Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
103.2
Width
5
Description
BEADED BELT WITH A GEOMETRIC PATTERN SET AGAINST A GREEN BEADED BACKGROUND. PATTERN ALTERNATES BETWEEN TWO MIRRORED BLACK, YELLOW, BLUE TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASES AT EITHER WIDTH END OF THE BELT MEETING IN THE CENTER AT THEIR POINTS AND LARGE RED AND BLUE WITH A GREEN CENTERED TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASE AT ONE WIDTH END AND THEIR POINTS EXTENDED TO THE OPPOSING END. BEADS ARE SEWN INTO A COTTON, CANVAS FABRIC. TWO ANIMAL HIDE TIES (EACH A DIFFERENT LENGTH FROM 6.2 TO 11.8) ON EACH END AT EACH CORNER OF BELT. BACK SIDE IS RAW FABRIC WITH SEAM AT CENTER CONNECTING THE TWO HALVES. ENDS ARE HEMMED WITH TIES SEWN TO THE OUTSIDE. CONDITION: SEVERE DISCOLOURATION TO FABRIC BACKING AND SEVERE WEAR TO ANIMAL HIDE TIES. MANY LOSS THREADS OVER ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK. BEADS AND BEADING IN EXCELLENT CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
UPON THE DONATION OF THIS BELT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, THE DONOR – PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON – EXPLAINED THAT THIS BELT BELONGED TO ALFRED HARDWICH LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO SERVED IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN FORT MACLEOD. HE RANCHED IN THE LUNDBRECK AREA AND SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE MOUNTIES. THE DONOR SAID THAT SHE HAD “NO KNOWLEDGE OF HOW [ALFRED HARDWICK] CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE BELT. A NOTE ON THE INITIAL DOCUMENTATION ATTRIBUTES THE DATE OF THIS BELT TO CA. 1880-1890. THE ACTING CURATOR OF THE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN DEPARTMENT OF THE GLENBOW, JOANNE SCHMIDT, AGREED WITH THE DONOR’S BELIEF THAT THE BELT WAS BLACKFOOT. THROUGH THE COMPARISON OF THE BEADED MOCCASINS AND BELTS IN THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION WITH THIS BELT, SCHMIDT EXPLAINED THAT THE DESIGN ON THE BELT WAS MOSTLY FOUND ON THOSE FROM SIKSIKA, BUT SHE HAS ALSO SEEN THE DESIGN IN PIIKANI AND KAINAI BEADWORK THOUGH THERE ARE NOT MANY EXAMPLES IN THE COLLECTION. ALSO BY USING THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, THE CURATOR BELIEVES THAT THE BELT IS SIMILAR IN APPEARANCE TO THOSE OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO EARLY 20TH-CENTURY MUSEUM HOLDINGS. SCHMIDT ALSO PROVIDED AN EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGN FROM THE CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY. IT STATES, “ONE OF THE EARLIEST DESIGNS USED WAS ‘MIISTA-TSIKA-TUKSIIN,’ OR MOUNTAIN DESIGN. OTHER DESIGNS INCLUDED SQUARES, DIAMONDS, BARS, SLOTTED BARS AND STRIPES… TODAY SUCH DESIGNS ARE CALLED ‘MAAH-TOOHM-MOOWA-KA-NA-SKSIN,’ OR FIRST DESIGNS.” IT WAS FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT A COMPLICATING FACTOR IN IDENTIFYING THE BELT’S ORIGINS IS THE FACT THAT THE BLACKFOOT TENDED TO USE WHITE OR BLUE AS THE BACKGROUND COLOUR, NOT GREEN AS IS PRESENTED IN THE LYNCH-STAUNTON DONATION. ON 19 JANUARY 