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Other Name
LAWN SIGN
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COROPLAST, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20200024001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LAWN SIGN
Date
2020
Materials
COROPLAST, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
102
Width
61.5
Description
A) RECTANGULAR COROPLAST LAWN SIGN. LENGTH: 45.6CM WIDTH: 61.5CM. COLOUR THEME PRINTED ON THE SIGN IS GREEN, GOLDEN YELLOW, AND BLACK ON A WHITE BACKGROUND. ON THE TOP LEFT IS THE CIRCULAR LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE LOGO. IN THE MIDDLE IN LARGE LETTERING IS “CLASS OF 2020”. AT THE BOTTOM IN YELLOW IS “CONGRATULATIONS #LCIGREEN2GOLD”. THE SIGN IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. B) METAL STAND THAT INSERTS INTO THE SPACES AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LAWN SIGN. LENGTH: 76CM WIDTH: 24CM. IT HAS TWO LEGS AND TWO SUPPORT RUNGS ACROSS THE MIDDLE. THE METAL IS SLIGHTLY BENT AND THE LEGS HAVE DIRT ON THE BOTTOM WHERE THEY WERE INSERTED INTO THE GROUND.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON JUNE 25TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DYLAN TAYLOR IN REGARD TO THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE 2020 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION MEMORABILIA HE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THEIR MEETING. DYLAN SPOKE ABOUT HIS EXPECTATIONS WHEN THE PANDEMIC FIRST AROSE: “…BY MARCH WE WERE DECENTLY SURE THAT BY JUNE WE WOULD BE BACK AT SCHOOL AGAIN BUT…HERE WE ARE. A LOT OF THE NARRATIVE THAT WAS BEING SPREAD AROUND WAS THAT IF WE STAY HOME ENOUGH AND IF WE QUARANTINE ENOUGH [AND HAVE A] SICKNESS FREE SUMMER THAT FALL WILL CONTINUE AS NORMAL AND EVERYTHING WOULD GO BACK TO NORMAL. BUT AS TIME GOES ON IT [WAS] BECOMING INCREASINGLY APPARENT THAT THIS [WAS] NOT GOING TO GO AWAY VERY EASILY IF AT ALL, AND THAT’S A…VERY DRAMATIC CONTRAST TO HOW WE WERE FEELING IN MARCH…EVEN AS THE MONTHS PROGRESS, I THINK WE ALL GOT MORE AND MORE HOPEFUL…[AND] AROUND APRIL…THERE WAS A PUSH FOR THERE TO BE A GRADUATION– [WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN] TOMORROW ACTUALLY…THEY HAD RESCHEDULED GRADUATION PROVISIONALLY FOR JUNE 26TH [2020]… WE ALL GOT OUR HOPES BACK UP AND THEN WITHIN 2 WEEKS’ TIME OR SO THAT WAS GIVEN THE KIBOSH AS WELL…THERE WERE…WAVES OF OPTIMISM…ABOUT OUR RETURN TO NORMAL… ONCE WE GOT INTO MID… [TO] LATE MAY THERE WAS THIS…ASSUREDNESS THAT THIS IS HERE TO STAY. WE’RE NOT COMING BACK TO NORMAL– PROBABLY EVER.” DYLAN ELABORATED ON THE UNIQUE GRADUATION EVENTS: “…IN GRADE NINE YOU ARE ASSIGNED TO ONE [ADVISOR] TEACHER…AND THAT TEACHER IS THERE TO…HELP YOU MOVE THROUGH YOUR…THREE OR FOUR YEARS OF SCHOOLING…THEN, IN THIS PARTICULAR CASE…WE WERE RECEIVING THESE GRAD PACKAGES BASED ON WHICH ADVISOR YOU HAD. YOU WERE TOLD TO COME TO THE SCHOOL AT A CERTAIN TIME…FOUR OR FIVE INDIVIDUALS WHO WERE [IN] GRADE TWELVE IN MY ADVISOR GROUP, WE ALL CAME [TO THE GRADUATION EVENT] AT SAY…2:00 -3:00 ON A GIVEN DAY….SO THEY HAD US…COME UP IN OUR CARS, PARK IN A SPECIFIC SPOT BY THE SIDEWALK, AND WALK INTO THIS COURTYARD IN THE FRONT OF OUR SCHOOL. FIRST, THEY WOULD GIVE US THIS PACKAGE OF ITEMS [THAT WAS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM]…THEY WOULD HAND IT OVER TO US OVER A TABLE. YOU’D GET A LITTLE PICTURE FOR…OUR YEARBOOK… STUDENT COUNCIL, OF WHICH I’M A PART-OF, ORGANIZED A LITTLE STUDENT VIDEO, SO THEY HAD ALMOST EVERY GRADUATING STUDENT RECORD A LITTLE MESSAGE, OR…RECORD ONE LINE OF A LARGER SPEECH THAT WOULD BE DONE LATER; [THEN IT WAS] POSTED ON SOCIAL MEDIA, AND SHARED TO PARENTS…THAT WAS ABOUT IT...THE TEACHERS WERE VERY GOOD SPORTS ABOUT IT. THEY GAVE YOU A BIG CHEER. BUT, OTHER THAN THAT, LITTLE TO NO FANFARE, AND NO DECORATIONS, OR ANYTHING…JUST ABOUT LIKE A SIX MINUTE PROCESS OF GRABBING [THE GRADUATION PACKAGE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM]. “SO, THE FRONT DOORS OF LCI HAVE…A CONCRETE COURTYARD IN FRONT OF THEM, WITH SOME BENCHES AND LITTLE THINGS FOR STUDENTS…[THE] TEACHERS HAD SET UP IN THAT CONCRETE SPACE TO HAND [GRADUATING STUDENTS] THESE ITEMS…NOT INCLUDING THE SIGN.” “…[THERE WAS] NO POSING [FOR PHOTOS] OR ANYTHING…[THE TEACHERS] JUST…USHERED YOU OVER TO A CERTAIN SPOT WHERE YOU WERE SUPPOSED TO STAND, AND PASSED [THE GRADUATION ITEMS] OVER.” “THAT [EVENT]…WAS THE BIGGEST MOMENT THAT PALES IN COMPARISON WITH THE REAL…HANDING-OF-THE-DIPLOMA MOMENT, WHEN YOU ARE IN FRONT OF YOUR PEERS, AND YOUR FAMILY, AND THE PUBLIC…THAT ABSENCE OF PEOPLE TO SEE IT HAPPEN FELT…VERY EMPTY AND INSIGNIFICANT…EVEN LOOKING THROUGH THESE ITEMS AFTERWARDS, THEY DIDN’T FEEL LIKE THEY MEANT ANYTHING, AND THAT WHOLE EXPERIENCE, IN GENERAL, DIDN’T REALLY FEEL LIKE IT MEANT ANYTHING. AS HARD AS THE TEACHERS TRIED, AND AS MUCH EFFORT AS THEY PUT INTO IT…IT REALLY WAS KIND OF A FACSIMILE…A POOR FACSIMILE OF A REAL GRADUATION.” “I HAD HONESTLY NO IDEA WHAT TO EXPECT…COMING UP TO THE SCHOOL; SEEING THE VERY SPARSE SET-UP THEY HAD THERE WAS A LITTLE SHOCKING…DEPENDING ON THE TEACHERS THAT WERE PRESENT, THEY DID SOME KIND OF GROUP PHOTOS, WHICH THEY WERE IMMEDIATELY SCOLDED FOR AFTERWARDS, BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO DO THAT… IT WAS…A BLEAK MOMENT…AS HAPPY AS THEY TRIED TO BE; AS HAPPY AS WE WERE MEANT TO BE, IT DIDN’T QUITE MEASURE UP...” ACCORDING TO A JUNE 22, 2020 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, THE SCHOOL ORGANIZED A PARADE, FOLLOWING ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES REGULATIONS, TO CELEBRATE THE 225 LCI GRADS OF 2020 AMID THE PANDEMIC. FINE ARTS AND ATHLETIC AWARDS WERE ALSO DELIVERED TO THE HOUSES OF RECIPIENTS. IN CELEBRATION, DYLAN’S GRAD CLASS ALSO RECEIVED A LAWN SIGN: “…THE LCI STAFF WAS KIND ENOUGH TO DELIVER ONE [SIGN] TO EVERY SINGLE GRADUATING STUDENT…THE ADVISOR TEACHER I MENTIONED BEFORE (MINE IS ACTUALLY MY CHOIR TEACHER…) DELIVERED THE SIGN PERSONALLY TO STUDENTS, AND HAD A PICTURE OF THEM PLANTING IT ON THEIR LAWN, [WHICH WAS] VERY NICE. IT WASN’T EXACTLY A SURPRISE…BECAUSE I SAW PICTURES OF STUDENTS RECEIVING THEM PREVIOUSLY— BUT, IN THE E-MAIL SENT TO PARENTS, IT WAS DECLARED AS A SURPRISE FOR STUDENTS…IT WAS NICE TO NOT ONLY SEE OUR TEACHER AGAIN, BUT TO HAVE THIS…EMBLEM…IN FRONT OF MY HOUSE, THAT [SHOWED] WE DID COMPLETE ALL FOUR YEARS, AND IT DID FEEL GOOD.” DYLAN EXPLAINED THE VALUE OF THE ITEMS HE RECEIVED IN THE GRADUATION PACKAGE: “[THE] FINE AND SUPPORTING ARTS CERTIFICATE [WAS SIGNIFICANT COMPARED TO SOME OF THE OTHER ITEMS]…IT [HAD] BEEN SIGNED HERE BY…MY CHOIR TEACHER…MY DRAMA TEACHER, AND MY PRINCIPAL… ALL OF THESE THINGS ARE IMPORTANT TO ME. OBVIOUSLY, MY CERTIFICATE OF BILINGUALISM; I SPENT [ABOUT] TEN…YEARS BEING EDUCATED IN FRENCH, AND THAT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO ME OBVIOUSLY. I’VE HAD SO MANY…PERSONAL EXPERIENCES [AND] MEMORIES WITH ALL THE FINE ARTS PROGRAMS AT LCI… SO MUCH OF WHO I AM TODAY CAN BE OWED TO THESE TEACHERS; TO THESE PROGRAMS. SO, AS MUCH AS IT’S A PIECE OF PAPER WITH A LITTLE JPEG OF A STAMP HERE, INSTEAD OF A REAL ONE…THIS DOES MEAN A LOT TO ME—…THIS…DECLARATION THAT I DID PASS THROUGH THESE PROGRAMS; THAT I DID…PUT IN THE EFFORT, AND THE WORK, TO LEAVE MY IMPACT ON THEM, AND TO BE IMPACTED BY THEM. ADDITIONALLY, IN THIS PACKAGE, THE ONE THING I DIDN’T INCLUDE [IN THE DONATION TO THE MUSEUM] WAS A LITTLE LETTER THAT YOU WROTE TO YOURSELF IN THE NINTH GRADE. IT WAS AN ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT…EVERY STUDENT WAS MANDATED TO TYPE OUT A LETTER TO THEIR GRADE TWELVE SELF, THAT WOULD THEN BE INCLUDED IN THIS PACKAGE, AND [THAT WAS IMPORTANT]. IT WAS CERTAINLY AN INSIGHTFUL LOOK INTO HOW MUCH I HAVE CHANGED…OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS.” DYLAN COMMENTED FURTHER ON THE EXPERIENCE OF GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL AMIDST THE GLOBAL COVID-19 PANDEMIC: “IT’S A LITTLE BIT OF A LETDOWN IN SOME WAYS…IT’S WONDERFUL TO HAVE THESE PHYSICAL TOKENS OF THE TIME I SPENT IN HIGH SCHOOL BUT IT FEELS LIKE SUCH A GRANDIOSE EXPERIENCE COMING TO SUCH AN ANTICLIMACTIC FINISH IN SOME WAYS. A LOT OF THE MOST IMPORTANT EXPERIENCES IN MY ENTIRE LIFE THAT I’LL REMEMBER FOREVER HAPPENED IN THIS BUILDING, LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, AND I FEEL A LITTLE CHEATED IN SOME WAYS TO HAVE SUCH A KIND OF LACK LUSTER FINISH – AS MUCH WORK AS THE LCI STAFF HAS PUT INTO RECOGNIZING THEIR GRADUATES AND THE STUDENTS WHO DID…GO ABOVE AND BEYOND, IT’S STILL A KIND OF MEAGRE FINISH I SUPPOSE.” “…MARCH 15TH WAS WHEN SCHOOLS CLOSED FOR GOOD INDEFINITELY AND…AT THAT TIME WE ALL HAD VERY VISCERAL REACTIONS. I REMEMBER COMING HOME FROM WORK AND THEN AS SOON AS I GOT IN MY CAR I WAS TOLD THAT I WASN’T GOING BACK TO SCHOOL WHICH IS A VERY STRANGE THING TO HEAR BECAUSE NONE OF US EXPECTED IT…THAT DATE MARCH 15TH…IT WAS ANNOUNCED BY LCI ADMINISTRATION THAT THEY HAD CANCELLED SOME EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OR SPORTS GAMES…TO PRESERVE SAFETY. WE WERE ALL UPSET…WE DIDN’T SEE ANYTHING LIKE THIS COMING. THEY HAD ALSO RECENTLY QUASHED A TRIP TO DISNEYLAND THAT THE BAND AND CHOIR HAD PLANNED SO WE WERE ALL…REELING AFTER THAT…SEEING IF WE COULD RECUPERATE ANY KIND OF FUNDS TO REALLOCATE TO SOME OTHER TRIP SO IT WAS ALL…SUDDEN AND FAST IN THAT WEEK…EVERYTHING SEEMED TO BE CANCELLED... SO IT WAS BEWILDERMENT AT FIRST AND THEN EVERYONE WENT INTO A STAGE OF…A VERY DEEP SORROW AND…FEELING SORRY FOR OURSELVES, WHICH WASN’T HELPED BY THE ABOUT 2 WEEK GAP THAT WE HAD IN TERMS OF ACADEMICS. THE SCHOOL TOOK A COUPLE OF WEEKS OFF JUST TO DRAFT SOME KIND OF PLAN AS TO WHAT THEY WERE GOING TO DO FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE YEAR. SO WE HAD A LOT OF TIME TO…GRIEVE AND PROCESS…WHAT A CATACLYSMIC EVENT THIS REALLY WAS. BUT…AFTER THAT WE KIND OF SETTLED INTO THE ONLINE DISSEMINATION PLATFORM…SOME BETTER THAN OTHERS, BOTH STAFF AND STUDENTS ACCLIMATED TO THIS NEW CHANGE…FOR BETTER OR WORSE… BUT THEN AGAIN, NEARING THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR, I THINK WE’RE ALL…FEELING…THIS HEAVINESS A LITTLE BIT. MAYBE NOT AS MUCH AS WHEN THE…CLASSES ENDED IN PERSON – BUT NOW THAT IT’S ALL OVER THERE’S A BIT OF WEIGHT THERE, THERE’S STILL THAT KIND OF [A MOROSE FEELING] THAT I MENTIONED EARLIER THAT’S…CREEPING BACK.” DYLAN ATTRIBUTED THIS SAD SENTIMENT TO BOTH THE PANDEMIC AND THE TRANSITION OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL IN GENERAL: “…AS MUCH AS THAT HEAVINESS IS [FROM] THE LEAVING BEHIND THESE EXPERIENCES WE’VE HAD, IT’S ALSO…A SADNESS THAT WASN’T LIVED OUT TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL. USUALLY AROUND GRADUATION THERE’S…[A] BIG HURRAH EVENT AND A BIG ANNOUNCEMENT OF GOING OUT INTO THE WORLD...BUT IN THIS CASE IT WAS…LIKE A SILENT CREEPING OUT INSTEAD OF A BIG HURRAH. SO…THERE IS THAT REGRET…THAT WE WEREN’T ABLE TO FULLY LIVE OUT THE EXPERIENCE, BUT THERE IS ALSO THE SADNESS OF LEAVING OUR OLD LIFE, OUR CHILDHOOD BEHIND…IT’S MY EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY TOMORROW WHICH COINCIDES CLOSELY WITH MY LAST SCHOOL EXPERIENCE SO VERY MUCH THIS IS…THE END OF LIFE AS WE KNEW IT AND OUR CHILDHOOD, IF YOU WILL.” “…IT WAS A PLEASURE TO HAVE THE TIME WE DID HAVE IN SCHOOL. WE HAD ABOUT SEVEN PRETTY SOLID MONTHS OF A GRAD YEAR…AS MUCH AS THERE IS A BIT OF UNFAIRNESS THERE, I ALSO FEEL BAD FOR THESE NEW STUDENTS WHO ARE MOVING INTO AN UNCERTAIN GRAD YEAR; WHERE THEY WON’T HAVE THINGS LIKE SCHOOL PLAYS, THAT WE WERE ABLE TO HAVE, OR BEING PART OF CONCERTS OR SPORTS GAMES. THE WHOLE NINE YARDS. EVERYTHING WILL BE CONDENSED AND WILL HAVE THAT SAME UNDERWHELMING EFFECT THAT I THINK WE EXPERIENCED TO SOME DEGREE. I DON’T EXACTLY ENVY THIS GRAD CLASS OF 2021. CERTAINLY, I WOULD LOVE TO BE BACK AT SCHOOL. I WISH THEM ALL THE BEST, AND I HOPE THEY ARE ABLE TO MAKE THE BEST OF WHATEVER KIND OF UNDERWHELMING EXPERIENCES THEY ARE MOVING INTO.” DYLAN TALKED ABOUT TAKING CLASSES ONLINE DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR: “I WANT TO PREFACE WHAT I AM SAYING HERE BY COMMENDING THE LCI STAFF, BY MAKING THE BEST OF WHAT THEY HAD UNDER VERY SHORT CIRCUMSTANCES. WE USED A SOFTWARE CALLED ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’…IT WORKED IN SOME CAPACITIES AND IT DID NOT WORK IN SOME CAPACITIES. OBVIOUSLY DOING DISTANCE LEARNING AND DISTANCE WORK IS A LOT DIFFERENT THAN HOLDING PEOPLE ACCOUNTABLE IN PERSON. FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS, SOMETIMES IT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO STAY ON TRACK AND TO STAY COMMITTED TO THEIR WORK, ESPECIALLY UNDER THESE KIND OF DISAPPOINTING AND DISHEARTENING CIRCUMSTANCES. THAT COMBINED WITH THIS NEW SYSTEM THAT DOES NOT EXACTLY HOLD STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE WITH THEIR WORK—OR LACK THEREOF—IN THE SAME WAY THAT IN-PERSON SCHOOLING DOES. I DID HAVE SOME REALLY GOOD EXPERIENCES [IN ONLINE CLASSES], SPECIFICALLY IN DRAMA. [THE TEACHERS] MADE INTERESTING USE OF THE SOFTWARE. WE WERE ABLE TO DIVE INTO THE HISTORY OF DRAMA AND THE THEORY OF DRAMA. WE ALSO WORKED ON SOME PROJECTS WHERE WE WERE EXPERIMENTING WITH THIS VIDEO CALLING SOFTWARE, SIMILAR TO SKYPE OR FACETIME THAT THEY HAD IN THE ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’. WE WERE ABLE TO DO SOME INTERESTING DRAMA PROJECTS IN THAT CAPACITY. OUR TEACHER…KEPT US VERY BUSY AND ENGAGED. IT WAS A BIT OF A MIXED BAG. I KNOW GOING FORWARD THE SCHOOL IS LOOKING AT A MORE INTENSIVE ACADEMIC STRAIN ON THEIR STUDENTS, IF THEY ARE LOOKING TOWARDS ONLINE LEARNING. WHICH I KNOW THEY ARE LOOKING TOWARDS A MIXED MODEL, WHERE SOME OF YOUR WORK WILL BE ONLINE AND SOME IN PERSON. I KNOW THE ONLINE WORK THAT THEY WILL DISSEMINATE WILL BE MORE ENGAGING AND CHALLENGING. WHEREAS THIS YEAR IT WAS A LITTLE BIT OF A WRITE-OFF, PERHAPS.” “ABOUT ONE DAY OUT OF THE WEEK, TEACHERS WOULD HOLD LIVE, IN-PERSON, CLASSES WITH THEIR STUDENTS. AGAIN, FOR MORE INFORMATION HEAVY CLASSES LIKE SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, MATH…THEY WOULD HAVE AROUND FIVE CLASSES IN FRONT OF WHITEBOARD WHILE TEACHING THE STUDENTS THROUGH A CAMERA.” “…IN OTHER CASES THEY WOULD SCREEN SHARE A POWER POINT. IT VARIED FROM TEACHER TO TEACHER. BUT, I DID SEE SOME TEACHERS STANDING IN FRONT OF A WHITE BOARD AND WRITING…” “IN THAT ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’ SOFTWARE THEY HAVE A VIDEO CALLING FUNCTIONALITY. ABOUT EVERY WEEK OR SO, DEPENDING ON THE CLASS, YOU WOULD MEET UP WITH YOUR TEACHER AND THEY WOULD TURN ON THE CAMERA AND USUALLY [YOU WOULD] SEE THEIR FACE.” “…EVERY STUDENT WOULD PILE INTO THE CLASS AND EITHER TURN ON THEIR CAMERA OR NOT. YOU WOULD HAVE A CLASS FULL…WITH NOTHING ON THE CAMERA, AND THE TEACHER…DICTATING OUT INTO AN ENDLESS SEA OF DARKNESS. IT VARIED FROM CLASS TO CLASS. AGAIN, WITH THAT DRAMA CLASS THE TEACHER WAS ABLE TO GET US ENGAGED, INVOLVED, AND TALKING. BUT IN OTHER CASES IT WAS THEM TELLING US WHAT TO DO WITH HOMEWORK AND SIGNING OFF IN ABOUT FIVE MINUTES TIME.” “IT [WAS] THE SAME AMOUNT OF STUDENTS THAT WERE IN CLASSES WHEN WE WERE IN PERSON…DEPENDING ON THE CLASS, MAYBE FIFTEEN TO TWENTY STUDENTS PER AVERAGE CLASS. A LARGER CLASS MIGHT LOOK CLOSER TO THIRTY.” “THE LCI TEAM DID THEIR BEST TO TRY AND PRESERVE A REGULAR SCHEDULE. SO CLASSES…HAPPENED AT THE SAME TIME THAT THEY NORMALLY WOULD HAVE [OTHERWISE]. IT WAS A VERY DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE BEING ABLE TO WAKE UP BLEARY EYED AND TURN ON YOUR PHONE AND YOU'RE IN CLASS.” “…EVEN THE BEST OF STUDENTS GOT A BIT OFF-TRACK IN THAT CAPACITY; MYSELF INCLUDED. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO STAY MOTIVATED IN THAT KIND OF CONTEXT.” “WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE THE IN-PERSON PRESSURE AND MOTIVATION OF TEACHER, WITH A CARROT OR STICK, TO MOTIVATE YOU TO COMPLETE YOUR WORK TO APPLY YOURSELF— IT IS COMPLETELY DEVOID OF ANY KIND OF AWARD, IN TERMS OF YOU FINISHING YOUR WORK. HANDING IN AN ASSIGNMENT FEELS LIKE A COMPLETELY EMPTY TASK. YOU ARE JUST HITTING A BUTTON AND THEN IT GOES AWAY PRETTY MUCH FOREVER, LITTLE IN THE WAY OF FEEDBACK I FOUND. SOME STUDENTS NEVER WENT TO A SINGLE CLASS AND NEVER HANDED IN A SINGLE ASSIGNMENT. AS PER THE GOVERNMENT’S INSTRUCTIONS, YOUR GRADE [NEVER CHANGED] FROM THE MOMENT YOU LEFT IN-PERSON CLASSES. SO AS OF MARCH 15TH [2020], YOUR GRADE WAS SET IN STONE... ANYTHING YOU [CHOSE] TO SUBMIT [WAS] KIND OF UP TO YOU. IN SOME CASES YOUR GRADE COULD GO UP IF YOU HANDED IN AN ASSIGNMENT, BUT NEVER DOWN BELOW YOUR ORIGINAL MARK. A LOT PEOPLE DECIDED THAT WAS ENOUGH FOR THEM; THAT THEY WERE DONE FOR THE YEAR. OTHER PEOPLE SETTLED INTO IT VERY WELL, KEPT A REGIMENTED SCHEDULE AND COMPLETED ALL OF THEIR WORK. MOST OF US FELL SOMEWHERE IN THE MIDDLE THERE. [AL]MOST EVERYONE COMPLETED EVERY ASSIGNMENT. WHETHER OR NOT THAT WAS ON TIME WAS A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT STORY.” DYLAN SPOKE MORE ON HIS TIME AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE HIGH SCHOOL: “…I [HAD] A VERY UNIQUE EXPERIENCE WITH THE DECISION I WAS MAKING ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL…IN THE NINTH GRADE…I WAS PLANNING ON TRANSFERRING OVER TO WINSTON CHURCHILL [HIGH SCHOOL] FOR THEIR IB PROGRAM, WHICH IS ESSENTIALLY LIKE AN ADVANCED PROGRAM OF STUDIES… IT WAS A VERY LANDMARK DECISION FOR ME, BECAUSE I THINK WHAT’S VERY SPECIAL ABOUT LCI IS THEIR EXTRA-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS, AND WHAT THEY’RE ABLE TO OFFER FOR STUDENTS BEYOND ACADEMICS… I’VE HAD A GREAT EXPERIENCE IN THOSE DEPARTMENTS, AS WELL, BUT I THINK WHERE IT REALLY SHINES IS WHERE IT IS ABLE TO NOT ONLY PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH A CREATIVE OUTLET, OR ATHLETIC OUTPUT, OR ANY OTHER KIND OF COMPARABLE EXPERIENCE— THEY ALSO ARE VERY GOOD ABOUT PROVIDING A VERY NURTURING, FAMILIAL SORT OF COMMUNITY. CHOIR AND DRAMA, I THINK, ESPECIALLY ARE GREAT FOR THIS, WHERE YOU HAVE A VERY TIGHT-KNIT…PRETTY LARGE GROUP. THESE [TEACHERS] AT THE SCHOOL, ARE ABLE TO…PULL THESE REALLY LARGE AND DISPARATE GROUPS OF PEOPLE TOGETHER AND REALLY MAKE SOMETHING SPECIAL OUT OF IT, WHERE EVERY STUDENT HAS THIS SORT OF INTRINSIC CONNECTION WITH ONE ANOTHER, WITHOUT BEING…VERY OVERT…FRIENDS…BUT THERE IS STILL THAT CONNECTION THAT YOU HAVE WITH THOSE STUDENTS IN THAT COMMUNITY THAT’S FOSTERED… MOVING INTO HIGH