THEM, AND TO THE EXTENDED FAMILY IT WAS IMPORTANT. I WAS AMAZED – EVEN WHEN I LOOK THROUGH MY WEDDING BOOK NOW – ALL OF THE AUNTS AND UNCLES THAT CAME. SOME CAME FROM THE UNITED STATES, AND DAVE’S UNCLE, WHO WAS MASTER OF CEREMONIES AT THE RECEPTION, WAS THERE FROM EDMONTON. I WAS AMAZED THAT PEOPLE WOULD COME. I DIDN’T THINK THAT I WAS THAT IMPORTANT THAT ANYBODY WOULD COME, BUT IT TURNED OUT TO BE A VERY, VERY NICE OCCASION, EVERYBODY HAD A VERY GOOD TIME. IT WAS CERTAINLY THE INTRODUCTION OF THE TWO FAMILIES TOGETHER. I RECOGNIZED AFTER-–SOME YEARS LATER-–THAT WEDDINGS ARE HAPPY OCCASIONS, AND THAT IF EXTENDED FAMILIES DON’T GET TOGETHER FOR HAPPY OCCASIONS, THEY OFTEN GET TOGETHER JUST FOR FUNERALS AND MORE SAD OCCASIONS. I CERTAINLY UNDERSTAND NOW HOW IMPORTANT IT WAS TO MY PARENTS, AND THAT IT WAS A GOOD OCCASION FOR THE WHOLE EXTENDED FAMILY.” “THE WAY THE SUMMER PROGRESSED, DAVE WAS VERY BUSY WITH HIS PARENTS…AND I WAS BUSY AT SUMMER SCHOOL. IF YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT SUMMER SCHOOL, YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE CRAMMING, AND TAKING CLASSES, AND YOU’RE DOING EXAMS. EVERYTHING IS FAST BECAUSE YOU ARE TRYING TO GET IT ALL DONE IN 6 WEEKS, AND YOU’RE TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE GETTING A FULL CREDIT FOR YOUR COURSE. MY FINAL EXAM WAS ON A TUESDAY, AND I PACKED UP MY THINGS, AND WENT TO CASTOR ON THE WEDNESDAY. [I] PICKED UP DAVE, AND WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON THE THURSDAY. WE MET WITH THE MINISTER ON THE THURSDAY, AND HE SAID THAT HE WAS BEGINNING TO WONDER IF THERE WAS A BRIDE AND GROOM BECAUSE HE HADN’T MET US…WE HAD THE REHEARSAL ON FRIDAY; THE WEDDING ON SATURDAY. FOR OUR HONEYMOON, WE WENT DOWN TO SANDPOINT AND COEUR D’ ALENE ON A LITTLE TRIP DOWN THERE. ONE WEEK LATER WE WERE IN A SMALL TOWN, NEIGHBOURING TO CASTOR, WHERE WE HAD TEACHING JOBS BECAUSE THE SCHOOL YEAR WAS TO START. WE HAD NO TIME TO SET UP A LITTLE TEACHERAGE. THE SCHOOL BOARD THERE RENTED US A HOUSE…THAT WAS HOW WE STARTED. IT WASN’T A VERY GRAND BEGINNING.” “[LETHBRIDGE WAS THE MID-POINT] TO ACCOMMODATE THE FAMILIES. MOM HAD MADE THE ARRANGEMENTS, SO I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN SOMETHING TO DO WITH WHETHER OR NOT THEY COULD HAVE THE RECEPTION CLOSE [TO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. BECAUSE I WENT TO SUNDAY SCHOOL AND BELONGED TO THE CHURCH IN MILK RIVER – SO DID MY PARENTS –WE WERE AFFILIATED WITH THE UNITED CHURCH. SOUTHMINSTER WAS DEFINITELY NOT OUR HOME CHURCH AT THAT TIME.” CLARKE SPOKE TO HER MOTIVES FOR KEEPING AND DONATING THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE, STATING, “IT’S ALWAYS [BEEN] EASY TO KEEP IT. I DON’T THINK I’M A HOARDER, BUT I DO LOVE SENTIMENTAL THINGS, AND I HAVE MY MOTHER’S WEDDING DRESS AND GOING-AWAY OUTFIT. THEY ARE VALUABLE PIECES. THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT, I HAD IT OUT AT OUR 25TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY. I COULDN’T WEAR IT MYSELF BECAUSE MY ARMS CHANGED, BUT MY NIECE WORE IT, AND WE HAD A BIG PARTY-–FAMILY PARTY–-FOR OUR 25TH. THEN A FEW YEARS AGO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH HAD A 100TH ANNIVERSARY, SO WE WERE ALL INVITED TO TAKE WHATEVER WE WANTED FROM OUR OWN HISTORY, AND SO [MY WEDDING] DRESS WAS WORN AT THAT OCCASION AS WELL.” “I’VE HUNG ONTO THESE MATERIALS FOR 52 YEARS, AND NOW I’M DOWNSIZING MY HOME SO THAT I CAN LIVE IN A CONDO. MY HUSBAND DIED LAST YEAR, AND, AS I’M DOWNSIZING, I LOOK THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE HAVE ACQUIRED AND PACKED AROUND WITH US FOR ALL OF OUR MARRIED YEARS. I DECIDED THAT THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT WERE NOT GOING ANYWHERE AS LONG AS IT WAS IN MY STUFF, AND THAT PERHAPS THERE WAS SOME VALUE IN IT HAVING IT AS PROPERTY OF THE MUSEUM.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180008001
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DRESS, WEDDING
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180008002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DRESS, WEDDING
Date
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
134
Width
43
Description
A. WHITE WEDDING DRESS, 134 CM LONG X 43 CM WIDE. DRESS HAS CREAM LACE OVERLAID DOWN FRONT AND AROUND SHOULDERS; FRONT HAS WHITE BOW AT WAIST. SLEEVES ARE POINTED AT CUFFS WITH THREE WHITE CLOTH-COVERED BUTTONS ALONG CUFFS. BACK OF DRESS HAS WHITE METAL ZIPPER RUNNING FROM NECK TO WAIST, AND SILVER FASTENING HOOKS AND LOOPS AT COLLAR AND WAIST. BACK HAS FOUR WHITE SNAP-BUTTONS UNDER LACE AT SHOULDERS FOR FASTENING TRAIN; COLLAR HAS SILVER SNAP BUTTON FOR CLOSING LACE OVERLAY. BACK HEM HAS SLIT UP CENTER. DRESS HAS STAINING AND RIP ON FRONT LEFT SLEEVE; RIGHT SLEEVE HAS STAINING ON BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. B. TRAIN FOR WEDDING DRESS, 210.4 CM WIDE X 174 CM LONG, DETACHABLE. TRAIN HAS FIVE METAL SNAP BUTTONS AT NECK PAINTED WHITE AT BASES; TRAIN HAS A TRIANGULAR SLIT CUT OUT OF BACK AT LOWER EDGE; CUT-OUT IS OVERLAID WITH CREAM LACE, WITH IVORY BOW AT THE PEAK OF THE CUT-OUT. MACHINE-STITCHED AT EDGES; CREASED; STAINED ALONG INSIDE LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON APRIL 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARB CLARKE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE. THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE WERE WORN BY CLARKE FOR HER WEDDING IN 1965. ON HER WEDDING AND HER SELECTION OF THE WEDDING GOWN, CLARKE RECALLED, “I WENT SHOPPING FOR A WEDDING DRESS, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST DRESS I TRIED ON. IT COST ME $75.00. I JUST BOUGHT IT, AND SAID, 'OK, IT FITS. I GUESS WE’LL PUT IT AWAY, AND HANG IT UP IN THE CLOSET, AND IT’LL BE READY WHEN WE GET [IT].' AFTER SUMMER SCHOOL–-I GUESS I HAD WORKED HARD–-BUT I HAD LOST SOME WEIGHT. WHEN I STOOD IN THE DRESS THE HEM HUNG ON THE FLOOR, SO FOR THE PICTURES I HAD TO STAND UP ON MY TIPTOES, SO THAT THE DRESS WAS NOT CRUMPLING IN FRONT OF ME.” “[I BOUGHT IT FROM] ONE OF THE DRESS SHOPS ON FOURTH AVE. THERE’S A NUMBER OF DRESS SHOPS ALONG THAT STREET. IT WAS NOT A BIG SHOP; IT WAS NOT A BIG ‘WEDDING DRESS’ SHOP LIKE THEY HAVE NOW. IT WAS JUST A SHOP THAT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD SOME WEDDING DRESSES IN ONE SECTION.” “[IT] WAS NOT A BIG