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Other Name
R.N. CUFFLINKS
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GOLD, IMITATION PEARL
Catalogue Number
P20190011001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.N. CUFFLINKS
Date
1965
Materials
METAL, GOLD, IMITATION PEARL
No. Pieces
2
Length
2.2
Width
1.9
Description
PAIR OF GOLD CUFFINKS WITH ROUND, FLAT CUFFLINK FACES; CUFFLINK FACES HAVE IMITATION PEARL INLAY SET IN GOLD FRAME, WITH GOLD MEDICAL CADUCEUS SYMBOL SET IN PEARL AND LETTERS “RN” AROUND CADUCEUS. CUFFLINKS HAVE GOLD METAL BACK PLATES, POSTS, HINGE PINS, AND TOGGLES; INSIDE LOWER POST HAS ENGRAVED TEXT, “FOSTER”; INSIDE UPPER POST HAS ENGRAVED TEXT, “PET. PEND. U.S.A.”. CUFFLINKS HAVE MINOR STAINING ON TOGGLES AND POSTS; CUFFLINK FACES HAVE MINOR STAINING ON GOLD FRAMES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE CUFFLINKS, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE CUFFLINKS…WERE GRADUATING GIFTS…[WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1965 AS] SHARON GEORGESON…THEY WERE GIVEN TO US WHEN WE GRADUATED…WE WORE LONG SLEEVES, AND SO THESE WERE CUFFLINKS ON THE LONG SLEEVES.” “[THE GRADUATION UNIFORM] WAS ALL WHITE…WHITE BIB. WHITE LONG SLEEVES. WHITE SKIRT [I WORE THE CUFFLINKS WITH THE GRADUATION UNIFORM].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
1.5
Description
BRASS METAL BROOCH WITH BAR-PIN CLASP; BROOCH HAS GOLD-COLOURED RECTANGULAR BAR FOR FRONT, WITH BLUE CROSS IN CENTER. CROSS HAS GOLD BANNER RUNNING ACROSS THE FRONT WITH BLUE TEXT “S M H”. BACK OF BROOCH HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STER 3 OF G, G.F.”. BROOCH HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN AND ON BACK OF CROSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE BROOCH, KIMERY RECALLED, “YOU [GOT THE BROOCH] AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR. IT’S CALLED A BANDING BARRING CEREMONY AND IT FASTENED AT THE TOP OF YOUR COLLAR OF YOUR UNIFORM. AND THAT JUST SHOWED THAT YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE FIRST YEAR AND THAT YOU HAVE A BAND AND A BROOCH NOW…YOU WORE IT UNTIL YOU GRADUATED.” “[IT SIGNIFIED RANK AND SENIORITY] BECAUSE YOUR FIRST YEAR YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING, YOU DON’T HAVE A BAND ON THE CAP, YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING. AFTER FIRST YEAR YOU GET THIS AND A YELLOW BAND AND THEN A BLUE ONE AND THEN A BLACK.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1965
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.5
Diameter
2.9
Description
GOLD PIN WITH BAR-PIN CLASP ON BACK; PIN IS ROUND WITH SHIELD IN CENTER ON FRONT. FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL BORDER WITH GOLD TEXT, “SCIENCE, SERVICE, SANCTITY, ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING”; FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL CROSS WITH SHIELD OVERLAID IN CENTER; SHIELD IN CENTER HAS BLUE ENAMEL TOP BAR WITH GOLD LAMP, AND WHITE MID-SECTION WITH A BLUE CROSS AND OVERLAID RED SHIELD IN THE CENTER WITH A GOLD CROSS. BACK OF THE PIN HAS ENGRAVED TEXT IN THE CENTER, “F. GEORGESON 1965” AND ENGRAVED TEXT AT LOWER EDGE, “[ILLEGIBLE] 10 K”. BACK OF PIN HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN; FRONT OF PIN HAS CHIPPED ENAMEL AND MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE PIN, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE PIN YOU DIDN’T GET ‘TIL YOU GRADUATED…THAT WENT ON THE UNIFORM WHEN YOU GRADUATED…[THE GRADUATION UNIFORM] WAS ALL WHITE…WHITE BIB. WHITE LONG SLEEVES. WHITE SKIRT…” “I WORE THE PIN WHEN I WORKED IN THE O.R. WHEN I GRADUATED. I WORKED IN THE O.R. FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER I GRADUATED…WE WORE IT ON OUR UNIFORMS IN THE O.R…I ONLY WORE IT ONE YEAR.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Date
1965
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.6
Length
2
Width
1.3
Description
GOLD RING WITH RECTANGULAR ONYX RING FACE; RING HAS NARROW BAND AND TEXT ENGRAVED ON THE INSIDE, “10 K, 8”. RING FACE HAS RECTANGULAR ONYX STONE SET IN GOLD FRAME, WITH GOLD LETTERS ON ONYX “S M H”; RING BAND SPLITS INTO TWO PRONGS AT THE SIDES OF THE RING FACE, AND DUAL PRONGS ATTACH TO THE RING FACE. RING HAS MINOR STAINING INSIDE FRONT DUAL PRONGS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE CUFFLINKS…AND THE RING WITH ‘SMH’… WERE GRADUATING GIFTS…[WHEN I GRADUATED FROM ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING IN 1965 AS] SHARON GEORGESON.” “I [WORE THE RING] UNTIL…THE OTHER ONE [THE O.R. RING] WAS MADE…[IN] I’M GOING TO SAY, ‘70 BECAUSE I WAS BACK [IN LETHBRIDGE] THEN.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Materials
GOLD
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
1.8
Width
1.9
Description
GOLD RING WITH TAPERED BANDS AND OVAL FACE; THE RING FACE HAS AN OVAL WITH THE EMBOSSED PROFILE OF A NURSE, AND WIDE BANDS THAT TAPER FROM SIDES OF THE RING FACE. BAND HAS TWO SMALL, ENGRAVED LEAVES ON SIDES OF THE RING FACE. INSIDE RING BAND HAS MINOR STAINING AND WEAR; RING FACE HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND THE EMBOSSED PROFILE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE O.R. NURSE’S RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST MADE BECAUSE WE JUST WANTED PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT WE WERE O.R. NURSES, A SELECT BRAND OF NURSES THAT HAD CHOSEN THIS PATH. AND WE WANTED IT NOT TO BE FOR EVERYONE SO SOMEONE SAID, ‘WELL, LET’S GET SOMETHING DESIGNED.’ SO WE THOUGHT THE BEST DESIGN WOULD BE AN O.R. HEAD WITH THE MASK AND THE TURBAN. SO WE TOOK IT TO FOSTER’S JEWELRY AND THEY MADE THIS UP FOR US. NOW I KNOW THAT PROBABLY EVERY O.R. NURSE AT ST. MIKE’S AT THAT TIME BOUGHT ONE. I’M NOT SO SURE THAT IT WENT TO THE GALT OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I CAN’T VOUCH FOR THAT. I JUST KNOW THAT THE STAFF, AT THAT TIME, WE ALL GOT ONE JUST BECAUSE IT WAS A SIGNATURE OF WHAT WE WERE AND WHAT WE DID.” “[THERE WERE] 15, APPROXIMATELY [MADE]…[THE RING IS] 10 CARAT [GOLD]…I THINK ONE PERSON DESIGNED IT AND SAID, ‘WHAT DO YOU THINK?’ AND WE SAID, ‘GOOD, PERFECT.’ SO SHE WENT AHEAD WITH IT.” “[I WORE THE RING] ALL THE TIME…SOCIALLY, WEAR IT TO WORK, PUT IT ON THE SHELF, PUT IT BACK ON WHEN YOU LEFT WORK, 24-7…WHEN YOU’RE OUT AND ABOUT…WE WORE THEM ALL THE TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN I STOPPED [WEARING THE RING]. I PRESUME WHEN I WENT TO MONTREAL I STOPPED. AND I PROBABLY WORE IT WHEN I CAME BACK…IT WAS IN A BOX WITH THE OTHER [PIECES FROM MY TIME AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20140049001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN"
Date
1908
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
27.6
Length
20.5
Width
5.5
Description