SCHOOL, THAT…BECAME…A REALLY INTEGRAL PART OF WHO I WAS…[ALONG WITH] THE COMMITMENTS THAT NOT ONLY I MADE, BUT EVERY STUDENT MADE TO THESE PROGRAMS, AND THE COMMITMENTS FROM THE STAFF AS WELL…TAKES IT ABOVE-AND-BEYOND AN AVERAGE FINE ARTS EXPERIENCE…BY THE END OF THE YEAR, WHEN ALL IS SAID AND DONE, THAT COMMUNITY, AND THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION THAT WAS PROVIDED FROM THE FINE ARTS DEPARTMENTS REALLY WAS CONFIRMATION THAT THIS WAS WHERE I WAS MEANT TO BE, FOR SURE.” DYLAN OFFERED HIS OUTLOOK ON THE FUTURE: “…THERE’S A VERY PROFOUND SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY THAT WE’RE MOVING INTO SO, I’M SETTLING ON REALISTIC OPTIMISM FOR NOW…BECAUSE THERE’S ALL THESE WHISPERS ABOUT A SECOND WAVE OR A RESURGENCE [OF COVID-19] AFTER…MORE BUSINESSES [AND] PARKS…ARE OPENED UP. BUT WHO KNOWS?,,, SO I’M GOING TO, AGAIN, REMAIN REALISTICALLY OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THIS SITUATION. I KNOW SOMEDAY I’LL GO TO UNIVERSITY. I KNOW SOMEDAY THE STUDENTS WHO ARE COMING UP INTO THEIR GRADUATION YEAR BEHIND ME WILL HAVE SOME SORT OF COMEUPPANCE…FOR THE THINGS THEY DID LOSE OUT ON. I’M NOT SAYING THAT IT WILL BE EASY OR THAT IT WILL BE NORMAL OR THAT IT WILL FEEL ENTIRELY NATURAL BUT I AM SURE THAT THINGS WILL WORK THEMSELVES OUT IN THE END.” FINALLY, DYLAN COMMENTED ON DONATING HIS GRADUATION ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM AND THE CONCEPT OF MAKING HISTORY: “I THINK MORE AND MORE [HISTORY] IS BECOMING, TO ME, SOMETHING THAT’S NOT SO DISTANT… IN THESE TIMES WE’RE IN RIGHT NOW SEEING HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF…OR EVEN HISTORY [FEELING] VERY IMMEDIATE AND…LIKE IT HAS A VERY PROFOUND INFLUENCE ON WHAT’S HAPPENING RIGHT NOW… IN THESE EVER CHANGING TIMES, EVERYTHING WE DO CAN BE CONSIDERED HISTORY AND CAN LEAVE A VERY SIGNIFICANT MARK THAT WILL EITHER COME BACK TO BITE US OR REWARD US IN FUTURE… [DONATING THE GRADUATION ITEMS] FEELS LIKE…I’M LEAVING SOME SORT OF IMPRINT ON HISTORY, THE CLASS OF 2020 IS LEAVING SOME IMPRINT ON HISTORY THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR A VERY LONG TIME…THAT WAS A LITTLE BIT CONVOLUTED BUT…I THINK…I’M COMING TO REALIZE THAT HISTORY DOESN’T JUST EXIST IN THE PAST. HISTORY IS ALWAYS HAPPENING WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT, THE THINGS YOU DO NOW [WILL MAKE] A BIG DIFFERENCE TOMORROW, AND THE NEXT DAY, FIVE YEARS FROM NOW AND FOREVER.” “…WHENEVER YOU THINK OF A MUSEUM OR YOU THINK OF HISTORY YOU THINK OF THE DISTANT PAST THAT YOU DON’T HAVE MUCH…[OF A] PERSONAL CONNECTION TO, SO IT WAS REALLY REMARKABLE TO CONSIDER THAT THE MOMENT THAT WE’RE IN RIGHT NOW WILL SOON BE CONSIDERED HISTORY AND IS SIGNIFICANT ENOUGH TO BE RECORDED, AND TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PERSONAL CONNECTION TO THAT HISTORY IS…VERY RESONANT…” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200024001
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
GRADUATION CAP, TASSEL, AND BAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, POLYESTER, THREAD, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20200024002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GRADUATION CAP, TASSEL, AND BAG
Date
2020
Materials
PLASTIC, POLYESTER, THREAD, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
3
Length
30.7
Width
27
Description
A) BLUE PLASTIC ZIPLOC BAG. LENGTH: 30.7CM WIDTH: 27CM. “HUDSON TAYLOR” IS WRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER ON THE FRONT. THE MARKER INK SLIGHTLY WORN OFF. VERY GOOD CONDITION. B) BLACK SQUARE GRADUATION MORTARBOARD CAP WITH BLACK BUTTON ON THE TOP AT THE CENTER. LENGTH: 25.5CM WIDTH: 22.5CM. INSIDE THE HEADPIECE IS A CIRCULAR WHITE CARDBOARD LABEL WITH BLACK PRINTED LETTERING. IT SAYS “MY GRADUATION CLASS AUTOGRAPHS” “GASPARD SINCE 1909” “100% POLYESTER”. THERE IS A CIRCULAR METAL DIVET IN THE CENTER OF THE CARDBOARD LABEL. THE CAP HAS ELASTIC INSIDE THE EDGES. THERE ARE SOME FOLDS IN THE HEADPIECE, BUT IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. C) GREEN AND GOLDEN YELLOW TASSEL. LENGTH: 23CM WIDTH: 4CM. GOLD FASTENING AND “2020” CHARM PIECE ATTACHED TO THE TOP. GOLDEN YELLOW THREAD LOOP FOR ATTACHING AROUND BUTTON ON TOP OF THE MORTARBOARD. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
EDUCATION
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON JUNE 25TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DYLAN TAYLOR IN REGARD TO THE LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE 2020 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION MEMORABILIA HE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THEIR MEETING. DYLAN SPOKE ABOUT HIS EXPECTATIONS WHEN THE PANDEMIC FIRST AROSE: “…BY MARCH WE WERE DECENTLY SURE THAT BY JUNE WE WOULD BE BACK AT SCHOOL AGAIN BUT…HERE WE ARE. A LOT OF THE NARRATIVE THAT WAS BEING SPREAD AROUND WAS THAT IF WE STAY HOME ENOUGH AND IF WE QUARANTINE ENOUGH [AND HAVE A] SICKNESS FREE SUMMER THAT FALL WILL CONTINUE AS NORMAL AND EVERYTHING WOULD GO BACK TO NORMAL. BUT AS TIME GOES ON IT [WAS] BECOMING INCREASINGLY APPARENT THAT THIS [WAS] NOT GOING TO GO AWAY VERY EASILY IF AT ALL, AND THAT’S A…VERY...DRAMATIC CONTRAST TO HOW WE WERE FEELING IN MARCH…EVEN AS THE MONTHS PROGRESS, I THINK WE ALL GOT MORE AND MORE HOPEFUL…[AND] AROUND APRIL…THERE WAS A PUSH FOR THERE TO BE A GRADUATION– [WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN] TOMORROW ACTUALLY…THEY HAD RESCHEDULED GRADUATION PROVISIONALLY FOR JUNE 26TH [2020]… WE ALL GOT OUR HOPES BACK UP AND THEN WITHIN 2 WEEKS’ TIME OR SO THAT WAS GIVEN THE KIBOSH AS WELL…THERE WERE…WAVES OF OPTIMISM…ABOUT OUR RETURN TO NORMAL… ONCE WE GOT INTO MID… [TO] LATE MAY THERE WAS THIS…ASSUREDNESS THAT THIS IS HERE TO STAY. WE’RE NOT COMING BACK TO NORMAL– PROBABLY EVER.” DYLAN ELABORATED ON THE UNIQUE GRADUATION EVENTS: “…IN GRADE NINE YOU ARE ASSIGNED TO ONE [ADVISOR] TEACHER…AND THAT TEACHER IS THERE TO…HELP YOU MOVE THROUGH YOUR…THREE OR FOUR YEARS OF SCHOOLING…THEN, IN THIS PARTICULAR CASE…WE WERE RECEIVING THESE GRAD PACKAGES BASED ON WHICH ADVISOR YOU HAD. YOU WERE TOLD TO COME TO THE SCHOOL AT A CERTAIN TIME…FOUR OR FIVE INDIVIDUALS WHO WERE [IN] GRADE TWELVE IN MY ADVISOR GROUP, WE ALL CAME [TO THE GRADUATION EVENT] AT SAY…2:00 -3:00 ON A GIVEN DAY….SO THEY HAD US…COME UP IN OUR CARS, PARK IN A SPECIFIC SPOT BY THE SIDEWALK, AND WALK INTO THIS COURTYARD IN THE FRONT OF OUR SCHOOL. FIRST, THEY WOULD GIVE US THIS PACKAGE OF ITEMS [THAT WAS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM]…THEY WOULD HAND IT OVER TO US OVER A TABLE. YOU’D GET A LITTLE PICTURE FOR…OUR YEARBOOK… STUDENT COUNCIL, OF WHICH I’M A PART-OF, ORGANIZED A LITTLE STUDENT VIDEO, SO THEY HAD ALMOST EVERY GRADUATING STUDENT RECORD A LITTLE MESSAGE, OR…RECORD ONE LINE OF A LARGER SPEECH THAT WOULD BE DONE LATER; [THEN IT WAS] POSTED ON SOCIAL MEDIA, AND SHARED TO PARENTS…THAT WAS ABOUT IT...THE TEACHERS WERE VERY GOOD SPORTS ABOUT IT. THEY GAVE YOU A BIG CHEER. BUT, OTHER THAN THAT, LITTLE TO NO FANFARE, AND NO DECORATIONS, OR ANYTHING…JUST ABOUT LIKE A SIX MINUTE PROCESS OF GRABBING [THE GRADUATION PACKAGE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM]. “SO, THE FRONT DOORS OF LCI HAVE…A CONCRETE COURTYARD IN FRONT OF THEM, WITH SOME BENCHES AND LITTLE THINGS FOR STUDENTS…[THE] TEACHERS HAD SET UP IN THAT CONCRETE SPACE TO HAND [GRADUATING STUDENTS] THESE ITEMS…NOT INCLUDING THE SIGN.” “…[THERE WAS] NO POSING [FOR PHOTOS] OR ANYTHING…[THE TEACHERS] JUST…USHERED YOU OVER TO A CERTAIN SPOT WHERE YOU WERE SUPPOSED TO STAND, AND PASSED [THE GRADUATION ITEMS] OVER.” “THAT [EVENT]…WAS THE BIGGEST MOMENT THAT PALES IN COMPARISON WITH THE REAL…HANDING-OF-THE-DIPLOMA MOMENT, WHEN YOU ARE IN FRONT OF YOUR PEERS, AND YOUR FAMILY, AND THE PUBLIC…THAT ABSENCE OF PEOPLE TO SEE IT HAPPEN FELT…VERY EMPTY AND INSIGNIFICANT…EVEN LOOKING THROUGH THESE ITEMS AFTERWARDS, THEY DIDN’T FEEL LIKE THEY MEANT ANYTHING, AND THAT WHOLE EXPERIENCE, IN GENERAL, DIDN’T REALLY FEEL LIKE IT MEANT ANYTHING. AS HARD AS THE TEACHERS TRIED, AND AS MUCH EFFORT AS THEY PUT INTO IT…IT REALLY WAS KIND OF A FACSIMILE…A POOR FACSIMILE OF A REAL GRADUATION.” “I HAD HONESTLY NO IDEA WHAT TO EXPECT…COMING UP TO THE SCHOOL; SEEING THE VERY SPARSE SET-UP THEY HAD THERE WAS A LITTLE SHOCKING…DEPENDING ON THE TEACHERS THAT WERE PRESENT, THEY DID SOME KIND OF GROUP PHOTOS, WHICH THEY WERE IMMEDIATELY SCOLDED FOR AFTERWARDS, BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO DO THAT… IT WAS…A BLEAK MOMENT…AS HAPPY AS THEY TRIED TO BE; AS HAPPY AS WE WERE MEANT TO BE, IT DIDN’T QUITE MEASURE UP...” ACCORDING TO A JUNE 22, 2020 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, THE SCHOOL ORGANIZED A PARADE, FOLLOWING ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES REGULATIONS, TO CELEBRATE THE 225 LCI GRADS OF 2020 AMID THE PANDEMIC. FINE ARTS AND ATHLETIC AWARDS WERE ALSO DELIVERED TO THE HOUSES OF RECIPIENTS. IN CELEBRATION, DYLAN’S GRAD CLASS ALSO RECEIVED A LAWN SIGN: “…THE LCI STAFF WAS KIND ENOUGH TO DELIVER ONE [SIGN] TO EVERY SINGLE GRADUATING STUDENT…THE ADVISOR TEACHER I MENTIONED BEFORE (MINE IS ACTUALLY MY CHOIR TEACHER…) DELIVERED THE SIGN PERSONALLY TO STUDENTS, AND HAD A PICTURE OF THEM PLANTING IT ON THEIR LAWN, [WHICH WAS] VERY NICE. IT WASN’T EXACTLY A SURPRISE…BECAUSE I SAW PICTURES OF STUDENTS RECEIVING THEM PREVIOUSLY— BUT, IN THE E-MAIL SENT TO PARENTS, IT WAS DECLARED AS A SURPRISE FOR STUDENTS…IT WAS NICE TO NOT ONLY SEE OUR TEACHER AGAIN, BUT TO HAVE THIS…EMBLEM…IN FRONT OF MY HOUSE, THAT [SHOWED] WE DID COMPLETE ALL FOUR YEARS, AND IT DID FEEL GOOD.” DYLAN EXPLAINED THE VALUE OF THE ITEMS HE RECEIVED IN THE GRADUATION PACKAGE: [THE] FINE AND SUPPORTING ARTS CERTIFICATE [WAS SIGNIFICANT COMPARED TO SOME OF THE OTHER ITEMS]…IT [HAD] BEEN SIGNED HERE BY…MY CHOIR TEACHER…MY DRAMA TEACHER; AND MY PRINCIPAL… ALL OF THESE THINGS ARE IMPORTANT TO ME. OBVIOUSLY, MY CERTIFICATE OF BILINGUALISM; I SPENT [ABOUT] TEN…YEARS BEING EDUCATED IN FRENCH, AND THAT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO ME OBVIOUSLY. I’VE HAD SO MANY…PERSONAL EXPERIENCES [AND] MEMORIES WITH ALL THE FINE ARTS PROGRAMS AT LCI… SO MUCH OF WHO I AM TODAY CAN BE OWED TO THESE TEACHERS; TO THESE PROGRAMS. SO, AS MUCH AS IT’S A PIECE OF PAPER WITH A LITTLE JPEG OF A STAMP HERE, INSTEAD OF A REAL ONE…THIS DOES MEAN A LOT TO ME—…THIS…DECLARATION THAT I DID PASS THROUGH THESE PROGRAMS; THAT I DID…PUT IN THE EFFORT, AND THE WORK, TO LEAVE MY IMPACT ON THEM, AND TO BE IMPACTED BY THEM. ADDITIONALLY, IN THIS PACKAGE, THE ONE THING I DIDN’T INCLUDE [IN THE DONATION TO THE MUSEUM] WAS A LITTLE LETTER THAT YOU WROTE TO YOURSELF IN THE NINTH GRADE. IT WAS AN ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT…EVERY STUDENT WAS MANDATED TO TYPE OUT A LETTER TO THEIR GRADE TWELVE SELF, THAT WOULD THEN BE INCLUDED IN THIS PACKAGE, AND [THAT WAS IMPORTANT]. IT WAS CERTAINLY AN INSIGHTFUL LOOK INTO HOW MUCH I HAVE CHANGED…OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS.” DYLAN COMMENTED FURTHER ON THE EXPERIENCE OF GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL AMIDST THE GLOBAL COVID-19 PANDEMIC: “IT’S A LITTLE BIT OF A LETDOWN IN SOME WAYS…IT’S WONDERFUL TO HAVE THESE PHYSICAL TOKENS OF THE TIME I SPENT IN HIGH SCHOOL BUT IT FEELS LIKE SUCH A GRANDIOSE EXPERIENCE COMING TO SUCH AN ANTICLIMACTIC FINISH IN SOME WAYS. A LOT OF THE MOST IMPORTANT EXPERIENCES IN MY ENTIRE LIFE THAT I’LL REMEMBER FOREVER HAPPENED IN THIS BUILDING, LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, AND I FEEL A LITTLE CHEATED IN SOME WAYS TO HAVE SUCH A KIND OF LACK LUSTER FINISH – AS MUCH WORK AS THE LCI STAFF HAS PUT INTO RECOGNIZING THEIR GRADUATES AND THE STUDENTS WHO DID…GO ABOVE AND BEYOND, IT’S STILL A KIND OF MEAGRE FINISH I SUPPOSE.” “…MARCH 15TH WAS WHEN SCHOOLS CLOSED FOR GOOD INDEFINITELY AND…AT THAT TIME WE ALL HAD VERY VISCERAL REACTIONS. I REMEMBER COMING HOME FROM WORK AND THEN AS SOON AS I GOT IN MY CAR I WAS TOLD THAT I WASN’T GOING BACK TO SCHOOL WHICH IS A VERY STRANGE THING TO HEAR BECAUSE NONE OF US EXPECTED IT…THAT DATE MARCH 15TH…IT WAS ANNOUNCED BY LCI ADMINISTRATION THAT THEY HAD CANCELLED SOME EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES OR SPORTS GAMES…TO PRESERVE SAFETY. WE WERE ALL UPSET…WE DIDN’T SEE ANYTHING LIKE THIS COMING. THEY HAD ALSO RECENTLY QUASHED A TRIP TO DISNEYLAND THAT THE BAND AND CHOIR HAD PLANNED SO WE WERE ALL…REELING AFTER THAT…SEEING IF WE COULD RECUPERATE ANY KIND OF FUNDS TO REALLOCATE TO SOME OTHER TRIP SO IT WAS ALL…SUDDEN AND FAST IN THAT WEEK…EVERYTHING SEEMED TO BE CANCELLED... SO IT WAS BEWILDERMENT AT FIRST AND THEN EVERYONE WENT INTO A STAGE OF…A VERY DEEP SORROW AND…FEELING SORRY FOR OURSELVES, WHICH WASN’T HELPED BY THE ABOUT 2 WEEK GAP THAT WE HAD IN TERMS OF ACADEMICS. THE SCHOOL TOOK A COUPLE OF WEEKS OFF JUST TO DRAFT SOME KIND OF PLAN AS TO WHAT THEY WERE GOING TO DO FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE YEAR. SO WE HAD A LOT OF TIME TO…GRIEVE AND PROCESS…WHAT A CATACLYSMIC EVENT THIS REALLY WAS. BUT…AFTER THAT WE KIND OF SETTLED INTO THE ONLINE DISSEMINATION PLATFORM…SOME BETTER THAN OTHERS, BOTH STAFF AND STUDENTS ACCLIMATED TO THIS NEW CHANGE…FOR BETTER OR WORSE… BUT THEN AGAIN, NEARING THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR, I THINK WE’RE ALL…FEELING…THIS HEAVINESS A LITTLE BIT. MAYBE NOT AS MUCH AS WHEN THE…CLASSES ENDED IN PERSON – BUT NOW THAT IT’S ALL OVER THERE’S A BIT OF WEIGHT THERE, THERE’S STILL THAT KIND OF [A MOROSE FEELING] THAT I MENTIONED EARLIER THAT’S…CREEPING BACK.” DYLAN ATTRIBUTED THIS SAD SENTIMENT TO BOTH THE PANDEMIC AND THE TRANSITION OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL IN GENERAL: “…AS MUCH AS THAT HEAVINESS IS [FROM] THE LEAVING BEHIND THESE EXPERIENCES WE’VE HAD, IT’S ALSO…A SADNESS THAT WASN’T LIVED OUT TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL. USUALLY AROUND GRADUATION THERE’S…[A] BIG HURRAH EVENT AND A BIG ANNOUNCEMENT OF GOING OUT INTO THE WORLD...BUT IN THIS CASE IT WAS…LIKE A SILENT CREEPING OUT INSTEAD OF A BIG HURRAH. SO…THERE IS THAT REGRET…THAT WE WEREN’T ABLE TO FULLY LIVE OUT THE EXPERIENCE, BUT THERE IS ALSO THE SADNESS OF LEAVING OUR OLD LIFE, OUR CHILDHOOD BEHIND…IT’S MY EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY TOMORROW WHICH COINCIDES CLOSELY WITH MY LAST SCHOOL EXPERIENCE SO VERY MUCH THIS IS…THE END OF LIFE AS WE KNEW IT AND OUR CHILDHOOD, IF YOU WILL.” “…IT WAS A PLEASURE TO HAVE THE TIME WE DID HAVE IN SCHOOL. WE HAD ABOUT SEVEN PRETTY SOLID MONTHS OF A GRAD YEAR…AS MUCH AS THERE IS A BIT OF UNFAIRNESS THERE, I ALSO FEEL BAD FOR THESE NEW STUDENTS WHO ARE MOVING INTO AN UNCERTAIN GRAD YEAR; WHERE THEY WON’T HAVE THINGS LIKE SCHOOL PLAYS, THAT WE WERE ABLE TO HAVE, OR BEING PART OF CONCERTS OR SPORTS GAMES. THE WHOLE NINE YARDS. EVERYTHING WILL BE CONDENSED AND WILL HAVE THAT SAME UNDERWHELMING EFFECT THAT I THINK WE EXPERIENCED TO SOME DEGREE. I DON’T EXACTLY ENVY THIS GRAD CLASS OF 2021. CERTAINLY, I WOULD LOVE TO BE BACK AT SCHOOL. I WISH THEM ALL THE BEST, AND I HOPE THEY ARE ABLE TO MAKE THE BEST OF WHATEVER KIND OF UNDERWHELMING EXPERIENCES THEY ARE MOVING INTO.” DYLAN TALKED ABOUT TAKING CLASSES ONLINE DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR: “I WANT TO PREFACE WHAT I AM SAYING HERE BY COMMENDING THE LCI STAFF, BY MAKING THE BEST OF WHAT THEY HAD UNDER VERY SHORT CIRCUMSTANCES. WE USED A SOFTWARE CALLED ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’…IT WORKED IN SOME CAPACITIES AND IT DID NOT WORK IN SOME CAPACITIES. OBVIOUSLY DOING DISTANCE LEARNING AND DISTANCE WORK IS A LOT DIFFERENT THAN HOLDING PEOPLE ACCOUNTABLE IN PERSON. FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS, SOMETIMES IT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO STAY ON TRACK AND TO STAY COMMITTED TO THEIR WORK, ESPECIALLY UNDER THESE KIND OF DISAPPOINTING AND DISHEARTENING CIRCUMSTANCES. THAT COMBINED WITH THIS NEW SYSTEM THAT DOES NOT EXACTLY HOLD STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE WITH THEIR WORK—OR LACK THEREOF—IN THE SAME WAY THAT IN-PERSON SCHOOLING DOES. I DID HAVE SOME REALLY GOOD EXPERIENCES [IN ONLINE CLASSES], SPECIFICALLY IN DRAMA. [THE TEACHERS] MADE INTERESTING USE OF THE SOFTWARE. WE WERE ABLE TO DIVE INTO THE HISTORY OF DRAMA AND THE THEORY OF DRAMA. WE ALSO WORKED ON SOME PROJECTS WHERE WE WERE EXPERIMENTING WITH THIS VIDEO CALLING SOFTWARE, SIMILAR TO SKYPE OR FACETIME THAT THEY HAD IN THE ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’. WE WERE ABLE TO DO SOME INTERESTING DRAMA PROJECTS IN THAT CAPACITY. OUR TEACHER…KEPT US VERY BUSY AND ENGAGED. IT WAS A BIT OF A MIXED BAG. I KNOW GOING FORWARD THE SCHOOL IS LOOKING AT A MORE INTENSIVE ACADEMIC STRAIN ON THEIR STUDENTS, IF THEY ARE LOOKING TOWARDS ONLINE LEARNING. WHICH I KNOW THEY ARE LOOKING TOWARDS A MIXED MODEL, WHERE SOME OF YOUR WORK WILL BE ONLINE AND SOME IN PERSON. I KNOW THE ONLINE WORK THAT THEY WILL DISSEMINATE WILL BE MORE ENGAGING AND CHALLENGING. WHEREAS THIS YEAR IT WAS A LITTLE BIT OF A WRITE-OFF, PERHAPS.” “ABOUT ONE DAY OUT OF THE WEEK, TEACHERS WOULD HOLD LIVE, IN-PERSON, CLASSES WITH THEIR STUDENTS. AGAIN, FOR MORE INFORMATION HEAVY CLASSES LIKE SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, MATH…THEY WOULD HAVE AROUND FIVE CLASSES IN FRONT OF WHITEBOARD WHILE TEACHING THE STUDENTS THROUGH A CAMERA.” “…IN OTHER CASES THEY WOULD SCREEN SHARE A POWER POINT. IT VARIED FROM TEACHER TO TEACHER. BUT, I DID SEE SOME TEACHERS STANDING IN FRONT OF A WHITE BOARD AND WRITING…” “IN THAT ‘MICROSOFT TEAMS’ SOFTWARE THEY HAVE A VIDEO CALLING FUNCTIONALITY. ABOUT EVERY WEEK OR SO, DEPENDING ON THE CLASS, YOU WOULD MEET UP WITH YOUR TEACHER AND THEY WOULD TURN ON THE CAMERA AND USUALLY [YOU WOULD] SEE THEIR FACE.” “…EVERY STUDENT WOULD PILE INTO THE CLASS AND EITHER TURN ON THEIR CAMERA OR NOT. YOU WOULD HAVE A CLASS FULL…WITH NOTHING ON THE CAMERA, AND THE TEACHER…DICTATING OUT INTO AN ENDLESS SEA OF DARKNESS. IT VARIED FROM CLASS TO CLASS. AGAIN, WITH THAT DRAMA CLASS THE TEACHER WAS ABLE TO GET US ENGAGED, INVOLVED, AND TALKING. BUT IN OTHER CASES IT WAS THEM TELLING US WHAT TO DO WITH HOMEWORK AND SIGNING OFF IN ABOUT FIVE MINUTES TIME.” “IT [WAS] THE SAME AMOUNT OF STUDENTS THAT WERE IN CLASSES WHEN WE WERE IN PERSON…DEPENDING ON THE CLASS, MAYBE FIFTEEN TO TWENTY STUDENTS PER AVERAGE CLASS. A LARGER CLASS MIGHT LOOK CLOSER TO THIRTY.” “THE LCI TEAM DID THEIR BEST TO TRY AND PRESERVE A REGULAR SCHEDULE. SO CLASSES…HAPPENED AT THE SAME TIME THAT THEY NORMALLY WOULD HAVE [OTHERWISE]. IT WAS A VERY DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE BEING ABLE TO WAKE UP BLEARY EYED AND TURN ON YOUR PHONE AND YOU'RE IN CLASS.” “…EVEN THE BEST OF STUDENTS GOT A BIT OFF-TRACK IN THAT CAPACITY; MYSELF INCLUDED. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO STAY MOTIVATED IN THAT KIND OF CONTEXT.” “WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE THE IN-PERSON PRESSURE AND MOTIVATION OF TEACHER, WITH A CARROT OR STICK, TO MOTIVATE YOU TO COMPLETE YOUR WORK TO APPLY YOURSELF— IT IS COMPLETELY DEVOID OF ANY KIND OF AWARD, IN TERMS OF YOU FINISHING YOUR WORK. HANDING IN AN ASSIGNMENT FEELS LIKE A COMPLETELY EMPTY TASK. YOU ARE JUST HITTING A BUTTON AND THEN IT GOES AWAY PRETTY MUCH FOREVER, LITTLE IN THE WAY OF FEEDBACK I FOUND. SOME STUDENTS NEVER WENT TO A SINGLE CLASS AND NEVER HANDED IN A SINGLE ASSIGNMENT. AS PER THE GOVERNMENT’S INSTRUCTIONS, YOUR GRADE [NEVER CHANGED] FROM THE MOMENT YOU LEFT IN-PERSON CLASSES. SO AS OF MARCH 15TH [2020], YOUR GRADE WAS SET IN STONE... ANYTHING YOU [CHOSE] TO SUBMIT [WAS] KIND OF UP TO YOU. IN SOME CASES YOUR GRADE COULD GO UP IF YOU HANDED IN AN ASSIGNMENT, BUT NEVER DOWN BELOW YOUR ORIGINAL MARK. A LOT PEOPLE DECIDED THAT WAS ENOUGH FOR THEM; THAT THEY WERE DONE FOR THE YEAR. OTHER PEOPLE SETTLED INTO IT VERY WELL, KEPT A REGIMENTED SCHEDULE AND COMPLETED ALL OF THEIR WORK. MOST OF US FELL SOMEWHERE IN THE MIDDLE THERE. [AL]MOST EVERYONE COMPLETED EVERY ASSIGNMENT. WHETHER OR NOT THAT WAS ON TIME WAS A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT STORY.” DYLAN SPOKE MORE ON HIS TIME AT LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE HIGH SCHOOL: “…I [HAD] A VERY UNIQUE EXPERIENCE WITH THE DECISION I WAS MAKING ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL…IN THE NINTH GRADE…I WAS PLANNING ON TRANSFERRING OVER TO WINSTON CHURCHILL [HIGH SCHOOL] FOR THEIR IB PROGRAM, WHICH IS ESSENTIALLY LIKE AN ADVANCED PROGRAM OF STUDIES… IT WAS A VERY LANDMARK DECISION FOR ME, BECAUSE I THINK WHAT’S VERY SPECIAL ABOUT LCI IS THEIR EXTRA-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS, AND WHAT THEY’RE ABLE TO OFFER FOR STUDENTS BEYOND ACADEMICS… I’VE HAD A GREAT EXPERIENCE IN THOSE DEPARTMENTS, AS WELL, BUT I THINK WHERE IT REALLY SHINES IS WHERE IT IS ABLE TO NOT ONLY PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH A CREATIVE OUTLET, OR ATHLETIC OUTPUT, OR ANY OTHER KIND OF COMPARABLE EXPERIENCE— THEY ALSO ARE VERY GOOD ABOUT PROVIDING A VERY NURTURING, FAMILIAL SORT OF COMMUNITY. CHOIR AND DRAMA, I THINK, ESPECIALLY ARE GREAT FOR THIS, WHERE YOU HAVE A VERY TIGHT-KNIT…PRETTY LARGE GROUP. THESE [TEACHERS] AT THE SCHOOL, ARE ABLE TO…PULL THESE REALLY LARGE AND DISPARATE GROUPS OF PEOPLE TOGETHER AND REALLY MAKE SOMETHING SPECIAL OUT OF IT, WHERE EVERY STUDENT HAS THIS SORT OF INTRINSIC CONNECTION WITH ONE ANOTHER, WITHOUT BEING…VERY OVERT…FRIENDS…BUT THERE IS STILL THAT CONNECTION THAT YOU HAVE WITH THOSE STUDENTS IN THAT COMMUNITY THAT’S FOSTERED… MOVING INTO HIGH SCHOOL, THAT…BECAME…A REALLY INTEGRAL PART OF WHO I WAS…[ALONG WITH] THE COMMITMENTS THAT NOT ONLY I MADE, BUT EVERY STUDENT MADE TO THESE PROGRAMS, AND THE COMMITMENTS FROM THE STAFF AS WELL…TAKES IT ABOVE-AND-BEYOND AN AVERAGE FINE ARTS EXPERIENCE…BY THE END OF THE YEAR, WHEN ALL IS SAID AND DONE, THAT COMMUNITY, AND THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION THAT WAS PROVIDED FROM THE FINE ARTS DEPARTMENTS REALLY WAS CONFIRMATION THAT THIS WAS WHERE I WAS MEANT TO BE, FOR SURE.” DYLAN OFFERED HIS OUTLOOK ON THE FUTURE: “…THERE’S A VERY PROFOUND SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY THAT WE’RE MOVING INTO SO, I’M SETTLING ON REALISTIC OPTIMISM FOR NOW…BECAUSE THERE’S ALL THESE WHISPERS ABOUT A SECOND WAVE OR A RESURGENCE [OF COVID-19] AFTER…MORE BUSINESSES [AND] PARKS…ARE OPENED UP. BUT WHO KNOWS?,,, SO I’M GOING TO, AGAIN, REMAIN REALISTICALLY OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THIS SITUATION. I KNOW SOMEDAY I’LL GO TO UNIVERSITY. I KNOW SOMEDAY THE STUDENTS WHO ARE COMING UP INTO THEIR GRADUATION YEAR BEHIND ME WILL HAVE SOME SORT OF COMEUPPANCE…FOR THE THINGS THEY DID LOSE OUT ON. I’M NOT SAYING THAT IT WILL BE EASY OR THAT IT WILL BE NORMAL OR THAT IT WILL FEEL ENTIRELY NATURAL BUT I AM SURE THAT THINGS WILL WORK THEMSELVES OUT IN THE END.” FINALLY, DYLAN COMMENTED ON DONATING HIS GRADUATION ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM AND THE CONCEPT OF MAKING HISTORY: “I THINK MORE AND MORE [HISTORY] IS BECOMING, TO ME, SOMETHING THAT’S NOT SO DISTANT… IN THESE TIMES WE’RE IN RIGHT NOW SEEING HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF…OR EVEN HISTORY [FEELING] VERY IMMEDIATE AND…LIKE IT HAS A VERY PROFOUND INFLUENCE ON WHAT’S HAPPENING RIGHT NOW… IN THESE EVER CHANGING TIMES, EVERYTHING WE DO CAN BE CONSIDERED HISTORY AND CAN LEAVE A VERY SIGNIFICANT MARK THAT WILL EITHER COME BACK TO BITE US OR REWARD US IN FUTURE… [DONATING THE GRADUATION ITEMS] FEELS LIKE…I’M LEAVING SOME SORT OF IMPRINT ON HISTORY, THE CLASS OF 2020 IS LEAVING SOME IMPRINT ON HISTORY THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR A VERY LONG TIME…THAT WAS A LITTLE BIT CONVOLUTED BUT…I THINK…I’M COMING TO REALIZE THAT HISTORY DOESN’T JUST EXIST IN THE PAST. HISTORY IS ALWAYS HAPPENING WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT, THE THINGS YOU DO NOW [WILL MAKE] A BIG DIFFERENCE TOMORROW, AND THE NEXT DAY, FIVE YEARS FROM NOW AND FOREVER.” “…WHENEVER YOU THINK OF A MUSEUM OR YOU THINK OF HISTORY YOU THINK OF THE DISTANT PAST THAT YOU DON’T HAVE MUCH…[OF A] PERSONAL CONNECTION TO, SO IT WAS REALLY REMARKABLE TO CONSIDER THAT THE MOMENT THAT WE’RE IN RIGHT NOW WILL SOON BE CONSIDERED HISTORY AND IS SIGNIFICANT ENOUGH TO BE RECORDED, AND TO HAVE SOME KIND OF PERSONAL CONNECTION TO THAT HISTORY IS…VERY RESONANT…” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200024002
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1945
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.2
Length
12.2
Width
17.5
Description
WOOD BOX WITH DARK-WOOD TONES AND LIGHTER WOOD BASE; BOX HAS CARVED SCROLL PATTERN ON TOP WITH CARVED TEXT, “MY DARLING IRENE”; BOX HAS CARVED SCROLL PATTERN ON FRONT WITH CARVED TEXT, “HOLLAND 1945”. BOX HAS NAILS IN SIDES AND ATTACHED TO BASE; BOX HAS BRASS HINGES ON BACK. INSIDE OF BOX HAS MINOR RESIDUE AND STAINING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON THE CARVED BOX, DARMODY SHARED, “DAD SENT [THE BOX] FROM OVERSEAS, TO MOM, FROM HOLLAND…HE DID SEND A FEW THINGS, BUT IT WAS MAINLY THE LETTER-WRITING BACK-AND-FORTH. HE MADE SURE MOM SENT BOXES OF COOKIES, AND DIFFERENT THINGS…MORE PSYCHOLOGICAL, THAN NEEDING THE COOKIES.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE [HIS] KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND [GRANDPA] WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN [GRANDPA] DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM." DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE, THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], [HE] ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1945
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
7.3
Diameter
30.6
Description
BROWN WOODEN BOWL; BOWL HAS SCALLOPED EDGES; BOWL TAPERS FROM TOP TO BASE; BOWL IS CARVED INWARDS FROM UPPER EDGES. INSIDE OF BOWL HAS CARVED WREATH OF LEAVES WITH TEXT AT THE TOP, “HOLLAND”, AND TEXT AT THE BOTTOM, “1945”, AND CARVED FLOWER IN THE CENTER. BASE HAS A HOLE CARVED IN THE CENTER. BOWL HAS MINOR DUST AND RESIDUE INSIDE; BOWL HAS LIGHT WEAR AND SCRATCHING INSIDE AND ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
MILITARY
History
ON JUNE 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL DARMODY REGARDING HER DONATION OF OBJECTS RELATED TO HER PARENTS, IRENE (NEE NAGY) AND JOHN FROUWS. ON THE BOWL, DARMODY SHARED, “DAD SENT [THE BOWL] FROM OVERSEAS, TO MOM, FROM HOLLAND…HE WATCHED THE GUY MAKE THIS [BOWL]…HE DID SEND A FEW THINGS, BUT IT WAS MAINLY THE LETTER-WRITING BACK-AND-FORTH. HE MADE SURE MOM SENT BOXES OF COOKIES, AND DIFFERENT THINGS…MORE PSYCHOLOGICAL, THAN NEEDING THE COOKIES.” “[THE BOWL WAS USED BY MY MOM AS A] JEWELRY BOX—THIS WAS PROBABLY ON THAT TABLE FOREVER.” ON HER FATHER’S SERVICE IN THE CANADIAN MILITARY, DARMODY RECALLED, “I THINK IT WAS POVERTY [THAT MOTIVATED DAD TO ENLIST]…DAD STRUGGLED IN THE 1930S. HE WAS PULLED OUT OF GRADE 11 TO WORK IN THE COAL MINE, AND HE GOT A LUCKY BREAK FROM BILL HOPE, TO WORK IN GALT GARDENS WITH PLANTS, BEFORE HE SIGNED UP [FOR THE WAR EFFORT]. THAT WAS SIGNIFICANT, AND THEY BECAME FRIENDS WHEN HE RETURNED FROM THE WAR…HE WAS A GOOD MENTOR TO DAD, AND THAT’S WHERE [HIS] KNOWLEDGE OF PLANTS GREW. [DAD] ENLISTED, BECAUSE THEN HE HAD A CHOICE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO FIGHT IN THE FRONT-LINE, SO, IF YOU VOLUNTEERED EARLY, YOU GOT TO PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO, SO HE PICKED ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, AND HE WAS REALLY WELL-TRAINED.” “MY DAD’S FAMILY CAME [FROM HOLLAND] IN THE ‘20S—’25—AND HIS DAD WANTED TO BE A FARMER HERE, AND [GRANDPA] WAS THE OLDEST, SO HE AGREED TO EMIGRATE FROM HOLLAND. THERE WASN’T ENOUGH LAND [IN HOLLAND]…AND HE DECIDED HE WANTED TO FARM SOMEWHERE ELSE, ‘CAUSE IT WOULDN’T HAVE WORKED OUT STAYING IN HOLLAND. SO, BECAUSE HE DIED IN THE ‘30S, TRYING TO SAVE THAT LITTLE BOY…WHO HAD FALLEN THROUGH THE ICE NEAR THE WEIR IN THE OLDMAN RIVER. THEY BOTH DROWNED…BUT HE HAD A FEW FAILURES, I THINK, WITH FARMING, AND HE DID WORK FOR THE COAL MINING COMPANY…WHEN [GRANDPA] DIED, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE GAVE HIS WIDOW, AND THE FAMILY, $30.00 A MONTH [I THINK IT WAS RELIEF MONEY]. SO DAD WAS HIGHLY-MOTIVATED. HE DIDN’T WANT TO GO OVERSEAS, AND BE KILLED…BUT, IF HE SIGNED UP EARLY, HE COULD PICK AND CHOOSE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO, AND START SENDING MONEY TO HIS MOTHER…ONLY DAD’S OLDEST SIBLING, GERTRUDE, WAS MARRIED. HIS OTHER SIBLINGS, ALICE, TINA, HARRY, AND JIM WERE YOUNGER AND NOT ABLE TO FINANCIALLY SUPPORT THEIR MOTHER. THE THREE YOUNGEST WERE STILL IN SCHOOL…THEY WEREN’T OF AN AGE WHERE THEY COULD WORK, AND SUPPORT THE MOTHER. SO, HE WAS IN A GOOD POSITION TO DO SO, BY SIGNING UP [FOR THE MILITARY IN 1940].” “[DAD] REALLY FELT CANADIAN, THROUGH-AND-THROUGH…AS A KID, HIS PARENTS TRUSTED HIM. HE WOULD BE GONE ALL WEEKEND, AT ALEXANDER WILDERNESS, JUST CAMPING WITH A FRIEND. THEY DIDN’T WORRY ABOUT HIM AT THE RIVER BOTTOM. HE LOVED THE COULEES…THIS WAS HOME. HOLLAND DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO HIM, BECAUSE HE WAS SO YOUNG WHEN HE CAME HERE…HIS MOM COULDN’T GO BACK, AND SHE PROBABLY HADN’T BONDED AS WELL TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, ESPECIALLY WITHOUT HER HUSBAND…THE IRONY…HE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN HOLLAND [DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR], AND HE WAS AN ASSET, BECAUSE HE COULD SPEAK SOME DUTCH, I’M NOT SURE HOW WELL, BUT IN EMERGENCIES THEY WOULD USE HIM." DARMODY ELABORATED ON HER PARENTS’ RELATIONSHIP, NOTING, “FOR DAD, [THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MOM] STARTED REALLY EARLY. MOM WAS 4 YEARS OLDER, AND HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE BOY. HE WOULD PLAY WITH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, BUT 3-4 YEARS [AGE DIFFERENCE WHEN] YOU’RE YOUNG, IS A LOT…HE PROBABLY WAS A NICE KID, BUT SHE DIDN’T SHOW ANY INTEREST. BUT HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER EARLY, AND HE PROCEEDED…MOM WOULD HAVE BEEN [LIVING] IN DIAMOND CITY. DAD MIGHT HAVE BEEN ON THE NORTH SIDE, THEY HAD A LITTLE HOUSE.” “THINGS WERE HAPPENING DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION. MY MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER [VERONA NAGY], HAD AN EXTREMELY UNHAPPY MARRIAGE. MY GRANDFATHER [STEVE NAGY], [HE] ALLEGEDLY DRANK TOO MUCH AND WOULD OFTEN SQUANDER HIS MEAGRE COAL-MINING EARNINGS ON ALCOHOL. IN 1933, SHE DECIDED TO HOMESTEAD IN PEACE RIVER AREA [HARMON VALLEY]. HER THIRD OLDEST SON [LEWIS] CAME WITH HER, AND HE BUILT HER A LOVELY LOG CABIN. DURING THE DEPRESSION, MOM [IRENE NAGY] SPENT TIME IN CHICAGO WITH HER BROTHER STEVE AND HIS FAMILY. SHE ALSO ALTERNATED BETWEEN LETHBRIDGE AND PEACE RIVER. IN PEACE RIVER THEY HAD LOTS TO EAT BUT VERY LITTLE MONEY. THROUGH HER YOUNGEST BROTHER, MITCH, MOM MOST LIKELY LEARNED THAT DAD WAS ABOUT TO ENLIST IN [THE SECOND WORLD WAR]. IN 1939, MY PARENTS ALLEGEDLY STARTED DATING. THEY WOULD SPEND LOTS OF TIME IN THE COULEES HAVING PICNICS AND PICKING SASKATOON BERRIES…THE THIRD OLDEST BROTHER, AND ALL HER SIBLINGS, EXCEPT FOR HER SISTER, MARY, MOVED EVENTUALLY TO PEACE RIVER, AND JUST THE TWO SISTERS REMAINED. DAD ASKED MOM, WHEN THEY MARRIED IN ’43, TO MAKE HER HOME BASE LETHBRIDGE. SHE WAS GOING BACK AND FORTH…TO HELP HER MOM.” “THEY STARTED TO COURT IN THE ‘40S [AND MARRIED IN 1943], BECAUSE HE GOT A LEAVE FROM THE TRAINING CAMP IN ONTARIO…SHE WAS IN PEACE RIVER AT THE TIME, WHEN HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM, AND HE WAS ON A SHORT LEAVE. HE TOOK HIS MOTHER, IN HIS CAR, FROM LETHBRIDGE TO PEACE RIVER, AND IT WAS LIKE A MAJOR EXCURSION ON GRAVEL ROADS, TO MEET MOM, AND THEN THE TWO MOTHERS WERE TOGETHER.” DARMODY ELABORATED ON HOW SHE OBTAINED HER PARENTS’ COLLECTION INCLUDING THE TROPHY, NOTING, “[THE OBJECTS CAME INTO MY POSSESSION TOGETHER]…WHEN DAD DIED…[IN] 2011.” “[I WANTED TO KEEP THEM BECAUSE] THEY CONNECT ME TO THE PAST, AND WHEN…THE FORMER GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S WIFE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE WROTE THAT BOOK, ‘MATRONS AND MADAMS’, SHE SAID IT USUALLY TAKES 3-4 GENERATIONS FOR THE WAR EFFECTS TO BE ELIMINATED, FROM THE GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDKIDS, SO, I WAS INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE WAR…I HAD TO TEACH SOCIAL STUDIES AT ONE POINT, IN VANCOUVER, SO I LEARNED, DID A LOT OF PREPARATION. DAD WAS SUPPORTING HIS WIDOWED MOTHER…AFTER 1943, HE WAS SENDING MONEY TO MOM. HE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF SPARE MONEY TO BUY THINGS AND SEND BACK HOME…SO THE THINGS HE SENT WERE HUMBLE.” ACCORDING TO THE SERVICE PAY BOOKS OF JOHN W. FROUWS HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038011], STAFF SERGEANT FROUWS [M-35922] ATTESTED WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES ON JUNE 3, 1941. THE WAR DIARY OF THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY, ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS, HELD IN THE GALT ARCHIVES [20191038023] DETAILS THE ACTIONS OF ST. SGT. FROUWS AND HIS COMPANY. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO IN 1942, THE 10TH CANADIAN FIELD PARK COMPANY TOOK ON MEMBERS OF THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E., AND ON JULY 22ND, 1942 THE UNIT WAS CHANGED TO THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY, R.C.E. ON AUGUST 14TH, 1943, THE NEW WAR ESTABLISHMENT CREATED AN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL UNIT WITHIN THE FIELD PARK COMPANY. AN ENTRY FROM MARCH 1, 1943 RECORDS FROUWS AS BEING PROMOTED FROM L.CPL. TO A.CPL. AT CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO. FROUWS WAS FURTHER PROMOTED TO L.SGT. ON JUNE 24, 1943 AT ALDERSHOT, NOVA SCOTIA, TO A.SGT. ON JULY 26, 1943, AND TO S.SGT. ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 AT MICKLEHAM, SURREY, ENGLAND. THE 2ND CORPS. FIELD PARK COMPANY MOVED FROM CAMP PETAWAWA, ONTARIO TO HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ENGLAND IN AUGUST 1943. THE UNIT SAILED FROM ENGLAND TO JUNO BEACH, NORMANDY IN TWO PARTS ON JULY 11, 1944. ON JULY 14, 1944, S.SGT. FROUWS WAS LISTED AS ACCOMPANYING L.CPL. TRETHEWAY IN “DE-BOOBY-TRAPPING” THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN CAEN, FRANCE. THE COMPANY PROCEEDED THROUGH HOLLAND AND BELGIUM IN 1944 AND 1945, STATIONING AT NIJMEGEN, HOLLAND ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1944, BOURG LEOPOLD, BELGIUM ON SEPTEMBER 29, 1944, WEMMEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 2, 1944, KESSEL, BELGIUM ON OCTOBER 10, 1944, AND TILBURG, HOLLAND BY NOVEMBER 1944. THE COMPANY REMAINED IN HOLLAND UNTIL APRIL 19, 1945, WHEN IT MOVED TO NORDHORN, GERMANY AND REMAINED THROUGH VE DAY ON MAY 9, 1945. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190010003
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNIT LEAVES
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20190020043
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNIT LEAVES
Date
2017
Materials
WOOL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Length
130.5
Width
10.1
Description
