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Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Date
1986
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.5
Diameter
5.7
Description
BROWN GLASS BEER BOTTLE WITH A LIP FOR A TWIST-OFF CAP (NO CAP). "85" IS IN RAISED LETTERS OF GLASS AT THE BASE OF THE BOTTLE. THERE IS A SEAM VISIBLE DOWN THE CENTER HALVES OF THE BOTTLE WHERE IT HAS BEEN FUSED TOGETHER. CREAM-COLOURED RECTANGULAR LABEL WITH GOLD TRIM PASTED TO ONE SIDE OF THE BOTTLE. LABEL READS "a7" WITHIN A RED DIAGONAL STRIPE RUNNING UP THE WIDTH OF THE LABEL WITH "BEER" PRINTED BELOW. THE BOTTOM OF THE LABEL READS: "BREWED AND BOTTLED IN CARLING O'KEEFE BREWERIES CALGARY, ALBERTA" IN ALTERNATING BLACK AND RED FONT. THERE IS A STAMP THAT STATES "100 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 1886-1986" IN THE UPPER LEFT SECTION OF THE LABEL. CONDITION: SLIGHT WRINKLE VERTICALLY DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE LABEL. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE GLASS OF BOTTLE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
INDUSTRY
History
A NOTE ABOUT THIS BOTTLE WAS WRITTEN BY THE DONOR, FRANK LIGHTBOUND, AND PROVIDED TO THE MUSEUM AT THE TIME OF DONATION STATES: “THE SPECIAL LABEL ON THIS BOTTLE IS ONE OF A FEW HUNDRED PRINTED TO HELP CELEBRATE THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY (1886-1986) OF THE A7 RANCHE (OLD SPELLING), THE SOUTHERN PORTION OF WHICH BORDERS THE OLDMAN RIVER NORTH OF LUNDBRECK IN THE MAYCROFT AREA. THE RANCH WAS ESTABLISHED BY A. E. CROSS OF BIG 4 STAMPEDE FAME AND THE FORMER CALGARY BREWING/MALTING CO. (HORSESHOE AND BUFFALO LABEL). THE RANCH IS STILL OWNED BY THE CROSS FAMILY. THE BEER WAS SERVED DURING THE CELEBRATION BAR-B-Q AND THIS BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO ME BY VAL DENNIS, SOUTH RANCH FOREMAN AT THE TIME.” ON 22 MARCH 2017, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LIGHTBOUND ABOUT HIS DONATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE BOTTLE FROM A7 RANCHE BREWERY. THIS BOTTLE COMMEMORATES THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE A7 RANCHE. OF THAT, LIGHTBOUND STATES, “WELL, I MUST HAVE ACQUIRED IT SOON AFTER THAT THEN – IN 1986. IT WASN’T GIVEN TO ME DIRECTLY. I KNEW THE FOREMAN OF THE SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE A7 RANCHE [VAL DENNIS], AND HE HAD SEVERAL OF THEM, AND HE GAVE ME ONE...THE DENNIS FAMILY HAVE A RANCH ON THE OLD MAN RIVER JUST OUTSIDE THE FOREST RESERVE, WHICH IS ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE A7 RANCHE.” THE BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO LIGHTBOUND EMPTY. WHEN ASKED WHY HE WAS COMPELLED TO SAVE IT, LIGHTBOUND REPLIED, “WELL, [IT REPRESENTS] AN INTERESTING PART OF THE COUNTRY. I WAS AT THE GAP RANGER STATION FOR FIVE YEARS AND THE DENNIS FAMILY HAD THE FIRST RANCH EAST OF THE FOREST RESERVE, ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROAD, BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE RIVER. I GOT TO KNOW THE FAMILY BACK AROUND 1965 AND THIS WAS [FROM] 1985. I STILL VISIT WITH THEM AND I HELPED THEM WITH THEIR RANCHING OPERATION...I SAW ALL THE FAMILY GROW UP, ALL THE KIDS GROW UP. VAL WAS ONE. WHEN I FIRST MET HIM, HE WAS A KID IN GRADE SCHOOL, AND NOW I THINK HE’S ABOUT 60 YEARS OLD, AND HE’S NEARING RETIREMENT AS AN RCMP OFFICER. SO A LOT OF YEARS HAVE PASSED. SO, OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF HIS HEART, HE THOUGHT I’D LIKE TO HAVE THAT BOTTLE AND I TOOK IT, AND I HAD IT DISPLAYED—IT WASN’T IN THE LIVING ROOM—BUT IT WAS IN THE CUPBOARD AREA IN THE DINING AREA.” ACCORDING TO THE A7 RANCHE HISTORY PROVIDED ON THEIR WEBSITE (ACCESSED ON 4 MAY 2018), THE RANCH’S FOUNDER – ALFRED ERNEST CROSS – “PICKED THE ‘A7’ BRAND TO SYMBOLIZE HIMSELF AND HIS SIX SIBLINGS. IT IS SAID TO BE THE OLDEST RANCH IN CANADA STILL IN THE HANDS OF THE ORIGINAL OWNERS, RIGHT THROUGH TO PRESENT-DAY OWNER JOHN CROSS.” THE WEBSITE CONTINUES, “A. E. CROSS IS BEST KNOWN FOR BEING ONE OF THE “BIG FOUR” CATTLEMEN WHO FOUNDED THE CALGARY STAMPEDE IN 1912. HOWEVER, HE HAD MANY OTHER BUSINESS, PUBLIC, AND CHARITABLE INTERESTS, LIKE THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY, OIL AND GAS, AND THE BUDDING MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY. CROSS ALSO SERVED AS THE MLA FOR EAST CALGARY IN THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES...” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, A7 HISTORY AND DONOR’S NOTE.
