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Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
2
Height
2.1
Length
2.5
Width
0.9
Description
A-B: PAIR OF GOLD-COLOURED COSTUME JEWELRY EARRINGS. CRESENT-SHAPED, CURVING OUT TO FRONT. WHITE RHINESTONES SET IN GOLD-COLOURED METAL VERTICALLY DOWN CURVE OF EARRING. SCREW-ON CLASP AT BACK. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: BOTTOM RHINESTONE MISSING OFF COMPONENT A AND SECOND FROM THE TOP RHINESTONE MISSING OFF B. METAL MODERATELY WORN/SCUFFED.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. OF THESE EARRINGS, RUTH RECALLED, “I KNOW THAT THESE WERE WORN WHEN THEY WERE PERFORMING. IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE EARRINGS BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.7
Length
5
Width
0.6
Description
SILVER AND BLACK OVAL BROOCH; 3 RAISED SILVER METAL LINES (LIKE A STAFF ON SHEET MUSIC) HORIZONTALLY ACROSS BROOCH WITH A SILVER SIXTEENTH NOTE SET ON TOP OF THE LINES. BACKGROUND IS COATED IN MATTE BLACK VARNISH. GOOD CONDITION: BLACK PAINT PRESENT ON SILVER METAL IN A COUPLE OF SPOTS. SLIGHT LOSS OF VARNISH IN SOME PLACES ON FRONT OF BROOCH.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THE ANDERSON SISTERS HAD MATCHING UNIFORMS THEY WOULD OFTEN WEAR FOR PERFORMANCES, WHICH INCLUDED PIECES SUCH AS THIS BROOCH. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE BROOCH BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20170034002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1920
Materials
IRON, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.3
Diameter
2
Description
IRON RING WITH WIDE BLANK SQUARE FRONT. RING HAS NO MARKING ON FRONT OR INSIDE. RING BAND WIDENS AT SQUARE FRONT AND NARROWS INTO BAND. RING IS TARNISHED ON INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF BAND; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON NOVEMBER 20, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RITA BERLANDO REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GIFTED RING AND CRUCIFIX. BERLANDO WAS GIFTED THE OBJECTS FROM A PREVIOUS EMPLOYER, GLADSTONE VIRUTE, OF LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RING, BERLANDO RECALLED, “[THEY WERE FASHIONED FROM A BELL IN FRANCE OR BELGIUM] I HAVE NO IDEA…HOW THEY BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION. BUT TO HIM, HE MUST HAVE TREASURED THEM BECAUSE HE KNEW OF THE CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED AND THE BELL THAT IT CAME FROM…WHEN HE GAVE THEM TO ME, I WAS INTRIGUED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT IT BUT HE DIDN’T HAVE TOO MUCH HISTORY ON THEM. NOT TO ME, ANYWAY.” ON GLADSTONE VIRTUE’S MILITARY SERVICE, BERLANDO NOTED, ““I DON’T THINK HE WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK HE HAD A PAST THAT HE WOULD RATHER NOT DISCUSS. IT WAS ALWAYS STRICTLY BUSINESS. IT WAS NEVER SITTING THERE AND DISCUSSING WHAT HIS LIFE WAS OR ANYTHING OF THAT NATURE.” “I DIDN’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT HIM BUT I KNOW THAT HE WAS A MAN THAT PEOPLE RESPECTED, AND FOR HIM TO RESPECT ME, I THINK THAT WAS AN HONOUR.” “I WOULD LOVE TO KNOW HOW THESE TWO LITTLE ITEMS BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION AND WHERE WAS HE WHEN THEY WERE GIVEN TO HIM AND WAS HE PRESENT AT SOME TIME…I JUST FIND THAT HE MUST HAVE HAD THEM IN HIS POSSESSION FOR SOME TIME.” BERLANDO ELABORATED ON HOW THE RING CAME INTO HER POSSESSION, “[THIS ITEM] MEANS AN AWFUL LOT TO ME BECAUSE IT WAS GIVEN AT THE TIME THAT I WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE LAW FIRM OF VIRTUE AND COMPANY. IT WAS MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, SEMI-RETIRED WHEN I WAS EMPLOYED THERE, THAT HAD ASKED THAT I GO INTO HIS ROOM AND TAKE LETTERS [AND] NOTES FOR LETTERS THAT HE WISHED TO HAVE TYPED. I WAS HIRED AS A RECEPTIONIST, NOT FEELING THAT I WOULD HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY AS A SECRETARY, SO I INFORMED HIM THAT I COULD NOT DO THIS DUTY. HE ASKED THAT I GET HIS SECRETARY TO TAKE HIS NOTES. AS THE MONTHS WENT BY, HE BECAME VERY – AND I USE THE WORD ‘ATTACHED’ – BECAUSE HE WOULD ALSO ASK ME TO DO SERVICES FOR HIM, WHICH I WOULD HAVE TO GO TO THE ROYAL BANK TO DO HIS BANKING [AND] HIS INVESTMENTS. WHEN HE WAS NO LONGER TO BE WITH THE FIRM, HE HANDED ME A LITTLE GIFT. THAT GIFT CONSIST[ED] OF A RING AND A CROSS THAT WAS MADE FROM A BELL OF A CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED IN THE FIRST WAR. THAT MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME SO I HAVE TREASURED IT CONTINUALLY AND [THE GIFTING] HAS TO DATE BACK TO [1965].” “[MR GLADSTONE VIRTURE] MUST HAVE KEPT IT AS A REMEMBRANCE FROM SOMEWHERE IN THE PAST THAT HE HAD THAT HE DID NOT [WANT TO] LEAVE IT TO HIS FAMILY, BUT [WITH] ME. THEREFORE, I DEFINITELY FELT THAT [IT] WAS A GIFT THAT I SHOULD TREASURE AND I HAVE TREASURED, AND I HAVE KEPT IT UNDER LOCK AND KEY. EVEN IN THE TRANSITION OF DOWNSIZING, I LIVED IN FEAR THAT FOR SOME REASON, THERE WERE ITEMS THAT I NO LONGER HAVE. I KEPT THINKING, ‘OH, DEAR LORD, I BETTER MAKE SURE I STILL HAVE THAT GIFT FROM MR. VIRTUE.’ WHEN I FOUND IT, THAT’S WHEN I REALLY SERIOUSLY THOUGHT I HAD TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THEM.” “AT [THE TIME I WAS HIRED], FINANCES WERE DIFFICULT IN THE FAMILY HOME SO I APPLIED FOR THE POSITION OF RECEPTIONIST. THE POSITION REQUIRED NOT ONLY [WORKING] AS A RECEPTIONIST BUT AS A BOOKKEEPER AND AN OFFICE MANAGER. I HESITATED ONCE I WAS INFORMED OF THIS RESPONSIBILITY, BUT I UNDERTOOK THE POSITION AND DID ALL OF THE REQUIREMENTS THAT WAS EXPECTED OF ME. THE LAW FIRM AT THAT TIME CONSISTED OF CHARLES VIRTUE, WILLIAM RUSSELL, MR. GORDON AND THEN LATER ON, THERE WAS VAUGHN HEMBROFF THAT BECAME PARTNER AND GLENN MORRISON. IT’S ALWAYS MEANT A LOT OF THE PAST HISTORY OF MY LIFE. THINKING HOW I WAS HONOURED TO BE WITH THAT FIRM, THESE LITTLE ITEMS THAT WERE GIVEN TO ME JUST EVEN MEANT ALL THE MORE.” “BUT I REMEMBER DISTINCTLY THAT THEY SAID I COULDN’T LEAVE [IN 1964] UNTIL I HIRED SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME. THEY GAVE ME THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FINDING SOMEONE. MY INTENTION AT THAT TIME WAS TO LEAVE AND MOVE TO MONTREAL. I WAS LIMITED IN THE TIME THAT THIS RESPONSIBILITY WAS GIVEN, AND I DID SUGGEST A PARTICULAR PERSON BUT SHE ONLY WORKED THERE FOR A SHORT TIME AND THEY DIDN’T FEEL THAT SHE QUALIFIED AND COULD HANDLE THE WORK THAT I HAD TAKEN ON. THEN I HAD TO CONTINUE TO STAY UNTIL THEY FELT COMFORTABLE THAT THERE WAS SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME AND IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1965 [THAT I LEFT].” “EACH ONE OF THE LAWYERS HAD THEIR OWN PRIVATE SECRETARIES. ONE WOMAN IN PARTICULAR…MARY, WAS EXCELLENT IN TAKING LETTERS AND WAS AN EXCELLENT LAW SECRETARY, BUT COULD NOT DO THE BOOKKEEPING. I UNDERTOOK TO DO THE BOOKKEEPING FOR THE SECRETARIES AND THEREFORE, THERE HAD TO BE, AT LEAST FOUR EXTRA GIRLS AS SECRETARIES THERE. AS THEY INCREASED WITH STAFF, THEY WOULD ALSO HIRE MORE SECRETARIES.” ON MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, BERLANDO STATED, “I ADMIRED HIM BECAUSE HE DEMANDED RESPECT, HE DEMANDED PROFESSIONALISM. HE WAS VERY SERIOUS ABOUT HIS CLIENTS AND THEY HAD TO BE TREATED LIKE IT WAS AN HONOUR TO HAVE HIM AS THEIR LAWYER. HE WAS NOT A TALL MAN IN STATURE BUT HE STOOD OUT AS A SPECIAL PERSON…BUT HIS CLIENTS CAME FIRST. HE WOULD NEVER HESITATE TO MAKE SURE THAT IF HE HAD A CLIENT OR HAD AN APPOINTMENT THAT I HAD TO MAKE SURE THEY WERE TAKEN CARE OF. HE USED TO INVEST THROUGH THE ROYAL BANK AND HE WOULD HAVE ME GO DOWN AND MEET WITH THE MANAGER. [I WOULD] LET THEM KNOW THAT I WAS THERE ON BEHALF OF MR. VIRTUE AND PRESENT THEM WITH WHATEVER INFORMATION HE GAVE ME…THEY WERE TO TAKE CARE OF THAT. SO HE REALLY MADE ME HIS PERSONAL PERSON TO LOOK AFTER ALL OF HIS PRIVATE AFFAIRS, WHICH TO ME WAS AN HONOUR…EVEN THE LAWYERS HAD SO MUCH RESPECT FOR HIM. WHEN HE MADE A STATEMENT OR A COMMAND OR MADE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHANGES, THEY WERE MADE AND THEY HAD TO BE ABIDED.” BERLANDO SPOKE ABOUT HER SENTIMENTS ON DONATING THE RING TO THE MUSEUM, NOTING, “AT THE AGE OF NINETY-ONE, WHICH I HAVE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE THIS LENGTH OF TIME, I HAVE TO TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION MANY ITEMS THAT I FEEL SHOULD BE INHERITED BY MY FAMILY…BUT NOT KNOWING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS GIFT…[I WISH TO] LEAVE IT TO NO ONE OTHER THAN I FEEL THAT DESERVES TO HAVE IT, [WHICH] WOULD BE THE GALT MUSEUM. I DO WISH TO LEAVE IT TO SOMEONE THAT I THINK MAYBE COULD CARRY ON A LITTLE IMPORTANCE OF THE GIFT THAT WAS HANDED TO ME.” “I THINK THAT IT PUTS SUCH A TRUST IN ME, THAT I FEEL NOW, EVEN IN THE YEARS GONE BY, HOW I’VE ALWAYS WANTED SOMEONE, OR ANYONE THAT HAD ANY CONNECTIONS WITH ME, THAT THEY COULD TRUST ME. THAT I WOULD NEVER WANT TO HURT ANYONE AND I WOULD WANT TO CONTINUE TO HELP PEOPLE. WHEN I HEAR PEOPLE IN DISCUSSION OR IN COMMENTS THAT THEY CAN RECALL THINGS THAT I HAVE DONE FOR THEM THAT I CAN’T REMEMBER…I GUESS IT’S JUST MY NATURE TO BE THAT TYPE OF PERSON. [BUT] IF SOMEONE LIKE MR. VIRTUE COULD TRUST ME, AND THEN CLIENTS CAN TRUST ME, I THINK IT INSTILLED [A] TRUST THAT I’LL CARRY TO MY GRAVE.” ABNER GLADSTONE VIRTUE GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA IN 1913 AND BEGAN HIS CAREER IN LAW SHORTLY BEFORE THE START OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1915, VIRTUE ENLISTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE MILITIA UNIT, THE 25TH FIELD ARTILLERY. UPON ITS FORMATION, VIRTUE ENLISTED AS A LIEUTENANT WITH THE LETHBRIDGE 61ST BATTERY THAT JOINED FRONT LINES IN FRANCE IN 1917. IN 1916, THE CARENCY CHURCH’S STEEPLE FELL FROM GERMAN GUN-FIRE. THE BELL FROM THE STEEPLE WAS RELATIVELY UNDAMAGED, AND MOVED TO BE BURIED IN VILLERS A ROIS FOR SAFETY. THE ARTILLERY BRIGADE OF THE 61ST BATTERY ARRIVED IN CARENCY, WHERE AMONGST THE CHURCH DEBRIS FRAGMENTS OF THE BELL WERE RETRIVED BY LETHBRIDGE FORCES. THE BATTERY FARRIER FASHIONED THE FRAGMENTS INTO SOUVENIRS THAT SOLDIERS RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH, INCLUDING GLADSTONE VIRTUE, WHO RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH A RING. AN ARTICLE FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED MARCH 24, 1931 ON THE FRONT PAGE REFERENCED "LIEUT. A.G. VIRTUE, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE 61ST [ALBERTA BATTALION] WHEN IT WAS DEMOBILIZED, HAS ONE OF THE RINGS MADE FROM FRAGMENTS OF THE FAMOUS [CARENCY] BELL, SHOT FROM THE STEEPLE OF THE CHURCH BY GERMAN SHELL FIRE AND SHATTERED." VIRTUE RESUMED HIS LAW PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE FOLLOWING HIS RETUN FROM WAR, AND BECAME A SENIOR PARTNER IN THE FIRM OF VIRTUE, RUSSELL, MORGAN AND VIRTUE. THE BELL OF CARENCY CHURCH WAS RETRIEVED BY THE PARIS MUNICIPAL COUNCIL IN 1931, AND RETURNED TO THE CARENCY CHURCH. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES ON THE BELL AND VIRTUE’S INVOLVEMENT FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170034001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170034002
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1985
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
No. Pieces
5
Height
13
Length
45
Width
32
Description