2017, MUSEUM STAFF FURTHER CONSULTED WITH RYAN HEAVY HEAD, FORMER DIRECTOR OF KAINAI STUDIES AT RED CROW COMMUNITY COLLEGE, REGARDING THE BELT’S DESIGN. HE EXPLAINED, “THE GREEN BACKGROUND IS ATYPICAL OF BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, WHICH IS NORMALLY BLUE. THE ‘MOUNTAIN DESIGN’ [DISPLAYED ON THE BELT] IS A COMMON MOTIF IN BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, BUT AGAIN THE COLOURS ARE NOT TYPICAL IN THIS EXAMPLE.” RYAN SPECULATED THAT DURING THE TIME OF DISEASE (WHEN THIS BELT APPEARS TO HAVE ORIGINATED) THERE WAS SOME DISRUPTION IN TRADITIONAL LIFE AND THAT COULD BE REFLECTED IN THE COLOUR CHOICES. ALTERNATIVELY, THE BELT MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE GROS VENTRES FROM NORTHEAST MONTANA. THE DONOR, PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON, IS THE GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER OF ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON. THIS BELT WAS PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE FAMILY, FIRST FROM A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, F. C. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO HER FATHER, A. G. LYNCH-STAUNTON, FINALLY TO THE DONOR WHO BROUGHT IT TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THE “A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON FAMILY HISTORY” WRITTEN FOR THE MUSEUM USING ONLINE SOURCES, THE GLENBOW ARCHIVES, AND THE BOOK TITLED “HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF PINCHER CREEK AND SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS OF ALBERTA.” “ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1860-1932) WAS BORN IN HAMILTON, ON AND CAME TO FORT MACLEOD IN 1877 TO JOIN THE NWMP. ACCORDING TO THE PINCHER CREEK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HE WAS SENT TO ESTABLISH A HORSE BREEDING FARM AT PINCHER CREEK IN 1878. AFTER RETIRING FROM THE NWMP IN 1880, LYNCH-STAUNTON STATED THE FIRST CATTLE RANCH IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA WITH JAMES BRUNEAU AND ISSAC MAY, AND LATER HOMESTEADED WEST OF TOWN. ALONG WITH HIS RANCH, LYNCH-STAUNTON MARRIED SARAH MARY BLAKE (1864-1933) IN 1890 AND THEY HAVE FIVE CHILDREN: VICTORIA, FRANDA, FRANCIS, JOHN, AND D’ARCY… A.H.’S BROTHER RICHARD LYNCH-STAUNTON (1867-1961) CAME AS FAR WEST AS MEDICINE HAT IN 1883 WITH HIS FATHER, F. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE SURVEY PARTY. RICHARD CAME WEST AGAIN, TO PINCHER CREEK, IN 1885 OR 1886. IN ABOUT 1900, HE ACQUIRED LAND NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON TODD CREEEK, WHICH BECAME THE ANTELOPE BUTTE RANCH. RICHARD AND A. H. WERE IN PARTNERSHIP FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS IN CATTLE-RANCHING AND, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WITH THE BUTCHER SHOP. IN 1901, RICHARD MARRIED ISABELLE MARY WILSON (1868-1971), AND THEIR SON FRANK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1905-1990), ALBERTA’S 11TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM 1979 TO 1985. LYNCH-STAUNTON DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RANCH IN THE LUNDBRECK/PINCHER CREEK AREA.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CORRESPONDENCE WITH DONOR AND PEOPLE CITED IN ABOVE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1945