A GREEN, HARD-COVERED BOOK WITH GOLD TEXT ON THE SPINE. THE TEXT READS “PFAUNDLER AND SCHLOSSMANN”, “THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN”, “SHAW AND LAFETRA”, “VOL. IV. GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM NERVOUS SYSTEM DERMATOLOGY”, “J.B.LIPPINCOTT CO.”. STAMPED ON THE TOP AND BOTTOM PAGES OF THE BOOK ARE THE WORDS “GALT HOSPITAL”. THE INSIDE IS INSCRIBED "J.E. LOVERING M.D." IN PENCIL. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE COVER IS FADED AND SCRATCHED IN PLACES, WHILE LIGHTLY FRAYED AT THE EDGES AND CORNERS.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED ABOUT THIS BOOK. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049001
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
26
Length
19
Width
6
Description
A GREEN HARD COVERED BOOK WITH GOLD TEXT ON THE SPINE. THE TEXT READS “PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS”, “DE LEE”, “SEVENTH EDITION”, “SAUNDERS”. IN ADDITION TO THIS THERE IS A WHITE WRITTEN “440”. STAMPED ON THE TOP AND BOTTOM PAGES OF THE BOOK ARE THE WORDS “GALT HOSPITAL”, AND STAMPED ON ALL THREE SIDES OF THE PAGES ARE THE WORDS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING”. "REFERENCE FOR NURSES OCTOBER 5 1939" INSCRIBED ON INSIDE IN PENCIL. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE COVER IS FADED AND WORN AT THE EDGES.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED ABOUT THIS BOOK. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
62
Length
68
Width
48
Description
A GREEN BASKETBALL T-SHIRT WITH WHITE TRIMMING AND WHITE PAINTED NUMBERS AND TEXT. THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT READS “55” AND “GALT ROYALS”. THE BACK READS “55”. THE WHITE TRIMMING FOLLOWS THE BOTTOM EDGE, THE SLEEVE EDGES AND THE COLLAR. THE COLLAR OPENS WITH A METAL ZIPPER, ENDING IN A SMALL SILVER CHAIN. A SMALL WHITE TAG IN THE BACK OF THE COLLAR READS “12” IN RED. EXCELLENT CONDITION: THE COLLAR IS CREASED ON ONE CORNER.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
SPORTS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SHIRT WAS A PART OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BASKETBALL UNIFORM. WHILE THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THIS ARTIFACT IS UNKNOWN, IT WOULD HAVE MOST LIKELY BEEN IN USE EARLIER THAT 1965, AS THE NURSING SCHOOL HAD GALT ROYAL UNIFORMS IN THAT YEAR THAT WERE DIFFERENT TO THIS ONE. THE UNIFORM WOULD HAVE BEEN USED BY “STUDENTS WHO WERE ON THE TEAM. BETWEEN 1965-68 ST. MICHAEL STUDENTS WERE [ON THE] TEAM ALSO.” ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT, SPORTS ACTIVITIES FOR THE STUDENTS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR LIVES DURING TRAINING. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Date
1979
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
12
Diameter
8.9
Description
A CREAM-COLOURED CERAMIC MUG. ON ONE SIDE IS THE INSIGNIA OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, WHICH IS COLOURED YELLOW, GREEN, AND RED. IN THE CENTER OF THE INSIGNIA IS A RED CROSS. THE TEXT READS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, LETHBRIDGE ALTA”, “FESTINA LENTE”, AND “1910-1979”. AROUND THE LIP OF THE MUG RUNS A GOLD RING. THE BOTTOM OF THE MUG READS “DECORATED IN CANADA BY …EMORE CHINA & GLASS” AND “CREEMORE, ONT”. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR TO GOLD RIM.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY, “THIS IS A COFFEE CUP COMMEMORATING THE CLOSING OF THE NURSING SCHOOL. THE ALUMNAE PURCHASED THEM AND SOLD THEM… [THE MUGS] WERE DESIGNED AND MADE IN 1979.” IT CONTINUES, “[THE] GALT GRADS BOUGHT THESE MUGS… [AS] A MEMENTO OF THE CLOSING OF THE SCHOOL.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
No. Pieces
6
Height
16.2
Length
57.5
Width
0.5
Description
1: GREEN FABRIC CASE, EDGED WITH BEIGE FABRIC. DIVIDED INTO THREE POUCHES SEWED IN WITH BEIGE THREAD. TWO BEIGE FABRIC STRAPS ATTACHED TO ROLL AND TIE THE FABRIC CASE. A WHITE LABEL IS SEWN ON, READING IN GREEN TEXT “ SIERRA – SHELDEN”, “TRACHEOTOME CATALOG NO. 175-00”, AND “SIERRA ENGINEERING CO. SIERRA MADRE. CALIF.” 2: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE LARGE TRACEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END AND A METAL HANDLE AT THE OTHER END WITH A “7” ETCHED ON THE END. L: 11 CM, D: 1.5 CM 3: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE SMALLER TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END THAT EXPANDS INTO A SHARP CURVE BLADE WITH A BLUNTED TIP. A SMALL CIRCULAR BEAD OF METAL SITS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WIRE AND AT THE OTHER END OF THE WIRE IS A CYLINDRICAL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. THE END OF THE HANDLE READS “ SIERRA ENG. CO CAT. NO. 287-00” AND “PATENT PEND”. METAL BOBBLE IS MISSING SOME OF ITS PATINA. L: 11 CM, D: 1.6 CM 4: A HOLLOW NEEDLE HEAD WITH A SMALL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. ETCHED INTO THE END OF THE HANDLE THE TEXT READS “287 SIERRA”. H: 6.1 CM, D: 1.7 CM 5: THE LARGE TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF THREE PIECES; THE OUTER CANNULA, THE INNER CANNULA AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA’S SIT TOGETHER, THE INNER LOCKED IN WITH A ROTATING LATCH, BOTH CURVED AND HOLLOW TUBES. THE FLANGE SITS AT THE END OF THE CANNULAS, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 10 CM, W: 4 CM 6: THE SMALL TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF TWO PIECES; THE CANNULA, AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA IS A CURVED HOLLOW TUBE ATTACHED AT ONE END TO THE FLANGE, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND A CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 6.5 CM, W: 3.8 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A TRACHEOTOMY SET THAT WAS USED IN DURING SURGERY, IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, AND IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM. BOTH DOCTORS AND NURSES WOULD HAVE USED THIS ARTIFACT DURING THE PROCEDURE OF TRACHEOTOMY, WHICH CREATES A DIRECT AIRWAY IN THROUGH AN INCISION IN THE TRACHEA (WINDPIPE). WHEN ANSWERING THE QUESTION OF THE ARTIFACT’S IMPORTANCE, THE INDIVIDUAL WRITING THE HISTORY STATED, “TRACHEOTOMIES HAVE BEEN LIFE-SAVERS EVEN TO THIS DAY.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, METAL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140049008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1946
Materials
GLASS, METAL, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.3
Diameter
8
Description
A CIRCULAR, BUNSEN BURNER (ALSO REFERED TO AS AN ALCOHOL BURNER) WITH A RUSTED, TARNISHED WICK HOLDER AND A WHITE, COTTON WICK HANGING DOWN INTO THE BOTTLE. EMBOSSED INTO THE BOTTOM OF THE GLASS ARE THE WORDS “MADE IN USA”. GOOD CONDITION: THE METAL CAP IS SEVERELY TARNISHED. SMALL FLAKES OF RUST SIT LOOSE IN THE BOTTLE.