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
Acquisition Date
2014-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE
No. Pieces
1
Length
76
Width
2
Description
DOUBLE-BUCKLED BROWN LEATHER BELT, FLOWER IN CENTER WITH FILIGREE DESIGN. TWO BUCKLES STAMPED “SOLID BRONZE.” 38 CM FROM BUCKLE TO BUCKLE ON ONE SIDE. BELT IS 2 CM IN WIDTH ON BACK AND MOST OF FRONT, FRONT CENTER DESIGN IS 7 CM AT WIDEST POINT. MINOR WEAR ON LEATHER AROUND BUCKLES FROM BENDING. FOUR BUCKLE HOLES ON EACH SIDE.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON NOVEMBER 28, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH REGARDING SMITH’S DONATION OF THE LEATHER BELT. THE BELT WAS GIVEN TO HER BY A RESEARCH STATION CO-WORKER NAMED ALEC JOHNSON, WHO DID LEATHER WORK. DURING THE INTERVIEW, SMITH EXPLAINED THAT SHE DID SECRETARIAL WORK AT THE RESEARCH STATION, IN THE LATE 1940S TO EARLY 1950S, BEFORE SHE GOT MARRIED. SHE REMEMBERS JOHNSON FROM HER TIME THERE: “[AS] A TALL GOOD LOOKING RED HEADED FELLOW AND I USED TO THINK HE WAS PRETTY CUTE BUT ANYWAYS HE MADE ME THIS BELT.” SMITH SPOKE ABOUT THE TIMELINE OF JOHNSON MAKING THE BELT: “IT WOULD HAVE TO BE ’50, ’51 IN THAT AREA THERE BUT HE WAS DOING TOOL LEATHER AND IT WAS REALLY VERY NICE AND HE SHOWED ME AND I ASKED IF HE’D MAKE ME A BELT AND HE DID. HE DIDN’T EVEN CHARGE ME FOR IT.” SMITH SPOKE ABOUT HER WEAR OF THE BELT DURING THE INTERVIEW: “I WORE IT QUITE A LOT A LONG TIME AGO BUT BELTS USED TO BE THE IN THING BUT I DON’T, I DON’T, I GOT A DRAWER FULL OF BELTS AND I DON’T WEAR THEM.” DESPITE HER MORE RECENT INFREQUENT USAGE OF THE BELT, SMITH STATED THAT SHE KEPT IT BECAUSE SHE “JUST ALWAYS TREASURED IT BECAUSE IT WAS MADE FOR ME.”
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, SPANDEX, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170007005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2015
Materials
NYLON, SPANDEX, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Length
23
Width
8.5
Description
PAIR OF WHITE, REFLECTIVE GLOVES WITH WHITE AND OPAQUE PLASTIC BEADING ON WRISTS; BEADING FORMS FLOWER PATTERNS WITH BEADED LOOP AND TWO BEADED STRANDS FROM CENTER. TAG INSIDE LEFT HAND GLOVE READS “87.30% NYLON, 12.70% SPANDEX, MADE IN TAIWAN”. FINGERTIPS ON RIGHT HAND GLOVE STAINED RED; BEADING ON BOTH GLOVES IS STAINED RED-BROWN UNDERNEATH. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED ANN MARIE MCDONALD OF THE LETHBRIDGE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE ON JUNE 6, 2017. ON THE GLOVES, MCDONALD ELABORATED, “WE ALWAYS WORE WHITE GLOVES FOR FUNERALS, FOR WHEN OUR SUPREME CAME. IF OUR SUPREME CAME, WE ALWAYS HAD OUR DRILL TEAM…THEY WORE LONG SKIRTS, BUT THEY DIDN’T WEAR JACKETS. IF YOU WERE HONORABLE ROYAL LADY, AND YOU HAD SOMEBODY IMPORTANT COME TO VISIT YOU, YOU WORE WHITES, WHICH MEANT WHITE GLOVES. IF YOU GO TO A FUNERAL, AND YOU DRESS IN ROYAL PURPLE, YOU’D BETTER BRING YOUR WHITE GLOVES, OR PUT YOUR HANDS IN YOUR POCKETS.” WILMA WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007005
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
2.7
Description
A: SILVER-COLOURED METAL BUTTON. SHIELD OF ALBERTA EMBOSSED ON THE CENTER OF THE BUTTON. “ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE” EMBOSSED AROUND THE CREST. SHINY FINISH. THE BACK OF THE BUTTON IS BRASS IN COLOUR. AROUND THE CENTRE OF THE BACK “W. SCULLY MONTREAL” IS MACHINE ENGRAVED. THERE IS A LOOP FOR A PIN FASTENER LOOSELY ATTACHED TO THE BACK B: TWO-PRONGED BRASS PIN WITH A CIRCULAR LOOP ON ONE END AND THE TWO ENDS ON THE PIN EXTENDING OUT INTO A V-SHAPE ON THE OTHER. PIN IS 3.2 CM IN LENGTH AND AT THE WIDEST POINT THE PRONGS ARE 1.1 CM APART. CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE FRONT AND BACK SURFACES OF THE BUTTON. BRASS BACK IS SLIGHTLY TARNISHED. METAL OF PIN IN SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BUTTON BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1951
Date Range To
1959
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1951
Date Range To
1959
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
90.2
Width
5.7
Description
GREY BELT WITH BRASS AND COPPER CLASP BUCKLE; BUCKLE HAS EMBOSSED CREST ON FRONT SHOWING A CROWN ABOVE AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN, WITH A BANNER AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”; BUCKLE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED ON BACK, “TOP, R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY (SP), R.C.A.”. BELT HAS BRASS AND COPPER CAPS ON ENDS WITH PAIRS OF METAL PRONGS EXTENDING FROM ENDS OF CAPS; BELT HAS TWO BRASS AND COPPER ADJUSTABLE LOOPS. INSIDE OF BELT HAS BLACK HAND-WRITTEN TEXT, “MAJOR R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY.” INSIDE OF BELT IS STAINED WITH WHITE AND YELLOW; INSIDE OF BELT IS WORN AND FRAYED BELOW PRONGS FROM ENDS; BUCKLE HAS WHITE AND GREEN RESIDUE FROM OXIDATION AT BASE OF CLASP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TROPHY BELT