Date Range To
2005
Materials
STEEL, WOOD
No. Pieces
7
Height
30
Diameter
31
Description
A: PRESSURE COOKER POT: STEEL POT WITH TWO BLACK WOODEN HANDLES. HANDLES ARE SCREWED TO LIP OF POT WITH TWO SCREWS EACH. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. BLACK RESIDUE, WATER STAINS, AND SCRATCHES ON OVERALL SURFACE OF POT FROM USE. THERE IS A FULL CRACK SEPARATING THE BACK END OF THE RIGHT HANDLE FROM THE POT. B: LID: STEEL LID 31.9CM (D) X 3.8CM (H). LID HAS ONE BLACK WOODEN HANDLE HELD IN PLACE BY TWO SCREWS. BOTH SIDES OF HANDLES HAVE VALVES FOR LETTING OFF/MANAGING PRESSURE. THE CENTER HAS A ROUND GAUGE WHICH READS BOTH PRESSURE (0 TO 20) AND TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT (228° TO 259°). IT READS "WARNING OPEN PETCOCK, EXHAUST STEAM…” GAUGE HAS SINGLE RED NEEDLE. IN FRONT OF GAUGE ON TOP OF LID READS, “IMPROVED KOOK / KWICK STEAM PRESSURE COOKER 22”. LID IS SECURED TO POT WITH REMOVABLE RING THAT IS TIGHTENED BY TURNING A SMALL HANDLE AT THE FRONT. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF LID AND BACKGROUND OF GAUGE IS YELLOWED. C: SEALING RING: 36 CM IN DIAMETER UNTIGHTENED. STEEL WITH A RUBBER KNOB AT THE OPENING. HINGE AT THE BACK SIDE OF THE RING. CLAMP AT FRONT IS TIGHTENED BY A METAL HANDLE. GOOD CONDITION. STAINING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF THE STEEL. D: COOKING RACK: 26.5 CM IN DIAMETER. CIRCULAR, METAL RACK WITH A CIRCLE OPENING AT THE CENTER AND A CURVED PATTERN OF TWO ROWS AROUND. THE RACK HAS 6 SECTIONS AROUND. THERE ARE RIDGES ALONG THE VERTICAL LINES ON ONE SIDE. THE OPPOSITE SIDE IS FLAT. THREE OF THE RIDGES HAVE SCREW HOLES ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE. E-G: 3 MASON JAR LID BANDS: ALL 8.5 CM IN DIAMETER. E IS MADE OUT OF A SILVER-COLOURED METAL. F AND G ARE MADE OUT OF GOLD-COLOURED METAL. POOR TO FAIR CONDITION FOR COMPONENTS D THROUGH G. ALL COMPONENTS ARE RUSTING WITH SIGNIFICANT MINERAL BUILD UP ON THEM. THERE IS FURTHER MATERIAL BUILD UP ON COMPONENTS E-G.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS PRESSURE COOKER IS EXTRACTED FROM A SEPTEMBER 2016 INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WITH THE ARTIFACT'S DONOR, JEANNETTE HOUTEKAMER: HOUTEKAMER CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE PRESSURE COOKER FROM HER AUNT, EUGENE SICOTTE: “WELL, FIRST OF ALL, I KNOW IT’S VERY OLD. IT CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT, WHO CAME TO THIS COUNTRY AS A YOUNG GIRL AND WAS LOCATED AROUND THE BEAVER MINE AREA… MUST [HAVE BEEN] LUNDBRECK. SHE WAS THERE WITH HER HUSBAND... SHE ALSO WAS A WONDERFUL COOK, AND SHE COOKED IN A LUMBER CAMP … HER FIRST MARRIED NAME WAS EUGENE (SIC) SICOTTE, MARRIED TO A PETE SICOTTE. [N.B. ALTERNATIVE SPELLING OF FIRST NAME EUGINE OR EUGENIE FROM OBITUARY AND LEGAL NOTICE] … SHE WAS WITH HIM FOR 17 YEARS... HOW SHE MET GEORGE ANDERSON, I’M NOT SURE, BUT HE WAS A