Subjects
CHEMICAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A GLASS BUNSEN BURNER. IT WAS USED “IN THE GSN SCIENCE LAB AND IN THE HOSPITAL LAB. THEY WERE USED ON THE WARDS IN THE EARLY DAYS TO HEAT UP SOLUTION TO DISSOLVE MEDICATION.” ACCORDING TO THE ARTIFACT’S HISTORY THIS ARTIFACT WAS USED IN “1943-1946. BY 1965, WE DID NOT USE THEM FOR DISSOLVING MEDICATION.” THE BUNSEN BURNER WAS USED BY REGISTERED NURSES AND STUDENTS. THIS ARTIFACT “WAS NECESSARY AND ROUTINELY USED EVERY DAY IN THE HOSPITAL.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049008
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.1
Diameter
8.3
Description
1: WOOD CASING LID WRAPPED IN BROWN, CHERRY FAUX LEATHER FABRIC. THE TOP HAS A STRIPE OF CREAM CLOTH TAPE, LIFTING AT ONE CORNER AND WRITTEN ON IT IN BLUE PEN IS, “CSR SKIN THERMOMETER”. THE INSIDE OF THE LID IS PADDED AT THE TOP WITH GREY FABRIC. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AWAY AT THE EDGES AND LIFTING AT THE SEAM AT THE SIDE OF THE LID, REVEALING THE WOOD UNDERNEATH. 2: A CIRCULAR SLIP OF CREAM PAPER TITLED “CORRECTING TABLE”. THE REST IS TYPED IN BLACK INK. HANDWRITTEN BLUE INK ADDITIONS FILL IN THE INSTRUMENT NUMBER AS “3878” AS WELL AS FILLING ADDITIONS TO THE CORRECTION CHART. THE SLIGHTEST WRINKLING LEAVES TWO SMALL CREASES ON THE SURFACE. DIAMETER: 6.3 CM 3: THE SKIN THERMOMETER. IT IS CIRCULAR IN A BLACK PLASTIC CASING WITH A SINGLE HALF CIRCLE PLASTIC WINDOW TO THE DIAL ON THE TOP SIDE. THE DIAL READS “FOREGGER”, “FAHRENHEIT HEIDENWOLF AUSTRIA”, AND “PATENT 3878”. THE BOTTOM SIDE HAS A 1.1 CM HIGH, 2.3 CM DIAMETER CYLINDRICAL ARM ON WHICH A ROUND SENSOR SITS. THE SENSOR IS MISSING ALMOST ALL ITS PATINA, ONLY A LITTLE BIT SURVIVING AT THE EDGES. H: 3.8 CM, D: 7 CM 4: THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE. AN OPEN WOOD CYLINDER WRAPPED ON THE OUTSIDE WITH FAUX LEATHER FABRIC WITH GREY FELT ON THE INSIDE. THE INSIDE LIP (ON WHICH THE THERMOMETER SITS) DOES NOT WRAP AROUND COMPLETELY, LEAVING SPACE FOR THE SENSOR ARM. THE BOTTOM EDGE IS UNCOVERED. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AT THE EDGES AND PULLING AWAY FROM THE SEAM ON THE SIDE. H: 3.1 CM, D: 8.3 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SKIN THERMOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM FROM 1955 TO 1988. ACCORDING TO ITS HISTORY, “OPERATING ROOM STAFF [USED THE THERMOMETER] TO ASSESS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE PATIENTS.” THIS ARTIFACT SHOWS “HOW THINGS HAVE ADVANCED. THEY USE SKIN TAPES NOW THAT ARE THERMOMETERS.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20140049010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1921
Materials
GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
9.1
Diameter
4.5
Description
A GLASS CONICAL SHAPED MEASURING CUP WITH A POURING LIP. ETCHED INTO THE GLASS IS A MEASURING GAGE FOR VOLUME. “PHARMACY 1921” IS HANDWRITTEN ON THE BOTTOM OF THE GLASS IN GREEN INK. GOOD / VERY GOOD CONDITION: HARDENED ADHESIVE FROM A REMOVED STRIP OF TAPE STAINS THE GLASS. SLIGHT SCRATCHING/SCUFFING OF SURFACE.