A. CASE, SPEED GUN, 45CM LONG X 32CM WIDE X 13CM TALL. BLACK SYNTHETIC LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH SILVER TRIM ALONG LID, TWO SILVER METAL CLASPS WITH LOCKS ON FRONT, FOUR ROUND, SILVER METAL FEET ON BACK, AND SILVER METAL HINGES ON BACK. FRONT OF CASE HAS BLACK PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED TO SILVER METAL MOUNT. CASE INTERIOR HAS GREEN FOAM INSERTS INSIDE LID AND BASE; BASE FOAM INSERT HAS CUT-OUTS FOR SPEED GUN TO REST. CASE EXTERIOR IS SCUFFED AND WORN; TOP AND FRONT OF CASE STAINED WHITE AND BROWN; HANDLE HAS LABEL RESIDE ON TOP AND INSIDE; FOAM INSIDE CASE IS HAS INDENTS FROM SPEED GUN. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. SPEED GUN, 75.4CM LONG WITH CORD, GUN 30.8CM LONG X 9.2CM WIDE. BLACK METAL GUN BODY WITH CONICAL FRONT END; SPEED GUN HAS BLACK HANDLE WITH ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED GRIP, AND BLACK TAPE WRAPPED AROUND THE BASE; BASE OF HANDLE HAS BLACK CORD ATTACHED. CORD HAS WHITE TAPE WOUND AROUND TOP, WHITE RUBBER CABLE GUARD; CORD IS SPIRALED WITH BLACK VEHICLE ADAPTER FITTED AT END; ADAPTER IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH ROUND SILVER METAL FITTING. SPEED GUN HAS BLACK PLASTIC TRIGGER AT FRONT OF HANDLE BELOW BODY; FRONT OF SPEED GUN HAS BLACK FOAM FITTED INSIDE CONICAL END. SPEED GUN BODY HAS WHITE TEXT ON SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH WORDS; BODY HAS SILVER SWITCH, TWO WHITE DIALS LABELLED “ALARM”, SILVER DIAL, AND BLACK PLASTIC SWITCH LABELLED “MAN.” “AUTO” “(REL).” BESIDE TEXT. SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT ON REVERSE SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH TEXT. UNDERNEATH OF SPEED GUN BODY HAS SILVER AND BLACK METAL PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “CMI INC, MINTURN, CO. USA, TRANSMITTER TYPE JF100, PAT. NO. 3,689,921 & RE 29, 401, S/N 38-001367”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS DARKENED GLASS DISPLAY WINDOW, WITH TWO GREEN AND TWO RED BULBS VISIBLE INSIDE. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “(CAL), MOV, STA.” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW, AND BELOW A SECOND SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “OFF, ON”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT “CMI INCORPORATED” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW. BODY OF SPEED GUN IS SCUFFED AND WORN, WITH CHIPS IN BLACK PAINT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. LEATHER CASE, 14.4CM LONG X 6.7CM WIDE. BLACK LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH BLACK COTTON AND FOAM-LINED INTERIOR; FRONT OF CASE HAS GOLD TEXT STAMPED NEAR TOP EDGE “DECATUR ELECTRONICS, INC, 715 BRIGHT STREET, DECATUR, ILLINOIS 82522”. CASE MACHINE-STITCHED ALONG RIGHT AND BOTTOM EDGES; TOP EDGE HAS RIM ENGRAVED IN LEATHER. CASE INTERIOR IS FLAKING; TEXT ON FRONT OF CASE IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “65 KPH, X BAND”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “11443”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “88 KPH”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “C22333”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MECHANICAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON DECEMBER 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED TIM STOBBS, FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES OFFICER, ON THE DONATION OF THE SPEED GUN. ON THE SPEED GUN, STOBBS ELABORATED, “[THE SPEED GUN 8] REALLY CHANGED THE WAY THE WORLD WORKED. [IT] ALLOWED US TO SET AN ALARM, IT COULD BE MOUNTED ON THE DASH OF THE CAR TO BE MOBILE, OR IT COULD BE HELD IN A STATIONARY POSITION.” “THIS IS THE LAST ITERATION OF THE SPEED GUN SERIES OF RADAR THAT THE POLICE SERVICES USED IN THE LATE ‘60S…PROBABLY A LOT OF PLACES USED THEM INTO THE EIGHTIES, AND LATER BECAUSE THEY WERE SUCH A GOOD UNIT. THE SPEED GUN 6 WAS A PRECURSOR TO THIS AND IT WOULD [BE] A PLAIN SPEED GUN WHICH LOOKED IDENTICAL TO [THIS] MODEL. BUT IT HAD NONE OF THE FANCY ITERATIONS LIKE ALARMS AND MANUAL AND AUTO SETTINGS ON IT. IT WAS THE FIRST ITERATION THAT ALLOWED THE POLICE, OR AN ENFORCEMENT AGENCY, TO ACTUALLY HAVE A PORTABLE UNIT THAT THEY COULD HOLD IN THEIR HAND [TO] GIVE THEM A READING ON A CAR…VERSUS EVERYTHING THAT THEY HAD WHICH WAS BUILT INTO THE CAR BEFORE AND ACTUALLY FIXED IN THE CAR. PRIOR TO THAT YOU WOULD BE OUTSIDE AND YOU WOULD HAVE A MOUNTED PIECE THAT WOULD BE A TIMING DEVICE, AND YOU WOULD HAVE PIECES OF TUBING ON THE GROUND AND IT WOULD GIVE YOU SPEED FROM TUBES. THIS WAS A STEP FORWARD INTO THE MODERN 2000 FUTURE. EVERYBODY THOUGHT THIS WAS FROM THE PLANET MARS, IT WAS AWESOME." “THE INITIAL ONES THAT STARTED OUT WERE 6’S…[BY 1979 WHEN I ARRIVED] WE WERE MOVING TO 8’S. 8’S HAD ALL THESE WONDERFUL FEATURES IN THEM, THEY HAD COME SO FAR [WITH] THE ALARM, THE AUTO AND MANUAL SETTINGS, THE STATIONARY MOVEMENT, VERY QUICKLY YOU COULD MOVE FROM STATIONARY TO MOVING. THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION WAS A BIG [FEATURE] BECAUSE YOU COULD VALIDATE YOUR SPEEDS WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, BUT IT WAS ALWAYS NICE TO JUST PERIODICALLY RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION TO MAKE SURE EVERYTHING WAS RUNNING GOOD.” “THEY ONLY LASTED PROBABLY ANOTHER 5 YEARS AFTER I GOT THERE, IF THAT, BECAUSE WE STARTED MOVING TO…A DOUBLE SYSTEM WHERE WE HAD HARD MOUNTED, MOVING RADAR. IT ALSO DID STATIONARY FRONT AND BACK. WE ALSO STARTED MOVING TO A HANDHELD STATIONARY RADAR, WHICH GAVE US MORE VERSATILITY AS WELL. NOW YOU HAD YOUR RADAR LIKE THIS [SPEED GUN] AND YOU COULD RUN TO THE SIDE, YOU COULD DO MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS AT ONCE.” “[WE