FARMER PAST COALDALE - BARNWELL. THEY HAD A FARM UP THERE. AND SHE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER THAN HIM, BUT THEY MARRIED, AND DID VERY WELL. THEN THEY RETIRED AND MOVED TO THE CITY HERE… I IMAGINE THEY BOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] DOWN IN GREAT FALLS, BECAUSE HE HAD A SISTER WHO WAS DOWN IN SHELBY. AT THE TIME, IT WAS CONSIDERED MORE EXPENSIVE.” OF THE RELATIONSHIP SHE HAD WITH HER AUNT, HOUTEKAMER STATED: “[W]E WERE VERY CLOSE. THEY HAD NO FAMILY, SO THEY KIND OF ADOPTED MY HUSBAND [MARTIN HOUTEKAMER] AND I... WE DID A LOT OF THINGS FOR THEM WHEN THEY GOT OLDER... SHE WAS A FABULOUS COOK.” HOUTEKAMER’S AUNT’S NAME BECAME EUGENE ANDERSON UNDER HER SECOND MARRIAGE. SOMETIME DURING THE PERIOD AFTER THE EUGENE AND GEORGE ANDERSON MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND BEFORE THE PASSING OF MRS. ANDERSON IN 1968, HOUTEKAMER CAME TO ACQUIRE THE PRESSURE COOKER: “WELL, SHE JUST GOT TO THE POINT WHERE SHE WAS GETTING OLDER, AND SHE DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE. SHE HAD DONE A LOT PREVIOUS TO THAT. SHE CANNED EVERYTHING, EVEN MUSHROOMS … [SHE WAS A] FABULOUS COOK … SHE KNEW THAT I DID A LOT OF CANNING, SO SHE THOUGHT [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD HELP." "MY HUSBAND DID A LOT OF FISHING, SO [WE] CANNED FISH, WHICH WAS THE BEST THING FOR IT. WHEN YOU CAN IT IN THERE, IT’S GOING TO BE GOOD… [HE CAUGHT FISH FROM] ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA. BEAVER MINES WAS ONE OF THE SPECIALS. IN FACT, HIS ASHES ARE IN POLICE LAKE. HE DID A LOT THERE AT POLICE LAKE AND LEE’S CREEK. DEPENDING [ON] HOW MANY FISH YOU HAD TO MAKE IT WORTHWHILE, I WOULD DO A CANNER OF IT. I USED THE SMALL FISH JARS, SO I COULD PACK THEM UP. I DID QUITE A FEW…” PRIOR TO OWNING A PRESSURE COOKER, HOUTEKAMER SAID SHE “USED A BIG CANNER. I HAD ONE THAT HELD 7 OR 8 QUARTS. THAT’S WHAT I DID - MOSTLY FRUIT. I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF VEGETABLES BECAUSE, BY THEN, YOU COULD START FREEZING STUFF. YOU KNOW, IT WAS STARTING TO GET MORE POPULAR.” HOUTEKAMER DID NOT LEARN A GREAT DEAL OF COOKING FROM HER AUNT, “BECAUSE I HAD LEARNED A LOT FROM MY MOTHER. SHE WAS A GOOD COOK. SHE EVEN MADE LEFTOVERS TASTE GOOD. SHE HAD HAD A LOT OF EXPERIENCE… WE DID A LOT OF PRESERVING IN HER DAY. THAT WAS ALL WE HAD AND IT WAS ALWAYS DONE IN A BOILER - A GOOD COPPER BOILER. THAT’S THE WAY YOU LEARNED. … FOR SOME THINGS [THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS BETTER THAN THE COPPER BOILER] BECAUSE MY VEGETABLES TAKE A VERY LONG TIME TO PRESERVE THROUGH BOILING. AND FISH, OH MY GOD, YOU WOULD BE THERE FOREVER TO BOIL, SO THIS [PRESSURE COOKER] IS MUCH BETTER, MUCH FASTER [AND] SAFER, AS WELL. IT WAS HEAVY WORK, MIND YOU. WHEN YOUR COOKER WAS DONE, WHEN YOUR TIME WAS DONE, IF YOU COULD LIFT IT AND TAKE IT OUTDOORS, YOU COULD THROW COLD WATER ON IT AND OPEN IT RIGHT AWAY. THEN YOU WOULD THROW THE CANS IN COLD WATER. FOR JARS, YOU HAD TO WAIT UNTIL IT WENT DOWN BY ITSELF. YOU COULDN’T OPEN IT UNTIL THEN OR ALL THE LIDS WOULD COME OFF.” FOR