Subjects
CHEMICAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A SMALL GLASS BEAKER THAT WAS USED TO MEASURE FLUID MEDICATIONS. IT WAS USED IN THE “PHARMACY AND MED ROOMS TO MIX MEDICATIONS.” ACCORDING TO HISTORY, THIS ARTIFACT WAS USED FROM 1945 TO THE 1960S. “NURSES USED THIS INSTRUMENT TO MEASURE MEDICATIONS IN C.C.’S [CUBIC CENTIMETERS].” OF THIS ARTIFACT, IT WAS WRITTEN, “THIS SHOWS HOW THINGS HAVE PROGRESSED FROM GLASS TO PLASTIC. IT WAS ESSENTIAL TO GIVE MEDICATIONS.” THE WRITING ON THE BASE OF THE BEAKER LINKS THIS ARTIFACT TO THE PHARMACY IN 1921. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049010
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
44.5
Width
17.2
Description
A WHITE CLOTH, STARCHED NURSING CAP. THE BACK EDGE IS STAMPED WITH BLACK INK, READING “E1040” AND BELOW THAT “HIRSCHE” . THE WHITE STRING TIES AND THE OPENING ATTACHMENT THEY PULL THROUGH IS FRAYING. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE HEAVILY STARCHED FRONT FOLD IS CREASED WITH FOLD LINES.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THIS NURSING CAP’S HISTORY, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN OF THE FIRST TYPES OF CAPS THAT THE STUDENT NURSES WOULD HAVE WORN. IT WAS WORN “ON THE WARDS” OF THE HOSPITAL FROM 1913 ONWARDS TO AN UNSPECIFIED DATE. THE INSIDE OF THE CAP IS LABELLED “HIRSCHE”. USING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK TITLED “WHITE CAPS AND RED ROSES” RECORDS ONE STUDENT FROM THE CLASS OF 1966 WITH THE MAIDEN NAME HIRSCHE AND THREE STUDENTS FROM CLASSES 1968 TO 1975 MARRIED MEN WITH THE HIRSCHE LAST NAME. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. ON 12 JULY 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK MET WITH THREE MEMBERS OF GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – SHARON DEJONG, DONNA KARL, AND SUE KYLLO – TO ESTABLISH FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT VARIOUS ARTIFACTS IN THIS WAVE OF GSN ACQUISITIONS. WHEN VIEWING THE CAP, KYLLO, KARL, AND DEJONG STATED THAT ALL STUDENTS HAD TO WRITE THEIR NAMES IN THEIR UNIFORMS – LIKE “HIRSCHE” IS LABELLED IN THIS CAP – BECAUSE THE UNIFORMS, INCLUDING CAPS, WOULD BE SENT TO THE LAUNDRY AND RETURNED BACK TO THE STUDENTS. ABOUT NURSING CAPS, THE THREE ALUMNI EXPLAINED THAT THEY ALWAYS WORE WHITE CAPS AS STUDENTS. UPON GRADUATION THEY RECEIVED A VELVET BLACK BAND THEY WOULD PIN ON THE CAPS FOR WORK AS GRADUATED NURSES. THIS WAS ONE OF THE INDICATORS USED TO IDENTIFY THE STUDENT NURSES VERSUS THE GRADUATED NURSES. THEY STATED THAT IN THEIR FIRST TWO YEARS OF SCHOOL, THEY WOULD WERE BLACK SHOES AND STOCKINGS (A PRACTICE THAT ENDED IN 1968) AND AFTER THAT THEY WOULD WEAR WHITE SHOES WITH WHITE STOCKINGS TO INDICATE SENIOR NURSES. THESE VARIANCES IN THE STUDENT UNIFORMS HAD IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR EXPERIENCES ON THE FLOOR. FOR EXAMPLE, THERE WAS ONE DOCTOR WHO HAD A STRICT RULE AGAINST STUDENT NURSES SCRUBBING IN FOR HIS OPERATIONS. THEY AGREED THAT THIS WAS AN EARLY EXAMPLE OF A NURSE’S CAP, USED FROM ESTIMATE DATES OF 1913 TO 1935. REFERENCING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK, “WHITE CAPS…,” THERE IS NO RECORD OF A STUDENT WITH THIS LAST NAME IN THE SPECULATED TIME PERIOD. AS AN ANSWER TO THIS, KYLLO ADDED TO THE CAP’S WRITTEN NOTES, “THIS HAT COULD HAVE BEEN A GALT HOSPITAL STAFF MEMBER AND MAY BE NOT A GALT HAT.” IT CAN ALSO BE NOTED THAT AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION INVOLVED IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS OF THE DONATION OF ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM WAS SHARON HIRSCHE (NEE TREIBER) OF THE CLASS OF 1968. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"HEARTSIM 2000"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180009000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"HEARTSIM 2000"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2005
Materials
PLASTIC, METAL, GLASS
No. Pieces
7
Height
14.7
Length
46.5
Width
35.6
Description
A. BLACK PLASTIC CASE, 46.5 CM LONG X 35.6 CM WIDE X 14.7 CM TALL. CASE FRONT HAS BLACK HANDLE WITH SILVER METAL BASE AND BLACK LABEL WITH WHITE TEXT “LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT”; FRONT HAS BLACK PLASTIC CLASPS ON BOTH ENDS. INSIDE OF CASE HAS BASE LINED WITH STYROFOAM INSERT, WITH CUT-OUT SECTIONS FOR STORING MONITOR AND ACCESSORIES. INSIDE CASE AT HINGE HAS CLEAR PLASTIC LABEL ATTACHED WITH BLACK TEXT “SPARE FUSE”. INSIDE OF LID HAS ATTACHED GREY INSTRUCTION SHEET WITH BLACK AND GREY LABEL “PROPERTY OF LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT” ABOVE BLACK TEXT ON GREY SHEET “LAERDAL HEARTSIM 2000, TEACHES ECG INTERPRETATION, ARRHYTHMIA MANAGEMENT AND HEMODYNAMIC WAVEFORM RECOGNITION” WITH LISTINGS OF “FUNCTIONS, ECG SIMULATION, ECG MENU” AND DIAGRAMS BELOW; LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF SHEET HAS LOGO SHOWING ONE FIGURE BANDAGING THE ARM OF ANOTHER AND TEXT “LAERDAL MEDICAL CORP., 1 LABRIOLA COURT, ARMONK, N.Y., 10504, FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND SERVICE INFORMATION CALL: 800-431-1055, IN NEW YORK CALL SERVICE DEPARTMENT COLLECT: 914-273-9404”. INSIDE LID UNDER INSTRUCTION SHEET IS BLACK