POUFY DRESS. I JUST WANTED SOMETHING VERY SIMPLE, BUT SOMETHING VERY STRAIGHT AND EASY TO WEAR. I ALWAYS LIKED THE ‘HEAVY LACE’ KINDS OF THINGS. WHEN I FOUND THIS, AND IT WAS 75 DOLLARS, [IT] SEEMED LIKE A LOT OF MONEY, BUT I WAS TEACHING. I HAD ALSO BORROWED SOME MONEY FROM MY DAD TO BUY A CAR, AND I WASN’T MAKING MUCH MONEY. WHEN I WAS STARTING TEACHING, MY COUSIN WHO WAS WORKING IN A BANK MADE MORE MONEY THAN I DID, BUT I HAD TO PAY OFF THE LOAN TO MY DAD FOR THE CAR. BUT I WAS ABLE TO SQUEEZE OUT ENOUGH MONEY TO BUY THIS DRESS.” “THIS WAS SOMEWHAT OF A DEPARTURE BECAUSE IT WAS JUST A STRAIGHT SHEATHE DRESS. MANY OF THEM WERE—I DON’T WANT TO SAY MORE STRAPLESS, BUT THEY HAD MORE ‘BEADING’, MORE ‘NETTING’, MORE POUFY WITH CRINOLINES, AND WIDER DRESSES. I JUST WAS TRYING TO GO AS SIMPLE AS I COULD. THIS ONE HAD THIS NICE LITTLE TRAIN ON IT, SO THAT MADE IT A LITTLE BIT MORE DRESSY AND ELEGANT. IT WAS NOT OVER-THE-TOP WITH POUFINESS. I WAS BRIDESMAID A FEW TIMES-–SO I THOUGHT I WAS NEVER GOING TO BE A BRIDE. MOST OF THE OTHER GIRLS HAD WIDER DRESSES. THIS ONE HAS THE LONG SLEEVES WITH THE LITTLE POINTY THING ON YOUR WRIST AND HAND, AND NOT MANY OF THEM WERE LIKE THAT. MOST OF THEM WERE SHORTER SLEEVES. I’M NOT SURE THAT THIS ONE WOULD BE TOTALLY REPRESENTATIONAL [OF THE FASHION OF THE TIME], BUT IT ALWAYS ACQUIRED MANY COMPLIMENTS AS BEING A VERY NICE DRESS.” ON HER WEDDING, CLARKE ELABORATED, “[I MARRIED] DAVE CLARKE. HE GREW UP AT CASTOR, ALBERTA, WHICH IS 200 MILES NORTH OF TABER, ON HIGHWAY 36. WE MET WHEN WE WERE BOTH TEACHERS. WE MET AT CARSTAIRS. HE WAS TEACHING, AND I STARTED AN INTERNSHIP PROGRAM THERE. WE MET IN THE SPRING, AND THEN I GOT A JOB THERE THAT FALL. WE DATED THROUGHOUT THAT YEAR, AND GOT MARRIED THE FOLLOWING YEAR.” “I GREW UP EAST OF MILK RIVER, IN THE COMMUNITY OF MASINASIN BY WRITING-ON-STONE PARK. I HAD COMPLETED MY HIGH SCHOOL IN MILK RIVER, AND THEN I WENT OFF TO CALGARY TO UNIVERSITY. TWO YEARS OF UNIVERSITY…WAS ALL THAT WAS REQUIRED AT THAT TIME. THERE WAS A TEACHER SHORTAGE, SO YOU COULD GET A JOB AFTER TWO YEARS, WITHOUT YOUR DEGREE, AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. THEN I MET DAVE. WE DECIDED TO GET MARRIED. DAVE WAS HELPING OUT HIS PARENTS AT THEIR FARM IN CASTOR BECAUSE THEY WERE MOVING A HOUSE DURING THAT SUMMER, AND HE WAS HELPING GET THAT HOUSE MOVED FOR HIS PARENTS. I WAS PICKING UP SOME COURSES AT EDMONTON UNIVERSITY. IT JUST HAPPENED THAT I HAD NOT FELT THAT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO HAVE A WEDDING. I JUST THOUGHT WE WOULD JUST GET MARRIED, AND HAVE FAMILY MEMBERS THERE, AND THAT WOULD BE IT. OF COURSE, MY MOM AND DAD SAID, 'NO, WE’RE GOING TO HAVE A WEDDING.' SO, I SAID, 'WELL, I’M GOING.' AFTER MY YEAR OF SCHOOL TEACHING IN CARSTAIRS THAT FINISHED THE END OF JUNE, I WAS DUE IN EDMONTON FOR MY SUMMER SCHOOL CLASSES. SO, I SAID TO MOM AND DAD, 'I GUESS IF YOU WANT A WEDDING, WE’LL TALK BY PHONE, BUT YOU’LL HAVE TO MAKE ALL THE ARRANGEMENTS, AND THE PLANS FOR IT.' SO, THEY DID. WE HAD THE WEDDING.” “[THE WEDDING] WAS ALL THE SAME DAY. THE WEDDING WAS AT ONE O’CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON [AT SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. THEN THE RECEPTION WAS A BIT EARLIER [AT EL RANCHO, WHICH IS NOW THE COAST HOTEL]. THEN WE DROVE DOWN TO THE FARM, AND WE HAD A BIT OF AN ‘OPEN HOUSE’ THERE. THE DANCE WAS AT NINE O’CLOCK [AT THE MASINASIN SCHOOL]. I WAS IN THE [WEDDING] DRESS UNTIL TOWARDS THE END OF THE WEDDING DANCE BECAUSE AT THE WEDDING DANCE YOU HAD TO HAVE YOUR FIRST DANCE WITH YOUR DAD. THEN I WENT BACK TO THE FARM, WHICH WAS ONLY THREE MILES AWAY, AND CHANGED INTO THE GOING AWAY OUTFIT. WE CAME BACK TO THE DANCE, AND SAID GOODBYE TO EVERYBODY THERE, AND THEN WE LEFT FROM THERE.” “IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN A COMMUNITY EVENT. I WAS THE YOUNGEST IN MY FAMILY, AND THE ONLY GIRL. MOM AND DAD HAD BEEN VERY ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY, AND CERTAINLY HOSTING A WEDDING FOR YOUR DAUGHTER WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO THEM. I GREW UP THINKING, 'HUH, IT DOESN’T MATTER TO ME IF I HAVE A WEDDING OR NOT.' BUT IT CERTAINLY WAS TO THEM, AND TO THE EXTENDED FAMILY IT WAS IMPORTANT. I WAS AMAZED – EVEN WHEN I LOOK THROUGH MY WEDDING BOOK NOW – ALL OF THE AUNTS AND UNCLES THAT CAME. SOME CAME FROM THE UNITED STATES, AND DAVE’S UNCLE, WHO WAS MASTER OF CEREMONIES AT THE RECEPTION, WAS THERE FROM EDMONTON. I WAS AMAZED THAT PEOPLE WOULD COME. I DIDN’T THINK THAT I WAS THAT IMPORTANT THAT ANYBODY WOULD COME, BUT IT TURNED OUT TO BE A VERY, VERY NICE OCCASION, EVERYBODY HAD A VERY GOOD TIME. IT WAS CERTAINLY THE INTRODUCTION OF THE TWO FAMILIES TOGETHER. I RECOGNIZED AFTER-–SOME YEARS LATER-–THAT WEDDINGS ARE HAPPY OCCASIONS, AND THAT IF EXTENDED FAMILIES DON’T GET TOGETHER FOR HAPPY OCCASIONS, THEY OFTEN GET TOGETHER JUST FOR FUNERALS AND MORE SAD OCCASIONS. I CERTAINLY UNDERSTAND NOW HOW IMPORTANT IT WAS TO MY PARENTS, AND THAT IT WAS A GOOD OCCASION FOR THE WHOLE EXTENDED FAMILY.” “THE WAY THE SUMMER PROGRESSED, DAVE WAS VERY BUSY WITH HIS PARENTS…AND I WAS BUSY AT SUMMER SCHOOL. IF YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT SUMMER SCHOOL, YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE CRAMMING, AND TAKING CLASSES, AND YOU’RE DOING EXAMS. EVERYTHING IS FAST BECAUSE YOU ARE TRYING TO GET IT ALL DONE IN 6 WEEKS, AND YOU’RE TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE GETTING A FULL CREDIT FOR YOUR COURSE. MY FINAL EXAM WAS ON A TUESDAY, AND I PACKED UP MY THINGS, AND WENT TO CASTOR ON THE WEDNESDAY. [I] PICKED UP DAVE, AND WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON THE THURSDAY. WE MET WITH THE MINISTER ON THE THURSDAY, AND HE SAID THAT HE WAS BEGINNING TO WONDER IF THERE WAS A BRIDE AND GROOM BECAUSE HE HADN’T MET US…WE HAD THE REHEARSAL ON FRIDAY; THE WEDDING ON SATURDAY. FOR OUR HONEYMOON, WE WENT DOWN TO SANDPOINT AND COEUR D’ ALENE ON A LITTLE TRIP DOWN THERE. ONE WEEK LATER WE WERE IN A SMALL TOWN, NEIGHBOURING TO CASTOR, WHERE WE HAD TEACHING JOBS BECAUSE THE SCHOOL YEAR WAS TO START. WE HAD NO TIME TO SET UP A LITTLE TEACHERAGE. THE SCHOOL BOARD THERE RENTED US A HOUSE…THAT WAS HOW WE STARTED. IT WASN’T A VERY GRAND BEGINNING.” “[LETHBRIDGE WAS THE MID-POINT] TO ACCOMMODATE THE FAMILIES. MOM HAD MADE THE