HOUTEKAMER, CANNING TOOK PLACE MOSTLY DURING THE FALL. SHE WAS ABLE TO PRESERVE A VARIETY OF FOOD WITH THIS PRESSURE COOKER: “I [CANNED] CHICKEN ONE YEAR, AND THAT WAS ENOUGH. WE ALWAYS HAD CHICKEN AROUND [AND] IT WAS BETTER FRESH. MY HUSBAND LOVED HIS FRESH CHICKENS. WE HAD OUR OWN GARDEN, AND SOMETIMES WE WOULD GET SOME CORN IN THE FALL [WHEN THE FARMERS WERE DOING THEIR THRESHING].” OF HER FAVOURITE VEGETABLES TO PRESERVE, HOUTEKAMER SAID, “BEANS, I GUESS. I WOULD GET A LOT OF BEANS. BEETS – I DID SOME – NOT CANNED. [I] DID A LOT OF PICKLES. BEANS WERE THE MAIN THING, AND CHICKEN, AND FISH. AND THAT WAS IT. I DID A LOT OF TOMATOES, BUT THEY WERE SIMPLER TO DO IN THE CANNER, BECAUSE THEY ONLY TAKE ABOUT 20 MINUTES… [THE PRESSURE COOKER] WOULD BE PLACED ON [A] GAS OR ELECTRIC [STOVE]. WHEN THE TIME WAS DONE, YOU JUST SHUT THE STOVE OFF AND LET IT COME DOWN BY ITSELF… I USED TO JUST KNOW WHERE TO PUT THE STOVE AT, THE BURNER, TO KEEP [THE PRESSURE WHERE NEEDED]. YOU HAD TO BE CAREFUL. YOU COULDN’T JUST TURN YOUR BACK ON IT. YOU WOULDN’T WANT THAT. THAT WHOLE THING WOULD COME OFF, AND YOU WOULD HAVE ONE BIG MESS. … NO [THAT NEVER HAPPENED]. I ALWAYS WAS VERY CAREFUL – WATCHED IT CLOSE. I DON’T THINK [MESSES] EVER HAPPENED TO MY AUNT EITHER THAT I’M AWARE OF… MOST OF THE COOKBOOKS IN THOSE DAYS HAD INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT HOW MANY POUNDS TO USE FOR VEGETABLES. I THINK MY FISH WAS 15 POUNDS. FOLLOW THOSE INSTRUCTIONS AND IT WORKED FINE – [IT] DID A VERY GOOD JOB.” HOUTEKAMER WOULD USE THE PRESSURE COOKER AT HER HOME ON THE RESEARCH STATION AND THEN LATER AT HER HOME ON THE NORTH SIDE OF LETHBRIDGE: “… AT THE TIME WE LIVED ON THE RESEARCH STATION FOR TWENTY YEARS. AND I USED IT THERE. MY HUSBAND WORKED THERE, IN POULTRY RESEARCH. WE WERE POOR. WE DID A LOT OF CANNING AND ALWAYS HAD A GARDEN. THAT’S HOW IT CAME ABOUT … WE HAD A PLACE TO LIVE AND OUR OWN GARDEN.” THE PRESSURE COOKER WAS ACTIVELY USED BY HOUTEKAMER UNTIL HER HUSBAND’S DEATH IN 2005: “WELL, I DON’T THINK I’VE USED IT IN THE LAST 10 YEARS BECAUSE I’VE BEEN LIVING IN A CONDO. I JUST HAD IT SITTING AROUND, TOO HEAVY TO MOVE… I DIDN’T DO A LOT OF CANNING ANYMORE…” THIS ARTIFACT BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HER LATE HUSBAND: “WE ALWAYS DID A LOT OF FISHING TOGETHER. WHEN HE RETIRED, HE BOUGHT HIS BOAT. WE HAD A CAMPER VAN, SO WE COULD GO OUT AND STAY OVERNIGHT. WE HAD [THE] BOAT, SO WE COULD GO ONTO THE WATER [AND] TRY TO GET SOME FISH. THOSE DAYS, THERE WERE SO MANY FISH... IF YOU WERE LUCKY, YOU HAD A NICE BIG ONE THAT WOULD FILL ABOUT FIVE OR SIX JARS.” CANNING WAS A NECESSITY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION: “WELL, I GUESS IT’S OK IF YOU CAN AFFORD IT, BUT WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER, WE WERE VERY POOR, SO YOU DID WHAT HAD TO DO. KEEP GOING. EAT… MY GIRLS STILL DO SOME, BUT NOW, WITH THE NEW FANCY STOVES, YOU COULD NEVER USE THIS – TOO HEAVY. THE NEW STOVES – THEY JUST CAN’T PUT ANYTHING HEAVY ON THERE. I THINK IT’S KIND OF TOO BAD, BECAUSE A GARDEN IS NOT THAT HARD TO HAVE, AND YOU CAN GET AN AWFUL LOT