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, SILVER
Catalogue Number
P20190007009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TROPHY BELT
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
LEATHER, BRASS, SILVER
No. Pieces
1
Length
101.3
Width
7.8
Description
LEATHER BELT WITH PINS AND BUTTONS FIXED; BELT HAS SILVER BUCKLE AT RIGHT END AND BUCKLE STRAP AT LEFT END; LEATHER IS STAMPED AT LEFT END WITH TEXT “[ILLEGIBLE] & COGGSHALL MILES [ILLEGIBLE]”. BELT HAS 22 PINS ATTACHED; PINS DISPLAYED INCLUDE: BRASS BAR WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “CANADA” [3 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS BUTTON WITH LION IN CENTER AND TEXT AROUND EDGES “43 CAMERON HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA” [11 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS MAPLE LEAF PIN WITH CROWN ABOVE TEXT “43 CAMERONS, CANADA” [2 ON BELT]; BRASS PIN DEPICTING OVAL SHIELD WITH CROWN AT TOP, MAPLE LEAF AND THISTLES AROUND BANNER, AND TEXT EMBOSSED ON OVAL BORDERS AND BANNER “OVERSEAS BATTALION, 113 CANADA, LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS” [3 ON BELT]; COPPER AND BRASS PIN DEPICTING “C” ABOVE A BAR AND “43” BELOW BAR [2 ON BELT]; SILVER PIN DEPICTING ROUND SHIELD WITH CROWN AT TOP, MAPLE LEAVES DECORATING LEFT EDGE AND THISTLES DECORATING RIGHT EDGE, WITH AN “X” IN CENTER WITH A LION OVERLAID, AND TEXT EMBOSSED OVER INSIDE BORDER, “43 CAMERON HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA” AND TEXT EMBOSSED AT BASE, “BATTN. C.E.F., WINNIPEG” [1 ON BELT]. LEATHER IS CRACKED AND WORN; BELT SHOWS SLIGHT GREEN RESIDUE AROUND PINS AND BELT BUCKLE HOLES FROM COPPER OXIDATION; BUTTONS, PINS, AND BELT BUCKLE ARE TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ACCORDING TO HIS CANADIAN MILITARY SERVICE FILE, JOHN MACDIARMID ENLISTED WITH THE 113TH OVERSEAS BATTALION (LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS) ON AUGUST 22, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH BATTALION ON OCTOBER 8, 1916, AFTER SAILING FROM CANADA OVERSEAS ON SEPTEMBER 25, 1916 WITH HIS UNIT. MACDIARMID WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH WITH THE 43RD CANADIAN RESERVE BATTALION SERVING IN FRANCE ON OCTOBER 27, 1916. MACDIARMID WAS DISCHARGED FROM SERVICE IN MAY 1919. A MEMO RECEIVED AND INCLUDED WITH HIS SERVICE FILE INDICATES THAT JOHN MACDIARMID PASSED AWAY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1918 AT THE SHAUGHNESSY HOSPITAL IN VANCOUVER, B.C. ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE HATE BELT, BRETT CLIFTEN NOTED, “THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...'” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007009
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HMV BAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170004004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HMV BAG
Date
2017
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.7
Width
35.7
Description
WHITE, PLASTIC SHOPPING BAG. BOTH SIDES ARE THE SAME. “HMV” IS ON THE BAG IN PINK LETTERING. THE BAG ALSO HAS INFORMATION ABOUT THE BAG INCLUDING “ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY” ALONG THE BOTTOM EDGE. THERE IS A HOLE IN THE TOP SIDE OF THE BAG FOR THE HANDLE. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. THE BAG IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED. THERE IS SLIGHT WEAR TO THE HANDLE THROUGH USE.
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
BUSINESS
History
IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 2017 THE MUSIC FRANCHISE, HMV CANADA, BEGAN TO THE PROCESS OF CLOSING DOWN ALL 120 OF THEIR STORES ACROSS CANADA. AFTER 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS, THE COMPANY WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. PARK PLACE MALL IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE HAD AN HMV LOCATION OF ITS OWN, WHICH OPENED IN 1994. THIS SHOPPING BAG IS AN EXAMPLE OF SHOPPING BAGS USED AT THE LETHBRIDGE LOCATION OF HMV DURING THE TIME OF RECEIVERSHIP. IT IS ALSO PHYSICAL SYMBOL OF BRICK-AND-MORTAR SHOPPING MALLS. ON 27 FEBRUARY 2017, IN AN INTERVIEW WITH COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE MANAGER OF THE HMV LETHBRIDGE, BRENDAN FRIZZLEY, REFLECTED ON HIS PAST EXPERIENCE AT THE MUSIC STORE, THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSIC STORES, AND ON THE RECEIVERSHIP PERIOD. FOR MORE INFORMATION OF FRIZZLEY’S CONNECTION TO THE STORE, PLEASE SEE