ARRANGEMENTS, SO I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN SOMETHING TO DO WITH WHETHER OR NOT THEY COULD HAVE THE RECEPTION CLOSE [TO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH]. BECAUSE I WENT TO SUNDAY SCHOOL AND BELONGED TO THE CHURCH IN MILK RIVER – SO DID MY PARENTS –WE WERE AFFILIATED WITH THE UNITED CHURCH. SOUTHMINSTER WAS DEFINITELY NOT OUR HOME CHURCH AT THAT TIME.” CLARKE SPOKE TO HER MOTIVES FOR KEEPING AND DONATING THE WEDDING GOWN AND GOING-AWAY ENSEMBLE, STATING, “IT’S ALWAYS [BEEN] EASY TO KEEP IT. I DON’T THINK I’M A HOARDER, BUT I DO LOVE SENTIMENTAL THINGS, AND I HAVE MY MOTHER’S WEDDING DRESS AND GOING-AWAY OUTFIT. THEY ARE VALUABLE PIECES. THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT, I HAD IT OUT AT OUR 25TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY. I COULDN’T WEAR IT MYSELF BECAUSE MY ARMS CHANGED, BUT MY NIECE WORE IT, AND WE HAD A BIG PARTY-–FAMILY PARTY–-FOR OUR 25TH. THEN A FEW YEARS AGO SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH HAD A 100TH ANNIVERSARY, SO WE WERE ALL INVITED TO TAKE WHATEVER WE WANTED FROM OUR OWN HISTORY, AND SO [MY WEDDING] DRESS WAS WORN AT THAT OCCASION AS WELL.” “I’VE HUNG ONTO THESE MATERIALS FOR 52 YEARS, AND NOW I’M DOWNSIZING MY HOME SO THAT I CAN LIVE IN A CONDO. MY HUSBAND DIED LAST YEAR, AND, AS I’M DOWNSIZING, I LOOK THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE HAVE ACQUIRED AND PACKED AROUND WITH US FOR ALL OF OUR MARRIED YEARS. I DECIDED THAT THIS DRESS AND THIS OUTFIT WERE NOT GOING ANYWHERE AS LONG AS IT WAS IN MY STUFF, AND THAT PERHAPS THERE WAS SOME VALUE IN IT HAVING IT AS PROPERTY OF THE MUSEUM.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180008002
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COURT WINDY WEST
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20120045008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COURT WINDY WEST
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
10
Description
ROUND PATCH WITH WHITE BACKGROUND AND RED EMBROIDERED EDGING; PATCH HAS RED TEXT ALONG TOP EDGE READING “COURT WINDY WEST 562” AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE “LETHBRIDGE ALTA.” PATCH HAS SCENE EMBROIDERED IN BLACK OF A CLOUD WEARING A FEATHERED CAP BLOWING BEHIND THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE. BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF PATCH HAS THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS SEAL EMBROIDERED IN GOLD, RED AND BLUE THREAD. PATCH IN EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH VERY LITTLE SIGN OF WEAR.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE PATCH, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THIS WAS SOMETHING WE HAD DESIGNED [TO PUT] ON YOUR JACKET. YOU WERE KNOWN AS A FORESTER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045008
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ORATOR COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120045010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ORATOR COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
53.6
Width
17.7
Description