STYROFOAM MOUNT. CASE EXTERIOR IS SCRATCHED, SCUFFED, AND WORN; INSIDE OF CASE IS STAINED AND SOILED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. HEARTSIM 2000, 8 CM TALL X 30.1 CM LONG X 27 CM WIDE. CREAM-WHITE PLASTIC MONITOR WITH TRI-COLORED RED, GREY AND BROWN STRIPE RUNNING DOWN UPPER LEFT EDGE. MONITOR IS SQUARE AND TOP TAPERS TO LOWER EDGE; LEFT SIDE HAS BROWN, BLACK AND RED LABEL “HEARTSIM 2000, LAERDAL MEDICAL” WITH BLACK AND WHITE LABEL BELOW “PROPERTY OF LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT”. RIGHT SIDE HAS MONITOR CONTROL DISPLAY WITH WHITE TEXT ABOVE “QRS TYPE, BASIC RHYTHM, PREMATURE COMPLEXES, RATE” AND WHITE TEXT ON RIGHT SIDE “RUNNING, WAITING”. KEYPAD BELOW CONTROL DISPLAY WITH DARK GREY, LIGHT GREY, AND RED BUTTONS WITH BLACK LABELS; BELOW BUTTONS BLACK TEXT “HEARTSIM 2000—KEYBOARD” WITH OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS. KEYBOARD DETACHES; BACK OF KEYBOARD HAS EMBOSSED STAMP “MADE IN GERMANY” ABOVE BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “SAIT”; BACK HAS REMOVABLE SECTION IN BACKING FOR BATTERIES. UNDER KEYBOARD ON MONITOR HAS CLEAR LABEL WITH GREY TEXT “CONDENSED INSTRUCTIONS” WITH INSTRUCTIONS FOR OPERATING MONITOR. RIGHT SIDE OF MONITOR HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “B 366536, SPECIAL INSPECTION SERVICE” WITH DETAILS ON SPECIAL INSPECTION. BACK OF MONITOR HAS BLACK “ON/OFF” SWITCH WITH RED CIRCLE ON LEFT SIDE OF SWITCH, AND DARK GREY LABELS ON SIDES; BACK HAS OUTPUT INSERTS FOR “HEMODYNAMIC WAVEFORMS OUTPUT CH. 2/CH. 3, MANIKIN, LAERDAL MONITOR INTERFACE, PULSE OUTPUT”; BACK HAS THREE INPUT AND OUTPUT INSERTS ON LEFT SIDE WITH WHITE, GREEN AND RED INPUTS ABOVE OUTPUTS LABELLED “RA, RL, LL”. RIGHT SIDE HAS DARK GREY LABELS “HEARTSIM 2000, 1A/110V~60 HZ/110W, FUSES: 1A SLOW BLOW, SERIAL NO.” WITH ENGRAVED NUMBERS “011618” ON WHITE SQUARE, AND LABEL “LAERDAL MEDICAL CORP., 1 LABRIOLA COURT, ARMONK, N.Y., 10504”. LEFT SIDE OF MONITOR HAS BLACK DIAL WITH CLEAR LABEL ABOVE WITH BLACK AND WHITE YIN AND YANG SYMBOL. BOTTOM OF MONITOR HAS BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPT.” WITH WHITE LABEL AND BLACK TEXT “THIS EQUIPMENT COMPLIES WITH THE REQUIREMENTS IN PART 15 OF FCC RULES FOR A CLASS A COMPUTING DEVICE. OPERATION OF THIS EQUIPMENT IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA MAY CAUSE UNACCEPTABLE INTERFERENCE TO RADIO AND TV RECEPTION REQUIRING THE OPERATOR TO TAKE WHATEVER STEPS ARE NECESSARY TO CORRECT THE INTERFERENCE. 2407”. WHITE LABEL IN LOWER LEFT CORNER HAS BLACK TEXT “CAUTIONS,” AND THREE STATEMENTS FOR USING THE HEARTSIM 2000. TOP OF MONITOR HAS BLACK MARK ON LEFT SIDE; TOP IS SCUFFED AND WORN; SIDES ARE SCUFFED AND RUBBED; BOTTOM OF MONITOR IS SCUFFED AND RUBBED ON LABELS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. GREY PLASTIC CORD, 168 CM LONG. CORD HAS TRI-PRONG INSERT AT ONE END, AND TRI-PRONG SILVER PLUG AT OTHER END. INSERT END HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “I-SHENG , IS-14, 10A 125V 1250W” AND EMBOSSED TEXT ON BACK “[COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] E55943, LL41230, [CSA SYMBOL], 214”. CORD HAS BLACK TEXT DOWN SIDES; CORD IS HEAVILY BENT AND COILED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. GREY PLASTIC CORD, 219 CM LONG. CORD HAS ROUND SILVER INSERT AT ONE END WITH SIX SILVER PLUG-RODS INSIDE; CORD SPLITS INTO THREE WIRES AT OTHER END WITH THREE NODES FORMING END. NODES ARE RED, BLACK, AND WHITE LABELLED “LL, LA, RA”. BASE WHERE CORD DIVERGES INTO THREE WIRES HAS SILVER CLIP ON BACK; FRONT OF BASE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “ZOLL, 9500-0229-02, LL, LA, RA”; BASE IS ATTACHED TO CORD WITH INSERTS FOR THREE WIRES TO EXTEND. INPUT END IS RUBBED AND SCUFFED; CORD IS HEAVILY BENT AND COILED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. WHITE PLASTIC SQUARE WITH THREE ROWS OF FOUR CUT-OUT HOLES ON TOP, 7.1 CM WIDE X 5.3 CM LONG X 0.8 CM TALL. SQUARE LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES AND LOWER EDGE ARE BENT DOWN; HOLES ON TOP ARE LABELLED INTO FOUR COLUMNS WITH GREY TEXT “YES, NO, NEXT, RESTART”. TOP HAS GREY TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE “HEARTSIM 2000 V. FIB. RECOGNITION MODULE” WITH “LAERDAL MEDICAL” LOGO BELOW. LOWER EDGE IS CRACKED; RIGHT AND LEFT CORNERS ARE CRACKED AND CHIPPED; BACK OF MODULE HAS BLACK MARK “L” AND BLACK SMEAR IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. PLASTIC ECG MODULE IN CARDBOARD BOX, 8 CM LONG X 6.7 CM WIDE X 2.1 CM TALL. WHITE CARDBOARD BOX WITH BLACK LABEL ON FRONT WITH WITE TEXT “PROPERTY OF LFD” AND BLUE “LAERDAL MEDICAL” LOGO ON LOWER EDGE OF FRONT AND BACK. UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF FRONT HAS WHITE LABEL WITH GREY TEXT “262003”, TOP HAS WHITE LABEL WITH GREY TEXT “SEQ MODULE”. WHITE PLASTIC MODULE HAS GREY TEXT ON TOP EDGE “HEARTSIM 2000, ECG SEQUENCE MODULE, 2484”; MODULE HAS BLACK LABEL WITH WHITE TEXT ON FRONT “PROPERTY OF LFD”; BACK OF MODULE HAS BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “L.F.D.” AND BLACK PRINTED TEXT ON LOWER EDGE “42/87 ELCO 20 8477 048 006 025”. CARDBOARD BOX WORN AT EDGES AND TORN AT TOP CORNERS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. G. PLASTIC