A. KNIT LEAVES HANGING ART, 130.5CM L X 10.1CM W; STRAND HAS SEVEN MULTICOLOUR AND OMBRE RED, ORANGE, YELLOWS, GREEN, BLUE, AND PURPLE LEAVES; BOTTOM OF STRAD HAS ORANGE FLOWER TIED ON. LOWEST LEAF ON STRAND HAS THREE BUTTONS OF RED, BLACK, AND ORANGE PLASTIC. LEAVES ARE ALL TIED TOGETHER; EDGES OF LEAVES CURL IN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. CROCHET OR KNIT?] LEAVES B. KNIT LEAF FOR HANGING STRAND, 15.1CM L X 10CM W; LEAF IS COMPRISED OF BLUE AND GREEN OMBRE YARN. LEAF IS TIED AT TOP; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. KNIT LEAF FOR HANGING STRAND, 13.5 L X 7.8 W; LEAF IS COMPRISED OF BRIGHT GREEN YARN. LEAF IS TIED AT TOP; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON JULY 25, 2019, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT AND COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELISABETH HEGERAT REGARDING HER DONATION OF PRIDE MATERIALS. ON THE HANGING LEAF ART, HEGERAT NOTED, “THE KNIT PIECES WERE PART OF A WINTER DISPLAY AT SHANNON PHILLIPS [M.L.A. CONSTITUENCY] OFFICE, AS PART OF PRIDE FESTS DOWN TOWN BUSINESS DECORATING CONTEST IN 2017. ONE OF THE ASSISTANTS IN [SHANNON PHILLIP'S] OFFICE, NATASHA FAIRWEATHER, IS ALSO A CROCHETER AND SHE HAD BEEN INVOLVED WITH A PUBLIC YARN BOMBING PROJECT DOWN AT THE PUBLIC LIBRARY THE YEAR BEFORE FOR THE WORD ON THE STREET FESTIVAL. THEY DECIDED THEY WOULD ASK PEOPLE IN THE COMMUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE KNITTING/CROCHET LEAVES, FLOWERS AND OTHER THINGS TO DO A RAINBOW DISPLAY FOR THEIR WINTER DISPLAY (WHICH IS HOW SHE GOT IN TOUCH WITH ME). THERE WAS A LOVELY LITTLE WRITE UP, WHICH I THINK I INCLUDED, ABOUT COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY EFFORT AND MANY SMALL THINGS TOGETHER ADDING UP TO A LARGER WHOLE, WHICH WAS THE THEME OF THE WHOLE PIECE. I WAS ONE OF THE PEOPLE SHE ASKED TO CONTRIBUTE. I KNIT A WHOLE BUNCH OF LEAVES…NOT ALL THE PIECES HAVE MADE IT HERE, BUT SOME OF THE LEAVES I KNIT ARE HERE…WHEN NATASHA MOVED AWAY TO VANCOUVER EARLIER THIS YEAR, SHE ASKED IF I WANTED TO TAKE OVER THE LEFTOVERS BECAUSE SHE KNEW I WOULD FIND SOMETHING TO DO WITH THEM, AND HERE THEY ARE.” “PRIDE FEST FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS HAS RUN A BUSINESS WINDOW DECORATING COMPETITION DURING PRIDE MONTH. I THINK THE RESULTS FROM PREVIOUS YEARS ARE ON THE PRIDE FEST WEBSITE RIGHT NOW. I KNOW IT WAS RUNNING FOR AT LEAST THREE OF FOUR YEARS. IT DIDN’T HAPPEN [IN 2018] BUT IT MIGHT HAPPEN AGAIN THIS YEAR [IN 2019]. A LOT OF THE DOWNTOWN BUSINESSES PARTICIPATE AND THERE HAS BEEN ONE OR TWO—I THINK IT WAS BUBBLES CAR WASH—THAT ARE OUTSIDE OF THE DOWNTOWN CORE THAT ALSO DID SOMETHING AS WELL.” “I THINK [THE KNIT AND CROCHET PROJECT] WAS JUST AN INVITE ONLY, PEOPLE THAT NATASHA KNOW COULD PARTICIPATE. PROBABLY NOT ANY EXCLUSIVITY REASON, BUT JUST FOR THE SAKE OF EASILY MANAGING THE PROJECT…I DECIDED TO TAKE PART BECAUSE I SUPPORTED THE POLITICIAN WHO WAS DOING IT AND BEING A KNITTER, I THOUGHT IT WAS NEAT THAT [PRIDE] WAS [THE] THEME THAT THEY CHOSE. I ALSO HAD BUNCH OF LEFT-OVER SCRAP YARN IN VARIOUS COLORS THAT I COULD USE UP IF I DID THIS, AND I HAD A PATTERN WHICH I COULD WHIP STUFF UP REALLY QUICKLY.” “[I CHOSE LEAVES] PARTLY BECAUSE I FOUND A PATTERN THAT I LIKED THAT LOOKED OKAY, AND THAT I COULD DO RELATIVELY QUICKLY, AND PARTLY BECAUSE IT FIT THE THEME NATASHA ASKED FOR. HONESTLY, ALL THE FLOWER PATTERNS I FOUND WERE TOO FINICKY AND DIDN’T LOOK THAT GREAT. IT WAS MOSTLY THE AESTHETICS…I THINK THERE WERE ABOUT EIGHT OR NINE [PEOPLE WHO CONTRIBUTED]. THERE WERE A BUNCH OF US AROUND THE TABLE WHEN IT CAME TO STARTING TO PUT STUFF TOGETHER, AND I KNOW A FEW PEOPLE JUST DROPPED STUFF OFF…I THINK MOST PEOPLE DID THEIR STUFF INDIVIDUALLY, ALTHOUGH I THINK THERE WAS ONE EVENING WHERE WE DID GET TOGETHER AT THE TENTH AT SHANNON’S OFFICE, BUT I COULD BE GETTING IT MIXED UP WITH WHEN WE PUT THINGS UP.” “[OUR GROUP] DID NOT WIN THE PRIZE. SOMEBODY ELSE WON…I THINK IT WAS ONCE UPON A BRIDE THAT YEAR. AND IF I AM REMEMBERING RIGHT, THEY DID A GORGEOUS, VERY ELABORATE DISPLAY WITH RAINBOW PATTERNS BEHIND THE WEDDING DRESSES, MADE WITH STRING PULLED INTO STRAIGHT LINES AND TRIANGLES. HOWEVER, I THOUGHT THAT THE THEME FOR THIS ONE SHOULD HAVE BEEN “GIVE THEM MORE WEIGHT WE SHOULD HAVE WON.” THERE WERE A LOT OF COOL ENTRIES, I AM NOT BITTER.” IN AN INTERVIEW WITH HEGERAT FROM JULY 25, 2019, HEGERAT RECALLED HER TIME WORKING WITH THE LETHBRIDGE PRIDE FEST SOCIETY, NOTING, “I THINK IT WAS 2016 THAT I FIRST STARTED VOLUNTEERING WITH THE PRIDE BOARD…WHEN WE MOVED HERE IN 2006…PRIDE IN THE PARK DIDN’T EXIST, OR THE PARADE, OR ANYTHING ELSE. THERE WAS A BARBECUE, AND WE NEVER REALLY WENT TO IT, BECAUSE WE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…WE KNEW WE COULD SHOW UP AND PEOPLE WOULD BE GLAD WE WERE THERE, AND EVERYTHING ELSE, BUT IT STILL KIND OF FELT LIKE WE WOULD HAVE BEEN CRASHING SOMEBODY’S FAMILY BARBECUE, BECAUSE WE DIDN’T KNOW ANYONE.” “WHEN PRIDE IN THE PARK STARTED, I KNOW THERE WERE A COUPLE OF YEARS WHERE WE WANDERED OVER AND CHECKED IT OUT, AND EVERYTHING ELSE, BUT [I] DIDN’T REALLY KNOW ANYBODY. WHEN, I THINK IT WAS 2015, [ONE OF THE PRIDE IN THE PARK PROGRAMS] WAS THEY HAD AN AUTHOR FROM CALGARY, A POET, COME AND DO A READING…WE WENT, AND WE LISTENED TO HER READ, AND I KNOW THE PEOPLE AT THE U OF L BOOKSTORE QUITE WELL THROUGH DOING LIBRARY STUFF, AND SO WAS HANGING OUT WITH BECKY COLBECK, AND KARI TANAKA, AND ONE OF THEIR BOOKSTORE STAFF, NICK ANTSON—HE AND HIS HUSBAND, DERRICK, WERE ON THE PRIDE BOARD. SO I ENDED UP TALKING WITH THEM, AND THEN STARTED THINKING…“MAYBE WE SHOULD DO SOMETHING AT THE LIBRARY NEXT YEAR.” AND THAT, AND SORT OF A FEW OTHER COMMITMENTS WITH WORK, AND A PUSH FROM THE LIBRARY TO GET MORE INVOLVED…IN THE COMMUNITY…I SHOWED UP FOR THE FIRST PRIDE FEST BOARD MEETING, AND JUST KEPT SHOWING UP…AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR IN, I THINK THE MEETING WOULD HAVE BEEN LIKE OCTOBER, 2015, BUT IT WAS FOR THE 2016 PRIDE. SO, I HAVE BEEN INVOLVED AS A VOLUNTEER SINCE THEN, AND HAVE DONE SOME WORK LIAISING BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN PRIDE FEST AND THE LIBRARY FOR PARTNER PROGRAMS…FOR 2019 PRIDE, I’M FINISHING MY FIRST TERM AS AN ELECTED BOARD MEMBER.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENENT FILE P20190020001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190020043
Acquisition Date
2019-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CLOAK AND SASH
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, THREAD, YARN
Catalogue Number
P20200029009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CLOAK AND SASH
Date
1929
Materials
FABRIC, THREAD, YARN
No. Pieces
2
Length
142
Width
77
Description
A) HAND SEWN RED CLOAK MADE FROM A LIGHT AND THIN FABRIC. THERE IS ONE ARM HOLE ON EACH SIDE AND THE NECK HOLE HAS A YELLOW SHINY EDGE SEWN ON WITH BLACK THREAD. THE WAIST IS HEMMED AROUND A WHITE DRAWSTRING, WHICH IS HANGING OUT ON ONE SIDE OF THE GARMENT. THERE IS A METAL SAFETY PIN ATTACHED TO THE END OF THE DRAWSTRING. THE BOTTOM OF THE CLOAK SKIRT IS FOLDED AND HEMMED WITH BLACK THREAD. THERE ARE SOME TEARS IN THE FABRIC AND THE HEMS ARE A BIT LOOSE AND UNEVEN. ON ONE ARM HOLE, THE HEM IS COMING APART. THE FABRIC IS WRINKLED. B) CREAM WHITE FABRIC SASH OR BELT WITH RED YARN CROSSED STITCHES ON ONE LONG SIDE EDGE AND BOTH OF THE SHORT ENDS. THE LONG EDGE WITHOUT THE RED CROSSED STITCHES HAS BEEN FOLDED OVER AND HEMMED. THE SASH IS COMPOSED OF THREE FABRIC SEGMENTS SEWN TOGETHER. WHERE THE SEGMENTS ARE ATTACHED, THE EDGES HAVE BEEN CUT WITH PINKING SHEARS AT THE SEAMS. ON THE SIDE WITHOUT THE RED CROSSED STITCHES, THE THREAD IS COMING LOOSE. ON ONE OF THE SHORT ENDS, THE RED YARN HAS COME UP ON THE CORNER. THE FABRIC IS SLIGHTLY WORN. LENGTH: 136CM WIDTH: 7.5CM
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
DECORATIVE ARTS
LEISURE
History
KENNETH RUSSELL, WHO PASSED AWAY IN 1983, WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY SCOUT IN HIS YOUTH; A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS; AND LATER BECAME A SCOUT LEADER AND SCHOOL TEACHER. HE WAS ONE OF 150 CANADIAN CONTINGENT BOY SCOUTS TO ATTEND THE 3RD WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE IN ENGLAND IN 1929, ALSO CALLED THE “COMING-OF-AGE” JAMBOREE DUE TO IT FALLING ON THE 21ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE PUBLICATION OF “SCOUTING FOR BOYS”. ACCORDING TO A MAY 9, 1929 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, KEN RUSSELL WAS SELECTED TO ATTEND THE WORLD JAMBOREE BY THE DISTRICT BOY SCOUT COUNCIL ALONG WITH FELLOW LOCAL KING SCOUT NORMAN MIDDLETON. THE COST OF THE TRIP WAS COVERED THROUGH FUNDRAISING EFFORTS. A SEPTEMBER 7TH, 1929 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE MENTIONED THAT THE ATTENDEES FROM CANADA TRAVELLED BY BOAT ABOARD THE ANTONIA TO ENGLAND, THEN CONGREGATED WITH AROUND 50 000 SCOUTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD IN A CAMP IN ARROWE PARK. THE JAMBOREE CONSISTED OF VARIOUS EVENTS AND INCLUDED APPEARANCES FROM FOUNDER OF THE SCOUTING MOVEMENT BADEN-POWELL, THE DUKE OF CONNAUGHT, AND THE PRINCE OF WALES. ON THE 7TH OF AUGUST 2020, KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH JOYCE ROSS, RICK ROSS, AND RON SHIELDS. THE THREE HAVE ALL BEEN INVOLVED WITH BOY SCOUTS, AND WERE CONSULTED TO PROVIDE INSIGHT INTO THE LATE KENNETH RUSSELL’S BOY SCOUT MATERIALS, WHICH WERE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS DAUGHTER, KENNA ASPLUND. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THEIR DISCUSSION. THERE IS NO EVIDENCE TO SUGGEST WITH CONFIDENCE THIS WAS A COSTUME WORN AT THE JAMBOREE, NOR THAT BOTH ITEMS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ONE ANOTHER. THE CONNECTIONS MADE BETWEEN THESE GARMENTS ARE SPECULATIVE AND CIRCUMSTANTIAL. RICK CONTEMPLATED WHAT THESE DONATED CLOTHING PIECES MAY HAVE BEEN USED FOR: “…WE THOUGHT THEY MIGHT BE A JAMBOREE COSTUME ORIGINALLY. WE KNOW [BOY SCOUTS] DO JAMBOREE COSTUMES WHICH THEY MAKE AT THE JAMBOREE...” THE COSTUME WAS STORED IN THE SAME CONTAINER AS THE SCOUTING MATERIALS, WHICH RICK ACKNOWLEDGED: “IT COULD BE THAT PLAY ENACTMENT WAS AT SCOUTS, WHICH IS WHY THAT [CLOTHING WAS STORED TOGETHER].” RON KNEW THE RUSSELL FAMILY, BUT WAS NOT AWARE OF KEN’S INVOLVEMENT WITH BOY SCOUTS: “…THIS [DONATION] ACTUALLY IS A TOTAL SURPRISE TO ME BECAUSE OF ALL OF THE YEARS THAT I GREW UP WITH [KEN RUSSELL’S] FAMILY, I NEVER…HEARD HIM SPEAK OF ANY SCOUTING EXPERIENCE, SO I WAS KIND OF SHOCKED WHEN I SAW THIS. HE OBVIOUSLY HAD A VERY VAST EXPERIENCE IN SCOUTING, BUT HE NEVER SHARED IT WITH ANYBODY THAT I AM AWARE OF.” ON SEPTEMBER 8TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH SIBLINGS KENNA ASPLUND, DALE RUSSELL, GRAEME RUSSELL, AND CHRISTOPHER (KIT) RUSSELL TO DISCUSS THEIR LATE FATHER KENNETH RUSSELL’S BOY SCOUT ITEMS THAT KENNA DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THEIR MEETING. KENNA SPOKE ABOUT HER DAD’S JOURNAL MENTIONING THE PERFORMANCES THE SCOUTS PUT ON: “…HE TALKS A LOT ABOUT THEM GETTING THEIR DISPLAYS READY AND THEIR STUNTS AND PUTTING ON THEIR PLAYS...” KENNA SAID HER MOM BRIEFLY SPOKE ABOUT THE SCOUT MATERIALS BEFORE HER PASSING: “…[MY MOM TOLD ME] THAT IT WAS [DAD’S] STUFF FROM THE WORLD JAMBOREE. SOMEHOW I KNEW BEFORE THAT HE HAD ATTENDED IT… THERE WASN'T ANYTHING SPECIFIC SHE SAID ABOUT ANY SPECIFIC ITEMS, BUT SHE SEEMED VERY AWARE WHAT ALL THE STUFF WAS.” KENNA EXPLAINED WHY SHE DECIDED TO DONATE THE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM: “…ALTHOUGH MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY, HER HOUSE WAS NOT TOTALLY CLEANED OUT. SO WHEN GOING THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS, SOME OF WHICH I HAD AT MY HOUSE…AND REALIZING THIS WAS SOMETHING VERY COOL…I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE [VALUABLE] TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA BECAUSE IT ORIGINATED HERE. IT ALL HAD TO DEAL WITH BEING A CANADIAN SCOUT AND BEING ABLE TO GO TAKE PART IN THIS [JAMBOREE]. THERE WAS ONLY [A RELATIVELY SMALL NUMBER OF] SCOUTS FROM CANADA. I FOUND A BOOK THAT TOLD ME…OUT OF ALL OF ALBERTA THERE WERE ONLY SIX THAT WERE ALLOWED TO GO.” KENNA EXPLAINED HOW SHE WAS ACQUAINTED WITH A TRUNK THAT HOUSED THE SCOUT ITEMS: “…AS A CHILD I REMEMBER THE TRUNK IN…MY FIRST HOUSE IN DIAMOND CITY DOWN IN THE BASEMENT BY…STEEL CABINETS… I KNEW IT WAS A TRUNK OF DAD’S STUFF, BUT NOBODY EVER SHOWED ME AT THAT TIME WHAT WAS IN IT. IT WASN’T UNTIL LATER AT THE SECOND HOUSE WHEN WE TOOK IT OUT AND PUT IT INTO A ROUGH TOTE, THAT MOM EXPLAINED WHAT ALL OF THE STUFF WAS AND I HAD PINNED ON THINGS SO THAT I KNEW WHERE THEY WERE FROM.” WHEN ASKED IF THE OTHER SIBLINGS REMEMBERED SEEING THEIR FATHER’S SCOUT ITEMS AS KIDS, GRAEME RESPONDED: “I REMEMBER SEEING THEM BUT THEY WERE PACKED AWAY IN THE TRUNK. HE HAD A SPECIAL TRUNK THAT WAS HIS SCOUT TRUNK, AND THIS [DONATED] STUFF WAS IN THERE.” DALE ALSO REMEMBERED THE TRUNK OF SCOUT MATERIALS BEING IN HIS GRANDPARENT’S HOME AT AN EARLIER TIME: “I REMEMBER THE TRUNK WHEN IT WAS IN OUR GRANDFATHER’S HOME UPSTAIRS… DAD TOOK ME UP THERE TO LOOK AT IT. HE WAS PULLING STUFF OUT...” DALE CONTINUED: “HE DID NOT TALK ABOUT IT, HE JUST PULLED IT OUT AND SHOWED ME SOME OF IT. I WAS A BOY SCOUT AT THE TIME...” DALE REMEMBERED ANOTHER ITEM BEING IN THE TRUNK AT SOME POINT IN TIME: “…THERE USED TO BE A ROPE IN THAT BOX ALSO, BUT I DO NOT KNOW WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO IT. HE WAS DOING ROPE TRICKS WHEN HE WAS OVER IN ENGLAND AS A DEMONSTRATION.” DALE PROVIDED MORE DETAILS AND THE TEACHING HIS DAD SHARED ALONG WITH THE ROPE: “…[IT WAS] A WHITE BRAIDED COTTON ROPE. HE TOLD ME THE STORY THAT HE WAS ON A STREET CORNER IN LONDON DOING ROPE TRICKS AS PART OF THEIR ASSIGNMENT, AND A MAN CAME UP AND STARTED TALKING TO HIM WHO ACTUALLY HAPPENED TO BE FROM LETHBRIDGE. HE SAID THE…LESSON HE WAS TRYING TO EMPHASIZE TO ME AT THE TIME WAS, ‘NO MATTER WHERE YOU ARE PEOPLE PROBABLY KNOW YOU [SO] ACT ACCORDINGLY.’ I DON’T KNOW WHERE THE ROPE IS, I HAVEN’T SEEN IT FOR YEARS, BUT I DID SEE IT ONE TIME IN THAT BOX.” DALE ADDED: “I WAS PROBABLY A SCOUT, ABOUT TWELVE [OR] THIRTEEN YEARS OLD [WHEN HE TOLD ME THE STORY].” KIT RECOLLECTED WHAT HIS FATHER SHARED ABOUT TUMBLING AT THE WORLD BOY SCOUT JAMBOREE: “…WHEN I WAS IN SIXTH GRADE [MY DAD] TAUGHT ME IN COALHURST, AND HE TOLD THE WHOLE CLASS ABOUT BEING IN ENGLAND AND…BEING SHOWN AROUND SHERWOOD FOREST. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO HE SAID THE OWNER OF THE PLACE WAS, SOME DUKE OR EARL, BUT HE SAID THE GUY TOOK GREAT PLEASURE IN TAKING [THE SCOUTS] AROUND AND SHOWING THEM HOW IN SHERWOOD FOREST, THERE WERE CAVES THAT WERE COVERED IN VINES, WHICH ADDED TO THE MYSTIQUE OF ROBIN HOOD, SO TO SPEAK... [HE ALSO TALKED ABOUT] READING THE DIARIES ABOUT HIM DOING TUMBLING…AS THEY PREPARED TO GO TO THE JAMBOREE. THEY WENT TO OTTAWA AND PRACTICED. [THOSE ARE THE MEMORIES] I HAVE.” A SEPTEMBER 7TH, 1929 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE DOCUMENTED KIT’S MEMORY OF KEN’S STOP IN OTTAWA, NOTING THAT “LEAVING LETHBRIDGE THE SCOUT’S WERE GIVEN A WEEK’S SPECIAL TRAINING AT OTTAWA UNDER THE DIRECTION OF REV. G. GUITON. AT THE CAPITOL…TUMBLING [WAS] PRACTICED”. KENNA ALSO REMEMBERED SOME FRAGMENTS HER DAD HAD TOLD HER ABOUT THE JAMBOREE: “…HE TOLD ME ABOUT RUNNING AROUND THE TENT AND RUNNING INTO THE PRINCE OF WALES, AND HOW EMBARRASSED HE WAS AND HOW ‘UN-SCOUT-LIKE’ HIS CONDUCT WAS… I DO REMEMBER HIM QUITE OFTEN MESSING AROUND AND PRETENDING TO DO THE SWORD DANCE USING STICKS AND THE STUFF HE HAD BEEN TAUGHT WHEN HE WAS IN ENGLAND. IT IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE I AM READING THIS ONE BOOK; IT IS WRITTEN BY LORD BADEN-POWELL BUT IT IS A SUMMARY OR A REPORT ON THE CANADIANS TO HIS EXCELLENCY COUNT WELLINGTON WHO WAS THE CHIEF SCOUT FOR CANADA. HE [TALKED ABOUT]...THE CANADIAN SCOUTS AND THE VISITORS THEY HAD TO THEIR CAMP AND…ABOUT HOW THE SCOTTISH CONTINGENT CAME OVER AND TAUGHT THEM ALL THEIR FOLK DANCING. I AM WONDERING IF THAT IS WHERE THAT CAME FROM, [HOWEVER MY DAD] NEVER ACTUALLY SAID THAT.” DALE SHARED ANOTHER OUTING HIS FATHER WENT ON WITH BOY SCOUTS: “…HE SPENT I THINK A SUMMER...IN GLACIER PARK WITH THE AMERICANS AND HE WAS SHORT HIS SWIMMING [BADGE] TO GET HIS EAGLE SCOUT ON THE U.S. SIDE. THE REASON HE COULD NOT DO THAT WAS BECAUSE HE SAID THE WATER WAS TOO COLD AND HE KEPT LOSING HIS BREATH WHEN HE WAS DIVING IN THE WATER TRYING TO PASS THEIR SWIMMING REQUIREMENTS. OTHERWISE, HE WOULD HAVE BEEN AN EAGLE SCOUT IN ADDITION TO A QUEEN SCOUT…OR KING SCOUT, WHATEVER IT WAS AT THAT TIME. HE ALSO TALKED ABOUT THAT CAMP. THEY HAD A CUB COME INTO THE CAMP, SO THE BOYS FORMED A CIRCLE AROUND IT, THEY WERE GOING TO CATCH IT. SO THESE SCOUTS ALL GOT IN A CIRCLE AND WENT AROUND THIS CUB, THINKING THEY WERE GOING TO CORRAL [AROUND] IT, AND HE SAID THE CUB TOOK OFF AND IT JUST KNOCKED THE BOYS OVER. HE SAID, ‘NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE STRENGTH OF A BEAR’… I THINK THAT [STORY] AND BUILDING THE TRAIL ARE ABOUT ALL I CAN REMEMBER OF WHAT HE SAID…” WHEN ASKED TO SPEAK ABOUT THEIR DAD’S INVOLVEMENT IN BOY SCOUTS, KIT SAID: “…WHEN I BECAME A SCOUT LEADER, HE WAS TOTALLY SUPPORTIVE OF ME DOING IT ALL. HE REALLY LIKED THE SCOUT PROGRAM.” KIT WENT ON: “I THINK BECAUSE [SCOUTING] GAVE KIDS DIRECTION… IT GAVE PARTICULARILY CITY KIDS SOMETHING TO KEEP THEM OUT OF TROUBLE. IT GAVE THEM SOMETHING TO BE DOING THAT WAS WORTHWHILE. IT IS A WORTHWHILE PROGRAM.” DALE ALSO INTERPRETED THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SCOUTS TO HIS DAD: “…HE WAS A VERY SMALL INDIVIDUAL. WHEN HE WENT TO UNIVERSITY HE WAS NINETY-EIGHT POUNDS. IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THERE ARE MANY REFERENCES TO HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD, SO HE WAS VERY ATHLETIC, BUT HE WAS VERY TINY. THE SCOUTING PROGRAM GAVE HIM SELF-CONFIDENCE. THERE ARE MANY ARTICLES WHEN HE WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL IN…THE PAPER…AT THE TIME, ACKNOWLEDGING HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD.” DALE CONTINUED: “…I NEVER WENT VERY FAR IN SCOUTING. I ENJOYED IT, BUT I DID NOT ACCOMPLISH [EVEN CLOSE TO] WHAT HE DID...” DALE SPOKE ON HOW HIS DAD USED THE LESSONS HE LEARNT THROUGH SCOUTS IN HIS PARENTING: “…HE WAS VERY RETICENT TO PUSH HIMSELF FORWARD; HE PREFERRED TO BE ON THE BACK SEAT OF THINGS. HE HAD A LOT OF PRIDE IN [THESE OBJECTS] OBVIOUSLY BY KEEPING [THEM], BUT HE NEVER REALLY DEMONSTRATED IT… HE ONLY TALKED ABOUT IT IN PASSING WHEN THERE WAS A TOPIC THAT IT WAS RELEVANT TO. OTHER THAN THAT, HE DID NOT. FOR EXAMPLE, GIVING ME A LECTURE ON MY CONDUCT, EVEN WHEN I WAS AWAY FROM HOME, AND WITH THAT REFERENCE, THE ROPE TRICK. THAT WAS HIS STYLE, IT WASN’T TO TELL US HOW HE WAS ON THE CORNER DOING ROPE TRICKS, IT WAS TO TELL ME TO PAY ATTENTION.” KENNA ADDED: “AND I THINK THAT IS THE SAME REASON WHY I HEARD ABOUT HIM RUNNING AROUND THE TENT, WAS BECAUSE SOMETIMES I WOULD RUN TO THINGS OR PEOPLE HEAD-LONG.” KENNA CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT GROWING UP WITH THEIR DAD UTILIZING LESSONS LEARNED THROUGH BEING A SCOUT: “…I JUST REMEMBER BEING REALLY JEALOUS THAT MY BROTHERS HAD THESE COOL [SCOUT] HATS… [I WAS] READING HIS JOURNAL…LAST NIGHT AND THEN I FOUND THIS NOTEBOOK THAT HE HAS HANDWRITTEN ALL THAT IS REQUIRED OF A SCOUT LEADER AND THE TRAINING COURSE... AS I WAS READING THROUGH IT, I REALIZED THAT THE TRAINING AND KNOWLEDGE THAT HE HAD, HE DID USE THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE. IT WAS LITTLE THINGS, JUST IN TEACHING YOU HOW TO WALK DOWN THE COULEE AND CHECK FOR RATTLESNAKES. A LOT IT WAS HIS KNOWLEDGE THAT HE HAD LEARNED AS A SCOUT AND AS A SCOUT LEADER. HE WAS JUST CALMLY PASSING ON, LIKE DALE SAID, AS THE MOMENT [WARRANTED] IT, NOT NECESSARILY AS A BIG THING.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO ACCESS THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200029009