P20170004001-2. IN THE INTERVIEW, FRIZZLEY SPOKE ABOUT THE CHANGE IN MALL TRAFFIC, “[THERE IS] SUCH A DROP IN TRAFFIC, AS PEOPLE START TO MOVE AWAY FROM MALLS. [THIS IS EXEMPLIFIED BY] THE FACT THAT I’LL HAVE SATURDAYS WHERE I’LL PULL AS MUCH AS I USED TO PULL ON A SLOW MONDAY EIGHT YEARS AGO, IN TERMS OF JUST PEOPLE COMING IN. WE’VE MADE SO MANY CHANGES TO BE ABLE TO MAKE THAT WORK FROM ON OUR SIDE, WHETHER IT’S GETTING BETTER DEALS FOR EVERY CD THAT WE SELL, OR JUST CHANGING THE GENERAL PRICE OF THINGS, OR HAVING THINGS THAT MAKE MORE MONEY… PEOPLE AREN’T SHOPPING IN MALLS ANYMORE. THERE’S STILL PEOPLE COMING IN, ESPECIALLY AROUND CHRISTMAS TIME, BUT IT’S NOT THE SAME AS IT USED TO BE. I REMEMBER MY FIRST CHRISTMAS [WORKING] HERE. WE HAD THREE TILLS – WE’D RUN ALL THREE OF THEM – AND THERE’D BE STILL CRAZY LINES. THAT WAS FOR ALL OF DECEMBER, AND THEN THIS YEAR, BLACK FRIDAY AND BOXING DAY BOTH HAPPENED, AND I DIDN’T HAVE TO OPEN A THIRD TILL…PEOPLE DON’T WANT SHOPPING TO BE A MULTI-HOUR STROLLING EXPERIENCE. WE’VE ALL GOT TO FACE THE ‘BUYING ONLINE,’ AND IF IT’S NOT ‘BUYING ONLINE’, [IT'S] BUYING ‘BIG BOX’. IF YOU WALK INTO WALMART OR COSTCO AND YOU’RE OUT IN AN HOUR, AND YOU GOT EVERYTHING THAT YOU NEED, THAT’S SO MUCH BETTER THAN A DAY AT THE MALL. I DON’T THINK THE THINGS AT THE MALL ARE INTERESTING ENOUGH ANYMORE FOR PEOPLE TO WANT TO PORE OVER THEM, AND HAVE THAT EXPERIENCE WHERE YOU WANDER AROUND THE MALL. THE KIDS WOULD GO OFF ONE WAY; PARENTS WOULD GO OFF THE OTHER. MOM AND DAD WOULD EVENTUALLY SPLIT UP, AS THEY GOT PULLED DIFFERENT WAYS. EVERYONE WOULD SORT OF WANDER AROUND; THEY’D MEET UP AT THE FOOD COURT, AT A CERTAIN TIME, AND THAT WOULD BE THAT, AND IT’S JUST NOT AN EXPERIENCE PEOPLE WANT [ANYMORE]. I THINK PEOPLE FEEL PULLED A LOT OF DIFFERENT WAYS, AND WE’VE GOTTEN VERY GOOD AT GETTING GOOD RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES, AT THE SAME TIME… MILLENNIALS HAVE FOUND REALLY INTERESTING, ENGAGING WAYS OF OCCUPYING THEIR TIME…YEAH, YOU KNOW PEOPLE ARE THERE TO BUY CERTAIN THINGS AT THE MALL… IF PEOPLE ARE COMING IN FOR A PARTICULAR ITEM AT MY STORE, THEY’RE PROBABLY NOT HITTING ANY OTHER STORE…NOBODY WANTS TO SHOP AROUND. AND THAT’S FINE. I’M NOT A MALL PERSON… WHEN I’M BUYING SOMETHING, I’M PROBABLY GETTING IT OFF AMAZON. I’LL BE IN THE MALL, HEADING OUT TO MY CAR, AND I’LL BE ON MY PHONE ON AMAZON BUYING THE THING THAT I WANT TO BUY, BECAUSE I WANT TO BE ABLE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THAT. I DON’T WANT TO SHOP AROUND IN THE MALL. AND IT’S KIND OF SURREAL THAT I LIVE IN A PLACE THAT SELLS THE THINGS I WANT, BUT I DON’T SEE EXACTLY WHAT I WANT HERE, SO RATHER THAN JUST HAVE TO SETTLE AND BUY THE BEST ONE, I’M JUST GOING TO GET ON MY PHONE…” MACLEAN STATED THAT THERE IS A “KIND OF REVOLUTION OF DIGITAL, IN TERMS OF, NOT JUST THE [HMV] ITSELF, BUT EVEN THE MALL.” FRIZZLEY ELABORATED ON THAT: “[Y]OU APPROACH THIS AWKWARD, POST-WORK SOCIETY WHERE YOU’VE KILLED RETAIL… WE CAN HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE UNEMPLOYED REALLY QUICKLY IF WE’RE DOING THIS. THAT’S THE BIGGEST THING THERE. I THINK THE LOSS OF - WE ALREADY LOST THE GOOD SIDES OF RETAIL YEARS AGO WHEN WE KILLED THE EXPERTS AND KILLED SPECIALTY STORES…” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ARTICLES REGARDING THE RECEIVERSHIP AND LIQUIDATION OF HMV CANADA.
Catalogue Number
P20170004004
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1925
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1925
Materials
GLASS, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Length
39
Width
17.7
Description
A. BEADED HANDBAG WITH BROWN TORTOISESHELL TRIM AND CLASP ALONG TOP OPENING. BAG HAS BLACK BEADS COVERING EXTERIOR WITH RED, PINK, GREEN AND YELLOW BEADED STARBURST PATTERN; BAG HAS BEADED FRINGE WITH BLACK, YELLOW AND GREEN BEADS. BAG HANDLE IS NAVY BLUE COTTON WITH BLACK BEADS COVERING EXTERIOR; HANDLE ATTACHES TO TRIM ALONG OPENING WITH BROWN TORTOISESHELL RINGS. BAG CLASP HAS BROWN TORTOISESHELL BUTTON AT TOP OF BROWN TORTOISESHELL TRIM ALONG OPENING; INSIDE OF BAG IS LINED WITH WHITE, BLUE AND GREEN FLORAL-PATTERNED COTTON FABRIC WITH POCKET SEWN INTO LINING FOR HOLDING MIRROR. OUTER BEADING IS EXTREMELY DELICATE AND FRAGILE; INSIDE OF BAG IS SOILED ON TORTOISESHELL TRIM; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. MIRROR, 6 CM LONG X 6.2 CM WIDE. SQUARE POCKET MIRROR SET IN CREAM SYNTHETIC LEATHER CASE; MIRROR BACKING COVERED IN WHITE, BLUE AND GREEN FLORAL-PATTERNED COTTON FABRIC THAT MATCHES INSIDE OF HANDBAG. CORNER OF MIRROR HAS SEWN LOOP OF BACKING FABRIC. FABRIC ON MIRROR IS DISCOLORED [DARKENED]; MIRROR SURFACE IS SOILED AND STAINED; MIRROR SURFACE HAS SCRATCH ALONG EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 12, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KERRY WRIGHT REGARDING HER DONATION OF A HANDBAG AND DRESS FROM THE 1920S. WRIGHT ACQUIRED THE OBJECTS FROM HER MOTHER UPON HER PASSING. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO WRIGHT’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, CLARA SAXON, PRIOR TO HER DEATH IN 1924. ON THE HANDBAG, WRIGHT ELABORATED, “I THINK THAT THAT HANDBAG WOULD BE SOMETHING THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN A TREASURE BECAUSE IT WAS SO INTRICATE, AND IT WOULD HAVE COST A LITTLE BIT MORE THAN WHAT [MY GRANDPARENTS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS WAS. I THINK THAT PROBABLY WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS VERY SPECIAL TO [CLARA].” WRIGHT RECALLED HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND THE CIRCUMSTANCES THAT LED TO WRIGHT’S MOTHER ACQUIRING THE OBJECTS, STATING, “1924. [MY] MOM [LILY WRIGHT] WAS BORN ON SEPTEMBER 29 [1924] AND CLARA PASSED AWAY…ON NOVEMBER 22 [1924].” “[MY MOTHER WAS] SIX WEEKS OLD AND HER MOTHER DIED. THERE WAS NEVER ANY QUESTION THAT HER GRANDPARENTS AUTOMATICALLY [LOOKED] AFTER HER. I REALLY DON’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT CLARA’S HUSBAND [HENRY SAXON]. I KNEW HIS NAME BUT HE PASSED AWAY WHEN MY MOTHER WAS ABOUT 8. OCCASIONALLY HE WOULD COME TO VISIT BUT NOT [OFTEN].” “[MY] MOTHER HAD ALWAYS SAID THAT THE DOCTORS DIDN’T KNOW WHAT SHE DIED FROM. BOTH OF HER PARENTS WERE DIABETICS AND MY GUESS WOULD HAVE TO BE GESTATION DIABETES. I DON’T BELIEVE THERE WAS ANY KIND OF INFECTION FROM WHAT ANYBODY HAD BEEN ABLE TO TELL…[SHE WAS TAKEN] TO THE DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY AND THEY SAID, “ OH, WHO KNOWS?” SHE LEFT AND DIED. HER SISTER NEVER DID KNOW WHAT SHE DIED OF EITHER AND THEY’RE ALSO DIABETIC NOW.” “[CLARA] LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN SHE PASSED…IT WAS MY GUESS THAT HER AND JOHN WERE MARRIED IN ST. MARY’S ANGLICAN CHURCH UP ON THE NORTH SIDE.” “[I GOT THESE PIECES] THROUGH MY MOTHER [LILY WRIGHT]. SHE HAD THEM PUT AWAY. HER GRANDPARENTS WHO RAISED HER KEPT A FEW THINGS LIKE THIS AND THEY WERE ALWAYS IN THE TRUNK DOWNSTAIRS. WHEN WE HAD TO CLEAN OUT MOM’S PLACE WHEN SHE WENT IN TO A NURSING HOME, MY SISTER AND I WENT “DO YOU WANT THIS, DO YOU WANT THIS? I SAID, THAT WAS CLARA’S, I WANT THAT. THAT’S HOW IT CAME INTO MY OWNERSHIP AND I’VE BEEN CARRYING IT AROUND FOR ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS.” “[THESE ARE OBJECTS] THAT I FELT SHE WOULD HAVE APPRECIATED THAT THEY MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, TO HANG ON TO AND STILL HAVE SOMETHING OF HERS…[THEY WERE IN] AN OLD STEAMER TRUNK, AN OLD METAL TRUNK AND I THINK PROBABLY AROUND THE TIME [MY MOTHER] AND DAD GOT MARRIED [’46…I’M PRETTY SURE THAT [MOM] HAD GOT [THE TRUNK] AS A SECONDARY HOPE CHEST. IT HAD CLARA’S WEDDING GOWN, HER SHOES…IT MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY MOTHER] SO SHE [HAD] THEM. [THERE WERE] A FEW ORNAMENTS AND GADGETS THAT MOM HAD PICKED UP OVER THE YEARS AND THERE REALLY WASN’T TOO MUCH OF CLARA’S BECAUSE SHE WAS ONLY 22 WHEN SHE PASSED.” “[THE TRUNK] WAS DOWNSTAIRS UNDER THE STAIRS AND IT WAS ONE TRUNK THAT SHE HAD ALWAYS ASKED US NOT TO GO IN. I WAS A PRECOCIOUS CHILD AND BEING TOLD THAT I COULDN’T GO NEAR THE STUFF, I DID ANYWAY. WHEN THEY WERE ON THE FARM, CLARA’S FATHER LIVED WITH MY MOM AND DAD, MYSELF AND MY SISTER UNTIL I WAS FOUR. [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS FOUR. HE LIVED IN THE FARMHOUSE BASEMENT, AND I DIDN’T LIKE THAT HE WAS DOWN THERE BY HIMSELF ALL THE TIME, SO I’D SNEAK DOWN THERE. I HAD GRAMPA JOHN’S PERMISSION TO LOOK THROUGH THAT STUFF BUT MY MOTHER DIDN’T KNOW.” “I IMAGINE IT WAS [MY GREAT GRANDFATHER] THAT TOLD ME [ABOUT CLARA]. EVENTUALLY MOTHER DID TELL ME THAT CLARA’S STUFF WAS IN THAT TRUNK.” “PROBABLY ABOUT ONCE A YEAR, I’D JUST TAKE [THE OBJECTS OUT] AND LOOK AT [THEM]. IT’S BEEN A BIG DEBATE WHETHER I WOULD GO AHEAD AND FIND SOMEBODY THAT COULD RESTORE THE PURSE OR WHETHER I SHOULD JUST PASS IT ALONG. I’M NOT A WEALTHY PERSON, SO I THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE A BETTER HOME FOR IT RATHER THAN INVESTING A BUNCH OF MONEY IN SOMETHING THAT WOULD COME HERE EVENTUALLY ANYWAY.” “[THESE OBJECTS] ARE SOMETHING THAT I KNEW DIDN’T BELONG IN THE GARBAGE. I GUESS IT WAS TO GET SOME KIND OF CONNECTION WITH MY PAST. I NEVER KNEW [CLARA]. MY MOTHER, SHE NEVER KNEW HER MOTHER. IT WAS JUST REASON THAT I HUNG ON TO THEM. NOW THAT I’M DOWNSIZING, HAVING TO LIVE IN A SMALLER PLACE, I HAVE TO LET GO OF A LOT OF STUFF. THIS IS A GOOD HOME FOR [THEM]. THAT HANDBAG WAS JUST SO SPECIAL.” IN AN EMAIL FROM WRIGHT TO MACLEAN, WRIGHT ELABORATES ON THE HISTORY OF CLARA SAXON. CLARA WAS BORN CLARA MELLING IN WIGAN, LANCASHIRE, ENGLAND IN DECEMBER 1902 TO ISABELLA (SMITH) MELLING AND JOHN MELLING. IN 1912, THE MELLING FAMILY EMIGRATED TO CANADA. CLARA’S SISTER, LILY MELLING, MARRIED ANDY ALLISON. CLARA MARRIED HENRY SAXON ON NOVEMBER 21, 1923, AND HAD ONE DAUGHTER, LILY (WRIGHT) SAXON BORN SEPTEMBER 29, 1924. CLARA WENT TO A MOVIE WITH HER SISTER ON NOVEMBER 18, 1924 AND FELL ILL. SHE PASSED AWAY OF AN UNDETERMINED CAUSE. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM NOVEMBER 20, 1924 AND DECEMBER 3, 1924, CONFIRM THAT THE CAUSE OF DEATH WAS NEVER DETERMINED. A POST-MORTEM WAS CONDUCTED AND STOMACH CONTENTS SENT TO EDMONTON, ALBERTA FOR ANALYSIS. IN A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 3, 1924, THE JURY FORMED TO ENQUIRE INTO THE DEATH OF CLARA SAXON RULED CAUSE OF DEATH UNKNOWN AFTER THE POST-MORTEM AND ANALYSIS OF STOMACH CONTENTS FOUND NO ABNORMALITIES, AND THE JURY WAS ADJOURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180003001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180003001
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SLURPEE CUP
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SLURPEE CUP
Date Range From
2000
Date Range To
2005
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.3
Diameter
10.6
Description
PLASTIC CUP WITH YELLOW, ORANGE AND GREY PRINTED IMAGE OF SOLDIER IN HELMET IN CITYSCAPE WITH BLUE AND ORANGE LOGO “HALO 2”. CUP HAS BLUE BORDER UNDER RIM WITH WHITE TEXT “SLURPEE”. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS BLACK AND GREEN LOGO “XBOX”; CUP HAS TEXT AT ALONG BASE “32 OZ, US (946 ML)” WITH WHITE, GREEN, RED AND ORANGE LOGO “7 ELEVEN”, AND BARCODE “0 05120 7” AND TEXT “WWW.SLURPEE.COM”. RIGHT END OF IMAGE HAS GREEN BORDER FROM BASE TO RIM WITH GREEN, RED AND WHITE LOGOS “MOUNTAIN DEW”. BESIDE “MOUNTAIN DEW” LOGOS IS WHITE BORDERS WITH BLACK TEXT “[COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] 2004 MICROSOFT CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MICROSOFT, BUNGIE, THE BUNGIE LOGO, HALO, XBOX, XBOX LIVE, THE XBOX LOGO AND THE XBOX LIVE LOGO ARE EITHER REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OR TRADEMARKS OF MICROSOFT CORPORATION IN THE U.S. AND/OR IN OTHER COUNTRIES. THIS PROMOTION IS BASED ON A MATURE-RATED VIDEO GAME. MOUNTAIN DEW AND THE MD DESIGN ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF PEPSICO, INC.” INSIDE OF CUP IS OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC; BASE OF CUP IS OPAQUE WHITE PLASTIC WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “TECHNIMARK, ASHEBORO, NC, MADE IN USA, 6, TM-32T, [RECYCLING SYMBOL] 7, OTHER”. LABEL ON FRONT HAS TEARS IN IMAGE AND SCUFF MARKS AT BASE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE SLURPEE CUP, MACLEAN RECALLED, “I WAS IN THE [ARMY] RESERVES AT THE TIME WHEN [THE] HALO CUPS CAME OUT, SO I’M PRETTY SURE THAT THEY WOULD DATE TO ABOUT 2001 AND 2002. UP UNTIL THAT POINT I WOULD BE USING DISPOSABLE CUPS. I HAD A 7-ELEVEN…WHEN WE LIVED IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 15TH STREET FOR 10 YEARS, THERE WAS A 7-ELEVEN A BLOCK AWAY FROM MY HOUSE. LATER IT WOULD BE ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE…BY THE SANDMAN IS WHERE I WOULD HAVE GOT THE HALO CUPS. WHAT I DID [IS] I BOUGHT A NUMBER OF THOSE CUPS SO I COULD HAVE HAD AS MANY AS 15 TO 20 OF THEM AND THEN I WOULD HAVE A CUP DISPENSER. IF YOU WERE IN MY VEHICLE [A YUKON], THERE WOULD HAVE BEEN 15-20 CUPS ON THE BACK SEAT. I ALWAYS HAD CUPS THAT I WOULD TAKE IN. I WOULD USE THOSE CUPS BECAUSE I THINK I WOULD ACTUALLY GET SOME REDUCTION IN PRICE FOR BRINGING THAT CUP IN. BUT I ALSO THOUGHT IT WAS A REALLY COOL CUP.” “IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN [PART OF A COLLECTOR’S SERIES].” “[THE CUPS WERE] MOVIE BASED…THAT ONE IS ACTUALLY GAME BASED [HALO IS A GAME]. AFTER THAT ONE CAME OUT THERE WAS A NUMBER OF, EITHER GAMES OR MOVIES, THAT WERE COMING OUT THAT 7-ELEVEN WOULD PROMOTE ON THOSE CUPS. I THINK I HAD TERMINATOR CUP, AND I HAD SOME FUTURE HALO CUPS. I NEVER LIKED THEM AS MUCH AS I LIKED THAT CUP THAT I’VE DONATED.” “I [LIKED] THE COLORS OF IT AND, BECAUSE I WAS IN THE ARMY AT THE TIME, I THOUGHT IT WAS A COOL CUP. AT THAT SAME TIME THEY WERE TWINNING MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE, MAKING IT 3 LANES IN BOTH DIRECTIONS, I REMEMBER COMING FROM THE ARMORY GOING DOWN TO 7-ELEVEN TO GET MY SLURPEE.” “I DON’T [PLAY HALO]. I JUST LIKED THE SOLDIER GUY.” MACLEAN SPOKE TO HIS INTEREST IN SLURPEES, NOTING, “THERE WOULD BE THINGS THAT WOULD BE PART OF MY DAY TO DAY LIFE AND EXISTENCE THAT, I WOULD SAY, ARE