RAN] 6’S AND 8’S AT THE SAME TIME.” “THIS PARTICULAR MODEL IS QUITE A HIGH END ONE, IT HAS A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT SETTINGS ON IT AND, YOU CAN LOOK ON THE SIDE AND IT SAYS “ALARM”. THIS WAS A UNIQUE THING BACK IN THE DAY—YOU COULD SET, WHEN YOU WERE TRAVELING DOWN THE HIGHWAY OR ON THE ROAD, A PRE-SET SPEED. LET’S SAY FOR AN EXAMPLE YOU GAVE A 15 KM/H DIFFERENTIAL. YOU WOULD SET THIS AT 65 KM/H AND YOU WOULD PUT THE TOP SWITCH TO THE “ON” POSITION, AND YOU LEAVE THIS BACK ROCKER SWITCH IN THE CENTER POSITION, AND WHEN YOU’RE TRAVELING DOWN THE ROAD, ANY VEHICLE THAT WAS IN VIOLATION OF THAT 65 IT WOULD AUTOMATICALLY BEEP AND IT WOULD LOCK THEIR SPEED ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE. YOUR PATROL SPEED WOULD BE DEMONSTRATED IN THE GREEN ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF THE BACK DISPLAY AND ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE WOULD BE THE RED DISPLAY WHICH WOULD BE YOUR TARGET SPEED. IT WOULD LOCK IT. WITH RADAR, THIS IS A DEVICE THAT CAN BE USED TO TEST A SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, BUT THE INITIAL OBSERVATION HAS TO BE MADE BY THE OFFICER TO SAY THAT, “I LOOKED AT A VEHICLE, I SAW THE VEHICLE WAS TRAVELLING AT WHAT I BELIEVE TO BE A SPEED OF FASTER THAN 65KM/H, I CHECKED AND VALIDATED IT WITH MY RADAR.” THIS [SPEED GUN], YOU COULD TOTALLY DEPEND UPON THE RADAR TO LOCK IT UP, EVEN IF YOU DIDN’T SEE THE VEHICLE. THIS ONE WAS A MILE STEP AHEAD OF ANYTHING AT THAT TIME THAT WE HAD.” “[THE SPEED GUNS] WORKED WELL IN COLD, THEY WORKED WELL IN HOT, THEY WERE VERY PORTABLE. WE COULD PUT A BATTERY PACK ON THESE, A 12 VOLT BATTERY PACK AND WE COULD STAND OUTSIDE THE VEHICLE WITH THE BATTERY PACK. THEY WERE A PRETTY GOOD UNIT FOR THE DAY. THE ONLY THING THAT YOU REQUIRED THE OFFICER FOR WAS TO ENSURE THAT YOU DIDN’T GET THE WRONG READING, BECAUSE IF YOU HAVE TWO CARS COMING AT YOU AND YOU HAVE TWO OF THEM IN THE BEAM, THE OFFICER HAS TO MAKE A DIFFERENTIAL WHETHER OR NOT IT WOULD WORK.” “WE HAD A NUMBER OF DASH MOUNTED UNITS WHICH HAD THE SAME CAPABILITIES, BUT NOTHING HAD THE ALLOWANCE FOR YOU TO BE ABLE TO PULL IT OUT IN A SECOND AND POINT IT OUT THE SIDE WINDOW TO CATCH SOMEBODY COMING AT YOU FROM THE SIDE OR THE REAR. IT WAS A VERY UNIQUE AND WELL THOUGHT OF BEAST. THE ONLY PROBLEMS WE HAD WITH THESE IS IF YOU CAN NOTICE THERE IS AT THE END [THERE’S A PIECE THAT LOOKS] LIKE A HORN. ONE OF THE BIGGEST ISSUES IS MOST POLICEMEN ARE RELATIVELY HARD ON EQUIPMENT IN THE CARS. THEY’VE GOT THE [SPEED GUN] AND THEY DROP IT ON THE GROUND AFTER THEY GET A SPEED. WE [USED] TO KNOCK THE HORNS OFF [SPEED GUNS] QUITE A BIT AND HAVE TO SEND THEM BACK, OR THE HORNS [BECAME] DEFORMED, AND THE REASON IT’S DEFORMED IS ITS BEEN DROPPED OR BANGED AGAINST SOMETHING. WHILE THAT WOULD BE A NORMAL FOR THIS TYPE OF INSTRUMENT, THAT WAS THE ONLY WEAK POINT IN THIS. IF YOU LOOK AT THE MORE MODERN HANDHELD UNITS THEY WENT AWAY FROM A HORN AND PUT A CONE ON THE OUTSIDE TO PROTECT THE INTAKE OF THE RADAR UNIT. THIS ONE HERE…HAS A STYROFOAM INSERT [IN] IT [TO PROTECT IT]. THOSE ALSO WERE VERY SUSCEPTIBLE TO BEING BANGED AND SMASHED OUT. WE WERE ALWAYS MAKING SOMETHING NEW TO PUT BACK IN THERE AND GLUE THEM BACK IN TO PROTECT THE INNARDS OF THE UNIT; THAT WAS PRETTY MUCH THE ONLY DOWNFALL OF THE UNIT.” “ANOTHER THING IT HAD, WHICH THE OLD ONES DIDN’T HAVE, IS IT HAS A STATIONARY MODE ON THE TOP SWITCH AND A MOVING MODE. THEN IT ALSO HAD A CALIBRATE MODE. IT HAD AN INTERNAL TESTING SYSTEM THAT WHEN YOU HIT CALIBRATE IT WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION ON IT TO HELP YOU, WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, TO ENSURE THAT THIS WAS WORKING RIGHT. YOU WOULD GENERALLY TEST THIS AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR SHIFT AND IF YOU STOPPED FOR LUNCH YOU WOULD TEST IT AGAIN DURING THE MIDDLE OF YOUR SHIFT. THEN YOU’D TEST AT THE END OF YOUR SHIFT TO VALIDATE THAT THIS INSTRUMENT HAD BEEN OPERATING CORRECTLY DURING THE DURATION OF YOUR SHIFT.” “THIS CALIBRATION INTERNALLY WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL TEST TO MAKE SURE THAT THE CALCULATIONS INSIDE WERE WORKING CORRECTLY, THE ELECTRONICS. BECAUSE THIS IS A PIECE OF ELECTRONICS AND IT IS SUSCEPTIBLE TO HOT AND COLD. THE WHOLE IDEA OF THIS IS TO ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU WENT TO COURT, WITH THE TUNING FORK TEST AND WITH THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION TEST, YOU COULD STAND UP BEFORE THE COURT AND [SAY], “I TESTED THE UNIT, AND IN MY OPINION, AND MY TRAINING, THIS UNIT WORKED CORRECTLY AND AS IT SHOULD TO DETERMINE ACCURATELY THE SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, EITHER WITH ME MOVING IT OR ME STATIONARY”. YOU HAVE TO GIVE THAT EVIDENCE…AND THAT [CALIBRATION] ALLOWED THAT. [THE] TUNING FORK TEST AND THE INTERNAL [MODE] VALIDATED YOUR ABILITY TO SAY THAT.” “EVERY TIME YOU TOOK OVER A CAR, OR SAY YOU CHANGE CARS MID-SHIFT, [AND] YOU HAD ONE OF THESE UNITS OR ANY RADAR UNIT IN IT, THE FIRST THING YOU’D DO IS YOU WOULD TEST AND ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF THIS UNIT. [THAT WOULD] ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU LEFT, IF YOU GOT SOMEBODY ON RADAR, IT WOULD BE GIVING YOU AN ACCURATE READING. THEY’RE USUALLY ACCURATE, PLUS OR MINUS LESS THAN 1%. AT A 100KM/H IT WOULD BE LESS THAN 1KM/H OFF. THERE ARE VARIOUS THINGS WITH RADAR THAT ARE [BENEFICIAL]. IF YOU’RE SITTING AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD AND YOU’RE SHOOTING AT AN ANGLE, THE HIGHER THE ANGLE THE LOWER THE SPEED BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A TONE. IF YOU THINK OF RADAR AS HEARING A TRAIN COMING TOWARDS YOU, YOU HEAR IT COMING, IT GETS LOUD, AND THEN IT GOES AWAY AND IT CHANGES TONE. [THE SPEED GUN] GIVES US THE SAME THING AND THAT’S WHAT THIS READS. SO THAT’S GOOD. THIS [SPEED GUN] WAS THE ULTIMATE IN THE SPEED GUNS, THIS WAS EXCELLENT.” “THE COOL THING ABOUT IT WAS FOR THE COURT SYSTEM, IT CAME WITH TWO SETS OF TUNING FORKS. THE TUNING FORKS WERE USUALLY CALIBRATED TO A SPEED. THESE ONES ARE X-BAND TYPE TUNING FORKS, AND THEY WERE SENT AWAY ANNUALLY TO BE CALIBRATED TO ENSURE THAT THEY MAINTAINED THEIR FREQUENCIES. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IS THAT YOU WOULD TAKE AND PUT [THE SPEED GUN] IN STATIONARY MODE, AND YOU WOULD TEST THE DEVICE TO ENSURE THAT IT WAS ACTUALLY READING CORRECTLY, ON BOTH OF [TUNING FORKS]. YOU TESTED THE COMPUTATIONAL SPEED OF THE UNIT. YOU’D STRIKE TWO OF THE TUNING FORKS AND PUT THEM TOGETHER IN FRONT OF THE UNIT, AND IT WOULD MAKE A COMPUTATION ON THE TWO TONES TO GIVE YOU THE BASIC SPEED DIFFERENTIAL BETWEEN THE TWO TUNING FORKS. THIS WAS ANOTHER MEANS TO ENSURE THAT WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS GETTING THE PROPER SPEED OUT OF YOUR UNIT. IT WAS REALLY A STEP FORWARD IN INSURING THAT THE CREDIBILITY AND CAPABILITY OF THE UNIT WAS VALIDATED, AND THE COURTS ACTUALLY LOVE THAT.” “ANNUALLY YOU RECERTIFY YOUR TUNING FORKS, YOUR TUNING FORK CERTIFICATION FOR TWO TUNING FORKS IS PROBABLY ABOUT $120 A YEAR. IF ANYTHING STARTS HAPPENING TO THESE, BECAUSE THEY GET BOUNCED IN THE CAR, VIBRATION, HOT, COLD, THEY’RE IN THE CAR ALL THE TIME. THEY START TO WEAR OUT. IT STARTS BECOMING COST PROHIBITIVE TO SEND THEM BACK TO THE FACTORY FOR REFURBISHING. THERE’S A THING IN [THE SPEED GUNS] CALLED THE OSCILLATOR. UNDER THE NEWER UNITS THE OSCILLATOR IS IN THE HEAD, AWAY FROM THE MAIN UNIT. THE OSCILLATOR FOR THIS [MODEL] IS BUILT INSIDE, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE [THE] WHOLE UNIT AND SHIP IT OFF. THEY HAVE TO PEAL IT ALL APART, PUT AN OSCILLATOR INTO IT. WHEREAS WITH THE NEW UNITS, WITH THE SEPARATE HEADS WITH THE OSCILLATOR, YOU CAN JUST GET ANOTHER HEAD, PUT ANOTHER HEAD ON, SEND THAT HEAD AWAY TO THE, AND FOR A $160 YOU GET THE OSCILLATOR FIXED. WHEN THESE START TO BREAK DOWN, IT’S USUALLY CATASTROPHIC. THIS IS USUALLY ALMOST COST PROHIBITIVE—LIKE MOST ELECTRONICS, THEY HAVE A VERY LIMITED SHELF LIFE. THEY DON’T GET TREATED EXACTLY THE NICEST. MOST POLICE CARS WILL HAVE POWER SEATS BECAUSE OF THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE THAT [HAVE] TO BE IN THEM AND THE DIFFERENT POSITIONS THEY HAVE TO BE IN, AND A REGULAR SLIDING SEAT GENERALLY DOESN’T GIVE ENOUGH TO FIT ENOUGH PEOPLE. IF SOMEBODY HAD USED THIS, AND PUT IT DOWN, AND IT FELL BEHIND THE SEAT, AND THEY PUSHED THE SEAT BACK, THOSE POWER SEATS ARE FAIRLY STRONG, THEY CAN DO A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF DAMAGE TO ONE OF THESE UNITS INADVERTENTLY. YOU HAVE TO ASSESS HOW THEY’VE BEEN TREATED, WHAT THE COST IS GOING TO BE TO MAINTAIN THEM, LONG-TERM INVESTMENT. AS SOON AS A SPEED GUN 8 OSCILLATOR’S DONE, IT’S DONE. BECAUSE IT’S NOT WORTH SENDING IT BACK TO HAVE RE-DONE.” “[THE] TRAFFIC SERGEANT WOULD HAVE BEEN IN CHARGE OF THE PROCUREMENT OF [RADAR EQUIPMENT]. AT THAT TIME I’M NOT SURE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN SERGEANT, BUT IT WAS ONE OF MY SERGEANTS THERE. HE HAD BEEN ON TRAFFIC FOR QUITE A WHILE AT THE TIME…SHORTLY THEREAFTER, WHILE I WAS TENURED THERE, SERGEANT NORRIS VANHORN WAS ALSO ON TRAFFIC WHEN I WAS ON THERE. THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE FANTASTIC…WHEN WE GOT THESE, THESE WERE EYE OPENERS…YOU THOUGHT YOU’D DIED AND GONE TO HEAVEN BECAUSE OF THE VERSATILITY IT GAVE YOU TO DO YOUR JOB.” “YOU CHANGE THE TECHNOLOGY TO TRY TO KEEP UP WITH THE NEEDS OF THE GUYS THAT ARE WORKING. IT MAKES YOU MORE EFFICIENT…I MANAGED THE PEACE OFFICERS IN OKOTOKS, AND I CAN TELL YOU, I CAN BUY EQUIPMENT EVERY DAY…THAT STUFF’S CHEAP. PEOPLE ARE EXPENSIVE…YOU WOULD TRY TO KEEP THEM IN EQUIPMENT THAT KEEPS THEM VERY EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE, AND YOU’D GET THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK OUT OF THE PEOPLE WORKING…THIS TYPE OF EQUIPMENT HAS USUALLY A SHORT SHELF LIFE. WE DID OTHER THINGS WITH THEM. WE USED TO LEND OUT THESE RADAR GUNS TO THE SOFT BALL KIDS…OR THE HARD BALL KIDS…AND THEY COULD SEE HOW FAST THEY COULD PITCH. OR WHEN THEY HAD SOAPBOX DERBIES…YOU’D GIVE THESE [SPEED GUNS] AND THEY COULD POST IT ON THE NEWS “AH LITTLE JOHNNY CAME DOWN THE HILL AND HE WAS DOING 37 KM/H IN HIS HOME MADE THING”. THERE [WERE] LOTS OF OTHER APPLICATIONS THAT THIS WAS SORT OF RE-CIRCULATED TO, FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S NOT LIKE YOU’D JUST DISCARD THE [EQUIPMENT], YOU’D TRY TO MAKE ANOTHER USE FOR IT. A LOT OF THIS [EQUIPMENT] FOR MANY YEARS, MADE ITS WAY AROUND THE COMMUNITY IN OTHER SOCIAL EVENTS TO ASSIST THE COMMUNITY IN WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO AND SEE.” STOBBS RECALLED HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE, NOTING, “I WAS VERY FORTUNATE. I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE [STARTING IN 1979]. I ALSO WORKED FOR THE RED CLIFF POLICE SERVICE PRIOR TO THAT, AND WE RAN THESE UNITS WHEN I WAS A YOUNG CONSTABLE. I WORKED IN TRAFFIC FOR OVER 3 AND A HALF OR 4 YEARS.” “THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE VERY COMMON IN OUR CARS WHEN I CAME HERE. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE—I DROVE A BLACK WIDOW…ONE OF OUR WIDOWS HAD THIS IN IT…WE HAD TWO CARS IN TOWN THAT WERE RENOWNED WITH THE KIDS. THEY WERE TWO BLACK FORDS WITH BIG 429’S IN THEM. THEY HAD SPEED GUNS IN THEM AND THEY ALSO HAD OTHER RADARS IN THEM. THAT [SPEED GUN] WAS ONE OF THE ITERATIONS WE HAD IN THEM, AND WE USED THESE A LOT FOR OUR ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. THEY COULD GIVE US SUCH VERSATILITY FOR THE OFFICER TO SIT STATIONARY OR TO BE MOVING. WHEN YOU’RE IN A SCHOOL ZONE, SOMETIMES YOU WANT TO STAND OUTSIDE YOUR CAR, YOU WANT TO RUN BACKWARDS, OR YOU WANT TO RUN TO THE SIDE. IF YOU’RE IN A PLAYGROUND ZONE, IT’S MORE ADVANTAGEOUS TO BE SITTING ON A SIDE STREET THAN SITTING WITH THE CARS PASSING YOU. IT GAVE US SUCH VERSATILITY WHICH WE NEVER HAD BEFORE.” “BACK IN THE DAY, OUR FLEET WAS…WE CALLED IT THE ‘SMARTIE’ FLEET. IT WAS MULTIPLE COLOURS AND I DON’T KNOW THE PURPOSE BEHIND IT. WHEN I WAS IN [LETHBRIDGE], IF YOU WOUND UP WITH THE TRAFFIC FLEET WHEN I STARTED IN ‘79, THERE WERE TWO CARS. THERE WERE ALWAYS TWO BLACK CARS, AND THEY WERE CALLED THE BLACK WIDOWS. THERE WERE DIFFERENT ITERATIONS. THE FIRST TWO WERE FORD INTERCEPTORS WITH 429’S ALL DECKED OUT, AND THEY WERE PURSUIT TYPE CARS, THEY ALL WERE IN THOSE DAYS. THEN WE HAD A NUMBER OF OTHER VEHICLES. ONE OF THE CARS THAT, WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, I DROVE [WAS] A SECONDARY MARKED ENFORCEMENT CAR AND IT WAS A PINKIE SALMON COLOUR. I DON’T EVEN KNOW, AND IT WAS GREAT, BUT IT WAS A GREAT BIG LTD AS WELL. THEN WE HAD A COUPLE OTHER CARS THAT WERE A COLLISION CAR AND A HIT-AND-RUN CAR. THEY WERE DIFFERENT COLOURS AGAIN. I DON’T KNOW WHY THEY BOUGHT THEM THAT WAY, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER THAT WAS THE THOUGHT OF THE CHIEF AT THE TIME, BUT THAT WAS THE WAY THINGS WENT UNTIL FINALLY WE DECIDED LATER ON THAT OUR FLEET WAS GOING TO GO BLACK AND WHITE LIKE IN THE OLD DAYS. BEFORE THE “SMARTIE” FLEET IT WAS BLACK AND WHITE, WE WERE GOING BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE. WE WERE THE FIRST POLICE SERVICE IN ALBERTA THAT WENT BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE AND EVERYBODY’S FOLLOWING LETHBRIDGE SUIT, ACTUALLY. THAT’S A CULTURAL THING THOUGH AND LETHBRIDGE IS VERY PROUD OF THEIR BLACK AND WHITE CARS.” “RADAR WAS A DAY-TO-DAY THING; IT WAS INVOLVED HEAVILY IN A DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. WE USED TO HAVE A PIN-MAP, AND WE DIRECTED OUR ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES AROUND A NUMBER OF THINGS. FIRST AND FOREMOST WOULD BE OUR PIN-MAP AND OUR PIN-MAP WAS OUR COLLISION MAP. EVERY COLLISION WAS PINNED AND THEY WERE PINNED IN DIFFERENT COLOURS—THIS [IS] OLD TECHNOLOGY. A FATAL WOULD BE BLACK, AN INJURY WOULD BE RED, A NON-INJURY WOULD BE BLUE. WE COULD VISUALLY SEE FROM THE ENFORCEMENT ASPECT WHERE WE SHOULD BE INVESTING OUR TIME TO SLOW PEOPLE DOWN AT THESE COLLISION POINTS. SECONDLY IS, LETHBRIDGE HAD ALWAYS HAD OUR SCHOOLS CLOSE TOGETHER, SO WE INVESTED A LOT OF OUR TIME AND ENERGY AROUND THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I WAS PROUD OF IS, FOR THE SIZE OF THE CITY AND THE TRAFFIC FLOWS THAT WE HAD, OUR FATALITY WITH YOUTH WAS VERY LOW. WE HAD A FEW KIDS HIT IN MY TIME AND A FEW OBVIOUSLY PASSED AWAY, IN A CITY OF THIS SIZE, BUT OVER THE YEARS MOST OF US TOOK GREAT PRIDE IN THE FACT THAT WE HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY MAKE A VISUAL AND A NOTED IMPACT ON BEHAVIORS IN SCHOOLS, WHETHER IT BE U-TURNS, SPEEDING, IN THIS. PEOPLE WERE WELL AWARE WE WERE THERE.” “WE HAD AN EXCELLENT RELATIONSHIP WITH THE KIDS…[IN THE 1970S-1980S WHEN] MUSCLE CARS WERE BIG. WE USED TO HAVE A COOL THING GOING WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS WHEN YOU’RE IN THE ENFORCEMENT GAME. WE USED TO HAVE A [SYSTEM OF] EVERY THIRD ONE’S FREE TYPE THING. THEY’D WORK ALL WINTER, A LOT OF THESE KIDS DIDN’T SMOKE, THEY DIDN’T DRINK, THEY DIDN’T DO ANYTHING. ALL THEY WORKED [ON] WAS THEIR CARS, BUT ONCE SPRING ROLLED OUT, OUT CAME THE MUSCLE CARS. OVER THE COURSE OF THE SUMMER THEY DROVE THEM. THEY WOULD END UP AFOUL OF US, WHETHER IT BE FOR STUNTING OR SPEEDING. WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS, WE WOULD HAVE THIS FREQUENT FLYER MILE PROGRAM BECAUSE THEY WOULD GET THEMSELVES INTO A BIND, BUT THEY WERE SUCH GOOD KIDS THEY WERE JUST STUPID WITH THEIR CARS. WE USED TO CATCH THEM FOR SPEEDING WITH THESE [SPEED GUNS], OR STUNTING. THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE YOUTH, SOME OF THE YOUNGER PEOPLE, THAT ARE LATE-TEENS OR EARLY-TWENTIES WAS PRETTY GOOD, THESE GUYS THAT BUILT THESE CARS UP. WE HAD A PRETTY GOOD KNOWLEDGE OF THEM AND WE WORKED WELL WITH THEM.” “WE RAN WHAT THEY CALLED A “DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM”. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF OPTIONS FOR THE GUYS TO GO WHERE THEY WANTED, BUT FIRST AND FOREMOST WE CONCENTRATED ON HIGH COLLISION AREAS AND SCHOOLS. OBVIOUSLY WE KNEW WE HAD THE STRIP…WE HAD 3RD AVENUE AND MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE AND KIDS DROVE THE STRIP IN THE SUMMER, THAT’S WHERE THEY DID THEIR DRAG RACING…BACK IN THE DAY, WHEN I FIRST STARTED, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE WENT STRAIGHT THROUGH TO NORTH MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE. THAT INTERSECTION [OF] 3RD AVENUE, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE USED TO GO STRAIGHT THROUGH ON THE HIGHWAY. IT WAS A BUSY PLACE [WITH] LOTS OF COLLISIONS. WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME DOWN IN THERE ON MAYOR MAGRATH, AND THERE WERE OTHER PLACES IN TOWN WHICH WERE CONCERNS. YOU’D GET CITIZENS COMPLAINING ABOUT LOTS OF TRAFFIC AND SPEED, WE WOULD GO DOWN AND MONITOR IT, AND WE WOULD TRY TO RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY BY ATTENDING THAT AREA. USUALLY IT WAS ONE OR TWO PEOPLE IN THE AREA THAT WERE DOING