Acquisition Date
2020-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
NON-MEDICAL FACE COVERING
Date Range From
2020
Date Range To
2020
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, ELASTIC, WIRE, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20200023000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
NON-MEDICAL FACE COVERING
Date Range From
2020
Date Range To
2020
Materials
FABRIC, ELASTIC, WIRE, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
19.5
Width
7.5
Description
HANDMADE CLOTH MASK WITH BROWN, BLUE, RED, AND ORANGE DREAMCATCHER DESIGN ON ONE SIDE. THERE IS A BLUE, PURPLE, PINK, AND WHITE DESIGN ON THE REVERSE SIDE. THERE ARE PLEATS IN THE FABRIC. THERE ARE WHITE ELASTIC LOOPS ON EITHER SIDE FOR GOING AROUND THE EARS. THERE IS WIRE SEWN BETWEEN LAYERS OF FABRIC INSIDE THE TOP OF THE MASK. THE MASK IS SEWN WITH WHITE THREAD AND A STRAIGHT STITCH. SOME OF THE STITCHING IS UNEVEN, AND THE ELASTIC IS VERY SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED AND WORN.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
INDIGENOUS
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
DOMESTIC
HEALTH SERVICES
History
ON JUNE 26TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH GRETA MANY BEARS (AAGOHH GISS STSISTIIGIIAAKII) TO DISCUSS THE HANDMADE FACE MASK SHE MADE IN THE WAKE OF COVID-19 AND THEN DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THEIR INTERVIEW. GRETA SHARED THAT: “…THE REASON WE DECIDED TO START MAKING MASKS WAS…BECAUSE WE WANTED TO MAKE SOME STUFF TO HELP WITH THIS COVID-19, AND WE WANTED TO…MAKE A BUNCH AND JUST GIVE THEM OUT…OF COURSE ALL THE SEWING PLACES ONLY ALLOW SO MUCH OF THE ELASTIC. SO THAT WAS WHAT WE WERE MAKING EVERY WEEKEND, AND WE WERE JUST TRAVELLING WITH THEM AND JUST GIVING THEM OUT.” “WE STARTED HEARING ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE MAKING...DIFFERENT TYPES OF MASKS, BUT THEY WERE SELLING THEM FOR FORTY-FIVE DOLLARS FOR ONE, THAT WAS ONE OF THE RUMORS I HEARD... WHEN A WOMAN NEEDED A MASK FOR HERSELF AND HER CHILDREN, WE WERE OVER AT ONE OF THE RELATIVES HOUSES… WE HAVE SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE AND EVEN A BIT LARGER THAN THAT…WE HAD DIFFERENT SIZES. SHE SAID SHE REALLY NEEDED ONE AND WANTED TO GET ONE FOR HERSELF AND HER KIDS, AND I JUST GAVE HER THE BAGS OF MASKS THAT WE HAD…I TOLD HER ‘THE SMALL ONES ARE MAINLY FOR KIDS,’…SO SHE DID HER SELECTION, AND THE NEXT THING SHE SAYS IS, ‘HOW MUCH?’ AND I TOLD HER THEY WERE FOR FREE. I TOLD HER WE WERE JUST MAKING THEM, BECAUSE WE WOULD RATHER HELP OUT OTHER PEOPLE BY WEARING A MASK, RATHER THAN SELLING THEM. THAT WAS THE REASON WHY.” “WE WANTED TO DO IT BECAUSE WE WANTED TO HELP OUT OTHERS…BY GIVING THEM AWAY FOR FREE. WE JUST ASKED THEM TO PRAY FOR US.” ON WHEN GRETA STARTED MAKING THE MASKS, SHE SAID: “I THINK BY APRIL... AROUND MID-APRIL.” GRETA COMMENTED ON HOW SHE LEARNED TO MAKE AND CUSTOMIZE THE MASKS: "I TOLD MY DAUGHTER [THAT LIVES DOWN EAST] WHAT WE WANTED TO DO... I TOLD HER WANTED TO MAKE THE MASKS ONCE WE GOT THE ELASTICS, AND THEN WE HAD ALL THE MATERIAL THAT WE NEEDED… SHE SENT ME SOME DIFFERENT THINGS FROM YOUTUBE… THE ONLY THING DIFFERENT THAT I DID WAS I PUT THIS [NOSE PIECE]...IN THERE.” “EVERYBODY JUST LOVES [THE NOSE PIECE]. YOU CAN PUT IT ON AND PINCH IT ON YOUR NOSE, SO YOUR GLASSES DON’T STEAM UP.” "[THE NOSE PIECE IS MADE OF] PIPE CLEANER…AND ON THE CENTER, I PUT A NET IN THERE, SO YOU CAN KIND OF BREATHE THROUGH. WE WERE JUST TALKING LAST NIGHT BECAUSE WE CAME INTO TOWN, AND OUR MASKS WERE HOT BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER CHANGING TO NICE WEATHER SO NOW I TOLD MY DAUGHTER, ‘OKAY, WE ARE GOING TO FIGURE SOMETHING OUT.’ I ALREADY GOT SOMETHING GOING, WE ARE GOING TO DO SOME MORE MASKS THAT ARE GOING TO BE COOLER FOR THE SUMMER. WE ALREADY HAVE SOME THOUGHTS IN MIND, LIKE WHAT KIND OF MATERIAL.” GRETA TALKED ABOUT THE UNIQUE QUALITIES OF HER MASKS: “IT IS NOT JUST...THE MASKS, BUT ANYTHING ELSE WE MAKE WE RECOGNIZE IT [AS SOMETHING WE MADE]. IT COULD BE THE DESIGNS OR THE MATERIAL THAT WE USE. THAT IS HOW WE RECOGNIZE THEM.” “THE ONLY OTHER THING THAT CHANGED IS WHAT I PUT INSIDE AND I AM ADDING ON THIS PIPE CLEANER, THOSE WERE ALL OUR OWN THOUGHTS. ON YOUTUBE, IT ONLY SHOWED YOU [ONE PART OF THE MASK]. WE JUST ADDED [THE NOSE PIECE] IN ON OUR OWN.” ON THE NUMBER OF MASKS GRETA PRODUCED, SHE SAID: “WE HAVE MADE QUITE A BIT, I CAN’T SAY HOW MANY, BUT WE DID MAKE A LOT, AND WE STILL WANT TO MAKE SOME MORE. THE OTHER THING WE ARE GOING TO DO HERE IN TOWN IS PICK UP SOME MORE ELASTIC, AND GET SOME MORE MATERIAL.” GRETA SPOKE ABOUT THE PANDEMIC AND CREATING: “…THIS ISN’T THE FIRST [PANDEMIC] THAT WE HAVE BEEN THROUGH, THERE WAS THE SARS, SWINE FLU AND THERE WAS TB WAY BACK THEN. I CAUGHT TB BACK THEN FROM BOARDING SCHOOL. WHAT WE ARE BEING TOLD IS ‘BE SAFE’, SO THAT IS WHAT WE ARE DOING. WE HAVE OUR MASKS, I HAVE ANOTHER ONE IN HERE, WE HAVE OUR HAND SANITIZERS ON US, AND WE ARE TRYING TO BE CAREFUL WITH WHATEVER WE DO…WE ARE [STAYING AT] HOME, EITHER THAT OR WE ARE OUT DOING OUR SUMMER PICKING AND GETTING READY FOR WINTER. I AM MORE STRESSED OUT AND I GET WORRIED WHEN WE HAVE TO COME INTO TOWN, BECAUSE [AT] HOME WE ALWAYS HAVE LOTS TO DO. WE HAVE BEEN IN BUSINESS [WITH] OUR SMALL BUSINESS FOR ABOUT THIRTY YEARS, AND THAT WASN’T JUST TO BE RICH. WHEN I STARTED DOING ALL OUR CRAFT WORK, I TAUGHT ALL MY CHILDREN. RIGHT NOW OUR BUSINESS IS [THREE BEARS] TRADITIONAL CRAFTS...IT IS NOT ONLY THE MASKS THAT WE ARE DOING, BUT WE ALSO WORK WITH RAWHIDE, THE DRUMS, RATTLES, WE MAKE SKIRTS AND DO BEAD WORK, A LOT OF STUFF…WOOD WORK.” “MY MOTHER, A LONG TIME AGO, WANTED TO TEACH ME TO USE THE SEWING MACHINE TO MAKE BLANKETS, BUT I ENJOYED DOING BEADWORK MORE AND ALSO HELPING MY DAD WORK WITH RAWHIDE TO DO THE DRUMS AND THE RATTLES. AT AN EARLY AGE, MY DAD WAS MAKING RAWHIDE, SO HE LET ME HELP SCRAPE AT THAT TIME. I NEVER REALLY TOOK UP SEWING [QUILTS] FROM MY MOTHER. I REMEMBER HER MAKING THE BLANKETS, I REMEMBER THE STEPS SHE DID—HOW SHE MADE HER QUILTS, BUT I AM UNABLE TO MAKE PATTERNS. I WAS OVER AT RED CROW BEFORE IT BURNT AND THEY WERE GOING TO HAVE A SEWING CLASS... THEY HAD SEWING MACHINES BUT OF COURSE RAYMOND SAID ‘GO OUT AND BUY YOUR OWN BECAUSE IF YOU ARE GOING TO LEARN, YOU MIGHT AS WELL LEARN WITH YOUR OWN SEWING MACHINE’, SO I WENT OUT AND I BOUGHT ONE…THE REASON WHY I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO SEW WAS BECAUSE I SAW SO MANY SKIRTS THAT WERE SO PRETTY, BUT THE PRICE I COULD NOT AFFORD. SO I SAID, ‘IF I EVER GET THE CHANCE I AM GOING TO LEARN HOW TO SEW,’ SO THAT IS WHAT I DID.” “…SO I BOUGHT MY OWN SEWING MACHINE AND I LEARNT HOW TO MAKE SKIRTS AND...I STARTED COMING UP WITH MY OWN DESIGNS. SOMEBODY ELSE IS TRYING TO COPY MY SKIRT... SOMEBODY TOOK A PICTURE OF IT AND ONE OF MY NIECES MET UP WITH THIS GIRL THAT SHE KNEW AND SHE SAID, ‘I REALLY LIKE THIS, I AM GOING TO TRY AND COPY IT.’ IT IS PROBABLY OUT THERE NOW. EVERYTHING WE THINK OF ON OUR OWN, SO THAT IS HOW I LEARNT TO MAKE SKIRTS. FROM THERE…WE KNOW HOW TO USE A SEWING MACHINE, WE HAVE GOT TO DO OTHER STUFF, SO WE STARTED DOING OUR OWN CREATIONS WITH OUR SEWING MACHINES.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION'S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200023000
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CREST
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1929
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20200029013
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CREST
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1929
Materials
FELT, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
12
Width
10.7
Description
BLUE AND WHITE FELT SHIELD SHAPED PATCH WITH “L” IN THE CENTRE. THE BLUE BORDER AND LETTER ARE STITCHED ONTO A WHITE BACKGROUND USING BLUE AND BLACK THREAD. THE PATCH IS VERY WORN, WITH FRAGMENTS OF THE BLUE FELT MISSING. THE STITCHES ARE FRAYING AND THE WHITE FELT IS DISCOLOURED. THERE ARE HOLES IN THE FELT ON THE RIGHT SIDE ON THE BACK.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Historical Association
EDUCATION
SPORTS
History
KENNETH RUSSELL, WHO PASSED AWAY IN 1983, WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY SCOUT IN HIS YOUTH; A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS; AND LATER BECAME A SCOUT LEADER AND SCHOOL TEACHER. HE WAS ONE OF 150 CANADIAN CONTINGENT BOY SCOUTS TO ATTEND THE 3RD WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE IN ENGLAND IN 1929, ALSO CALLED THE “COMING-OF-AGE” JAMBOREE DUE TO IT FALLING ON THE 21ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE PUBLICATION OF “SCOUTING FOR BOYS”. KEN’S SCOUT MATERIALS WERE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM ALONG WITH SOME NON-SCOUT RELATED ITEMS, INCLUDING A WHITE AND BLUE SHIELD SHAPED PATCH WITH AN “L” IN THE CENTRE. IT IS SPECULATED THAT KEN WORE THE PATCH WHILE PARTICIPATING IN SPORTS AT LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL (LHS). A PHOTO FROM 1923-1924, NOW IN THE GALT ARCHIVES, SHOWS LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WEARING SHIELD SHAPED PATCHES WITH AN “L” AS A PART OF THEIR BASKETBALL TEAM UNIFORM. THESE APPEAR TO BE NEARLY IDENTICAL TO KEN RUSSELL’S DONATED PATCH. IN A MAY 1927 PUBLICATION BY LHS CALLED “THE SPOTLIGHT”, K. RUSSELL IS IDENTIFIED IN A GROUP PHOTO. THE IMAGE IS PRINTED ON PAGE 27 WITH THE TITLE “FIELD DAY CHAMPIONS”. THREE OTHER PEOPLE IN THE PHOTO HAVE A SIMILAR “L” PATCH VISIBLY ATTACHED TO THEIR CLOTHING. ON SEPTEMBER 8TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH SIBLINGS KENNA ASPLUND, DALE RUSSELL, GRAEME RUSSELL, AND CHRISTOPHER (KIT) RUSSELL TO DISCUSS THEIR LATE FATHER KENNETH RUSSELL’S ITEMS THAT KENNA DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THEIR MEETING. KIT EXPLORED WHERE THE PATCH WITH THE LETTER “L” MAY HAVE COME FROM: “[MY DAD] WAS...BIG IN TRACK-AND-FIELD AT [SCHOOL], AND IN FACT ONE DAY HIS MOTHER SAID TO HIM, ‘THERE IS A TRACK-AND-FIELD, ARE YOU GOING TO GO TO IT?’ AND HE SAID, ‘I AM NOT SURE.’ WHEN SHE SAW HIM THAT EVENING SHE ASKED, ‘HOW DID YOU DO?’ AND HE SAID, ‘THERE WERE SOME PRETTY FAST PEOPLE.’ WHEN SHE READ THE PAPER, IT SAID HE HAD WON MOST OF HIS RACES. I WONDER IF THOSE ARE SOMEHOW RELATED [TO THE PATCH].” DALE ALSO REMEMBERED HIS DAD’S ATHLETICISM: “…HE WAS A VERY SMALL INDIVIDUAL… IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THERE ARE MANY REFERENCES TO HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD, SO HE WAS VERY ATHLETIC, BUT HE WAS VERY TINY. THE SCOUTING PROGRAM GAVE HIM SELF-CONFIDENCE. THERE ARE MANY ARTICLES ON HIM IN HIGH SCHOOL IN…THE PAPER…AT THE TIME, ACKNOWLEDGING HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD.” IN LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL’S MAY 1927 “THE SPOTLIGHT” PUBLICATION, K. RUSSELL IS LISTED AS PLACING IN THE TOP THREE OF THE BOYS JUNIOR GROUP 100 YARD DASH; THE RUNNING HIGH JUMP; THE RUNNING BROAD JUMP; THE 220 YARD RACE; THE 440 YARD RACE; THE 880 YARD RACE; AND THE HOP, STEP AND JUMP ON PAGE 29. ON PAGE 41, IT IS POINTED OUT THAT “KENNETH RUSSELL…CAPTURED THE JUNIOR ATHLETIC CHAMPIONSHIP.” KENNA EXPLAINED HOW SHE WAS ACQUAINTED WITH A TRUNK THAT HOUSED THE ITEMS: “…AS A CHILD I REMEMBER THE TRUNK IN…MY FIRST HOUSE IN DIAMOND CITY DOWN IN THE BASEMENT BY...STEEL CABINETS… I KNEW IT WAS A TRUNK OF DAD’S STUFF, BUT NOBODY EVER SHOWED ME AT THAT TIME WHAT WAS IN IT. IT WASN’T UNTIL LATER AT THE SECOND HOUSE WHEN WE TOOK IT OUT AND PUT IT INTO A ROUGH TOTE, THAT MOM EXPLAINED WHAT ALL OF THE STUFF WAS AND I HAD PINNED ON THINGS SO THAT I KNEW WHERE THEY WERE FROM.” WHEN ASKED IF THE OTHER SIBLINGS REMEMBERED SEEING THEIR FATHER’S SCOUT ITEMS AS KIDS, GRAEME RESPONDED: “I REMEMBER SEEING THEM BUT THEY WERE PACKED AWAY IN THE TRUNK. HE HAD A SPECIAL TRUNK THAT WAS HIS SCOUT TRUNK, AND THIS [DONATED] STUFF WAS IN THERE.” KENNA SAID HER MOM BRIEFLY SPOKE ABOUT THE SCOUT MATERIALS BEFORE HER PASSING: “…[MY MOM TOLD ME] THAT IT WAS [DAD’S] STUFF FROM THE WORLD JAMBOREE. SOMEHOW I KNEW BEFORE THAT HE HAD ATTENDED IT… THERE WASN'T ANYTHING SPECIFIC SHE SAID ABOUT ANY SPECIFIC ITEMS, BUT SHE SEEMED VERY AWARE WHAT ALL THE STUFF WAS.” KENNA EXPLAINED WHY SHE DECIDED TO DONATE THE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM: “…ALTHOUGH MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY, HER HOUSE WAS NOT TOTALLY CLEANED OUT. SO WHEN GOING THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS, SOME OF WHICH I HAD AT MY HOUSE…AND REALIZING THIS WAS SOMETHING VERY COOL…I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE [VALUABLE] TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA BECAUSE IT ORIGINATED HERE..." FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO ACCESS THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE. TO VIEW THE PHOTOS WHERE SIMILAR PATCHES ARE PICTURED, PLEASE SEE 19961023008 IN THE ARCHIVES.
Catalogue Number
P20200029013
Acquisition Date
2020-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1929
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20200029014
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1929
Materials
FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
35
Width
46.5
Description
WHITE PADDED CANVAS SHORTS. THE SHORTS HAVE TWO BELT LOOPS ON THE FRONT AND THREE ON THE BACK. THERE IS ONE BACK POCKET ON THE RIGHT SIDE. THE FRONT OPENING HAS FOUR BUTTONS, THREE FACING OUTWARD AND ONE INWARD. THE PADDING HAS BEEN SEWN INTO TWO INSERTS, ONE ON EACH SIDE, AND QUILTED INTO PLACE. THERE ARE MULTIPLE RED, BROWN, AND BLUE STAINS ACROSS THE SHORTS AND THE WHITE FABRIC IS DISCOLOURED. THERE ARE SOME LOOSE THREADS AND THE EDGES AT THE WAIST ARE FRAYING.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
EDUCATION
SPORTS
History
KENNETH RUSSELL, WHO PASSED AWAY IN 1983, WAS A LETHBRIDGE BOY SCOUT IN HIS YOUTH; A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS; AND LATER BECAME A SCOUT LEADER AND SCHOOL TEACHER. HE WAS ONE OF 150 CANADIAN CONTINGENT BOY SCOUTS TO ATTEND THE 3RD WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE IN ENGLAND IN 1929, ALSO CALLED THE “COMING-OF-AGE” JAMBOREE DUE TO IT FALLING ON THE 21ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE PUBLICATION OF “SCOUTING FOR BOYS”. KEN’S SCOUT MATERIALS WERE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM ALONG WITH SOME NON-SCOUT RELATED ITEMS, INCLUDING A PAIR OF WHITE PADDED SHORTS. IT IS SPECULATED THAT KEN WORE THE SHORTS WHILE PARTICIPATING IN SPORTS AT LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL (LHS). A PHOTO FROM 1923-1924, NOW IN THE GALT ARCHIVES, SHOWS LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WEARING PADDED WHITE SHORTS AS A PART OF THEIR BASKETBALL TEAM UNIFORM. THESE APPEAR TO BE SIMILAR TO KEN RUSSELL’S DONATED SHORTS. IN A MAY 1927 PUBLICATION BY LHS CALLED “THE SPOTLIGHT”, K. RUSSELL IS IDENTIFIED IN A GROUP PHOTO WEARING WHITE SHORTS. THE IMAGE IS PRINTED ON PAGE 27 WITH THE TITLE “FIELD DAY CHAMPIONS”. ON SEPTEMBER 8TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH SIBLINGS KENNA ASPLUND, DALE RUSSELL, GRAEME RUSSELL, AND CHRISTOPHER (KIT) RUSSELL TO DISCUSS THEIR LATE FATHER KENNETH RUSSELL’S ITEMS THAT KENNA DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THEIR MEETING. KIT COMMENTED ON HIS DAD EXCELLING IN TRACK AND FIELD: “HE WAS…BIG IN TRACK-AND-FIELD AT [SCHOOL]…AND IN FACT ONE DAY HIS MOTHER SAID TO HIM, ‘THERE IS A TRACK-AND-FIELD, ARE YOU GOING TO GO TO IT?’ AND HE SAID, ‘I AM NOT SURE.’ WHEN SHE SAW HIM THAT EVENING SHE ASKED, ‘HOW DID YOU DO?’ AND HE SAID, ‘THERE WERE SOME PRETTY FAST PEOPLE.’ WHEN SHE READ THE PAPER, IT SAID HE HAD WON MOST OF HIS RACES…” DALE REMEMBERED HIS DAD’S ATHLETICISM: “…HE WAS A VERY SMALL INDIVIDUAL… IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD THERE ARE MANY REFERENCES TO HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD, SO HE WAS VERY ATHLETIC, BUT HE WAS VERY TINY. THE SCOUTING PROGRAM GAVE HIM SELF-CONFIDENCE. THERE ARE MANY ARTICLES ON HIM IN HIGH SCHOOL IN…THE PAPER…AT THE TIME, ACKNOWLEDGING HIS AWARDS IN TRACK-AND-FIELD.” IN LETHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL’S MAY 1927 “THE SPOTLIGHT” PUBLICATION, K. RUSSELL IS LISTED AS PLACING IN THE TOP THREE OF THE BOYS JUNIOR GROUP 100 YARD DASH; THE RUNNING HIGH JUMP; THE RUNNING BROAD JUMP; THE 220 YARD RACE; THE 440 YARD RACE; THE 880 YARD RACE; AND THE HOP, STEP AND JUMP ON PAGE 29. ON PAGE 41, IT IS POINTED OUT THAT “KENNETH RUSSELL…CAPTURED THE JUNIOR ATHLETIC CHAMPIONSHIP.” KENNA EXPLAINED HOW SHE WAS ACQUAINTED WITH A TRUNK THAT HOUSED THE ITEMS: “…AS A CHILD I REMEMBER THE TRUNK IN…MY FIRST HOUSE IN DIAMOND CITY DOWN IN THE BASEMENT BY…STEEL CABINETS… I KNEW IT WAS A TRUNK OF DAD’S STUFF, BUT NOBODY EVER SHOWED ME AT THAT TIME WHAT WAS IN IT. IT WASN’T UNTIL LATER AT THE SECOND HOUSE WHEN WE TOOK IT OUT AND PUT IT INTO A ROUGH TOTE, THAT MOM EXPLAINED WHAT ALL OF THE STUFF WAS AND I HAD PINNED ON THINGS SO THAT I KNEW WHERE THEY WERE FROM.” WHEN ASKED IF THE OTHER SIBLINGS REMEMBERED SEEING THEIR FATHER’S SCOUT ITEMS AS KIDS, GRAEME RESPONDED: “I REMEMBER SEEING THEM BUT THEY WERE PACKED AWAY IN THE TRUNK. HE HAD A SPECIAL TRUNK THAT WAS HIS SCOUT TRUNK, AND THIS [DONATED] STUFF WAS IN THERE.” KENNA SAID HER MOM BRIEFLY SPOKE ABOUT THE SCOUT MATERIALS BEFORE HER PASSING: “…[MY MOM TOLD ME] THAT IT WAS [DAD’S] STUFF FROM THE WORLD JAMBOREE. SOMEHOW I KNEW BEFORE THAT HE HAD ATTENDED IT… THERE WASN'T ANYTHING SPECIFIC SHE SAID ABOUT ANY SPECIFIC ITEMS, BUT SHE SEEMED VERY AWARE WHAT ALL THE STUFF WAS.” KENNA EXPLAINED WHY SHE DECIDED TO DONATE THE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM: “…ALTHOUGH MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY, HER HOUSE WAS NOT TOTALLY CLEANED OUT. SO WHEN GOING THROUGH ALL OF THE THINGS, SOME OF WHICH I HAD AT MY HOUSE…AND REALIZING THIS WAS SOMETHING VERY COOL…I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE [VALUABLE] TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA BECAUSE IT ORIGINATED HERE...” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO ACCESS THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE. TO VIEW THE PHOTOS WHERE SIMILAR SHORTS ARE PICTURED, PLEASE SEE 19961023006 AND 19961023008 IN THE ARCHIVES.