ECG MODULE IN CARDBOARD BOX, 7.4 CM LONG X 6.6 CM WIDE X 2.1 CM TALL. WHITE CARDBOARD BOX WITH BLACK LABEL ON FRONT WITH WHITE TEXT “PROPERTY OF LFD” AND BLUE “LAERDAL MEDICAL” LOGO ON LOWER EDGE OF FRONT AND BACK; TOP HAS WHITE LABEL WITH GREY TEXT “V. FIB MODULE”. WHITE PLASTIC MODULE HAS GREY TEXT ON TOP EDGE “HEARTSIM 2000, ECG SEQUENCE MODULE, 2486”; MODULE HAS BLACK LABEL WITH WHITE TEXT ON FRONT “PROPERTY OF LFD”; BACK OF MODULE HAS BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “L.F.D.” AND BLACK PRINTED TEXT ON LOWER EDGE “42/87 ELCO 20 8477 048 006 025”. CARDBOARD BOX WORN AT EDGES AND TORN AT TOP CORNERS; BOX FRONT CREASED ALONG UPPER EDGE; BOX CREASED ON BACK AND SIDES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
HEALTH SERVICES
History
ON APRIL 19, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LETHBRIDGE EMS RESOURCE OFFIER WARD EGGLI REGARDING HIS TIME USING A DONATED HEARTSIM 2000. THE HEARTSIM 2000 TRAINING SIMULATOR WAS DONATED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES, AND WAS USED FOR TRAINING NEW RECRUITS. ON THE SIMULATOR, EGGLI ELABORATED, “THIS IS A PIECE OF EQUIPMENT THAT TODAY TECHNOLOGY-WISE HAS JUST SURPASSED ITS USE. IT’S NO LONGER USED IN OUR TRAINING DIVISION. IT WAS USED ORIGINALLY WAS IN TRAINING CARDIAC RHYTHMS.” “THIS IS A VERY VALUABLE TOOL FOR STUDENTS IN RELATION TO CARDIAC RHYTHM INTERPRETATION. THE ADVANTAGE THAT THIS TOOL GAVE US WAS THAT IT WOULD PRODUCE A RHYTHM, LIKE A HUMAN BEING ON THE OTHER END OF THE LEADS WOULD PRODUCE ON A CARDIAC MONITOR. SO IT WAS A REAL WORLD APPLICATION FOR US TO INTERPRET WHAT WE WERE SEEING [ON] A VERY SMALL SCREEN AND THE CONNECTION WOULD BE A CONFIRMATION TO WHAT THE GENERATOR WAS ACTUALLY PRODUCING. NORMAL SINUS RHYTHM FOR EXAMPLE SHOULD BE WHAT WE SEE ON THE MONITOR AND THE CONFIRMATION FROM THE EDUCATION PERSPECTIVE WOULD BE FOUND ON THE SIMULATOR.” “IT’S PROBABLY BEEN OUT OF SERVICE, PROBABLY AT LEAST TEN YEARS AGO [2005 TO 2008].” “WE ONLY HAD THIS ONE AND THEN WE HAD TWO HAND HELD VERSIONS THAT WERE MUCH SMALLER. THEY ONLY PRODUCED SORT OF THE MOST CRITICAL RHYTHMS, BUT WE ONLY HAD THIS ONE IN THE TRAINING DIVISION.” “TRAINING CONFIRMATION AND INTERPRETATION OF CARDIAC RHYTHMS [WAS] ITS SOLE PURPOSE.” “IN [THE] CONSTRUCTION OF THE CASE…[IS] STYROFOAM. IT WAS THE ONLY ONE IN ITS SERVICE AND THEN THE ONES THAT CAME AFTER IT WERE SMALLER AND LESS EXPENSIVE AND LESS CAPABLE THAN THAT ONE WAS FOR ITS TIME…I DON’T KNOW THE COST OF IT, I CAN ONLY IMAGINE THAT IT BEING VERY EXPENSIVE. MOST THINGS IN EMS AND FIRE SERVICES ARE.” “I THINK THE INTERNET, SOME OTHER SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS, DEFINITELY FROM AN EDUCATION PERSPECTIVE STARTED SURPASSING ITS ABILITIES. [FOR] EDUCATION THIS WOULD BE A SIMULATOR THAT PRODUCED A RHYTHM FOR ONE INDIVIDUAL. THE ADVANTAGE OF SOME OF THE TECHNOLOGY IN 2005 AND 2008 WAS YOU WOULD BE ABLE TO BRING IN A WHOLE CLASSROOM AND DO AN INTERPRETATION ON A BIG SCREEN, ON A LAPTOP, ON A COMPUTER…SO IT JUST GOT OLD. [IT] STILL [HAS] VALUE BUT IT JUST GOT OLD.” “IT’S BEEN IN THE DEPARTMENT AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER BUT I WASN’T ABLE TO FIND OUT A SERVICE DATE FOR THIS THROUGH THE INTERNET.” ON HIS EXPERIENCE USING THE HEARTSIM 2000, EGGLI RECALLED, “I WAS THE MEDICAL TRAINING OFFICER WHEN THIS WAS IN USE AND EVEN BEFORE THAT AS A NEW RECRUIT, A NEW MEMBER TO THE SERVICE. IN 2000 I BECAME A PARAMEDIC AND IN MY PARAMEDIC TRAINING I WOULD USE THIS DEVICE. I WOULD TAKE IT HOME, MY WIFE ACTUALLY RAN THE REMOTE. SHE DIDN’T KNOW A LOT ABOUT RHYTHMS BUT SHE LEARNED ALONGSIDE ME WITH THIS. [SHE WOULD] BASICALLY PUSH A BUTTON, I WOULD ANALYZE RHYTHM, SHE WOULD TELL ME IF I WAS CORRECT OR NOT FROM THE MACHINE. IT PRODUCES TWENTY-FIVE HUNDRED RHYTHMS SO WE HAD LOTS TO DO.” “AS A STUDENT ON THE OTHER END OF WHAT THE GENERATOR WOULD PRODUCE, IT HONED MY SKILLS. IT REALLY MADE ME QUITE GOOD AT THAT INTERPRETATION BECAUSE I [SAW] A CERTAIN WAVE. I COULD LOOK FROM ALMOST ACROSS THE ROOM AND GO “I KNOW WHAT THAT IS, IT’S THIRD DEGREE HEART BLOCK.” SOME OF THEM ARE TRICKY AND THIS PARTICULAR GENERATION IN ITS DAY GAVE SOME VARIATION TO EACH OF THOSE TYPES OF RHYTHMS, WHICH ALSO MAKES YOU A LITTLE BIT BETTER AT [READING THE RHYTHMS].” “I’M THE EMS RESOURCE OFFICER TODAY BUT I WAS THE MEDICAL TRAINING OFFICER WHEN THIS WAS IN USE…IT’S POSSIBLE [THIS WAS IN USE FROM DAY ONE].” “WE ALSO USED IT IF WE HAD STUDENTS THAT WERE LOOKING FOR SOME EXTRA SUPPORT. WE WOULD THROW A MANNEQUIN ON THE FLOOR, WE WOULD PUT THE HEART 2000 BESIDE THEM, WE WOULD RUN A SCENARIO AND MAYBE END UP WITH A RHYTHM OR TWO THAT THEY WERE INTERPRETING. WE USED IT THAT WAY, BUT MY FONDEST MEMORIES OF USING IT WERE DEFINITELY MY WIFE SITTING IN THE CORNER PUSHING THE BUTTONS FOR HOURS. IT WAS VERY INVALUABLE AND CARDIAC RHYTHM INTERPRETATION WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING I WAS REALLY INTERESTED IN BECAUSE IT’S A UNIQUE ART ALMOST, A SKILL THAT SOME PRACTITIONERS EITHER HAVE OR DON’T. SOME ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SOME AREN’T. I COULD DO IT UNTIL THE COWS CAME HOME.” “TODAY [WITH] A CARDIAC MONITOR YOU CAN SWITCH IT SO THAT IT’S AN AED, IT CAN ACT LIKE AN AED. IT WILL DO MANY THINGS. THE CARDIAC MONITOR THAT WE USE TODAY IN SERVICE DOES BLOOD PRESSURE, IT’LL MEASURE OXYGEN SATURATION, IT’LL MEASURE CARBON DIOXIDE MEASUREMENTS AS WELL. IT CAN HELP US WITH TRACKING THE DRUGS WE USE AND IT HAS SOME MEMORY. WE HAVE THE ABILITY TO USE WI-FI AND BLUETOOTH AND SEND THE ECGS TO EMERGENCY DEVICES WHEN WE’RE IN HOSPITAL, AND WHEN WE GET BACK TO STATION FOR TRACKING AND AUDIT PURPOSES. WE DO SOME AMAZING STUFF AND THIS HEARTSIM 2000 IS A GREAT GRANDFATHER OF SOME OF WHAT WE’RE USING TODAY.” “DEFINITELY, LEADERS IN FIRE, LEADERS IN EMS, LEADERS IN COMBINED SERVICES, IS LETHBRIDGE. WE WERE THE FIRST ORGANIZATION OF ITS KIND TO BE ACCREDITED, [WITH] ACCREDITATION CANADA. ONE OF OUR MEDICAL DIRECTORS, YEARS AGO, CALLED US THE CROWN JEWEL OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA BECAUSE OF THE TYPE OF SERVICE WE WERE, HOW WE TREAT OUR STAFF, HOW WE TRAIN OUR STAFF, THE OUTCOMES THAT WE HAVE IN BOTH FIRE AND EMS AND COMBINED SERVICE. THERE’S NOT MANY ORGANIZATIONS IN THE WORLD THAT HAVE A SERVICE LIKE OURS THAT WOULD RESPOND TO A PATIENT ANYWHERE IN THE CITY IN THE FASHION THAT WE DO, WITH A COUPLE OF UNITS IN HIGH EQUITY CALL WHERE A PUMP AND AN AMBULANCE ARE SUPPORTING GREAT CARE. IT DEFINITELY, APPROPRIATELY I BELIEVE, A CADILLAC SERVICE. OFTEN SOME PEOPLE WOULD SAY “WELL DO WE NEED THE CADILLAC ALL THE TIME?” AND I THINK IN LETHBRIDGE, IF YOU’VE HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO BE A PART OF A RESPONSE, YOU’RE THANKFUL FOR WHAT YOU GET HERE.” “I CAN ONLY IMAGINE THE NUMBER OF HANDS THAT HAVE TOUCHED THIS HEART SIM 2000. SOME OF THE POTENTIAL PATIENT OUTCOMES THAT WERE REALLY LIFESAVING, IN MY OPINION, [CAME] FROM A DEVICE LIKE THIS. I THINK IT’S BRILLIANT THAT IT’S GOING TO BE KEPT, [THAT] IT’S NOT JUST SOMETHING WE THREW IN THE DUMPSTER. IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF HISTORY, IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF EMS HISTORY. IT’S A VERY IMPORTANT PART OF LETHBRIDGE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES’ HISTORY, EDUCATION AND TRAINING, AND OFTEN WE KIND OF FORGET ABOUT WHY WE’RE HERE. IT’S FOR THE PATIENTS AND PEOPLE THAT WE TOUCH IN THE COMMUNITY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180009000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180009000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

DEVICE, BLOOD PRESSURE

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact13220
Other Name
OSCILLONTONOMETER
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OSCILLONTONOMETER
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CARDBOARD, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
11
Height
24
Length
31.8
Width
9
Description
1: AN ORANGE-BROWN CASE WITH BRONZE COLOURED HINGES, CLASPS, AND FEET. THERE IS A SINGLE HANDLE AT THE TOP MADE OF THE SAME FAUX LEATHER MATERIAL AS THE CASE ON TWO METAL HINGES. IT SITS ABOVE A GOLD PUSH CLASP. THERE ARE TWO BRONZE COLOURED HINGES THAT THE CASE SWINGS OPEN ON. THE CASE HAS EIGHT BRONZE-COLOURED DOMED FEET, FOUR OF WHICH SIT AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE HINGES AND FOUR OF WHICH ARE ON THE SIDE OF THE CASE. ON THE SAME SIDE SIX SILVER STUDS SIT IRREGULARLY IN THE BODY OF THE CASE. THE INSIDE OF THE CASE HAS A BUILT IN POUCH, ON WHICH A STICKER STATES “LETHBRIDGE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 3402041” AND A PIECE OF PAPER READING “OSCOLLOTONOMETER USE FOR BLOOD PRESSURE” IS TAPED ON. AT THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE, BOLTED TO THE CASE WITH SILVER STUDS SITS THE MEASURING MECHANISM OF THE OSCILLONOMETER. THE SILVER CASED MECHANISM HAS A BLACK RUBBER HAND PUMP ATTACHED, ALONG WITH MULTIPLE ATTACHMENT POINTS FOR THE TUBES OF THE PRESSURE CUFFS. TWO DIALS SIT ON ITS FACE, ONE RANGING FROM 7-0-18 AND READING “COMPARATIF”, THE SECOND RANGING FROM 0-300MMHG AND READING “MANOMETER”. NEXT TO IT IS A SILVER COLOURED PLATE HOLDING FOUR SILVER SCREW-IN KNOBS. 2: A CIRCULAR PAPER TAG RIMMED IN A METAL FRAME AND HELD WITH A SAFETY PIN TO THE HANDLE OF THE CASE. ON ONE SIDE THE TAG READS “C.S.R OSCILLOTONOMETER “CAMPARAT”” . THE TAG IS CRUMPLED AND SOME OF THE TEXT IS WORN OFF. H: 0.1 CM, D: 4.7 CM 3: A PIECE OF THE INSIDE LINING OF THE CASE THAT HAS PEELED OFF FROM THE SIDE. ONE SIDE IF THE FAUX LEATHER, THE OTHER A CARDBOARD PAPER COATED IN HARDENED GLUE. H: 0.1 CM, L: 23 CM, W: 5 CM 4: A GREY PRESSURE CUFF ATTACHED TO TWO TUBES, RED, AND BLACK. THE INFLATABLE PART OF THE CUFF MEASURES 46 CM BY 14 CM, WITH THE WRAP AROUND STRAP MEASURING 76 CM BY 4 CM. THE TWO RED AND BLACK TUBES MEASURE 63 CM LONG AND 0.5 CM AROUND. H: 76.5 CM, L: 122.5 CM, W: 14 CM 5: RED TUBING BROKEN OFF FROM ONE OF THE PRESSURE CUFFS. THE TUBING IS CRIMPED AND SNAPPED OFF INTERNALLY NEAR THE BROKEN EDGE OF THE TUBING. L: 47 CM, D: 0.5 CM 6: A GREY PRESSURE CUFF ATTACHED TO TWO TUBES, RED, AND BLACK. THE INFLATABLE PART OF THE CUFF MEASURES 46 CM BY 14 CM, WITH THE WRAP AROUND STRAP MEASURING 76 CM BY 4 CM. THE BLACK TUBE MEASURES 63 CM LONG AND 0.5 CM AROUND. THE RED TUBE MEASURES 18 CM, BROKEN IN HALF. H: 76.5 CM, L: 122.5 CM, W: 14 CM 7: A TYPED NOTE READING “RE OSCILLOMETER. IF ANYONE WISHES TO USE THIS AND IS NOT FAMILIAR WITH THIS MODEL, DR. KING-BROWN HAS SAID THAT HE WOULD HELP. THANK YOU. MIB.” THERE IS ALSO AN “MIB” SIGNED IN BLUE PEN. L: 15.4 CM, W: 10.1 CM 8: A SINGLE PAGE BOOKLET TITLED “SERVICE INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE OSCILLOMETER COMPARATIF”. THE PAPER IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED WITH A TORN CORNER AND A SLIGHT TEAR IN THE MIDDLE EDGE OF THE PAGES. L: 30 CM, W: 11.7 CM 9: A SINGLE PAGE BOOKLET TITLED “OSCILLOTONOMETERS “COMPARAT” AND “COMPARATIF”” FRONT COVER ALSO HAS AN IMAGE OF A DOCTOR USING THE MACHINE TO MEASURE BLOOD PRESSURE FROM A PATIENT'S ANKLES. THE BACK COVER SHOWCASES AN IMAGE OF THE COMPARATIF AND A DIAGRAM OF BLOOD PRESSURE TUBE CONNECTORS. THE PAGES ARE SLIGHTLY DIMPLED AROUND THE EDGES. L: 30 CM, W: 12.2 CM 10: AN EXAMPLE OF THE FILL-IN FORMS PRINTED WITH FILL-IN EXAMPLES AND GRAPHS IN BLACK INK. WRITTEN IN GERMAN. L: 15 CM, W: 24.7 CM 11: A PAD OF ORANGE INKED FILL-IN FORMS COMPLETE WITH GRAPHING GRIDS. THE FORMS ARE WRITTEN IN GERMAN. THE PAD IS MISSING ONLY A FEW PAGES, WITH SLIGHTLY DIMPLED EDGES AND CURVING CORNERS. H: 0.7 CM, L: 15 CM, W: 24.7 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS ARTIFACT IS CALLED AN OSCILLOTONOMETER AND IT WAS USED TO MEASURE THE BLOOD PRESSURE OF THE LEGS. THE OSCILLOTONOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM (OR), WHERE IT WAS USED BY THE OR STAFF. IT CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE IN 1988 AFTER ITS USE IN THE OR. THE ALUMNI BELIEVE THAT THIS ARTIFACT IS OF IMPORTANCE BECAME IT IS “SOMETHING NOT SEEN OFTEN BY FLOOR STAFF.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. ON 12 JULY 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK MET WITH THREE MEMBERS OF GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – SHARON DEJONG, DONNA KARL, AND SUE KYLLO – TO ESTABLISH FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT VARIOUS ARTIFACTS IN THIS WAVE OF GSN ACQUISITIONS. ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT, THE ALUMNI STATED THAT THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN USED FROM 1958 TO 1988 (BASED ON THEIR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES DURING THEIR CAREER AND THE CLOSING YEAR OF THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL). THEY ALSO ADDED THAT THIS INSTRUMENT WAS NOT OFTEN SEEN BY THE FLOOR STAFF. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049003
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
GHST LETHBRIDGE
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20140049004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GHST LETHBRIDGE
Date
1913
Materials
FELT, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
25
Length
77
Width
0.3
Description
A YELLOW AND GREEN FELT PENNANT. MACHINE SEWN IN WITH FELT IS THE TEXT “GHTS LETHBRIDGE”. FOUR FELT RIBBONS, TWO GREEN, TWO YELLOW, SIT AS TIES AT THE WIDE END OF THE PENNANT, HAND CUT BUT APPROXIMATELY 17.5 CM LONG AND 1.5 CM WIDE. ATTACHED TO THE BACK IS A PIECE OF MASKING TAPE, ON WHICH IS HANDWRITTEN “MADE BY MRS TAYLOR”. GOOD CONDITION: THE POINT OF THE PENNANT IS FALLING APART AS THE FELT PULLS APART.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS BANNER WAS DONATED TO THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE BY ELIZABETH TAYLOR (NEE PATTESON), WHO WAS A PART OF THE FIRST CLASS OF THE GSN. IT WAS OBTAINED BY TAYLOR IN 1913, BUT ITS USE IN THE HOSPITAL IS UNKNOWN. THE WRITER OF THE ARTIFACT’S HISTORY BELIEVES, “[TAYLOR] PROBABLY RECEIVED [THE BANNER] EITHER DURING TRAINING OR WHEN SHE GRADUATED.” ACCORDING TO A PROFILE IN THE DECEMBER 4, 1981 ISSUE OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND GALT ARCHIVES RECORD 19971065002, ELIZABETH PATTESON WAS BORN IN FORT MACLEOD IN 1891 – HER FATHER, THOMAS EDWARD PATTESON, WAS A STAFF SERGEANT WITH THE NWMP. THE FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1904, AND ELIZABETH BEGAN HER TRAINING AT THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING IN 1910. AFTER GRADUATION IN 1913 SHE NURSED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA BEFORE MOVING TO EDMONTON IN 1914, WHERE SHE MET AND MARRIED LT. ARNOLD TAYLOR. ELIZABETH ENLISTED AND WENT OVERSEAS WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY SERVICE CORPS, WORKING WITH THE BRITISH RED CROSS AND GIVING BIRTH TO A SON, JOHN, IN HASLEMERE, ENGLAND. IN 1919 THE FAMILY RETURNED TO CANADA AND SETTLED IN EDMONTON. IN 1920 TAYLOR JOINED THE OVERSEAS NURSING SISTERS, WHICH SUPPORTED VETERANS IN HOSPITALS, AND WORKED FOR YEARS WITH THE CANADIAN NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND AND GIRL GUIDES. A 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE ABOUT THE CELEBRATION OF THE GALT HOSPITAL CENTENNIAL MENTIONS PATTESON TAYLOR AS EXPECTED TO ATTEND THE CEREMONY AT AGE 99, THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE FIRST GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING CLASS. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049004
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
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