IT AND YOU CAUGHT AND DEALT WITH THEM, AND THE PROBLEM PRETTY MUCH WENT AWAY. ONE OF THE THINGS I WAS TAUGHT AS A YOUNG CONSTABLE [WAS WHEN YOU] COME TO WORK AFTER YOUR DAYS OFF, THE FIRST THING YOU DO IS YOU GO LOOK AT YOUR PIN BOARD AND YOU SEE IF ANYTHING CHANGED, IF HAVE WE HAD A FATALITY. HAS THERE BEEN SOME SERIOUS COLLISIONS, HAS SOMETHING CHANGED? YOU ALWAYS KNEW IN YOUR MIND WHERE YOU HAD TO BE.” “WE SPENT LOTS OF TIME ON SCENIC DRIVE ANYWHERE. AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE. IF YOU’RE RUNNING A MARKED VEHICLE, SOMETIMES WE WOULD JUST PARK ON A BOULEVARD SOMEWHERE IT WAS BUSY AND JUST SIT THERE. YOU’D MONITOR TRAFFIC AND OF COURSE SOMEBODY WOULD EVENTUALLY DO SOMETHING SILLY AND YOU’D HAVE STOP THEM, BUT THE WHOLE IDEA WOULD BE FOR THE VISIBILITY ASPECT.” “I REMEMBER WHEN WE GOT THE 8’S [SPEED GUNS] AND WE COULD PROGRAM THEM, WE THOUGHT WE’D DIED AND WENT TO HEAVEN. WE ARE ALL ABOUT EFFICIENCY. EVERY SHIFT YOU WOULD DEAL WITH TWENTY, THIRTY PEOPLE OR MORE. NOT INCLUDING COMPLAINTS, WE’RE TALKING ABOUT INTERACTIONS WITH PEOPLE THAT WERE VIOLATIONS SOMEHOW. [THE SPEED GUNS] GAVE YOU A TOOL TO INTERACT WITH SOMEBODY…AND A LOT OF OTHER THINGS COME FROM THIS. A LARGE AMOUNT OF CRIME IS SOLVED BY SOMEBODY STOPPING A CAR AND TALKING TO SOMEBODY, AND THE CAR’S STOLEN, THERE’S STOLEN PROPERTY IN THE CAR, THE GUY’S WANTED ON WARRANTS. THIS TOOL WAS A LEVERAGE AND AN ABILITY TO ENTER A WHOLE NEW REALM IN ASSISTING OUR COMMUNITY AND KEEPING OUR COMMUNITY SAFE. IT JUST WASN’T FROM THE TRAFFIC END OF IT, IT GAVE YOU AN OPPORTUNITY TO INTERACT WITH PEOPLE THAT NORMALLY YOU WOULD NOT HAVE THE CAPACITY TO INTERACT WITH. AND DO IT IN A LAWFUL MANNER.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120014000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
Acquisition Date
2012-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
No. Pieces
4
Height
14.4
Length
221.5
Width
51.2
Description
EMERGENCY FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER. ADJUSTABLE, MEDIUM BURGUNDY COLOURED VINYL WITH SILVER COLOURED METAL, AND FOUR BLACK RUBBER WHEELS. OUTER RECTANGULAR FRAME WITH A SMALLER, ADJUSTABLE FRAME WITHIN. STRETCHER HAS THREE STRAPS: TWO WINE COLOURED NYLON SEATBELT STYLE STRAPS, WITH METAL AND BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLES, ON THE UPPER BODY. BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLE AT CHEST HEIGHT HAS "FERNO" IN GREY. THIRD BUCKLE IS A BLACK NYLON AND PLASTIC BUCKLE, ON THE LOWER BODY. BACK OF PLASTIC BUCKLE IS EMBOSSED WITH "ACCULOC CSR-10 A.C.W. ASIA, WOONSOCKET RI". RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING ON RIGTH SIDE OF STRETCHER, AT WAIST AREA, READS "FERNO". TWO RUBBER FEET AT THE FOOT END OF STRETCHER TO STABILIZE STRETCHER WHEN FULLY EXTENDED. VINYL IS IN TWO PIECES AND CAN BE REMOVED FROM INNER FRAME. GOLD COLOURED ZIPPERS AND SILVER COLOURED SNAPS HOLD VINYL IN PLACE. THERE ARE TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE FOOT PORTION, BOTH RUNNING VERTICALLY. THERE ARE ALSO TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE UPPER BODY PORTION, WITH ONE RUNNING HORIZONTALLY AND ONE VERTICALLY. METAL LABEL RIVETED ONTO FRAME AT FOOT OF STRETCHER READS "FERNO - WASHINGTON, INC. WILMINGTON, OHIO, U.S.A. SERIAL NUMBER 07-052255." FOUR FOLDABLE HANDLES, TWO AT HEAD AND TWO AT FEET. HANDLES HAVE TEXTURED BLACK PLASTIC GRIPS. GRIPS EMBOSSED WITH "HUNTWILDE CORPORATION". LOWER HANDLES (AT FOOT) HAVE METAL CYLINDERS THAT SLIDE OVER THE JOINT TO PREVENT HANDLES FROM FOLDING BACK IN. CROSSBAR AT KNEE AREA HAS A SMALL RECTANGULAR PIECE THAT SWINGS OUT AND ONTO A BOLT WHEN STRETCHER IS FOLDED INTO SITTING POSITION, WHICH PREVENTS STRETCHER FROM GOING BACK TO A LAYING DOWN POSITION. UPPER BODY PORTION CAN BE ADJUSTED TO FOUR DIFFERENT POSITIONS: LAYING TOTALLY FLAT TO SITTING AT AN APPROXIMATELY 45 DEGREE ANGLE. AT SHOULDER AREA ON RIGHT SIDE THERE IS A TRIANGULAR SHAPED CLIP, WHICH RELEASES THE UPPER BODY PORTION AND ALLOWS IT TO BE ADJUSTED TO A SITTING POSITION. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. VINYL IS STRUCTURALLY VERY GOOD, WITH NO RIPS OR TEARS. SCUFF MARKS AND BLACK STAINS ALL OVER, ESPECIALLY ALONG THE EDGES. METAL FRAME IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. WHEELS AT THE FOOT ARE WORN MORE THAN THOSE AT THE HEAD.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-HUMAN-POWERED
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS EMERGENCY FOLDING STRETCHER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE STRETCHER WAS “USED PRIMARILY IN AMBULANCES FOR MOVING PATIENTS DOWN STAIRS OR AROUND TIGHT CORNERS. WE USE A MORE STAIR FRIENDLY VERSION NOW.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED: “IT WAS MORE OR LESS TO TAKE PEOPLE DOWN STAIRS. SIT THEM UP, STRAP THEM IN, HAD WHEELS ON IT. IT WAS FOR A PERSON THAT DIDN’T HAVE ANY SERIOUS INJURIES MORE OR LESS … IT WAS LIKE A LITTLE CHAIR, FOLD UP, SIT THEM DOWN … GO DOWN THE STAIRS ONE AT A TIME – THUNK, THUNK, THUNK, THUNK.