COLLAR MEDAL; RED RIBBON WITH GOLD-FINISHED MEDAL AT THE END. MEDAL IS COMPRISED ON TOP GOLD BAR WITH INDIGO BACKGROUND AND GOLD TEXT “ORATOR” AND GOLD, RED, INDIGO AND WHITE CROSS OF INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS ATTACHED TO BAR WITH TWO METAL CHAINS. CROSS SHOWS, CLOCKWISE: AT TOP A WHITE BACKGROUND WITH AN OPEN GOLD EYE, A RED BACKGROUND WITH A GOLD FEMININE SILHOUETTE ON PEDESTAL, AT BOTTOM A WHITE BACKGROUND WITH GOLD TEXT “L.B.C.”, A RED BACKGROUND WITH GOLD FEMININE SILHOUETTE HOLDING SKIRT HEM ON PEDESTAL, AND IN CENTER ON INDIGO BACKGROUND GOLD TEXT “IOF”. RED RIBBON COLLAR HAS STITCHED SEAMS ACROSS TOP RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES, AND AT BOTTOM ABOVE MEDAL TO CENTER OF COLLAR LOOP. RIBBON IS CREASED ON BACK. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE MEDAL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THE MEDALS INDICATED] THAT WAS YOUR STATUS. THIS ONE WAS A TRUSTEE. A TRUSTEE WAS…A BOARD OF DIRECTORS; IT WAS ONE OF THE DIRECTORS.” “WHEN THEY SET UP THEIR ROOM, FOR THE RITUAL, THEY HAD LITTLE TABLES AND [A] COVER FOR THAT LITTLE TABLE…THIS WAS THE ORATOR…THERE WOULD BE FOUR TABLES.” “THERE’S THE PAST CHIEF RANGER [PAST PRESIDENT]. VICE CHIEF RANGER…THEY USED THEM AS DEEMED DEPENDENT ON WHO WAS DOING WHAT…THE ORATOR…[WOULD BE SIMILAR TO] THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE…THAT’S THE BEST WAY FOR ME TO DESCRIBE IT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045010
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20120045014
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.6
Width
5.5
Description
GREEN PAPER MEMBER CARD FOR THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CARD HAS PRINTED SEAL OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS AND TEXT “INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS, COURT WINDY WEST NO. 562, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA.” BELOW SEAL IS GREEN PRINTED TEXT “THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT RUTH HUFF [NAME TYPED IN BLACK] IS A MEMBER OF THE I.O.F. AND WHILE IN GOOD STANDING IS ENTITLED TO ALL RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES AND BENEFITS PROVIDED BY THIS MEMBERSHIP.” CARD HAS LINES FOR “MEMBER’S SIGNATURE” AND “CHIEF RANGER” SIGNATURES’ BOTH ARE SIGNED IN BLUE INK. BACK OF CARD HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “POLICY NO. 1164932, 11/30, 1953”. BACK RIGHT AND FRONT LEFT EDGES HAS BLACK SOILING ALONG EDGES; BACK HAS PINK STAIN LEFT OF CENTER, AND BLACK STAINING ALONG LEFT EDGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE MEMBER CARD, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THIS IS A] MEMBERSHIP CERTIFICATE. RUTH’S IS ONE.” “THE FORESTERS HAD DEVELOPED A VERY STRONG BACKGROUND OF LIFE INSURANCE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE MOTIVATIONS FOR ME TAKING IT OUT. IT WAS A WAY OF – I DIDN’T HAVE TO BUY FROM SUN LIFE. THERE WERE SOME EXTRA PERKS THAT CAME WITH THIS THAT DIDN’T COME WITH SUN LIFE AND THAT STILL EXISTS.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045014
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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