PART OF MY IDENTITY IN TERMS OF WHO I AM. DRINKING SLURPEES WOULD HAVE BEEN ONE OF THOSE THINGS. IF YOU WOULD HAVE BEEN AT WORK WITH ME IN THE 1990S THEN YOU POTENTIALLY WOULD HAVE RECALL OF ME DRINKING SLURPEES EVERY SINGLE DAY. IT WAS SUPER IMPORTANT TO ME SO I THOUGHT I SHOULD OFFER ONE TO THE MUSEUM. I KNEW THERE WASN’T ALREADY A SLURPEE CUP.” “I REMEMBER MY AUNT AND UNCLE, WHO ARE BRIAN AND BONNIE MURRAY, TAKING ME AS A KID [AT ABOUT 8 OR 9 YEARS OLD]…THIS WOULD BE IN THE LATE 1970S, AND WE VISITED A STRIP COMMERCIAL SPACE ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE OUT BY THE GREEN STRIP. LOCATED THERE WAS A 7-ELEVEN ADJACENT TO A TACO TIME. I THINK WE WENT TO BOTH LOCATIONS BECAUSE I WAS A FARM KID IN PICTURE BUTTE. I REMEMBER EATING SOFT TACOS WITH MEXI-FRIES AND THEN FOR SURE GOING TO 7-ELEVEN AND HAVING A GRAVEYARD SLURPEE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME.” “[A GRAVEYARD SLURPEE IS] ORANGE CRUSH MIXED WITH COKE AND ROOT BEER. IT’S A WHOLE BUNCH OF FLAVORS MIXED IN ONE AND I THOUGHT IT WAS THE COOLEST THING. I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS THE TEXTURE IN MY MOUTH OR IF IT WAS THE TEMPERATURE BUT IT RESONATED WITH ME IN A BIG WAY.” “I POTENTIALLY WOULD DRINK MULTIPLE SLURPEES PER DAY AND THE SLURPEES ARE NOT ALL THE SAME. DEPENDING ON WHEN YOU GO, THE QUALITY OF THE SLURPEE IS GOING TO BE DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE A BAD SLURPEE EXPERIENCE, YOU MIGHT DECIDE NOT TO DRINK THE WHOLE THING AND THEN WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO IS GO BACK IN FOUR HOURS AND TRY AGAIN. OR YOU COULD HAVE A REALLY GOOD SLURPEE EXPERIENCE AND YOU WOULD GO BACK AND TRY AGAIN. BUT THERE WOULD BE THINGS LIKE, IF I WALKED INTO THE STORE AND SOMEONE WAS IN FRONT OF ME AND THEY HAPPENED TO HAVE ONE OF THOSE LARGE THERMOS [CUPS], THAT COULD HOLD THE EQUIVALENT OF 4 OR 5 OF [MINE]…THEY WOULD DESTROY THE CONSISTENCY OF THE SLURPEE. IF THEY’RE IN FRONT OF ME, I’D BE GETTING REALLY ANGRY AT THEM OVER A SLURPEE WHICH ISN’T GOOD AT ALL. IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE I COULD WALK IN THE FRONT DOORS AND I COULD LOOK AT THE MACHINE, WHICH WOULD BE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE OF THE ROOM AND TELL, JUST BY THE COLOUR AND HOW QUICKLY THAT PADDLE WAS GOING AROUND, HOW GOOD THAT SLURPEE WAS GOING TO BE. I WOULD TURN AROUND AND WALK OUT IF IT WAS MOVING RELATIVELY QUICK AND IT WAS REALLY DARK. SO I KNEW. THAT’S A PROBLEM AND…POTENTIALLY MY BLOOD PRESSURE WOULD CHANGE WHEN I’M DISPENSING THE SLURPEE BECAUSE I’M SO EXCITED TO GET IT. A LOT OF WHAT WE DO AS HUMAN BEINGS IS ABOUT RITUAL AND IT’S NOT EVEN REALLY ABOUT THE SLURPEE ITSELF BUT THAT, AT A CERTAIN POINT OF THE DAY, WE DO THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AGAIN BECAUSE IT FEELS GOOD. FOR ME, IT WAS AT LUNCH TIME, DRIVING FROM MY HOUSE TO GO GET THAT SLURPEE TO BRING IT BACK TO WORK, WHICH IS A TREMENDOUS WASTE OF TIME. AND FOR WHAT? EXCEPT THAT, I REALLY DID LIKE DRINKING SLURPEES. I REALLY LIKED THE SUGAR RUSH A LOT. IT GAVE ME A LOT OF ENERGY AND I DON’T KNOW IF I HAVE THAT ANY MORE. I NEVER CRASHED AFTER I DRANK THEM. I SAID “IT WAS LIKE I PARACHUTED BACK TO EARTH”. I LOVED THEM LOTS.” “[I STOPPED DRINKING SLURPEES] AROUND [2011/2012]. THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE WAS OFFERING A HEALTH CHECK-UP WHICH WAS REALLY GOOD. I WENT AND THEY MEASURED MY BLOOD SUGAR WHICH WAS HIGH NORMAL. IT WASN’T OUTSIDE NORMAL, BUT IT WAS HIGH NORMAL AND THEY WERE RECOMMENDING TO ME…THAT PERHAPS I SHOULDN’T BE DRINKING SUGAR EVERY DAY. AND ME KNOWING THAT PANCREATIC CANCER IS SOMETHING THAT COULD BE RELATED TO SUGAR CONSUMPTION, I JUST KNEW THAT THERE WAS REALLY NO GOOD REASON FOR ME TO BE DRINKING THOSE STUPID THINGS AS PART OF MY DAY TO DAY EXISTENCE.” “I CUT THEM OUT. I STOPPED AND I THINK IF YOU CAN BREAK THE RITUAL OF GOING TO GET THEM, BECAUSE YOU CAN GET THERE, YOU DON’T EVEN DRINK IT OR YOU DON’T EVEN GET IT. I JUST THOUGHT I HAVE TO BREAK THE PATTERN. SO I BROKE THE PATTERN AND THEN I HAVEN’T GONE BACK.” “I DON’T THINK I’VE KNOWN ANYONE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN CONSUMING THE NUMBER OF SLURPEES THAT I WAS. I KNOW MY SISTER AND HER HUSBAND WERE DRINKING BIG GULPS, AND THEY WOULD HAVE MUCH LARGER CONTAINERS THAN I EVER HAD. PEOPLE WERE CRITICAL OF MY SLURPEE CONSUMPTION, AND MY SISTER AND BROTHER-IN-LAW WERE PROBABLY DRINKING AS MUCH IF NOT MORE COKE, [OR] FOUNTAIN POP, THAN ME. I DON’T KNOW WHY SLURPEES GET SUCH A BAD RAP, BUT I’VE NEVER KNOWN MANY PEOPLE THAT LIKED TO DRINK MORE THAN ME. THE OTHER THING IS THAT I HAVE NO CAVITIES. I DON’T EVEN GO TO THE DENTIST EVERY YEAR BECAUSE I THINK IT’S A RACKET. I WOULD GO, AND THEY WOULDN’T FIND ANY CAVITIES.” “[THE CUP HAS] MEANING TO ME TO SEE [IT] BECAUSE [SLURPEES WERE] PART OF MY DAY TO DAY EXISTENCE FOR—IF IT STARTED IN 1979 AND ENDED BY 2012—THE BETTER PART OF THIRTY-TWO YEARS. IT’S A LONG TIME, AND I [THOUGHT] OF THEM EVEN DURING HIGH SCHOOL.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029008