OF GOOD FOOD OUT OF THERE – NATURAL FOOD, AND VERY HEALTHY FOOD. SOME PEOPLE JUST CAN’T BE BOTHERED. [IT'S] SIMPLER TO GO TO THE STORE… [MY AUNT] COULD HAVE PROBABLY SAID MORE, SHE DID A GREAT DEAL OF CANNING. SHE ALWAYS MADE SURE, WHEN THEY BUILT THEIR HOUSES, THAT THEY HAD A PLACE FOR PUTTING HER CANNED STUFF, WHERE SHE COULD KEEP IT COOLER IN THE SUMMER.” ACCORDING TO HER LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, MRS. EUGINE ANDERSON PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON JANUARY 18, 1968 AT THE AGE OF 85. HER SECOND HUSBAND, MR. GEORGE ANDERSON, PASSED AWAY IN CALGARY ON NOVEMBER 26, 1972 AT THE AGE OF 79. MRS. ANDERSON’S FIRST HUSBAND, MR. PETE SICOTTE, PASSED AWAY IN CAMROSE, ALBERTA ON FEBRUARY 15, 1966 AT THE AGE OF 92. A MEMORIAM IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD INDICATES THAT THE DONOR’S HUSBAND, MR. MARTIN HOUTEKAMER PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 21, 2005. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160029000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASSEROLE DISH SET
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2006
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160001000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASSEROLE DISH SET
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2006
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
22
Height
22
Length
44
Width
32
Description
BOX OF SUNBURST CASSEROLE DISHES WITH 11 PIECES (5 FULL SETS OF SMALL AND LARGE DISHES AND 1 PARTIAL SET WITH ONE SMALL DISH). THERE ARE 22 PIECES INCLUDING THE STORAGE MATERIALS. A – F: CERAMIC CASSEROLE DISHES. UNGLAZED. “SUNBURST… OVENPROOF” WITH A SUN LOGO STAMPED ON THE BOTTOM. THE DISHES HAVE A RIM AT THE TOP AND A BASE AROUND THE BOTTOM. THERE ARE 2 HANDLES ON OPPOSITE ENDS OF THE TOP OF THE DISHES. A-E HAVE “1.95” WRITTEN ON THE BOTTOMS IN PENCIL. F HAS AN ERASER MARK IN THAT PLACE, AND A WHITE STICKER WITH THE PRICE “$5.00” HANDWRITTEN AND STICKING TO A TOP HANDLE. THE DIAMETERS ARE 19.4 CM, THE LENGTHS INCLUDING THE HANDLES ARE 23.3 CM AND THE DISHES ARE EACH 7.1 CM DEEP. THE CONDITIONS OF DISH A THROUGH D ARE VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT. THERE IS DUST COATING EACH DISH. B HAS 5 SMALL CHIPS ON THE BASE AND A SLIGHT CRACK (LESS THAN 1 CM LONG) ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE RIM. THE CERAMIC ON C IS ROUGH ON THE INNER RIM. IT ALSO HAS A DARK MARK ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE RIM AND SOME SMALL CHIPS ON THE BASE. D HAS A SCRATCH ON THE BASE. THE CONDITION OF E IS VERY GOOD WITH A SMALL CRACK ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH, A DARK STAIN ON THE EDGE OF THE RIM, AND A SLIGHT SCUFF ON THE BOTTOM. CASSEROLE DISH F IS IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION WITH SOME MARKS ALONG THE RIM AND BASE. THERE IS A CHIP IN THE HANDLE. G – K: CERAMIC CASSEROLE DISHES. UNGLAZED. “SUNBURST… OVENPROOF” WITH A SUN LOGO STAMPED ON THE BOTTOM. THE DISHES HAVE A RIM AT THE TOP AND A BASE AROUND THE BOTTOM. THERE ARE 2 HANDLES ON OPPOSITE ENDS OF THE