Catalogue Number
P20200029014
Acquisition Date
2020-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170023002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FELT, WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
37
Width
30
Description
RED FELT BANNER WITH TOP FORMING A STITCHED LOOP FIXED TO WOODEN ROD. BANNER IS FRINGED AT THE BOTTOM AND FRONT HAS RED AND BLACK PAINTED SCENE DEPICTING FORT MACLEOD, TEEPEES, AND MOUNTAINS WITH TEXT “ORIGINAL HOME OF THE MOUNTIES, FORT MACLEOD”. BACK HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL ATTACHED WITH BLACK FADED TEXT “JUNIOR FOREST WARDENS & [ILLEGIBLE], FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, CANADA”. FRONT AND BACK ARE CREASED, AND FRONT HAS STAIN AT TOP BELOW ROD; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RCMP FIGURINE, ALLEN RECALLED, “THESE TWO MOUNTED POLICE ITEMS, THE BANNER AND THE LITTLE STATUETTE…I WAS YOUNG, IN THE [HOMEFRONT] PERIOD FROM 1940-1945. LETHBRIDGE WAS A MAJOR BASE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING THING. WE HAD YOUNG BRITISH AIRMEN COME, AND THEY LIVED EVERYWHERE. THEY BOARDED WITH PEOPLE; THEY STAYED ON BASE, BUT WHEN THEY HAD A DAY OFF, IT WAS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PEOPLE OF LETHBRIDGE TO TAKE THEM ON LITTLE JOURNEYS TO PLACES. I CAN REMEMBER GOING WITH THEM…TO FORT MACLEOD, AND THEN TO PINCHER CREEK, AND WE HAD PLUMS AND CHERRIES. I CAN REMEMBER MY MOTHER BRINGING THIS BAG OF FRUIT OUT, AND SAYING TO THE ONE YOUNG FELLOW, “WOULD YOU LIKE A PIECE OF FRUIT?” HE WAS SITTING IN THE FRONT SEAT, TURNED TO MY MOTHER [WHO] WAS DRIVING THE CAR, [THEN] HE TURNED TO HIS BUDDIES IN THE BACKSEAT, AND HE [SAID], “WOULD YOU LIKE A PLUM OR A CHERRY?” WE VISITED THERE, AND THOSE WERE GIFTS FROM THOSE AIRMEN TO ME, AT THAT TIME. I HAD A LITTLE MANTLE IN MY ROOM, DOWNSTAIRS IN CALGARY, AND HAD THEM THERE. WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE, WE HAD NO SPACE AT ALL FOR ANYTHING. OUR FURNITURE HAD TO BE ALL STORED. THE ONLY POSSESSIONS OF OURS THAT WERE IN THAT HOUSE WERE OUR BEDS AND OUR DRESSERS, MAYBE A COUPLE OF CHAIRS…” “[I DISPLAYED THEM] MORE IN CALGARY, THAN LETHBRIDGE.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023002
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, PAINT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170023003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1935
Materials
FELT, PAINT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
79.3
Width
19.2
Description
GREEN FELT PENNANT WITH BROWN TRIM AT FRONT AND TWO SETS OF BLACK DOUBLE-STRAND TIES FOR SECURING PENNANT. PENNANT HAS WHITE PAINTED TEXT ON FRONT “LETHBRIDGE GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATION, 1885 TO 1935”. PENNANT IS CREASED ACROSS FRONT AND BACK, AND TEXT ON FRONT IS DISCOLOURED AND YELLOWED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE LETHBRIDGE JUBILEE PENNANT, ALLEN RECALLED, “PENNANTS WERE REALLY POPULAR IN THOSE DAYS. [MY FAMILY] LOVED PENNANTS, AND, IN MY ROOM, AS A CHILD, I HAD [IT] PINNED TO THE WALL.” “THAT [PENNANT] RELATES BACK TO [MY PARENTS’] MARRIAGE… THE PENNANT WAS THE YEAR THEY WERE MARRIED.” “[IT] WOULD HAVE BEEN POSTED ON MY WALL IN CALGARY. THEN IT WENT INTO A BOX WITH THE OTHER PENNANTS. I LIKELY HAD THOSE BEFORE I WAS ADOLESCENT IN AGE, AND THEN WHEN ADOLESCENCE CAME ALONG, THERE WERE OTHER THINGS THAT INTERESTED ME, AND THOSE PENNANTS WENT.” “PENNANTS…SHOWED THAT YOU HAD BEEN SOME PLACE. MY DAD BEING WITH THE RAILWAY, WE WENT BY RAIL TO VANCOUVER, FROM THE TIME I WAS ABOUT 3 ON. IF YOU STOPPED IN BANFF, YOU HOPPED OUT AND YOU GOT ONE OF THESE, AND YOU DID AT LAKE LOUISE, AND YOU DID AT REVELSTOKE, AND THEY WENT TO SEATTLE. THEY BROUGHT ME [PENNANTS].” “THEY WERE KIND OF ‘THE THING’, SO THEY BROUGHT THOSE BACK TO ME. I HAD DOZENS OF THEM.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023003
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSFER PATTERN
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20170022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSFER PATTERN
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
2
Length
43
Width
71.3
Description
A.WHITE ENVELOPE, 11.6CM LONG X 20CM WIDE; ENVELOPE PRINTED WITH BLACK IMAGE OF A WOMAN EMBROIDERING BESIDE TABLE AND LAMP AND BLACK TEXT “THE HERALD, HOUSEHOLD ARTS DEPT., LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED, ALICE BROOKS DESIGN, YOU HAVE ORDERED TWO OR MORE PATTERNS, PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THEY MAY [WORD TORN] ARRIVE AT THE SAME TIME BECAUSE [WORD TORN] ARE MAILED IN SEPARATE ENVELOPES”. FRONT OF ENVELOPE HAS WHITE LABEL WITH PRINTED TYPED BLACK TEXT “LH DEC. 3/47, MRS. OLE HUSTAD, 336 TALISMAN AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C., 7457”. FRONT OF ENVELOPE HAS BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “EMBROIDERY” AND RED POSTAL SEAL “TORONTO, ONTARIO, DEC. 5, 1947”. BACK OF ENVELOPE HAS BROWN LONG STAIN ON LEFT SIDE; ENVELOPE IS TORN OPEN AT FRONT LEFT SIDE; ENVELOPE IS CREASED ALONG TOP AND RIGHT EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. TRANSFER PATTERN PRINTED IN DARK GREEN ON PAPER, 43CM LONG X 71.3CM WIDE. PAPER IS FOLDED INTO FOUR SECTIONS LENGTH-WAYS AND WIDTH-WAYS; FIRST SECTION HAS PRINTED BLUE TEXT “ALICE BROOKS DESIGNS, T.M. REG. U.S. PAT. OFF., TRANSFER PATTERN, NO. 7457” AND TEXT WITH INSTRUCTIONS “MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS”, “PLACING MOTIFS”, “TRANSFERRING PATTERN”, “EMBROIDERY”, “COLOR SUGGESTIONS”, AND IMAGES OF FIVE TYPES OF STITCHES. PATTERN IS PRINTED OF: A PUPPY IN A CORNER WITH DARK FOOTPRINTS LEADING TO PUPPY; A PUPPY IN A WASHBIN WITH KETTLE POURING WATER ON IT; A CHICK CHASING A PUPPY; A PUPPY HIDING FROM A CHICK BEHIND A DOGHOUSE LABELLED WITH REVERSED TEXT “BEWARE!”, A PUPPY WITH A BONE IN GRASS LOOKING AT BUTTERFLY; A PUPPY OUTSIDE A WASHBIN WITH KETTLE AND SCRUB BRUSH, AND DARK FOOTPRINTS; A CHICK WITH LABELLED WITH REVERSED TEXT “TRIAL”. BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER HAS REVERSED NUMBERS “7457”. PAPER IS YELLOWED AND TORN IN CENTER; PAPER IS CREASED FROM FOLDS INTO SIXTEEN SECTIONS; TOP LEFT CORNER IS CREASED ALONG EDGE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
DOMESTIC
History
ON JUNE 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED PAT DEBOER REGARDING THE DONATION OF A NEEDLEWORK TRANSFER PATTERN. THE TRANSFER PATTERN WAS SOLD TO PAT’S MOTHER, MARGARET HUSTAD, IN 1947 THROUGH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE PATTERN AND HOW SHE CAME TO ACQUIRE IT, DEBOER ELABORATED, “MY MOTHER [MARGARET HUSTAD] NEVER THREW ANYTHING OUT…AND I DON’T THROW ANYTHING OUT. SHE HAD THIS GREAT BIG SEWING BOX PLUS A GREAT BIG BOX OF PATTERNS…WHEN SHE DIED IT JUST GOT MOVED TO MY HOUSE. I STARTED TO GO THROUGH IT AND I’VE GIVEN…A LOT OF THE PATTERNS I TO THE DRAMA DEPARTMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY BECAUSE THEY WENT BACK TO ABOUT 1945.” “THIS PATTERN…CAME FROM LETHBRIDGE, SHE ORDERED THEM THROUGH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD…THAT’S HOW SHE COULD HAVE ORDERED THEM. [IT’S A] TRANSFER…THEY’RE LITTLE PUPPY DOGS AND A DOG HOUSE…I THINK SHE BOUGHT IT TO USE IN THINGS IN MY ROOM.” “IT’S IMPORTANT FOR PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND THAT…WE DIDN’T HAVE MASS [PRODUCED GOODS]. MOM DIDN’T HAVE MASS PRODUCED STUFF LIKE THEY DO NOW. SHE WAS AN EXPERIENCED SEAMSTRESS AND SHE MADE ALL MY CLOTHES, SHE ALTERED ALL HER CLOTHES AND SHE HAD SO MUCH [SEWING] STUFF. I THOUGHT WELL…I DON’T THINK IT WOULD HURT TO GIVE SOME OF THIS TO THE GALT SO THAT IF YOU EVER WANT TO DO A DIORAMA…THAT EXPLAINS WHAT WIVES AND FARM WIVES AND WOMEN DID YEARS AGO.” DEBOER SPOKE TO HER MEMORIES OF HER MOTHER’S SEWING, RECALLING, “I DON’T KNOW WHERE [MY MOTHER] LEARNED HOW TO SEW, OTHER THAN I THINK WOMEN ALWAYS SEWED. IT WAS A NECESSITY, DURING THE DIRTY ‘30S WHEN PEOPLE COULDN’T GET THINGS. WOMEN WOULD COME INTO TOWN HERE, THEY WOULD SEND THEIR HUSBANDS TO ELLISON’S AND GET FLOUR SACKS. THEY WOULD MAKE TEAS TOWELS AND PILLOW SLIPS, AND IT WAS SIMPLY BECAUSE THAT WAS WHAT THEY HAD, THAT’S WHAT THEY COULD GET. MOM WAS GOOD AT IT. DURING THE ‘30S, MOM AND HER FAMILY WERE LITERALLY LIVING HAND TO MOUTH AND MOM WAS MARRIED TO A GENTLEMEN FROM BARONS FOR FOUR OR FIVE YEARS AND SHE WAS RIGHT DURING THE MIDDLE OF THE ‘30S. [SHE] AND LLOYD HAD NO MONEY, BUT PEOPLE WOULD GIVE MOTHER THINGS. THEY WOULD GIVE HER OLD DRESSES AND THEY’D GIVE HER OLD COATS, AND SHE WOULD ALTER THEM SO THAT SHE COULD WEAR THEM, OR LLOYD COULD WEAR THEM. OTHERWISE SHE WOULDN’T [HAVE] HAD ANY CLOTHES TO WEAR.” “[MY LOVE OF SEWING] COMES FROM MY MOTHER…SHE ALWAYS WAS SEWING…THE SEWING MACHINE SAT IN THE KITCHEN, RIGHT WHERE SHE COULD GET AT IT. SHE TAUGHT ME TO SEW WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWELVE MAYBE, A SINGER SEWING MACHINE AND I DID IT. I COULD’VE USED A TREADLE SEWING MACHINE TOO BECAUSE MY AUNT THAT LIVED IN VULCAN…SHE HAD A TREADLE SEWING MACHINE, SO I’D USE THAT. MY MOM TAUGHT ME TO SEW ON AN ELECTRIC SEWING MACHINE AND SHE TAUGHT ME TO MAKE MY OWN DOLL CLOTHES. THAT’S HOW IT STARTED. I HAD AN AFFINITY FOR IT. IT WAS SOMETHING I FELT I LIKE I WAS GOING TO BE GOOD AT…YOU COULD PRODUCE SOMETHING THAT SOMEBODY ELSE COULD USE OR ENJOY. WHEN MY GIRLS WERE LITTLE I MADE ALL THEIR OWN CLOTHES. I SEWED EVERYTHING.” “MY MOTHER WAS THIRTY-EIGHT WHEN I WAS BORN…I CAME LATER IN LIFE. MY DAD [MOTHER’S SECOND HUSBAND] WAS SIXTY-SEVEN WHEN I WAS BORN. I’M MY DAD’S SECOND FAMILY. MOTHER ALWAYS SEWED, SHE SEWED FOR HER[SELF], SHE HAD A SISTER WHO HAD EIGHT CHILDREN AND FOUR GIRLS AND FOUR BOYS, AND MOM SEWED FOR THEM. THEY LIVED JUST OUTSIDE OF VULCAN…THE OTHER LADIES SEWED, BUT NOT TO THE EXTENT MY MOTHER DID. MY MOTHER REALLY WAS AN EXPERT SEAMSTRESS. SOME OF THE NEIGHBOURS WOULD BRING THINGS UP TO HAVE MOTHER FIX THEM, OR [SHE WOULD] SHOW THEM HOW TO FIX THEM. MOTHER WAS ALSO VERY GOOD AT MAKING DINING ROOM AND LIVING ROOM DRAPES. THE NEIGHBOURS WOULD SHOW UP WITH THESE BOLTS OF CLOTH AND SAY, “HERE MARGARET WE NEED DRAPES”…IT WAS A BIT UNUSUAL. THE OTHER LADIES IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD DIDN’T DO IT LIKE SHE DID…I THINK THAT WAS PART OF THE REASON WHY I TOOK TO SEWING.” “MOM A GREAT BIG KITCHEN, AND HER IRONING BOARD WAS IN THE KITCHEN AND…THE SEWING MACHINE WOULD GET MOVED OUT TO THE KITCHEN, EVERY SO OFTEN IT WOULD GET PUT AWAY…AT CHRISTMAS WHEN SHE WAS CLEANING THE HOUSE UP FOR COMPANY. IT WOULD GET PUT AWAY. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS IN THE KITCHEN. MOM WAS SEWING AND I APPARENTLY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST, AND SO SHE SAID “OKAY IF THIS WHAT YOU’D LIKE TO DO” THEN…SHE BOUGHT PATTERNS FOR DOLL CLOTHES THAT WOULD FIT MY DOLLS AND STARTED TEACHING ME. WE’D BE IN THE KITCHEN, AND IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT WAS DONE, BETWEEN THE TWO OF US…IT WAS A PROGRESSION OF HER EXPERTISE AND LOVE OF DOING IT.” “I DON’T THINK SHE EVER CHARGED [FOR HER SEWING]. IT WAS THEY ASKED HER AND SHE SAID OKAY AND THAT WAS THE WAY IT WAS. I CAN NEVER REMEMBER MY MOTHER CHARGING FOR HER SEWING.” “PART OF [SEWING] WAS BONDING WITH MY MOM. I WAS AN ONLY CHILD BEING RAISED BY PARENTS WHO WERE OLD. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF TIMES WHERE I WAS BY MYSELF BECAUSE OF THE PEOPLE MOM AND DAD ASSOCIATED WITH WERE OLDER…SO [SEWING] WAS SOMETHING THAT I COULD DO THAT WOULD KEEP ME OCCUPIED…WHILE MOM AND DAD WERE VISITING…IT WAS A GENERATIONAL THING, BECAUSE MOM AND DAD WERE ESSENTIALLY A GENERATION ABOVE THE PARENTS OF ALL MY FRIENDS. I SPENT A LOT OF TIME AS A YOUNG CHILD ALONE, SO I READ OR SEWED.” “[MY PARENTS] LIVED IN VANCOUVER [AFTER RETIRING]…THEY LIVED IN VANCOUVER FROM 1945 TO 1949.” “IN 1949 THEY MOVED, THEY DIDN’T COME TO LETHBRIDGE RIGHT AWAY. I WAS RAISED IN PENTICTON. MY DAD HAD BRONCHITIS AND WHEN THEY MOVED OUT TO VANCOUVER HE FOUND THE DAMP AIR WAS TOO HARD ON HIS LUNGS. HE DIDN’T WANT TO COME BACK TO GRANUM, SO HE WENT LOOKING FOR SOME PLACE TO MOVE TO THAT WAS DRIER SO HE FOUND PENTICTON.” “IN 1961 I MARRIED A BOY FROM BARONS BY THE NAME OF RONALD DEBOER. I HAD A CHILD, AND AS I’M AN ONLY CHILD, AND DAD AND MOM DECIDED IF THEY WERE GOING TO HAVE GRANDCHILDREN, THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSE TO THEIR GRANDCHILDREN AND MOVED BACK.” “SHE KEPT SEWING. SHE MADE CLOTHES FOR HER GRANDDAUGHTER…MOM WAS ALWAYS SEWING SOMETHING. I DON’T THINK SHE MADE TOO MANY THINGS FOR ME AFTER THEY MOVED BACK TO LETHBRIDGE HERE, BUT SHE CERTAINLY DID FOR [MY DAUGHTERS]. THERE WERE SIX YEARS BETWEEN BOTH MY TWO GIRLS, MY FIRST HUSBAND WAS KILLED A YEAR AND FOUR MONTHS AFTER WE WERE MARRIED IN A FARMING ACCIDENT. I WAS SINGLE FOR TWO YEARS…THE FACT THAT MOM AND DAD WERE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS MY SAVING GRACE BECAUSE I WAS OUT ON THE FARM.” “I SEWED ALL THE TIME. THE LAST FEW YEARS IS ABOUT THE ONLY TIME I HAVEN’T SEWED. THIS LAST…TEN OR FOURTEEN YEARS THAT I HAVEN’T SEWED ON A REGULAR BASIS [WAS] BECAUSE I HAD TO GO BACK TO WORK FULLTIME. BUT PREVIOUS TO THAT I SEWED ALL THE TIME. MY MACHINE WAS NEVER PUT AWAY. IT WAS DOWN IN THE BEDROOM, IT WAS JUST NEVER PUT AWAY.” “[I ALWAYS SEWED] GENERALLY SPEAKING CLOTHES. I WAS EITHER ALTERING CLOTHES…MY HUSBAND’S GOT REALLY SHORT LEGS, TWENTY-EIGHT (28) INCH LEG, YOU CAN’T GET A PANT THAT’S GOT TWENTY-EIGHT INCH LEGS, SO I WAS SHORTENING HIS JEANS. ON THE FARM YOUR WORK CLOTHES GET RIPPED AND THE SEAMS COME APART AND I DID ALL THAT.” “[I LIKED SEWING FOR] THE FACT THAT I COULD SHUT EVERYTHING ELSE OUT, AND IT WAS MY TIME. I COULD FOCUS…IF I WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF A PROJECT, YOU HAD TO KNOW WHERE THE GROCERIES WERE BECAUSE I NEVER STOPPED. [MY HUSBAND] WOULD COME IN AND SAY “YOU KNOW, IT IS SUPPER TIME”, AND I’D SAY, “YEAH, MHMM”. IT WAS A WAY FOR ME TO FOCUS, AND IT WAS MY TIME. IT WAS JUST TIME THAT WAS MINE. I WAS BEING CREATIVE, AND FELT LIKE I REALLY BEING USEFUL…IT FELT GOOD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION TO DONATE THE PATTERN, DEBOER NOTED, “I HAVEN’T BEEN DOING ANY SEWING FOR A LONG TIME AND I DECIDED BECAUSE I HAVEN’T DONE ANY SEWING FOR A LONG TIME MAYBE I SHOULD GET GOING AND START DOING SOME SEWING. WHEN I STARTED SEWING, I STARTED GOING THROUGH ALL THIS STUFF, AND I THOUGHT THERE’S A LOT OF OLD INTERESTING STUFF IN HERE. THIS IS JUST A VERY BRIEF SAMPLE OF WHAT I HAVE AT HOME. I THOUGHT MAYBE I SHOULD GET A HOLD OF [THE MUSEUM] AND SEE IF THEY’D LIKE SOMETHING THAT THEY COULD USE TO DEMONSTRATE AT SOME POINT IN TIME THROUGH THE MUSEUM OF WHAT WOMEN USED TO DO…WHAT THEY WERE EXPECTED TO DO.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170022000
Acquisition Date
2017-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170027000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1971
Materials
WOOL, NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
98
Width
59
Description
RED WOOL COAT WITH BROWN EDGING AT CUFFS AND ON TWO FRONT POCKETS; COAT HAS RED ZIPPER RUNNING DOWN FRONT; COAT HAS BROWN STITCHED DETAILING ON FRONT WITH A FLOWER WITH STEM ON BOTH SIDES OF ZIPPER, AND SINGLE BROWN HUMMINGBIRDS ON BOTH FRONT POCKETS. POCKETS HAVE WHITE COTTON LINING INSIDE. COAT HOOD HAS BLACK-TIPPED, BROWN FUR TRIM. INSIDE COAT SLEEVES IS WHITE ELASTIC LINING. INSIDE COAT IS RED LINING. BACK OF JACKET HAS THREE PANELS WITH BROWN STITCHED DETAILING, ON FIRST AND THIRD PANELS ARE SINGLE BEAVERS AND ON SECOND PANEL IS TREE STUMP. SEWN INSIDE COAT ON BACK IS BLACK TAG WITH YELLOW EBROIDERED TEXT “ORIGINAL CREE INDIAN GARMENT HANDCRAFTED BY THE BEAVER LAKE INDIAN BAND OF ALBERTA, AMISK”, WHITE TAG WITH BLACK BILUNGUAL ENGLISH/FRENCH TEXT “BEAVER LAKE FASHIONS & SPORTSWEAR, BOX 1207 LAC LA BICHE, ALBERTA, T0A 2C0, STYLE 2053, SIZE L, SHELL 100% PRIME NEW ZEALAND PURE VIRGIN WOOL, LINING, FACE: NYLON, QUILL: NEW FORTEL, MADE IN CANADA, DRY CLEAN ONLY”, AND WHITE TAG WITH BLACK TEXT UNDER FIRST WHITE TAG “NOT TO BE REMOVED UNTIL SOLD BY RETAIL AND DELIVERED, THIS LABEL IS AFFIXED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH ACT OF CANADA, THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS NEW MATERIALS ONLY”. COAT HAS FRAYING THREADS INSIDE SLEEVES, INSIDE LOWER TRIM, AND INSIDE AT COLLAR; ZIPPER PULL HAS PAINT CHIPPED SHOWING SILVER METAL UNDER RED; COAT HAS LINING SEPARATED FROM OUTER SHELL ON THE INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RAYMOND AND INGRID SPEAKER REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF A CREE-MADE WOOL COAT. SPEAKER WAS RAISED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND WAS ELECTED A MINISTER IN THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT IN 1963 WITH THE SOCIAL CREDIT PARTY. SPEAKER WAS INVOLVED WITH THE FORMATION OF THE WHITE PAPER ON HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IN 1967. RAYMOND SPEAKER PROVIDED BACKGROUND ON THE COAT IN HIS POSSESSION, NOTING, “ONE OF [THE] PROJECTS [I WORKED ON AS A MINISTER] WAS TO HAVE A NATIVE PROJECT THAT PRODUCED THESE JACKETS…AFTER THAT, I BOUGHT ONE FOR MY WIFE, AND ONE FOR MYSELF FOR, I THINK, $100.00 EACH [IN 1971].” “I‘D HAVE TO SAY WE DIDN’T [WEAR THE COATS ANNUALLY], AND NOT BECAUSE OF ANY REASON. JUST BECAUSE YOU HAD ONE JACKET THAT YOU USUALLY PICKED UP OUT OF THE CLOSET AND, ON THE FARM, YOU HAVE THIS ONE THAT YOU GO OUTSIDE, AND MUCK AROUND IN, AND GET DIRTY. IF THEY HAD BEEN HANGING IN THE RIGHT PLACE [WE MIGHT HAVE WORN THEM MORE]…WE KEPT THEM IN THE CAR” INGRID STATED, “THEY ARE VERY WARM. YOU ALMOST NEED 20- 30 BELOW WEATHER, SO WHEN WE WERE TRAVELING, MANY A TIME, WE TOOK THEM WITH US, KNOWING THEY WOULD SEE US THROUGH VERY COLD WEATHER…THEY ARE ALSO A BIT HEAVY, SO FOR SHOPPING YOU’D PROBABLY HAVE SOMETHING ELSE WITH YOU. THEY’RE VERY WARM.” “WE WORE THEM [TO GREY CUP GAMES] AND JUST ABOUT FROZE. WHEN IT WAS BITTERLY COLD, AT THAT GREY CUP GAME, WE WORE THEM. WE WORE THEM TO A HOCKEY GAME IN CALGARY. WHENEVER YOU WERE TOUGH TRAVELING, KNOWING THERE WAS A TWO HOUR TRIP TO THE FARM, YOU ALWAYS FELT SAFE WITH THIS.” RAYMOND ADDED, “A FELLOW BY THE NAME OF NEIL GILLIETTE BROUGHT THEM TO MY OFFICE IN EDMONTON, WHEN I WAS THE MINISTER, SO I PAID HIM THE CHEQUE BECAUSE I HAD SEEN THEM WHEN I HAD TRAVELED INTO THE NORTH. I HAD SEEN THEM AT THAT TIME, AND I SAID, 'OH, MAN, I’D SURE LIKE TO HAVE THOSE COATS.'…WE DIDN’T BUY THEM DIRECTLY…FROM THE FACTORY.” “THE REASON I HAD IT…WAS THAT I FELT THAT, IF SOMEBODY CHALLENGED ME ABOUT SOME OF THE NATIVE PROJECTS WE DID, I COULD SAY, 'LOOK, HERE’S A PROJECT THAT HAPPENED, THAT WORKED. WE DID IT.' WE TRIED TO MEET ALL THE OBJECTIVES OF SELF-DETERMINATION, SELF-MANAGEMENT, FULLY-FUNDED PROJECT THAT SHOULD HAVE WORKED. IT WORKED FOR A WHILE, BUT, ALL-OF-A-SUDDEN, IT DIDN’T.” THE DONOR ELABORATED ON HIS TIME AS AN ALBERTA GOVERNMENT MINISTER AND THE PROJECTS THAT LED TO THE CREATION OF THE COAT, “I WAS ASSOCIATED WITH PRESTON MANNING, WHO WAS THE SON OF THE PREMIER OF THE PROVINCE. AT THE TIME, HE AND I WERE AT UNIVERSITY TOGETHER, AND TALKED A LOT ABOUT GOVERNMENT AND WHAT FORMATS GOVERNMENT SHOULD TAKE, NOT ONLY PROVINCIALLY BUT FEDERALLY. IN 1967, BETWEEN PRESTON, HIS DAD, AND MYSELF, AND ONE OTHER RESEARCHER, ERIC SCHMIDT, WE DECIDED THAT THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT SHOULD HAVE A NEW OBJECTIVE, AND BE DEFINED IN A BETTER AND CLEARER WAY THAN IT WAS. [THE PARTY] NEEDED TO BE RE-VITALIZED IN TERMS OF ITS OBJECTIVE. WORKING TOGETHER WITH THESE FOUR PARTICIPANTS, WE CAME UP WITH A WHITE PAPER, CALLED THE WHITE PAPER ON HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, IN MARCH OF 1967, AND PRESENTED IT TO THE ALBERTA LEGISLATURE. THERE WAS ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE PROVINCE. AT THE SAME TIME, THE PEOPLE OF THE PROVINCE NEEDED A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF ATTENTION IN TERMS OF SOCIAL GROWTH, AND SO WE SAID TO OURSELVES, THERE MUST BE SOME WAY OF INTEGRATING ECONOMIC GROWTH WITH SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT. THE WHITE PAPER DOES THAT. IT TALKS ABOUT IF YOU CAN GROW THE ECONOMY OF THE PROVINCE, YOU SHOULD ALSO PARALLEL THAT WITH SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT GROWTH. IN THE WHITE PAPER, WE SET OUT THAT OBJECTIVE, IN 1967. AFTER THE LEGISLATURE ACCEPTED THE PAPER, THEN WE HAD TO DEVELOP IT. I WAS APPOINTED, SHORTLY AFTER THAT, THE MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, AND ONE OF MY RESPONSIBILITIES WAS TO DEVELOP THE CONCEPTS OF THE WHITE PAPER. IN ORDER TO BRING TOGETHER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, WE SET UP A BODY CALLED THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, AND IT HAD HUGE POWERS TO CHANGE THE FUNCTIONS OF THE DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS OF GOVERNMENT, REORGANIZE THE BUDGETING OF THE GOVERNMENT, AS A WHOLE, TO FOCUS ON THIS NEW OBJECTIVE. I WAS THE CHAIRMAN OF THAT HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY.” “THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT, WHEN I GOT ELECTED IN 1963, [WAS] I MET WITH MR. MANNING, AND HE SAID, ‘I NEED HELP – SOMEBODY TO DO NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT – HELP WITH THE METIS SETTLEMENTS, WITH THE ABORIGINAL SETTLEMENTS, AND WITH THE NEW FARMERS. THERE’S A WHOLE AREA. WE’VE PUT HOMESTEADERS INTO NEW AREAS, AND THEY’RE ALL HAVING TROUBLE. WHAT I’D LIKE YOU TO DO IS GO OUT AND SEE WHAT YOU CAN DO –GO OUT AND VISIT THESE COMMUNITIES.'” “HERE WAS A FARM KID – NEVER HAD THAT EXPERIENCE BEFORE – HAD NO IDEA WHAT WAS NORTH OF EDMONTON. I THOUGHT IT WAS ALL BUSH…ALL OF A SUDDEN, I WAS MEETING ALL THESE GREAT PEOPLE THAT HAD NEEDS, AND WERE TRYING TO ACHIEVE, IN VERY DIFFICULT CIRCUMSTANCES. BECAUSE I…HAD MET PEOPLE ON ALL OF THE METIS SETTLEMENTS, GOT TO KNOW PEOPLE BECAUSE OF THAT, MET A BUNCH OF ABORIGINAL PEOPLE AND GOT TO KNOW THE COMMUNITIES OF THE NORTH, THEN WHEN I WAS APPOINTED MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, AND THE CHAIRMAN OF THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, I HAD BACKGROUND. I AUTOMATICALLY FELL INTO IT. RATHER THAN DOING SOUTHERN ALBERTA DEVELOPMENT, I WAS DOING NORTHERN ALBERTA DEVELOPMENT, AND ENJOYED IT VERY MUCH. IT WAS A GREAT EXPERIENCE, WONDERFUL PEOPLE…WITH GREAT AMBITIONS, AND THEY NEEDED OUR HELP. THAT’S WHY I GOT INVOLVED IN IT.” “ONE OF THE PROGRAMS THAT WE ESTABLISHED…WAS TO WORK AND COOPERATE WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HAD SET UP WHAT WAS CALLED SPECIAL AREAS ACROSS CANADA THAT THEY FELT NEEDED EXTRA FOCUS, FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. ALBERTA, BECAUSE IT HAD ECONOMIC GROWTH AT THE TIME, WAS JUST ABOUT LEFT OUT OF THE FORMULA. THE BLOOD RESERVE WAS A BENEFACTOR OF THAT SPECIAL AREAS.” “THE OTHER PROGRAM WAS SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHERN ALBERTA. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF METIS SETTLEMENTS, ABORIGINAL SETTLEMENTS – ALSO SOME NEW HOMESTEAD SETTLEMENTS – THAT NEEDED SPECIAL ATTENTION. WHAT I DID, AS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, ESTABLISHED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICERS, TO GO INTO THESE DIFFERENT AREAS. ONE OF THESE AREAS THAT HAD A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICER WAS THE COMMUNITY OF SLAVE LAKE…THESE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICERS WERE TO TRY AND FOCUS THIS SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE WHITE PAPER THAT WE HAD PRESENTED.” “I HAD HEARD THAT THE [FEDERAL] MINISTER, THE HONORABLE MR. MARCHAND, MIGHT BE OPEN TO A LITTLE SPECIAL AREA IN NORTHERN ALBERTA. WE HALF-SUGGESTED TO HIM, VERBALLY, ON THE PHONE, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT SLAVE LAKE?' HE THOUGHT IT WAS NOT A BAD IDEA. I SAID TO MY STAFF IN SLAVE LAKE, 'LET’S PUT TOGETHER A PROPOSAL, AND GO TO OTTAWA, AND PRESENT IT TO MR. MARCHAND.' WE PUT THE PROPOSAL TOGETHER, BUT WE ALSO FOUND OUT THAT [MANCHARD’S] DEPUTY MINISTER…WAS ANTI-ALBERTA. HE’D WORKED IN ALBERTA; HE DIDN’T LIKE ALBERTA VERY MUCH, AND HE WASN’T IN FAVOR OF ANY SPECIAL AREA FOR THE NORTHERN PART OF OUR PROVINCE. I THOUGHT WE’VE GOT TO GET AROUND [HIM]…HAVE A MEETING WITH THE MINISTER, WITHOUT THE DEPUTY MINISTER. I ARRANGED FOR THE MEETING AT 9 O’CLOCK IN OTTAWA. I GOT ON THE PLANE AT MIDNIGHT, FLEW DOWN [TO OTTAWA] WITH TWO OF MY STAFF, WALKED OFF THE AIRPLANE, [AND] DRAGGED ME INTO HIS OFFICE. I SAID TO HIM, 'WE’RE HERE. WE WANT TO TALK ABOUT A SPECIAL AREA, ESPECIALLY SLAVE LAKE. WOULD YOU BE INTERESTED?'” “[HE SAID] 'OH, RAY, I WOULD LOVE TO DO THAT.' I SAID, 'IF WE HAD A PROPOSAL, WOULD YOU ACCEPT IT, AND COULD WE MOVE ON IT, AND WOULD YOU BE BEHIND IT?' [MANCHARD SAID] 'RAY, I’D ENDORSE IT RIGHT NOW, IF YOU HAD A PROPOSAL.' I OPENED MY BRIEFCASE, AND PUT IT ON THE TABLE. I SAID, 'HERE’S THE FIRST ONE.' IT WAS FOR $4,000,000, SO THEN WE STARTED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE SLAVE LAKE AREA, WITH THIS $4,000,000 PROJECT. ONE OF THE ITEMS WAS METIS/ABORIGINAL…ASSISTING THEM IN DEVELOPING A BUSINESS CLIMATE TOWARD SELF-SUFFICIENCY.” “WE WERE MOST LIKELY ONE OF THE FIRST PROJECTS THAT WERE IMPLEMENTED IN CANADA. WE HAD THE AUTHORITY TO SPEND THE MONEY AS WE SAW FIT. THERE WAS VERY LITTLE INTERVENTION FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. THEY LET US DO WHAT WE WANTED TO DO, SO ONE OF THE RESULTS OF THAT WAS THIS MANUFACTURING OF JACKETS BY ABORIGINAL LADIES.” “THE OTHER PART OF [THIS PROGRAM]…THERE WAS A SPECIAL AREA HERE IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE PROVINCE. THE OTHER PROJECT WE PUT TOGETHER WITH JEAN CHRETIEN WAS A PROJECT ON THE BLOOD RESERVE. WE SET UP KAINAI INDUSTRIES. THIS WAS THE BUILDING OF HOMES, AND WE BUILT A WHOLE BUNCH OF HOMES. WE HAD TRUDEAU, THE OLDER FATHER, COME OUT AND CUT THE RIBBON, AND WE BUILT THE FACTORY. THE FEDERAL [GOVERNMENT PUT IN] ONLY ABOUT $100,000 INTO IT, BUT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BUILT THE FACTORY. THEY PUT A SUM OF MONEY IN THE BANK TO OPERATE IT, AND DID ON-SITE TRAINING FOR THE NATIVE PEOPLE TO RUN THE THING. WE HAD THE FOX BROTHERS RUN IT TO BEGIN WITH…THAT WAS ONE OF THE OTHER SPIN-OFFS OF THIS SPECIAL AREA OF CANADA THAT I WAS INVOLVED IN. IT WAS ANOTHER WAY THAT WE FELT WE COULD DO SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT WITH THE ABORIGINAL PEOPLE.” “THERE WAS A MARKET PLACE FOR THE JACKETS. THERE WAS A MARKET PLACE FOR PRE-BUILT HOMES. KAINAI INDUSTRIES SOLD THOUSANDS OF HOMES IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. THEY WERE GOOD CONSTRUCTION, GOOD QUALITY HOMES.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE COAT, RAYMOND SPEAKER STATED, “WE’RE MAKING A MAJOR MOVE FROM OUR HOMESTEAD FARM…[IT] WAS HOMESTEADED BY MY GRANDFATHER IN 1908…MY FATHER TOOK OVER THE FARM IN 1925, AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM IN 1975. NOW WE’RE MOVING TO LETHBRIDGE...WE’RE TRYING TO DEAL WITH ISSUES AND STORAGE THINGS...THE JACKETS ARE PART OF THAT ACCUMULATION.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170027000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170027000
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RAWHIDE DRUM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
HIDE, WOOD, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20170018003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAWHIDE DRUM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
HIDE, WOOD, LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Diameter
34
Description
A. RAWHIDE DRUM WITH HIDE FITTED OVER ROUND WOODEN FORM; HIDE HAS LEATHER LOOPED ABOVE WOODEN FORM, WITH LEATHER STRAPS TIED INTO CENTER OF DRUM WITH CLOTH AND WIRE AT ENDS OF LEATHER STRAPS. DRUM HAS METAL NAILS THROUGH HIDE AND WOODEN FORM. DRUM HAS FOUR PUNCHED HOLES IN HIDE ALONG EDGE AT SURFACE, AND FOUR ADDITIONAL HOLES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF DRUM. INSIDE OF DRUM HAS TWO PUNCHED HOLES AT BASE OF WOODEN FORM. HIDE IS WORN AND CRACKED ALONG WOODEN FORM; HIDE IS SEPARATING FROM LEATHER CORD ALONG WOODEN FORM; LEATHER IS STAINED AND EMBRITTLED; WOODEN FORM IS CRACKED AND SPLITTING. CLOTH IN CENTER OF DRUM HOLDING LEATHER STRANDS IS DISCOLOURED AND FRAYING. HIDE IS DISCOLOURED AND STAINED ON EDGES, SURFACE, AND INSIDE OF DRUM. OVERALL FAIR CONDITION. B. WOODEN DRUM STICK, 1.2CM WIDE X 37CM LONG. LIGHT WOOD WITH WIDER HANDLE END THAT TAPERS; WOOD VARNISHED DARKER. TAPERED END IS CHIPPED AND CRACKED. VARNISH IS PEELED AND FADED; WOOD IS CRACKED DOWN TOP END. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
LEISURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE RAWHIDE DRUM, HAMILTON RECALLED, “IT WAS GIVEN TO MY DAD AND I ENDED UP WITH IT. FROM WHAT I REMEMBER IT’S…AT LEAST SIXTY, SIXTY-FIVE YEARS OLD. THE STICK IS THE SAME, THERE SHOULD BE SOME CLOTH WRAPPED AROUND THE END. IT’S ORIGINAL, I THINK IT’S MADE BY A BLOOD TRIBE [MEMBER], BECAUSE I KNOW MY DAD KNEW A LOT OF THEM. I THINK IT WAS MADE BY ANDY SHADE.” “[I REMEMBER MY FATHER] GETTING IT. HE JUST SHOWED UP, ANDY WAS THERE. THEY WERE HAVING A BEER AND HE BROUGHT IT INTO HIM.” “[MY FATHER AND ANDY SHADE] WERE FRIENDS. THEY WERE FRIENDS IN MAGRATH AND IN LETHBRIDGE, THAT’S WHEN HE GOT IT…IT’S FROM MAGRATH.” “WE PLAYED WITH IT. WE’D WALK AROUND TOWN, GO UP AND DOWN THE STREET.” “[MOTHER] HAD CLOTHES FROM WHEN WE WERE LITTLE, NOT ALL THE CLOTHES BUT SOME HANGING UP. THIS WAS UP THERE. SHE HAD STORAGE ON HER WALL FULL OF TOYS, [AND] GAMES.” “IT DOES MEAN SOMETHING. IT DID MEAN SOMETHING. IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD, PART OF MY GROWING UP.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018003
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
175
Width
61.5
Description
GOBELIN TAPESTRY, MACHINE-STITCHED AND WOVEN; SCENE WOVEN DEPICTS FOUR FIGURES IN A HOUSE AROUND A TABLE, THREE ADULTS AND A CHILD; INTERIOR OF HOUSE DEPICTED SHOWS CABINET AND VASES ON CARPET IN FOREGROUND ON LEFT SIDE; BACKGROUND HAS TWO CHAIRS AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING ON WALL AT LEFT, CENTER OF ROOM HAS A FIREPLACE AND COOKING POT WITH SIX PLATES ON MATLEPIECE, RIGHT SIDE OF FIREPLACE SHOWS PODIUM WITH BOOKS STACKED AND CABINET; RIGHT SIDE SHOWS FIGURES IN FOREGROUND AROUND A TABLE SEWING, AND WINDOW ON RIGHT WALL OPEN. SCENE IS WOVEN USING GOLD AND BROWN HUES PRIMARILY, WITH PINK AND GOLD FOR FLOOR. FRONT HAS ORANGE STAINING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON RIGHT, CENTER, AND LEFT SIDES; TAPESTRY SHOWS SIGNS OF FADING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. *UPDATE* IN JANUARY 2021 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT NICOLE WILKINSON ATTACHED A COTTON MUSLIN SLEEVE TO THE REVERSE SIDE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY WITDOUCK REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GOBELIN TAPESTRY. WITDOUCK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN 1955 WITH HER FAMILY, THE BOUWS, AND HAD BEEN GIFTED THE TAPESTRY BY HER MOTHER PRIOR TO IMMIGRATING, HAVING PURCHASED THE TAPESTRY FROM A BELGIAN SALESMAN. ON THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK ELABORATED, “THERE WERE A FEW TAPESTRIES [IN THE FAMILY] BUT THEY WERE NOT GOLDEN. THEY WERE TAPESTRIES [OF] TULIP FIELDS AND THEY WERE MORE VELVETY TYPES WITH BRIGHT COLOURED TULIP FIELDS…IN DIFFERENT COLOURS HERE, DIFFERENT COLOURS THERE. TO ME, THEY WERE NICE AT THE TIME BUT THEY FADED MORE AND THEY WERE JUST NOT LIKE THIS ONE.” WITDOUCK TOLD THE STORY OF HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE TAPESTRY, RECALLING, “IT WAS AROUND THE END OF FEBRUARY IN 1955. I WAS SEVENTEEN YEARS OLD AND WORKED ON MY FATHER’S FARM. OUR FARM WAS SITUATED NEAR THE SMALL TOWN OF ERP IN THE PROVINCE OF NORTH BRABANT, NETHERLANDS. THE ECONOMY IN EUROPE AT THE TIME, DUE TO THE AFTERMATH OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR WAS NOT GOOD AND THAT WAS EXPECTED TO LAST FOR MANY MORE YEARS. LIFE FOR US, MYSELF AND OUR WHOLE FAMILY, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE IN A BIG WAY AS MY PARENTS HAD MADE PLANS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA. THE DAY THAT WE WOULD LEAVE WAS ONLY ABOUT THREE WEEKS AWAY ON MARCH 25TH TO BE EXACT AND LOTS HAD TO BE DONE TO PREPARE FOR THAT DAY. JUST AROUND THAT TIME, A MAN RIDING A TRANSPORT BICYCLE STOPPED BY OUR HOUSE. THE MAN SAID THAT HE WAS SELLING TAPESTRIES AND ASKED MY MOTHER IF HE COULD SHOW THEM TO HER. THE TAPESTRIES WERE GOBELINS AND WERE MADE IN BELGIUM. SEVERAL OF US GIRLS, ALONG WITH MY MOTHER STOOD AROUND THE SALESMAN AS HE SHOWED US THE DIFFERENT ONES. MY MOTHER THEN SAID TO US OLDER GIRLS, 'IF YOU LIKE TO HAVE ONE YOU MAY ALL PICK ONE.' WE WERE HAPPY WITH THAT TO GET THESE TAPESTRIES. I DON’T KNOW WHAT MY MOM PAID FOR THEM. WE CAREFULLY WRAPPED THEM AS SOON THESE TAPESTRIES WOULD COME ALONG TO CANADA. AFTER ARRIVING IN CANADA, I WAS NOT ABLE TO SHOW OFF MY TAPESTRY ON THE WALL UNTIL 1965 ABOUT 10 YEARS LATER. RALPH [WITDOUCK] AND I MET AND MARRIED IN 1960, AND CAME TO LIVE ON A FARM IN A SMALL TWO-ROOM HOUSE. [WE] DID NOT HAVE A WALL LARGE ENOUGH TO HANG THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. OUR FAMILY GREW AND FIVE YEARS AND THREE LITTLE ONES LATER, WE MOVED INTO A MUCH LARGER HOME. EVER SINCE THEN, NEARLY FIFTY YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHOW OFF THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. THE REASON WHY THE TAPESTRY ALSO MEANT A LOT TO US IS BECAUSE BELGIUM WAS THE PLACE WHERE RALPH WAS BORN…I STILL REMEMBER MANY OF THE OLDER HOMES IN HOLLAND, THAT HAD THE SAME TYPE OF FURNITURE, FIREPLACE WITH PLATES ON TOP, WINDOWS THAT OPENED FROM THE TOP…AND A DOOR WHERE YOU COULD LEAVE THE TOP HALF OPEN, AND ALSO A BIBLE STAND WITH BIBLE. I ALSO REMEMBER MY GRANDMOTHER BEING DRESSED LIKE THE MOTHER IN THE TAPESTRY. ALSO SEWING AND KNITTING WAS ALL DONE BY HAND.” “IT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE I’VE ALWAYS LIKED OLD PLACES IN EARLIER DAYS. I REALLY LIKED GOING TO MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THINGS WERE SO DIFFERENT THEN. ALREADY [BEFORE 1955]…OUR PLACE WAS A BIT MORE MODERN. I CAN CONNECT WITH LOTS OF THOSE THINGS [IN THE TAPESTRY] BECAUSE I SAT ON THOSE CHAIRS AND I KNOW MY GRANDMA WAS DRESSED SOMETHING LIKE THE LADY IN THERE.” “BELGIUM WOULD HAVE HAD THOSE SAME SCENES IN THOSE DAYS. THEY WERE OLD FARM HOMES…THEY WERE AN AWFUL LOT ALIKE.” “I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED HAVING THIS ON THE WALL. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS EITHER IN THE DINING ROOM OR IN THE LIVING ROOM, EITHER ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD OR [IN FAIRMONT SUBDIVISION] WE HAD IT IN THE DINING ROOM, THERE WAS A NICE BIG WALL THERE.” “THE FARM THAT WE WERE LIVING ON WHEN I LIVED IN THE TWO-ROOMED HOUSE WAS SE 10-11-20. THEN WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20 AND THERE WAS A TWO-STORY HOUSE ON THERE THAT WAS BUILT IN 1906. IT WAS OLD AND IT WAS COLD. IT WAS ONLY INSULATED WITH NEWSPAPERS BUT WE HAD MUCH MORE ROOM...WE LIVED THERE UNTIL WE WERE ABLE TO BUILD A NEW HOME ON THAT PLACE [IN 1975]. BUT AS SOON AS WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20, I WAS ABLE TO PUT [THE TAPESTRY] UP.” “AT THAT TIME, IT WAS HANGING ON A ROD. THERE WERE ALSO TASSELS ON THERE…I THINK MY KIDS HAD PROBABLY PULLED ON IT TOO MUCH. THEY WERE ALL LITTLE ONES [AND] BECAUSE IT WAS ALWAYS HANGING ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD AND THE KIDS ARE ON THE CHESTERFIELD [IT WAS DAMAGED]. AFTER THAT, PROBABLY TWENTY YEARS AFTER THAT, WE DECIDED TO FRAME IT. I HAD IT, WE LIVED IN FAIRMONT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS…MAYBE FIFTEEN YEARS…I HAD IT HANGING IN THE DINING ROOM ON A NICE BIG WALL. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ON THE WALL UNTIL WE GOT [IN THIS LETHBRIDGE HOUSE], BECAUSE I KNEW THAT THIS WAS THE LAST PLACE UNTIL WE HAVE TO GO TO…ONE OF THOSE PLACES [SENIORS’ HOMES]. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’LL END UP, BUT NOW WE DECIDED THAT WE SHOULD DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH IT.” WITDOUCK RECALLED THE MOVE HER FAMILY MADE TO CANADA IN 1955, STATING, “WE [THE BOUW FAMILY] LEFT MARCH 25TH, AND WE ARRIVED IN CANADA…AT PIER 21 IN HALIFAX ON APRIL 2ND. WE ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 6TH. MY BIRTHDAY WAS ON JULY 6TH SO I WAS NEARLY 18.” “[MY PARENTS] THOUGHT, WELL ‘MAYBE THIS [TAPESTRY] IS A NICE MEMORY’ AND [MY MOTHER] WANTED TO MAKE US HAPPY BECAUSE WE WERE IMMIGRATING AND WE LEFT OUR FRIENDS BEHIND, FAMILY. MY OLDER SISTER WAS ALREADY IN CANADA BECAUSE SHE GOT MARRIED THE YEAR BEFORE. [THAT WAS] ONE MORE REASON WHY MY PARENTS WANTED TO IMMIGRATE TOO, BECAUSE THEY KNEW THAT THE FAMILY WOULD BE DIVIDED FOREVER IF WE DIDN’T GO. LOTS OF TIMES WITH FAMILIES, SOME WOULD LIKE TO GET MARRIED BUT THERE WAS NO CHANCE IN HOLLAND. AFTER THE WAR, THE ECONOMY WAS REALLY BAD AND PEOPLE COULD NOT BUILD ANY HOMES FOR THEIR CHILDREN WHO [GOT] MARRIED.” “THERE WERE NINE CHILDREN, TEN WITH THE ONE THAT IMMIGRATED TO [CANADA] BEFORE…THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS FIVE, AND MY SISTER WAS 22 BY THEN AND THE NEXT ONE WAS 21. WE SLEPT WITH THREE IN A BED. ON THE FARM, WHEN WE ARRIVED, [THERE WAS] NO RUNNING WATER AND THAT WAS THE NORM FOR ALL NEW IMMIGRANTS.” “MY OLDER SISTER ENDED UP IN SPRING COULEE [WITH] HER HUSBAND, AND NATURALLY WE WANTED TO BE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TOO. BUT IN SPRING COULEE THERE’S NO SUGAR BEETS [AND] WE WANTED TO BE SOMEWHERE WHERE A FARMER WAS GOING TO GIVE US A JOB. THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU COULD COME IS IF YOU HAD A JOB LINED UP FOR A FAMILY LIKE THAT.” “I MISSED MY FRIENDS THE MOST BUT, IN THE MEANTIME, YOU END UP WITH NEW FRIENDS, SLOWLY…WE WERE ONLY [HERE] FOUR DAYS AND I HAD A JOB IN MILK RIVER ALREADY. IN THE MEANTIME, I GOT TO KNOW RALPH. I ONLY GOT TO COME HOME ONCE IN TWO WEEKS FROM MILK RIVER TO PICTURE BUTTE AND WE WENT TO CHURCH. RALPH WAS CATHOLIC TOO AND THIS IS HOW WE GOT TO SEE EACH OTHER AND HE FLIPPED MY HAT OFF. HE WAS KIND OF A FUNNY GUY. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND THEN IF YOU HAVE FRIENDS HERE, YOU DON’T REALLY FORGET THE ONES IN HOLLAND BUT IT BECOMES EASIER.” “I WAS NEVER AGAINST [IMMIGRATING]…WE [SAW] THAT THERE WAS GOING TO BE A FUTURE HERE IN CANADA FOR US. WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED IN CANADA WE COULD SEE THAT ALL THE FARMERS WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH EITHER. THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB BECAUSE THEY NEEDED PEOPLE TO HELP IN THE SUGAR BEETS AND THAT. BUT AT THE SAME TIME WE COULD SEE THAT THEY WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH YET EITHER. THERE WAS THE ODD ONE THAT WAS VERY WELL OFF BUT LOTS OF THEM WERE NOT. BUT THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB. WE ARRIVED IN APRIL [WITH] THE FARMER, BUT WHEN THE BEETS WERE READY TO BE THINNED AND HOED AND HARVESTED…[AFTER THAT] MY DAD WAS OUT OF A JOB. WE COULD STILL LIVE IN THE HOUSE AS LONG AS WE WANTED BUT OF COURSE MY DAD WANTED A JOB AND HE LOOKED AROUND. HE ENDED UP [AT LOURDES FARM].” [MY DAD] WORKED THERE FOR TWO YEARS, BUT HE WANTED TO FARM FOR HIMSELF. THEN HE CAME AND WORKED FOR TIFFIN BUT NOT ON THE DAIRY. HE HAD ANOTHER PLACE, AND TIFFINS WERE VERY GOOD FOR US. THEY GAVE US A MILK COW AND THAT MEANT A LOT. WE HAD A YARD AND A LITTLE GARDEN, AND MY DAD RENTED LAND FOR SUGAR BEETS FROM TIFFIN FOR A FEW YEARS THEN HE BOUGHT A FARM IN BOW ISLAND. MY PARENTS MOVED TO BOW ISLAND BUT I NEVER MOVED WITH THEM BECAUSE I HAD A GOOD JOB HERE. THEN RALPH AND I WERE GOING TOGETHER ALREADY AND HE WAS TALKING SOMETIMES ABOUT GETTING MARRIED.” “I THINK [IMMIGRATING] WAS HARDEST ON MY MOTHER, YET SHE WAS THE BIGGEST PUSH BEHIND IMMIGRATING. I THINK IT WAS THE HARDEST ON HER MAINLY BECAUSE, DURING THE DAY WE WERE ALL OUT WORKING IN THE BEETS. IF WE WEREN’T WORKING IN THE BEETS, THE CHILDREN WERE GOING TO SCHOOL. LUCKILY THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS NOT IN SCHOOL YET AND THAT HELPED MY MOM. BUT SHE DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ENGLISH YET, MAYBE A LITTLE BIT, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE RADIO WAS SAYING. THEN HER PARENTS IN HOLLAND HAD A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY...SHE WENT BACK. THAT WAS TWO AND A HALF YEARS AFTER SHE WAS HERE, SHE WENT BACK TO CELEBRATE HER PARENTS’ ANNIVERSARY. MY DAD DIDN’T GO, MAINLY BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE AND HE PROBABLY NEEDED THE MONEY HERE TO KEEP GOING. WHEN SHE CAME BACK SHE WAS A DIFFERENT PERSON. SHE WAS SO HAPPY TO BE BACK.” ON HER MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK NOTED, “I WANT TO SCALE DOWN. I’M 81 NOW, YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SUDDENLY YOUR LIFE TAKES A TURN...THIS IS WHY I WANT TO TAKE CARE OF [THE TAPESTRY] NOW BEFORE IT HAS TO BE DONE IN A HURRY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INLCUDING MARY WITDOUCK’S TYPED STORY, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
Acquisition Date
2018-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Date
2017
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
239
Width
216
Description
QUILT WITH BACKGROUND PRINTED WITH RED NAMES OF CANADIAN TOWNS AND CITIES ON WHITE, AND WITH RED TRIM AROUND EDGES PRINTED WITH WHITE MAPLE LEAVES. QUILT HAS INNER BORDER ON FRONT ALONG LEFT, RIGHT, AND LOWER EDGES; INNER BORDER HAS 13 FABRIC BLOCKS TRANSFER PRINTED ON WHITE WITH THE FLAGS OF ALL CANADIAN PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, THE NAME OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, THE FLOWER OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND THE DATE THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY JOINED CONFEDERATION; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE LEFT SIDE: QUEBEC, ONTARIO, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE: YUKON, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, NUNAVUT, ALBERTA, SASKATCHEWAN; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE: NEW BRUNSWICK, NOVE SCOTIA, MANITOBA, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. CORNERS OF INNER BORDER HAVE TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS HAVE BROWN, WHITE AND BLUE BACKGROUNDS WITH YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA” WITH BLACK SILHOUETTES OF BEAR AND CARIBOU ON SIDES OF TEXT, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF BELOW TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS. CENTER OF QUILT HAS RED FABRIC BLOCK WITH APPLIQUED WHITE MAPLE LEAVES IN UPPER CORNERS, AND WHITE APPLIQUED TEXT IN CENTER “CANADA 150, 1867, 2017”. ABOVE CENTER BLOCK IS SEWN RED AND WHITE CANADA FLAG; LEFT OF FLAG HAS TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK DEPICTING POSTER OF ORANGE, RED, AND BLACK CITYSCAPE WITH RED TEXT “OTTAWA”, AND TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK OF BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] ”ELIZABETH THE SECOND…A PROCLAMATION…” ON THE ADOPTION OF THE 1965 CANADIAN RED AND WHITE MAPLE LEAF FLAG; RIGHT OF CANADA FLAG SHOWS FOUR TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS OF ITIERATIONS OF THE CANADIAN FLAG, STARTING FROM TOP: ROYAL UNION FLAG “USED PRIOR TO 1801”, RED ENSIGN “1871-1921”, CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1921-1957”, AND CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1957-1965”. BELOW CENTER “CANADA 150” BLOCK IS MAP OF CANADA WITH APPLIQUED PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES IN ORANGE, YELLOW, BLUE, AND RED FABRIC WITH WHITE PRINTED TEXT LABELLING THE PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, WHITE STITCHED EDGES AROUND PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, AND WHITE PRINTED IMAGES OF: ORCA AND FISH BESIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA; MOOSE AND TOTEM POLE ON BRITISH COLUMBIA; PUMPJACK AND SKIER ON ALBERTA; WHEAT HEAD ON SASKATCHEWAN; BEAR ON MANITOBA; BEAVER, LEGISLATURE BUILDING, AND CN TOWER ON ONTARIO; FLEUR-DI-LIES AND “SKIDOO” ON QUEBEC; LIGHTHOUSE AND FISH ON NOVA SCOTIA; FISH ON NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; WHALES BESIDE NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; HAWK ON YUKON; DIAMOND ON NORTHWEST TERRITORIES; CARIBOU, BEAR, AND INUKSHUK ON NUNAVUT. PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES HAVE CAPITAL CITIES INDICATED WITH BLACK STARS AND CITY NAMES IN WHITE. UPPER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA”; UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND BLUE TEXT “FROM SEA TO SEA” AND RED AND WHITE CANADIAN FLAG; LOWER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED, WHITE, AND BLUE ROUND COMPASS ROSE WITH “N” LABELLED AT TOP OF COMPASS IN BLACK. CENTER BLOCKS HAVE BORDERS AROUND THEIR PERIMETERS OF CREAM FABRIC PRINTED WITH RED REPEATING TEXT “CANADA 1867-2017”. BACK OF QUILT HAS WHITE LABEL ON TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH RED TEXT “SYDNEY FISHER; LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA; 403-327-5838; QUILT FOR CANADA’S 150TH; 1867 – 2017.” BACK HAS MINOR STAIN AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON JULY 26, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SYDNEY AND FRANK FISHER REGARDING SYDNEY FISHER’S CREATION OF THE CANADA 150 QUILT DONATED BY VERN NEUFELD. NEUFELD WON THE QUILT IN A RAFFLE AS A FUNDRAISER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN. ACCORDING TO A LETTER SENT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NEUFELD INDICATED THAT HE AND HIS WIFE HAD NO NEED TO KEEP THE QUILT, AND HAD OFFERED THE QUILT BACK TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FOR ANOTHER RAFFLE. BILL GINTHER, CEO OF THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN, DIRECTED THE QUILT TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WITH THE DONATION COMPLETED BY NEUFELD. ON THE CREATION OF THE QUILT, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “AS FAR AS I KNOW, IT’S THE ONLY ONE WITH THAT LAY-OUT THAT I’VE SEEN, ANYWHERE. IT WAS MY ORIGINAL IDEA. I LIKE TO MAKE THEME QUILTS. THE 150TH BIRTHDAY WAS THE IDEAL TIME TO DO IT. SO, I WENT ABOUT COLLECTING ALL THE PIECES, FROM THE INTERNET, AND THE MIDDLE PIECE IS TOTALLY MY OWN. THIS WAS FROM FABRIC STORES…THE MAP.” “I MADE THAT [CENTER PIECE], TOTALLY FROM SCRATCH. I BOUGHT THE TEMPLATES, CUT IT OUT, AND APPLIQUED IT ON. THESE LITTLE THINGS, I MADE UP OUT OF THREE MAPLE LEAFS, JUST STUCK TOGETHER, UP IN THE CORNER. I MADE THE FLAG, AT THE TOP. THIS PIECE [THAT READS “OTTAWA”] WAS FROM A PANEL [OF] MATERIAL.” “[I INCLUDED IT BECAUSE] IT’S THE CAPITAL. BELOW THAT IS THE DECLARATION FROM THE QUEEN THAT SAYS THAT THE MAPLE LEAF BECAME OUR FLAG IN 1965. THAT, WE GOT OFF THE INTERNET ALSO. AND, SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, 'YOU CAN’T DO THAT. THAT’S --' I SAID, 'IT’S ON THE INTERNET. I CAN SO.' THEN WE ALSO GOT, ON THE UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER, ARE THE FOUR FLAGS THAT [WERE] USED FROM 1867 TO 1965, AND IT’S GOT THE DATES UNDERNEATH EACH ONE OF THEM.” “[THERE ARE] THE FLAGS AND THE FLOWERS, AND THEN THERE’S ALSO THE DATES THAT THEY JOINED CONFEDERATION, WHICH BRINGS THEM DOWN THE QUILT FROM BOTH SIDES. THERE’S THE FOUR ORIGINALS, AND THEN AS THEY JOIN, THEY COME [AROUND THE EDGE], AND NUNAVUT IS RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE, BECAUSE IT WAS THE LAST ONE IN 1999.” “THAT CAME RIGHT OUT OF MY HEAD. IT’S JUST SOMETHING I LIKE TO DO. I LIKE THEME QUILTS, AND IF I HAVE A THEME, I RUN WITH IT. [THE QUILT] HAS MORE MEANING BECAUSE IT IS CANADA. SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, 'WELL, IT SHOULD HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH MILITARY.' NO, IT’S CANADA’S BIRTHDAY, IT’S NOT MILITARY! THAT ONE IS A CANADA QUILT…THIS ONE WAS SPECIFICALLY FOR CANADA.” “IT WOULD BE ABOUT MARCH OF 2017 [WHEN I STARTED THIS QUILT]. WHEN I START A QUILT, I FOCUS ON NOTHING ELSE. I HAVE THIS BEAUTIFUL PICTURE IN MY HEAD, AND IT’S GOT TO TURN OUT THAT WAY, OR I DON’T LIKE IT. I JUST KEEP GOING. THE FIRST ONE ENDED UP KING-SIZE BECAUSE I HAD ALL THIS STUFF I WANTED TO GET ON IT…THEN I STARTED NARROWING IT UP A BIT, SO THAT IT WOULD BE A QUEEN-SIZE INSTEAD.” “[THE FIRST QUILT] TOOK ABOUT 120 HOURS, BECAUSE I HAD TO GATHER ALL THE STUFF FOR [IT]. I [HAD] ALL THE PATTERNS FOR THIS, AND THE DOWN-SIZED ONE, SO I CAN PUT IT TOGETHER [FASTER]…BECAUSE I HAVE ALL THE PATTERNS…I WORK USUALLY FROM 7:00 IN THE MORNING TILL 4:00 IN THE AFTERNOON.” “THIS ONE WAS THE SECOND [QUILT] MADE TO SHOW OFF, BECAUSE [THE FIRST] ONE WENT TO ENGLAND. MY PLAN WAS TO MAKE ONE, AND I MADE THE ONE AND HUNG IT IN THE [ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE]. IT WENT OVER SO WELL, I MADE TWO MORE. QUEEN-SIZE. THEN SOMEBODY SAID, “BUT THAT’S SO BIG.” THEN I MADE [ABOUT SIX]…WALL-HANGINGS.” “[THIS QUILT] WENT OVER WELL, EVEN IF THE BIRTHDAY IS OVER. PEOPLE WANT IT. THERE WAS A FELLOW AT THE BANK, HE WANTED THE QUILT BECAUSE HE’S SETTING UP, OUT IN STIRLING THEY HAVE A CP RAIL [MUSEUM], BUT THE QUILT WAS TOO BIG. HE ORDERED TWO—ONE FOR HIS HOUSE, AND ONE FOR STIRLING, BUT HE WANTED THE CP RAIL ACROSS CANADA, SO THAT ONE HAS THE CP RAIL ACROSS THE BOTTOM.” SYDNEY FISHER ELABORATED ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FUNDRAISER, NOTING, “[THIS KING-SIZED VERSION ENDED UP] IN THE ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MCGRATH. THAT IS MY BANKING BANK, AND I SAID, 'WOULD YOU CONSIDER HANGING IT THERE?' BECAUSE THAT WAS THE END OF JUNE…THEY HUNG IT THERE SO THAT THEY COULD HAVE IT THERE FOR THE FIRST OF JULY. [THIS QUEEN-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO THE EXHIBITION WHEN THEY HAD…A CANADA DAY PAVILION, OR CANADA’S 150TH BIRTHDAY. I HUNG ONE OF THE WALL HANGINGS ALONGSIDE OF IT.” “[THE KING-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO ENGLAND…THERE WAS AN ENGLISHMAN CAME INTO THE BANK, AND HE GAVE THE GIRLS HIS PHONE NUMBER, AND SAID, 'GET HER TO PHONE ME.' I PHONED HIM, AND HE SAID, 'I WANT ONE.' I SAID, 'EXCUSE ME?' WELL, HE SAID, 'THAT QUILT AT THE BANK…I WANT ONE.' I SAID, 'WELL, IT’S A KING-SIZE (IT’S 100X104, OR 108), IT’S $1000.00.' 'I’LL TAKE IT.'” “THAT’S WHEN I MADE TWO QUEEN-SIZED ONES. I DONATED [THE QUILT FROM THE PAVILLION] TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. I PUT [THE QUEEN-SIZED QUILTS] ON KIJIJI, AND GOT NO RESPONSE WHATSOEVER. I WOULDN’T PAY $800.00 FOR A QUILT, BECAUSE I COULD MAKE THEM. I BROUGHT THEM BACK HOME, AND I SAID, 'YOU KNOW, WE DONATE TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. THEY’RE DOING A BREAKFAST PROGRAM. THEY CAN TAKE IT, AND RAFFLE IT OFF FOR THEIR BREAKFAST PROGRAM.' I [DONATED ONE QUILT TO] NOR-BRIDGE. THEY RAFFLED IT OFF, FOR WHATEVER PROGRAMS THEY NEED.” “WE STARTED TALKING ABOUT IT, AND [THE SOUP KITCHEN STAFF] ALL SAID TO ME, 'OH, THAT WOULD BE NICE FOR US TO RAFFLE OFF.' I THOUGHT (THIS WAS BEFORE I PUT THEM ON KIJIJI), 'I DON’T KNOW.' WHEN THEY DIDN’T SELL ON KIJIJI, I TOOK IT TO BILL, AND I SAID, 'DO YOU STILL WANT IT?' WELL, HE HUNG IT ON THE WALL, AND STARTED SELLING TICKETS…I THINK THESE GUYS GOT $1500.00. I DON’T KNOW ABOUT NOR-BRIDGE…$1500.00 IS WHAT BILL SAID THEY MADE ON THAT QUILT. [TICKETS] WERE $5.00.” “THIS ONE HAD GONE TO SASKATCHEWAN…TO [THE KELVINGTON HERITAGE SHOW]. THE LEGION LADIES SAW IT, AND ASKED MY SISTER HOW MUCH I WANTED FOR IT. OF COURSE, THE LEGION ISN’T AS FLUID AS A LOT OF THINGS, AND $800.00 WAS TOO MUCH. I SAID, 'WELL, YOU ASK THEM IF THEY WOULD LIKE A WALL-HANGING.' THE WALL-HANGINGS ARE ONLY $150.00. THAT’S HOW THEY STARTED. THAT, AND LARRY AT THE ROYAL BANK, WHO WANTED A SMALLER ONE FOR STIRLING.” ON HER INTEREST IN QUILTING, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “MY MOTHER [FRANCES DICKS, NEE FENNELL] SEWED EVERYTHING, FROM HER OWN BRAS ON UP, AND SHE SEWED FOR EVERYBODY. I WENT HOME TO HER HOUSE, WHEN I WAS IN NURSING, AND SHE SAID, 'WELL, DON’T TOUCH THAT.' THERE’S A SHEET IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LIVING ROOM FLOOR; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE. I SAID, 'WHAT HAVE YOU GOT IN -?' “WELL, THAT’S THE WEDDING DRESS, AND THESE ARE THE BRIDESMAID DRESSES.” THAT’S HOW SHE SEWED! ON AN OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “PROBABLY ABOUT 10 YEARS AGO I STARTED QUILTING. I WAS PAST DOING CLOTHING, AND TO DO THESE SILLY LITTLE THINGS THAT ARE OF NO USE, OTHER THAN TO COLLECT DUST, I CAN’T BE BOTHERED WITH THAT. I NEED TO HAVE SOMETHING I CAN KIND OF SET MY TEETH IN.” “QUILTING HAS MADE ME EVEN A WORSE HOUSEKEEPER THAN I ALREADY WAS, BECAUSE, WHEN I GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND I HAVE AN IDEA, WELL, 'IF YOU DON’T DO THE DISHES, FRANK, THEY AREN’T GOING TO GET DONE, BECAUSE I’M DOING SOMETHING.' I’M NOT A SUPER HOUSEKEEPER, AS IT IS, AND WHEN I HAVE SOMETHING LIKE THIS, EVERYTHING ELSE TAKES A BACK-BURNER.” SYDNEY FISHER NOTED HER THOUGHTS ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE MUSEUM, “IT MEANS EVERYTHING TO ME, BECAUSE I AM A CANADIAN. I WAS BORN IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND THE FURTHEST I’VE GONE IS TO LETHBRIDGE. I’VE BEEN TO TORONTO ONCE, AND WE WENT TO NOVA SCOTIA ONCE. I’VE BEEN TO B.C. ONCE. I LIVED IN WINNIPEG FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. BUT, YOU’RE STILL IN CANADA, AND, AS FAR AS I’M CONCERNED, THERE ISN’T ANY PLACE LIKE IT, EVEN IF IT IS THE DUST BOWL OF THE WORLD…I’M QUITE PROUD THAT IT’S AT THE MUSEUM. I DIDN’T THINK THEY’D EVER GET THAT FAR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETTER FROM VERN NEUFELD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180018000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, PAINT, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20170038000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
FELT, PAINT, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41.5
Width
88
Description
BLUE FELT BANNER WITH WOOD DOWEL POLE AT END, DOWEL WIDTH 88CM, BANNER WIDTH 74 CM. DOWEL ENDS ARE ROUNDED WITH SCREWS IN ENDS; RIGHT END OF DOWEL AS BLUE LINE AROUND POLE. BANNER IS FELT WITH WHITE FELT SEWN ON IN LETTERS “CFUW”, ROUND FELT MOSAIC OF COULEES UNDER A BLUE SKY BELOW, AND WHITE FELT SEWN TEXT “LETHBRIDGE & REGION”. LOWER EDGE OF BANNER HAS BLUE COTTON STRING TASSELS. BACK OF BANNER HAS WHITE OUTLINES OF LETTERS IN THREAD FROM STITCHING ON FRONT. LOOSE THREAD ON LETTER “G” IN “REGION” TEXT; LETTERS HAVE RED STAINING ON LOWER TEXT; WRINKILING OF FELT ON RIGHT SIDE OF BANNER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON APRIL 16, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KATHYRN YOSHIDA AND ROSE JURISICH REGARDING THE DONATION OF A WALL BANNER FROM THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN [CFUW]. YOSHIDA AND JURISICH WERE MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE CFUW WHEN THE HANGING WAS MADE IN THE 1990S. ON THE WALL BANNER, JURISICH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT [LAURIE] KAMINSKI MADE IT…SHE HASN’T BEEN A MEMBER FOR A LONG TIME… LAURIE MADE IT I THINK IN [PROBABLY THE ‘90S]. WE HAVE A NEW BANNER NOW THAT’S CURRENT. I DON’T REMEMBER WHO ELSE LAURIE DID IT [WITH]. SHE DIDN’T DO IT HERSELF, SHE DID IT WITH A COMMITTEE. BUT I DON’T REMEMBER WHO IT WAS.” “[WE USED THIS AT] PRAIRIE MEETINGS, WHERE WE ALL MET, AND THEY THOUGHT THAT EACH CLUB SHOULD HAVE A BANNER. THAT’S WHY WE GOT IT, AND THEN WE DIDN’T USE IT, I GUESS, BECAUSE IT’S HERE. I DON’T THINK [THE BANNER WAS IN USE] UP UNTIL 2010.” YOSHIDA ADDED, “I THINK [WE USED THE BANNER AT] MORE PROVINCIAL MEETINGS, NOT FOR THE GENERAL MONTHLY MEETINGS, BUT FOR ANYTHING A LITTLE BIT MORE SPECIAL.” “I REALLY LIKE [THE BANNER]…THE PRAIRIE AND THE COULEES. THERE’S A DIFFERENT…GRAPHIC ON THE NEW [BANNER]. THE NEW ONE WAS JUST UNVEILED A COUPLE YEARS AGO.” MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARBARA DOYLE ON DECEMEBER 22, 2017 REGARDING HER TIME WITH THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN AND ON THE WALL BANNER. ON THE BANNER, DOYLE NOTED, “WE [USED] IT WHEN WE [WERE HAVING] A GATHERING OF PEOPLE FOR ONE THING—[THE] AGM. SOMETIMES, WE HOST [THE AGM], JUST THE ALBERTA ONE. IT GOES TO DIFFERENT CITIES, SO WE PUT [THE BANNER] UP THERE, WHEN SOMETHING LIKE THAT [HAPPENS].” “I THINK THIS IS JUST THE ‘HOME’ THING, AND THEY ALL HAVE A ‘HOME’ PLACE THERE, TOO. WHEREVER THEY ARE GOING, THERE IS PROBABLY SOMETHING LIKE [THIS BANNER DISPLAYED] TOO.” “I THINK I DO [REMEMBER THE BANNER BEING ON DISPLAY], BECAUSE I THINK [THE] NEW ONE HAS BEEN IN THE WORKS IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS.” “[WHEN I FIRST STARTED, THE BANNER] WOULD JUST HANG IT IN THE HOUSE, WHEN THERE WAS A MEETING… IT WOULD BE FOLDED UP AND PUT IN THE CLOSET.” YOSHIDA ELABORATED ON THE HISTORY OF THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “WE USED TO MEET AT THE [ATCO] GAS COMPANY [BUILDING]…IN THE 70S AND 80S…WE HAD TO GO DOWN STAIRS, AND I THINK THE STAIRS BECAME A PROBLEM FOR SOME OF OUR WOMEN. FROM THE GAS COMPANY [WE WENT] TO THE BULLMAN.” JURISICH ADDED, “WE WERE ALSO AT SAVE-ON-FOODS. [ATCO HAD] AN AUDITORIUM DOWNSTAIRS. THAT WAS QUITE LARGE. THEY [HAD] A VERY LARGE ROOM DOWNSTAIRS WITH A KITCHEN. IT WAS ACTUALLY VERY NICE EXCEPT THAT THE STAIRS WERE LIKE GOING INTO THE DEPTHS. THE STEPS WERE VERY STEEP AND VERY LONG. AND NO ELEVATOR.” DOYLE NOTED, “WE DON’T HAVE A BUILDING. BOOK CLUB IS AT PEOPLE’S HOUSES. WE ROTATE, AND WE HAVE A LITTLE, NOT A LUNCH, BUT NIBBLEY’S, (THAT’S FINGER FOOD), THERE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE THE BRIDGE GOES – THE BRIDGE PEOPLE. I THINK MAYBE TO THE SENIOR’S, ON THE SOUTH SIDE…WE USED TO GO TO THE POLICE STATION, BECAUSE THEY HAD A ROOM THERE, AND THEY LET US HAVE OUR MEETINGS THERE. I THINK IT WAS USUALLY MONTHLY THAT WE WERE DOING SOMETHING THERE.” “THAT SPACE [AT THE POLICE STATION] IS GONE, AND I WAS TOTALLY OUT OF IT THIS PAST SEMESTER, BECAUSE I WAS SO BUSY…I DON’T KNOW WHERE THEY WENT.” ON HER TIME WITH THE GROUP, JURISICH RECALLED, “I MOVED HERE IN 1971 AND A FRIEND BROUGHT ME TO THE ORGANIZATION. SHE THOUGHT I WOULD BE INTERESTED IN A MEMBERSHIP. IT WAS LIKE-MINDED WOMEN AND WE HAD A LOT OF DISCUSSIONS ABOUT WHITE PAPERS AND [OTHER TOPICS].” “AN UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE WAS FINE [TO BE A MEMBER], JUST SO LONG AS YOU HAD A DEGREE. THEY DIDN’T HAVE NURSING DEGREES AT ONE TIME, IT WAS JUST REGISTERED NURSE WHICH WASN’T CONSIDERED A DEGREE. NOW THEY HAVE NURSING DEGREES. BUT IF YOU HAD THAT KIND OF EDUCATION, THEN YOU WERE AN ASSOCIATE MEMBER…THEY ALSO WERE QUITE RESTRICTIVE AS TO LEGITIMATE UNIVERSITIES, AND THEY DON’T HAVE ANY OF THAT ANYMORE.” “I REMEMBER WHEN WE STUDIED THE WHITE PAPER ON THE MURDOCH CASE, WHERE THAT WOMAN WAS MARRIED FOR…FORTY YEARS OR SOMETHING AND THEY LIVED ON A FARM. HE LEFT SO THEY CHANGED THE LAWS ABOUT WOMEN CONTRIBUTING TO LIFE AND I THINK THE CHANGE WAS IN THE ‘70S OR ‘80S.” “THE SCHOOL SYSTEM [WAS AN IMPORTANT TOPIC] WHEN THEY WERE INTRODUCING THE GIFTED PROGRAM. I REMEMBER GOING TO MEETINGS ABOUT THAT AND REPORTING BACK.” “[OUR ACTIVISM] VARIES [BY] THE ISSUE, WE WERE VERY ACTIVE WITH THE ANTI-FRACKING. WE WERE DEMONSTRATING ON THE STREETS FOR THAT…I THINK WE WERE MORE INVOLVED WITH DISCUSSING THINGS. I DON’T THINK THE ADVOCACY WAS GREATER [THEN]. I THINK IT’S GREATER NOW.” “I REMEMBER THAT WE USED TO WRITE LETTERS AND THINGS, I THINK AT THE TIME. WE STILL DO THAT ACTUALLY.” “THE MEETINGS ARE ON SATURDAY, THAT’S TO ACCOMMODATE ANYBODY THAT’S WORKING THAT CAN COME. OTHERWISE THEY WOULD PROBABLY BE WORKING OTHER DAYS. THAT WAS PROBABLY WHY, ORIGINALLY, IT WAS DECIDED TO HAVE IT ON THE SATURDAY. SATURDAY AT NOON ACTUALLY. IT USED TO BE IN THE EVENING ALL THE TIME, THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH.” “FOR ME IT WAS THE FIRST ORGANIZATION THAT I WAS INTRODUCED TO AND I WAS WORKING. I HAD A WORKING LIFE AND A HOME LIFE WHERE I HAD CHILDREN. I DID BELONG TO SOMETHING ELSE AT ONE TIME, I THINK THE HOME EC ASSOCIATION. I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE IN IT AND IT WAS INTERESTING FOR ME. IT WAS DIFFERENT THAN ANYTHING I HAD DONE, SO THAT’S WHY I CONTINUED.” YOSHIDA ADDED, “I BECAME A MEMBER IN 1968, THE YEAR THAT WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, AND I WAS BROUGHT TO THE MEETING BY ANOTHER FACULTY MEMBER’S WIFE, JENNIFER BUTTERFIELD. I THINK SHE KNEW THAT WE WERE NEW TO TOWN AND WE DIDN’T REALLY KNOW ANYBODY. SHE REALLY DID A VERY NICE JOB OF INTRODUCING ME TO LETHBRIDGE AND WHERE THE MEAT MARKET AND VALUE VILLAGE [WERE], PLACES TO SHOP AND PLACES TO GO. CFUW WAS ONE PLACE THAT SHE BROUGHT ME TO. AT THE TIME, I WAS NOT ONLY NEW TO TOWN, BUT I WAS A STAY-AT-HOME WITH A BABY AND DIDN’T HAVE MUCH SOCIAL EXPERIENCES. THIS GROUP MET ONCE A MONTH AND IT WAS MY EVENING OUT AND, AS ROSE SAID, THEY HAD EXCELLENT SPEAKERS ABOUT [TOPICS], PEOPLE FROM THE COMMUNITY WHO WOULD COME AND TALK. IT WAS MY INTELLECTUAL EVENING, IT WAS AWAY FROM DIAPERS AND BABIES AND A CHANCE TO BE WITH ADULTS. THAT, FOR ME, REALLY SERVED A VERY IMPORTANT PURPOSE. AT THAT TIME I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW WHAT IT STOOD FOR AND THE PROVINCIAL OR NATIONAL AGENDAS, IT WAS JUST THAT IT WAS NICE.” “MANY WERE [IN THE] UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S CLUB. AT THE TIME, YOU HAD TO BE A GRADUATE OF A UNIVERSITY OR HAVE A DIPLOMA[TO BE A] FULL-FLEDGED MEMBER. I THINK THEY’RE DESPERATE FOR MEMBERS, BECAUSE I THINK THIS GROUP, AS OTHER GROUPS/CLUBS ARE NOTICING A DECLINE IN INTEREST THAT THEY HAVE TAKEN THAT [REQUIREMENT] AWAY. WHEN ROSE SAYS LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE, THE WOMEN WERE EDUCATED, THEY WERE KEEN, AT THAT TIME IT WAS THE WOMEN’S MOVEMENT, MS MAGAZINE WAS BIG, THE PLACE OF WOMEN AND EQUAL MEMBERS. WE’RE STILL WORKING ON IT…I REMEMBER WHEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT…ALL ALONG IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN [ABOUT] THE STATUS OF WOMEN.” “DAYCARE WAS [AN] IMPORTANT [TOPIC] AT ONE TIME… SOMETIMES THE WOMEN IN OUR GROUP ARE INVOLVED IN OTHER AGENCIES OR GROUPS, SO IT KIND OF MESHES, AND I’M NOT SURE WHERE ONE BEGINS AND THE OTHER ENDS.” “[I JOINED THE GROUP BECAUSE] I GUESS NOBODY ELSE ASKED ME TO JOIN ANYTHING. ALTHOUGH, WHEN YOU ARE A ONE-CAR FAMILY AND YOU HAVE A BABY AND YOU ARE…TRADING, LIKE, I’LL LOOK AFTER YOUR CHILD THIS AFTERNOON SO THAT YOU CAN DO THIS AND THEN IT’S MY TURN, I WAS IN THAT SORT OF SITUATION. I GUESS I WASN’T INTERESTED IN PURSUING OTHER THINGS LIKE KINETTES, THE ‘Y’.” DOYLE ELABORATED ON HER TIME WITH THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN, STATING, “I WAS ASKED TO JOIN [THE GROUP BY A FRIEND, PATTY JOHNSON, ABOUT 2008], AND I ENJOY IT VERY MUCH. IT’S A WOMEN’S GROUP, AND WE COLLECT MONEY, FOR A [SCHOLARSHIP]…WE DO TWO SCHOLARSHIPS A YEAR, AND IT’S ALSO A FRIENDSHIP GET-TOGETHER, AND A LEARNING PROCESS. WE HAVE PEOPLE COME IN, AND [TELL] US WHAT’S GOING ON, AND WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE CITY…IT’S REALLY QUITE ENJOYABLE.” “I HAVE TWO DEGREES, SO I ENJOY THE COMPANY OF PEOPLE, THAT WE HAVE A LOT TO TALK ABOUT. I LIKE THE FACT THAT WE ARE GIVING BACK, TO THE KNOWLEDGE THAT WE LEARNED, IN THE FORM OF SCHOLARSHIPS.” “WHEN THIS STARTED, AND IT’S BEEN GOING IN LETHBRIDGE UNDER A DIFFERENT NAME, THE WIVES OF THE PROFESSORS THAT MOVED INTO TOWN, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE WAS FORMED. THEY WERE THE ONES THAT STARTED THIS CHAPTER.” “I THINK MOST OF THE WOMEN THAT MARRIED WERE HOUSEWIVES, AFTER THEY WERE MARRIED, AND HAVING CHILDREN, BUT THEY HAVE DEGREES. THAT WAS THE REQUIREMENT FOR BELONGING – THAT YOU HAD A DEGREE, BUT JUST IN THE NEAR PAST NOW [ABOUT 2 – 3 - 4 YEARS], THE DOORS ARE OPEN TO ALL WOMEN NOW. THERE ARE A FEW PROFESSIONALS IN OTHER AREAS, AND SOME, WE DON’T ASK. IF THEY WANT TO JOIN, THAT’S FINE.” “THEY HAVE A PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY. I’M FINDING, AS WE ARE ALL FINDING, AS WE ARE AGING, WE HAVE VERY FEW YOUNGER PEOPLE, BECAUSE THEY ARE ALL AT UNIVERSITY, AND VERY BUSY. THE ONES THAT HAVE JOBS, THEY ARE VERY BUSY TOO. AS WE AGE, WE ARE ALL ACTIVE, AND IT KEEPS US REALLY ACTIVE. IT’S GOOD TO GET OUT, AND BE WITH OTHER PEOPLE.” “WE DO HAVE PEOPLE IN THE GROUP THAT GO TO OTHER THINGS THAT ARE GOING ON, IN DIFFERENT PROVINCES. THEY SOMETIMES DO THE NATIONAL ONE, EVEN, AND FLY SOMEWHERE, AND THAT GOES ON ONCE A YEAR. IT’S CERTAINLY A WORTHWHILE GROUP, AND REALLY QUITE ACTIVE. WE HAVE A YOUNG PRESIDENT NOW, SHE IS DOING HER PHD, AND HER MOTHER IS A PROF [AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE].” “I THINK [THE GROUP IS RAISING AWARENESS] THAT TIMES ARE CHANGING. IT HAS BEEN, IN THE PAST, KIND OF SNOBBISH, HAVING TO BE VETTED IN, SO THIS IS REALLY GOOD, AND IT’S WORKED WELL. WE HAVE GOT SOME WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING IN [THE GROUP]…WHEN THEY HAD THE WOMEN’S PARADE, THE WOMEN’S PROTEST…THERE WAS A NUMBER OF US THAT PARTICIPATED IN THAT, AND THEY MADE THE HATS FOR IT. WE ARE ACTIVE IN THINGS LIKE THAT, THAT PERTAIN TO WOMEN.” “IT’S LIKE WOMEN ARE RISING, AND THAT SEEMS QUITE APPARENT. I AM IN THE UNIVERSITY BUILDING ENOUGH THAT I SEE IT AMONG THE YOUNG WOMEN. BOY, THEY DON’T LET ANYTHING GO BY. THEY’RE ACTUALLY REALLY QUITE GOOD, I THINK…[SEEING THAT MAKES ME FEEL] REALLY GOOD. IT’S ABOUT TIME. WE HAVE LOTS OF ENGAGEMENT WITH WOMEN—THE PEOPLE AROUND TOWN, WHO ARE THE ‘SHAKERS’ HERE, AND THEY SHAKE THINGS UP. THAT’S REALLY GOOD.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN FORMED A CHAPTER IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1944. DR. URSILLA MACDONNELL, DEAN OF WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA, SPOKE TO A GROUP OF LETHBRIDGE WOMEN ON FORMING A CHAPTER. BY 1958, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER WAS SENDING REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S NATIONAL CONVENTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170038000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170038000
Acquisition Date
2017-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THIS BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS NOTED, “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, ON THE QUILT'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT", “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN. I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0284." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
202
Width
260
Description
PURPLE QUILT WITH DOUBLE WEDDING RING PATTERN ON FRONT; QUILT HAS MACHINE-STITCHED GRID OF 80 SQUARES. RINGS ARE INTERLOCKED AND MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-PATTERNED WITH YELLOW, BLUE, PINK, AND RED PRIMARY COLOURS IN RINGS. QUILT TOP IS HAND-STITCHED AND SEAMS ALONG EDGES ARE MACHINE-STITCHED. BACK OF QUILT HAS LIGHTER PURPLE SECTIONS IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. EDGES ARE FRAYED; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS LOOSE STUFFING EXPOSED FROM INSIDE, STUFFING IS WOOL. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS INTERIOR FABRIC EXPOSED AND IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “[MOM] WAS ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING, ’CAUSE SHE COULDN’T SIT DOWN IDLY. SHE HAD TO BE CROCHETING, OR EMBROIDERING OR MAKING QUILTS.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “[IT WAS MADE IN THE] ‘60S, MAYBE EVEN THE ‘70S.” “WHEN I FIRST MET [KATHERINE], I CAN REMEMBER COMING INTO THE HOUSE AND SHE WAS SITTING AT THE OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE. THAT THING WAS JUST [GOING] AND THAT’S WHAT SHE WAS DOING, WAS JUST PIECING PIECES OF MATERIAL TOGETHER.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 2.