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GALT HOSPITAL" "LUCY R. HATCH"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GOLD PLATE, ENAMEL
Catalogue Number
P20140049026
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GALT HOSPITAL" "LUCY R. HATCH"
Date
1913
Materials
METAL, GOLD PLATE, ENAMEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.6
Diameter
2.1
Description
ROUND PIN, GOLD PLATED WITH GREEN ENAMEL BORDER AND RED ENAMEL CROSS AT CENTRE. TEXT AROUND BORDER READS “GALT HOSPITAL – LETHBRIDGE ALBERTA” AND TEXT ON A GREEN ENAMEL BANNER UNDER THE CROSS READS “FESTINA LENTE”. ENGRAVED TEXT ON THE BACK SIDE READS “LUCY R. HATCH – 1935” AND A MAKER’S MARK AND 10K STAMP IS VISIBLE AT BOTTOM. STRAIGHT PIN WITH ROTATING CLASP IS SAUTERED HORIZONTALLY ALONG BACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS GRADUATION PIN IS MARKED “LUCY R. HATCH.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM THE 1960S AND 70S AND GALT ARCHIVES RECORD 19760225055, LUCY HATCH WAS BORN IN TIMBER, MONTANA IN 1890 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910 TO BEGIN NURSES TRAINING. SHE WAS ONE OF THREE FIRST GRADUATES OF THE GSN IN DECEMBER 1913, ALONG WITH LILLIAN DONALDSON AND ELIZABETH PATTESON. HATCH NURSED IN THE GALT HOSPITAL FOR EIGHT YEARS, BRIEFLY MOVED TO NEW YORK, AND RETURNED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO WORK IN THE COALHURST HOSPITAL. HATCH MARRIED JAMES MCINNIS IN 1922 AND REJOINED THE GALT HOSPITAL THAT YEAR AS FLOOR SUPERVISOR. SHE WENT ON TO FOUND THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION IN 1945, SERVING AS ITS HONOURARY PRESIDENT UNTIL HER DEATH IN 1955. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049026
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
2010 OLYMPIC TORCH RELAY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
2010 OLYMPIC TORCH RELAY
Date
2010
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
43
Width
8.9
Description
WHITE ARMBAND WITH DIAGONAL STRIPES OF LIGHT BLUE, MEDIUM BLUE ON ONE SIDE AND GREEN ON THE OTHER END. IN CENTRE OF ARMBAND IS A SILK-SCREEN OF THE VANCOUVER 2010 OLPYMICS: "TORCH RELAY/RELAIS DE LA FLAMME - VANCOUVER 2010 - PRESENTED BY/PRESENTE PAR COCA-COLA, RBC, CANADA". FASTENS WITH BLACK VELCRO, WITH A LARGER LOOP SECTION (MEASURES 10.2CM WHILE THE HOOK SECTION IS ONLY 4CM). ON REVERSE OF HOOK SECTION IS ANOTHER SILK-SCREEN: "HUDSON'S BAY CO." WITH HBC COAT OF ARMS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
History
THIS ARMBAND RELATES TO THE 2010 OLYMPICS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. IN AN INTERVIEW WITH ITS DONOR ANINE VONKEMAN, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JUNE 2015, SHE SAID I “WAS HONOURED TO BE ACCEPTED AS A VOLUNTEER, A MEDIA HANDLER VOLUNTEER, ALONG WITH BOB COONEY FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNICATIONS AT THE TIME, WHO I REALLY RESPECT AND HE’S RESPECTED BY THE LOCAL MEDIA. AND SO HE AND I WORKED TOGETHER TO BE THE MEDIA HANDLERS FOR THE TORCH RELAY, WHICH IS A HUGE EVENT ... FROM A LOGISTICAL POINT OF VIEW AND IN TERMS OF DEALING WITH MEDIA IN THAT WAY. LIKE WE DO MEDIA PREVIEWS OF OUR EXHIBITS AND THEY’RE JUST TINY COMPARED TO WHAT AN UNDERTAKING THIS IS, BECAUSE IT WAS TELEVISED NATIONALLY AND ALL OF THAT AND ALL THE INFRASTRUCTURE THAT WAS SET UP FOR THE CELEBRATION AT HENDERSON LAKE.” THE ARMBAND ALLOWED ANINE ENTRY TO THE MEDIA PIT AND VOLUNTEER TENT AT HENDERSON LAKE. ANINE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT SHE WAS “EXCITED ABOUT BEING PART OF THE TORCH RELAY AND BECAUSE THE OLYMPICS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE AND SPORTS EVENTS IN GENERAL, DUTCH PEOPLE GO A LITTLE NUTS. SO, YOU KNOW, TO BE ABLE TO BE A PART OF THAT AND ALSO TO DEAL WITH THE MEDIA IN THAT WAY, WHICH WAS A BIG DEAL, WAS KIND OF REALLY INTERESTING.” ANINE KEPT THE ARMBAND, SAYING “IT’S AN IMPORTANT REMINDER OF BEING PART OF THAT. AND IT WAS AN IMPORTANT EVENT IN LETHBRIDGE TO BE ON THE TORCH RELAY ROUTE FOR THE OLYMPIC FLAME.” ANINE ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) IN 1986 AND STARTED WORKING AT THE SAAG IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004, SHE WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND SEE P20150005000FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
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