TOP OF THE DISHES. H-J HAVE “2.95” WRITTEN ON THE BOTTOMS IN PENCIL. G HAS AN ERASER MARK IN THAT PLACE, AND A WHITE STICKER WITH THE PRICE “$7.00” HANDWRITTEN AND STICKING TO A TOP HANDLE. THE DIAMETERS ARE 22.6 CM, THE LENGTHS INCLUDING THE HANDLES ARE 27.1 CM AND THE DISHES ARE EACH 8.4 CM DEEP. THE CONDITION OF DISH G IS VERY GOOD WITH DARK IMPURITIES IN THE CLAY, A SCUFF ALONG THE BASE AND A SCRATCH IN THE CLAY ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH. THE CONDITION OF H IS FAIR TO GOOD. THIS DISH HAS A LARGE CHIP IN THE RIM WITH A LENGTH OF APPROXIMATELY 6.1 CM. THERE IS A SCUFF IN THE BOTTOM. DISH I IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION WITH SOME IMPURITIES IN THE CLAY, AN AIR BUBBLE ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH, A DARK BROWN STAINING ON THE SIDE, AND CHIPS ON THE BOTTOM RIM. DISHES J AND K ARE IN VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH SMALL CHIPS IN THE RIM. L – M: SQUARE PIECES OF CARDBOARD FOR PACKING. THEY ARE BENT TO FOLD AROUND A DISHES WITH A CIRCULAR CREASE IN THE CENTER WITH TWO PARALLEL SLITS (APPROX. 3.5 CM APART) FROM ONE END TO THE CENTER. THE DIMENSIONS OF EACH ARE 21 CM X 21 CM. GOOD CONDITION WITH TEARING IN SOME AREAS (L IS TORN ON ONE SIDE) AND CLAY DUST OVERALL. N – U: RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD SEPARATORS FOR PACKING (THEY ARE PLACED IN BETWEEN THE SMALL AND LARGE DISH IN A SET. THERE ARE 3 SLITS IN EACH SEPARATOR THAT ARE 4.5 CM LONG FROM ONE SHORT END STOPPING AT THE CENTER AND EACH SLIT IS 7.5 CM APART. EACH PIECE IS BENT TO FIT THE SHAPE OF DISHES. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION WITH REGULAR WEAR (TEARS AND STAINING) OVERALL. V: CARDBOARD BOX WITH ORANGE LETTERING, “SUNBURST CERAMICS” WITH AN ORANGE LOGO ON THE LONG SIDE OF THE BOX. HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK ON THE TOP OF THE BOX CAN BE READ “OPICAL EDMONTON ALTA.” ON ONE SHORT SIDE IT SAYS, “6 CASSEROLES 48 OZ…” IN ORANGE PRINT AND THEN IN BLACK HANDWRITING IT READS “6 + 32 OZ 6 – 48 OZ CASS.” THERE ARE 4 LARGE STAPLES HOLDING THE BOTTOM OF THE BOX TOGETHER. THE INSIDE HAS 4 CARDBOARD DIVIDERS (3 LENGTHWISE AND 1 HORIZONTALLY DOWN THE CENTER) THAT FIT TOGETHER THROUGH SLITS IN THE DIVIDERS. THESE MAKE UP 6 SECTIONS IN THE BOX FOR STORING THE SETS OF DISHES. THE OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF THE BOX ARE 32 X 44 X 22 CM. POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. THERE ARE HOLES, BENDS, AND TEARS OVERALL THE WHOLE SURFACE OF THE BOX. ONE CORNER EDGE IS TAPED TOGETHER WITH A BROWN PAPER TAPE. THERE IS A STAPLE LOOSE ON A TOP FLAP. THE BOX IS DIRTY AND STAINED OVERALL.DIRTY AND STAINED OVERALL.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