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “I HATED THIS STRETCHER. THIS WAS A FOLDING STRETCHER … ACTUALLY THE OLD STAIR-CHAIR, BASICALLY. THEY HAVE MODERNIZED AND IMPROVED THIS DRAMATICALLY. BUT THIS PUZZLE OF A STRETCHER – YOU USED TO BE ABLE TO SET IT UP SO THAT IT CAME INTO A CHAIR … ANY TIME YOU WENT UP INTO AN APARTMENT BUILDING THAT WAS UNDER THREE STORIES, THERE’S NO ELEVATOR, SO YOU SOMETIMES HAD TO CARRY PEOPLE DOWN THREE FLIGHTS OF STAIRS. THIS WAS THE CHAIR OF CHOICE A LOT OF TIMES, IT WAS THE STRETCHER OF CHOICE, BECAUSE IT WAS LIGHTER THAN THE OTHER ONE AND IT WAS EASIER TO MANEUVER AROUND CORNERS … IT WAS A PUZZLE TO PUT TOGETHER AND TO TAKE APART AND I JUST NEVER EVER – I HATED THIS THING. TO THIS DAY, WHEN THE PARAMEDICS SAY ‘WE’RE GONNA NEED THE STAIR CHAIR’, I GRIT MY TEETH AND I CRINGE A LITTLE BIT, I THINK BECAUSE I THINK OF THIS THING, EVEN THOUGH THE NEW ONE IS WAY BETTER. THIS WAS IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE AND I WOULD SAY THAT THIS WAS IN SERVICE ON THE AMBULANCES UNTIL ABOUT … 7 YEARS AGO, GIVE OR TAKE. SO THE BETTER PART OF 15 YEARS THAT THAT WAS IN SERVICE WHILE I WAS HERE.” HE CONTINUED: “THE WORST PART ABOUT THIS IS THAT WHEN YOU PUT A PATIENT ON IT AND YOU LIFTED THEM UP TO GO DOWN THE STAIRS, IT FELT UNSTABLE ENOUGH FOR THEM THAT THEY ALWAYS WANTED TO PUT THEIR ARMS OUT, AND THE SECOND THAT THEY GRABBED ON TO SOMETHING, WELL THEN YOUR CENTRE OF GRAVITY IS LOST AND THEN YOU WERE REALLY IN IT. LIKE YOU THOUGHT, ‘GEEZ, WE COULD ACTUALLY DROP THIS GUY.’ BUT THAT’S WHAT I DISLIKED PROBABLY THE MOST ABOUT THIS THING, OUTSIDE OF HAVING TO PUT IT TOGETHER.” PETIT ADDED: “IF YOU GO TO THE BUILDINGS UP HERE ON LONDON ROAD, SOME TWO STORY BUILDINGS AND THE STAIRS ARE VERY NARROW AND VERY TIGHT, WE USED TO USE THIS TYPE. SO IN OTHER WORDS, INSTEAD OF PUTTING HIM ON A STRETCHER, YOU’D PUT HIM ON THE SEAT. ONE GUY GETS AT THE BACK AND ONE GUY GETS AT THE FRONT AND TAKE THE PERSON DOWN … OVER THE YEARS I GOT A BAD BACK AND GUESS WHERE I GOT THE BAD BACK FROM? IT WAS LIFTING, DOING THINGS LIKE THIS, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY CUMBERSOME.” DZUREN AGREED: “THAT’S JUST A CONFINED SPACE STRETCHER … YOU CAN’T [ALWAYS] GET THE BIG STRETCHER IN, SO YOU CAN PUT THEM ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE. IN AN ELEVATOR, YOU CAN’T GET THAT BIG ONE IN THERE. SOME OF THE ELEVATORS, THE RESIDENTIAL ONES, THEY DON’T, AT LEAST IN THE DAYS GONE BY, THEY DIDN’T THINK ABOUT HAVING TO ACCOMMODATE STRETCHERS. I WOULD PROBABLY SAY IT’S A RARE OCCASION THAT WE HAD TO USE THAT. CAUSE A LOT OF TIMES … IF THE PERSON WAS FAIRLY PHYSICALLY OKAY, YOU COULD TAKE HIM OUT, JUST HOLD HIM. ONE GUY BY THE ARMS, ONE GUY BY THE LEGS, WE HAD A TECHNIQUE THERE WHERE YOU COULD QUITE EASILY TAKE HIM OUT THAT WAY WITHOUT DOING HIM ANY HARM, YOU KNOW. IF HE HAD A BROKEN ARM, WELL, WE COULDN’T DO THAT, SO YOU’D HAVE TO USE ONE OF THOSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OBSIDIAN
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Materials
OBSIDIAN
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
32.7
Width
24.7
Description
SHINY, BLACK OBSIDIAN ROCK. VARIOUS GROOVES AND FLAKE SCARS ON THE OVERALL SURFACE OF THE ROCK.
Subjects
MASONRY & STONEWORKING T&E
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
ARCHAEOLOGY
History
THIS OBSIDIAN ROCK WAS DONATED ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2015 BY NANCY BIGGERS IN MEMORY OF HER LATE PARENTS, BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS. IT WAS LOCATED ON THE FAMILY FARM BY BOYD BIGGERS. ACCORDING TO A STATEMENT GIVEN BY NANCY AT THE TIME OF DONATION, "... FARMERS NEED TO CLEAR THEIR LAND OF ... ROCKS IN ORDER TO PLANT AND HARVEST THEIR FIELDS. BOYD WAS DOING THIS ONE DAY (IN THE EARLY 1980S) AND CAME ACROSS A BEAUTIFUL SHINY BLACK ROCK. HE WAS IMPRESSED BY [ITS] COLOURING AND THE VARIOUS GROOVES, SO RATHER THAN THROWING IT ON TO THE PILE WITH THE OTHER ROCKS, HE DECIDED TO TAKE IT HOME. ... MARY, BEING A SCHOOL TEACHER, TOLD HIM THAT IT APPEARED TO BE OBSIDIAN, WHICH THE ABORIGINALS USED TO MAKE ARROWHEADS AND TOOLS. MARY RETIRED FROM TEACHING IN 1986 AND THUS BOYD DECIDED TO SELL THE FARM. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE ... [AND] THE OBSIDIAN CAME WITH THEM ... AS IT WAS A REMINDER OF THEIR FARM LIFE. IT WAS USED AS A DECORATIVE PIECE IN BOTH OF THE HOMES IN WHICH THEY LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE." ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2015, ARCHEOLOGIST, NEIL MIRAU, OF ARROW ARCHAEOLOGY LIMITED STATED VIA EMAIL THAT THE ROCK HAD BEEN BROUGHT TO THE AREA BY HUMANS AND THAT IT WAS RELATIVELY EASY TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF THE OBSIDIAN FROM ITS GENERAL APPEARANCE. HE WAS ALMOST CERTAIN THAT THIS PIECE OF OBSIDIAN CAME FROM THE OBSIDIAN CLIFFS IN WHAT IS NOW YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING. HE WROTE, “OBSIDIAN DOES NOT OCCUR NATURALLY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND REALLY THE ONLY WAY FOR IT TO GET HERE, ESPECIALLY THIS TYPE OF ROCK IS TO BE CARRIED BY HUMANS. OBSIDIAN ... WAS PRIZED BY PAST CULTURES AND IT MAKES VERY ATTRACTIVE AND VERY SHARP TOOLS AND PROJECTILE POINTS. THIS PARTICULAR PIECE HAS FLAKE SCARS SHOWING THAT IT WAS WORKED BY HUMANS. IT WAS LIKELY, GIVEN ITS ‘VALUE,’ CARRIED BY ITS OWNER TO FLAKE PIECES OFF EVERY ONCE IN AWHILE TO MAKE A NEW TOOL. OBSIDIAN IS ONE OF THE RARE TYPES OF STONE THAT IS CURATED BY PAST HUMANS, THAT IS, ALTHOUGH HEAVY, THEY WOULD HAVE CARRIED IT WITH THEM TO MAKE TOOLS WITH.” HE ALSO WROTE THAT OBSIDIAN FROM WYOMING THAT HAS BEEN FOUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HAS ARRIVED “EITHER THROUGH TRADE OR BY LONG DISTANCE TRAVEL OF PEOPLE FROM HERE TO THERE AND RETURN," AND THAT THERE IS EVIDENCE OF BOTH METHODS. MIRAU INFERS THAT IT COULD HAVE BEEN DROPPED THERE THREE OR FOUR CENTURIES AGO, OR MANY THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPY OF THE NANCY BIGGER’S INFORMATION, EMAIL TRANSCRIPTS, MAPS OF THE LOCATION OF THE BIGGERS’ FARM WHERE ARTIFACT WAS FOUND, AND A PHOTOGRAPH OF BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS.
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
Acquisition Date
2015-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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