DONOR MIKE MYCHAJLUK ACQUIRED THIS SET OF CERAMIC DISHES WHEN TROPICAL GARDENS IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA WAS CLOSING BETWEEN THE YEARS 2004 AND 2006. THE OWNER OF THAT BUSINESS HELD AN AUCTION AT HIS WAREHOUSE AND PART OF THAT LOT WAS THE SUNBURST CERAMIC SET, WHICH MYCHAJLUK BOUGHT FOR THIRTY-FIVE DOLLARS. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS CERAMIC SET COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH MYCHAJLUK THAT WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JANUARY 22, 2016: “TROPICAL GARDENS WAS GOING OUT OF BUSINESS AND THEY WERE SELLING OFF IN THEIR STORE. A COUPLE OF BOXES THEY HAD ON DISPLAY THEN A COUPLE OF MONTHS LATER HE HAD THE AUCTION AT HIS WAREHOUSE ON HIS ACREAGE. HE HAD BINS - TONS OF STUFF THERE AND THIS [BOX] HAPPENED TO BE IN [THE SALE] WHEN I BOUGHT IT. I HAD TO BUY THE WHOLE LOT… [FIRST], I’M INTERESTED IN ALBERTA POTTERY STUFF AND NUMBER TWO I KNEW OTHER PEOPLE WERE [TOO]. I WAS GOING TO SELL SOME OF IT OFF BUT THERE WAS SO MUCH OF IT. I’LL NEVER SELL [ALL OF IT] IN MY LIFETIME TO COLLECTORS… NOBODY KNOWS MUCH ABOUT [SUNBURST] AND IF I BRING IT MORE TO THE ATTENTION, MORE PEOPLE WOULD BE INTERESTED IN IT. IT’S ONE OF THE LAST POTTERIES THAT WAS IN ALBERTA… THE STUFF IS ORIGINALLY FROM LETHBRIDGE.” ON THE CERAMICS BEING UNGLAZED, MYCHAJLUK STATES: “I THINK THAT’S WHEN [SUNBURST WAS] GOING OUT OF BUSINESS. THEY JUST PACKAGED WHAT WAS LEFT AND SOLD IT OFF OR EVEN AFTER IT COULD BE A DISPERSAL… I’M ASSUMING [TROPICAL GARDENS] BOUGHT IT TO SELL DRY FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS… THE ONLY THOUGHTS WAS HE COULDN’T USE IT FOR LIVE [FLOWERS] WITH WATER BECAUSE IT WOULD COME APART.” ACCORDING TO MYCHAJLUK, WHO IS INTERESTED IN ALBERTA POTTERY, IT IS NOT USUAL TO FIND A LARGE QUANTITY OF UNGLAZED CERAMICS LIKE WHAT HE FOUND AT TROPICAL GARDENS. WHILE MYCHAJLUK WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE, HE DID NOT SPEND MUCH TIME LIVING HERE. SUNBURST CERAMICS WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1961 BY RALPH THRALL SR. AND JR. WHEN THEY BOUGHT OUT NEW MEDALTA CERAMICS FROM MALCOM MCARTHUR IN MEDICINE HAT. AFTER OPERATING WITH THOSE KILNS FOR THE COMPANY’S FIRST YEARS, A NECESSITY TO UPGRADE INFLUENCED THE COMPANY TO MOVE THEIR OPERATION TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE THEY OPENED A PLANT ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH IN 1965. DURING THEIR EXISTENCE, THE PLANT PRODUCED 200 TYPES OF PRODUCTS. IN THE EARLY 1970S, THEY EXPANDED THEIR OPERATION TO PRODUCE GIFTWARE IN ADDITION TO WHAT THEY WERE PRODUCING IN THE MEDALTA STYLE. THE COMPANY DEVELOPED A REPUTATION AS LEADERS IN THE ALBERTAN CERAMIC INDUSTRY, BRINGING IN THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGIES AND EQUIPMENT FROM GERMANY WITH PROVINCIAL SUPPORT. THIS ALLOWED THEM TO ADD DINNERWARE TO THEIR PRODUCTION LINE. SUNBURST CERAMICS CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1975. THE THRALL FAMILY BOUGHT THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF BILLY MCINTYRE IN 1947. THE FAMILY CONTINUES TO OPERATE IT AT THE TIME OF DONATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REGARDING SUNBURST CERAMICS. SEE ALSO FILES FOR ARTIFACTS P19960004001, P19980077001, AND P200000056000 FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SUNBURST CERAMICS.
Catalogue Number
P20160001000
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail