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Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170028000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
73
Diameter
27
Description
SILVER STANDING FLOOR ASHTRAY WITH ROUND DISH AT TOP SECURED TO SILVER METAL POLE AND ROUND SILVER BASE; TOP DISH HAS SILER ORNATE HANDLE WITH LEAF AND BEADS PATTERN AND RAISED POINT IN CENTER. ROUND BASE HAS FOUR FEET; BASE ORNATELY ENGRAVED WITH FLUTED PATTERN; METAL STAND POLE FIXED TO TOP DISH WITH METAL BRACKET AND TWO SCREWS. SILVER HANDLE TARNISHED; INSIDE DISH IS TARNISHED AND WORN; UNDERSIDE OF BASE IS SOILED; EDGES OF PATTERN ON BASE ARE TARNISHED. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 23, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ANDY AND JO KOCSIS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF A STANDING, FLOOR-MODEL ASHTRAY. THE ASHTRAY WAS USED IN ANDY KOCSIS’S FATHER’S HOME, AND WAS TAKEN BY ANDY AND JO KOCSIS FOR USE IN THEIR HOME WHEN THEY MOVED. ON THE ORIGINS OF THE ASHTRAY, JO NOTED, “ALL THAT I KNOW ABOUT THEM IS THAT THEY WERE [IN MY PARENTS' HOME AT 109-7TH AVE. SOUTH] WHEN I GOT MARRIED, WHICH WAS 53-54 YEARS AGO. [WE KEPT THEM] IN THE FRONT ROOM.” ANDY ELABORATED, “THEY WERE THERE [IN THE HOME ALREADY]. MY DAD WAS THE OWNER [OF THE HOUSE]. I ALWAYS THOUGHT THEY COME WITH THE HOUSE…[THE ASHTRAY] GOT TIPPED OVER SOMEHOW, IT USED TO HAVE A [DARK BOWL].” ANDY NOTED, “I QUIT [SMOKING] WHEN I WAS THIRTY … YEARS OLD. [JO] SMOKED EVER SINCE SHE WAS SIXTEEN.” ANDY RECALLED HIS FAMILY’S HOME, STATING, “MY DAD [STEVE KOCSIS] BROUGHT US OUT FROM HUNGARY. HE OWNED THE MAYOR [CHARLES A.] MAGRATH HOUSE [AT 109-7TH AVE. SOUTH]…THAT’S HOW WE ENDED UP THERE.” “MIKE ANGYAL [THE OWNER BEFORE MY DAD] WAS A GOOD FRIEND OF HIS, ANOTHER HUNGARIAN, BIG FARMER, SO I GUESS HE HELPED THEM GET INVOLVED. WHEN [DAD] BOUGHT THE HOUSE…THE HUNGARIANS USED TO HAVE BUSINESS THERE. IT WAS A BIG EMPTY LOT AND HE SUB-DIVIDED, SO HE GOT SOME MONEY AND SOLD A BUNCH OF LOTS.” “[MY DAD MADE THEM INTO APARTMENTS BECAUSE] HE COULDN’T LIVE IN ALL OF IT SO HE GOT A BUNCH OF HUNGARIAN COAL MINERS DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THERE [WERE] SIX OR SEVEN OF THEM. THEY ALL LIVED DOWNSTAIRS. SOME, THEIR WIVES KICKED THEM OUT.” “[IT WAS MADE INTO] FOUR SUITES. WE WERE RENTING FOR A WHILE, WE HAD GOOD TENANTS. THEN THERE WAS ONE COUPLE…THEY STOLE THE LAMP. … SO FINALLY, WE RENTED NO MORE. IT GOT SO BAD. I SAID I CAN’T TAKE THIS ANYMORE.” JO ADDED, “[THERE WERE SUITES] TWO UPSTAIRS, AND THEN THERE WAS ONE ON THE SIDE AND ONE ON THE LOWER FLOORS… MY MOTHER-IN-LAW, WHEN WE GOT MARRIED, MOM KOCSIS, SHE SAID “THIS PLACE I’M IN [IS] TOO BIG” SO SHE MOVED INTO THE SMALLER SUITE ON THE GROUND FLOOR AND WE GOT THE BIGGER SUITE. THEN IT WAS RENTED OUT, THE TOP, UNTIL, THEN THE KIDS GOT BIGGER, BECAUSE WE HAD TWO CHILDREN. THEN WE TOOK OVER THE SUITE AT THE TOP, CLOSED OFF THE KITCHEN, PUT A DOOR THERE. THEN WE HAD HALF OF THE HOUSE…THE OTHER SUITE STAYED EMPTY ‘TIL IT WAS SOLD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE ASHTRAY, ANDY NOTED, “[IT’S] A KIND OF REMINDER OF…THE OLD TIMES…THE OLD HUNGARIANS USED TO COME AND PLAY POKER IN THE FRONT ROOM…A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THEIR ‘50S.” JO ADDED, “WE’RE HAVING TO SELL OUR [CURRENT] HOME AND WE HAVE NO MORE USE FOR IT…WE WANT IT TO GO…[IT’S] OLD, SO WE’D LIKE [IT] TO GO SOMEWHERE. MY KIDS ARE NOT INTERESTED IN THEM, NOR ARE MY GRANDKIDS. THEY DON’T WANT THIS OLD STUFF.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170028000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170028000
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, CLOTH
Catalogue Number
P20170029001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, CLOTH
No. Pieces
1
Height
10
Diameter
35.7
Description
SILVER CLOCK WITH PLASTIC COVER OVER FACE; CLOCK FACE HAS GREY BACKGROUND WITH BLACK NUMBERS, BLACK TEXT ABOVE HANDS “SIMPLEX”, BLACK HOUR AND MINUTE HANDS AND RED SECONDS HAND. BOTTOM OF CLOCK HAS SILVER KNOB; BACK OF CLOCK IS BLACK METAL. BACK OF CLOCK HAS SILVER MOUNTING HOOK SCREWED ON AND BLACK COVERED BOX COVERING INTERNAL MECHANISMS. BLACK BOX HAS PAPER LABEL WITH DIAGRAM AND TEXT “TYPE, 804-006, CLOCK CIRCUIT VOLTS 115, VOLT AMPS 4.6, CYCLES 60, SIMPLEX, TIME RECORDER CO., GARDNER, MASS., U.S.A.”. BLACK BOX HAS TWO BLUE WIRES THAT ATTACHES TO WHITE CONNECTOR, WITH TWO BLACK AND TWO WHITE WIRES ATTACHED; WHITE WIRES CONVERGE INTO WHITE POWER CORD WITH PLUG AT END. POWER CORD HAS BLUE AND BLACK SCUFF MARKS. BACK RIM OF CLOCK HAS BLUE-GREY PAINT SPOTS AND CHIPPED BLACK PAINT; BACK OF CLOCK HAS TWO EXPOSED SPOTS WITH ONE LOOP TO HANG ON WALL AND TWO BLACK CORDS. EXPOSED PATCHES SHOW ORANGE CLOTH UNDER BLACK BACKING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TIMEKEEPING T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE WALL CLOCK, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THAT [CLOCK] WAS IN THE AUDITORIUM. IT WAS THE ONLY CLOCK IN THE AUDITORIUM THERE. THAT’S THE ONE YOU’D CHECK TO SEE IF THE SHOW WAS ON TIME STARTING ON TIME OR NOT. MOST TIMES IT WAS.” “[THE PLAYGOERS] STARTED ON TIME. [I] ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS IMPORTANT TOO, IF WE ADVERTISED THE FACT THAT THE SHOW STARTED AT 8:00 O’CLOCK THAT WE START AT 8:00 O’CLOCK. NOT AT 8:30 OR QUARTER AFTER. THIS WAS VISIBLE, YOU COULD SEE IT. IF THERE HADN’T BEEN A CLOCK THERE IT WOULDN’T MATTER TOO MUCH BECAUSE PEOPLE WOULDN’T HAVE KNOWN REALLY. I ALWAYS FELT WE HAD AN OBLIGATION TO THE AUDIENCE, IF THEY ARRIVED ON TIME, WE START ON TIME. IF THEY’RE LATE, WELL THAT’S THEIR OWN FAULT.” “THE STAGE MANAGER [WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR STARTING ON TIME]. IF THEY DIDN’T, THEN THE DIRECTOR WOULD REMIND THEM TO GET WITH IT.” “IT WAS PART OF THE ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT. [IT WAS] ON [THE WALL] AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER, ALWAYS IN THAT SAME SPOT. IT HUNG TO THE RIGHT [OF THE DOOR TO THE HALLWAY].” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “BETWEEN THE DOOR AND THE STAGE, OR THE CURTAIN.” “I REMEMBER COMMENTS AND SOMETIMES A LITTLE BIT OF PANIC BY THE FRONT OF HOUSE MANAGER WHO HAD TO SEE THAT ALL THE AUDIENCE MEMBERS WERE IN THEIR SEATS READY FOR THE SHOW TO BEGIN AT, SAY, 8:00 O’CLOCK, AND LATE ARRIVERS NOT GETTING THERE IN TIME. THEY DON’T WANT TO START PERFORMING, CLOSE THE DOORS. IF YOU WERE IN YOUR SEATS AND READY, EVERYBODY HAD THEIR EYE ON THAT CLOCK TO MAKE SURE THAT IT STARTED ON TIME. WITH EVERY PRODUCTION FOR MUSICAL THEATRE OR PLAYGOERS THEY’D SAY 'FOR A 15 MINUTE INTERMISSION.' THE PEOPLE WOULD GO OUT AND GET THEIR REFRESHMENTS AND COME BACK IN AND LOOK TO SEE IF IT WAS 15 MINUTES FOR SURE. SOMETIMES WE HAD TO FUDGE MAYBE A MINUTE OR TWO TO GET PEOPLE BACK IN THEIR SEATS. EVERYBODY KNEW IT WAS THERE AND PAID ATTENTION TO IT. THE FOLKS IN THE LIGHT BOOTH KNEW WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH THE LIGHTING BOARD AND THE SOUND. THEY HAD A CLEAR SIGHT TO THE CLOCK AND WORKED HARD TO KEEP TO THE PROPER TIME ALWAYS.” “[THE CLOCK] APPEALS TO ME BECAUSE IT SEEMED TO BE SO INTEGRAL TO ALL THE AUDIENCE MEMBERS. IT’S NOT DIGITAL AND THESE OTHER THINGS HAVE BEEN UPDATED. I DON’T KNOW IF IT WOULD BE IN USE ANY MORE, BUT THE EQUIPMENT THAT THEY HAVE HAS EVOLVED INTO SO MANY NEW THINGS THAT THEY COULD BE REPLACED QUITE EASILY. THE CLOCK COULD BE REPLACED TOO BUT SENTIMENTAL IS THE FEELING I GET ABOUT IT AND THAT IT WAS IN THE YATES.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE CLOCK, “[IT WAS] MY FAVOURITE THING EVER. THE GLOWING, GREEN CLOCK ON THE WALL…MY ENTIRE TIME AT THE YATES. IT WAS MY SIGN-OFF ACTUALLY AT NEW WEST FOR TWENTY-FIVE YEARS. YOU HAVE CAROL BURNETT WHO WOULD PULL THE EAR, WAYNE AND SCHUSTER HAD THEIR FAREWELL SONG, MINE WAS ALWAYS, “WELL I CAN TELL BY THE GLOWING, GREEN CLOCK ON THE WALL THAT IT’S TIME TO LET YOU FOLKS GO HOME”. I GOT GOOSE BUMPS AGAIN JUST SAYING IT. IT’S THE FIRST TIME I’VE SAID IT IN A DECADE SO THAT ONE IS VERY NEAR AND DEAR TO MY HEART. I’M ALWAYS HOPEFUL THAT IT WAS A BULB OF SOME KIND IN THE CLOCK AND NOT PAINTED WITH IRRADIATED PAINT AS SO MANY THINGS BACK IN THE DAY WERE. THAT’S A PRETTY GOOD MEMORY FOR ME.” “WE USED TO HAVE TWENTY THOUSAND PATRONS COME TO SEE NEW WEST OVER THE COURSE OF A SUMMER OR A YEAR. EVERY TIME I WOULD SAY, 'I CAN TELL BY THE GLOWING…' YOU COULD SEE THE ENTIRE AUDIENCE WOULD LOOK SO I KNOW THAT AT LEAST TWENTY THOUSAND PEOPLE A YEAR LOOKED AT THAT CLOCK. THAT’S AN AWESOME THING.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
THEATRE LAMP
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CLOTH
Catalogue Number
P20170029002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
THEATRE LAMP
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CLOTH
No. Pieces
1
Length
131
Width
28
Description
SILVER THEATER LAMP WITH BLUE METAL C-CLAMP AND BOLT FIXED TO METAL HANDLE; C-CLAMP HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “STRAND ELECTRIC”. LAMP IS ROUNDED WITH GLASS COVER OVER INSIDE LIGHT AND THREE SILVER SLIDES AROUND FRONT FOR HOLDING SCREENS AND COVERS. BOTTOM OF LAMP HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “MADE IN ENGLAND” ABOVE BLACK AND SILVER PLATE NAILED ON “THE STRAND ELECTRIC & ENG CO LTD, LONDON, PATT. NO. 23/LS, VOLTS 120, MAX. WATTS 500”. BOTTOM HAS METAL COVER OVER BOLT AND BLACK CHIPPED HANDLE FOR TURNING BOLT; BOTTOM HAS WHITE CLOTH POWER CORD EMERGING; CORD HAS SILVER PLUG END WITH NGRAVED TEXT “HUBBEL, TWIST LOCK, TURN & PULL, COVER GROUNDED, 20A_250V., 10A. 00V. A.C., 2920304, PAT. 2815495”. BACK OF LAMP HAS CUT-OUTS IN METAL TO SHOW INSIDE; CENTER OF BACK HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STRAND ELECTRIC”. TOP OF LAMP HAS SILVER BUTTON PRESSED INTO METAL TO OPEN COVER; INSIDE OF LAMP HAS SILVER ROUND REFLECTOR AND GLASS BULB SET IN WHITE PLASTIC FITTING. TOP HAS BROWN AND SILVER PLATE NAILED ON “SUPPLIED BY STRAND ELECTRIC, TORONTO”. LAMP HAS PINK PAINT SPOTS ON TOP AND SIDES; CORD IS DISCOLOURED AND STAINED WITH BLACK; BLUE C-CLAMP ON HANDLE IS RUSTED AND IS CHIPPED; RIGHT SIDE OF LAMP HAS BROWN ADHESIVE RESIDUE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LIGHTING DEVICE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
INDUSTRY
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE “STRAND” THEATRE LAMP, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THOSE WERE THE LAMPS THAT WE USED TO FILL IN THE AREAS WHERE THE PROFILE LIGHTS DIDN’T LIGHT UP. BECAUSE THEY WERE 500 WATTS WE COULD UTILIZE MORE OF THEM. YOU COULD ONLY GET SO MANY LIGHTS ON ONE CIRCUIT AND THESE WERE VERY HANDY LIGHTS. PUSH THAT BUTTON THERE AND THE FRONT OPENS UP AND YOU CAN CHANGE THE BULB. THEY DIDN’T GET OVERLY HOT WHICH MEANT THEY’D LAST LONGER.” “I BOUGHT THE LIGHTS [FOR THE THEATRE]. IT WAS THE FIRST COUPLE OF YEARS THAT WE WERE BUYING THE LIGHTS. IT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART, [THE THEATRE] NEEDED TO HAVE THEM IN ORDER TO UTILIZE THE STAGE PROPERLY. WE STARTED USING THEM FROM DAY ONE…PART OF THE NEW EQUIPMENT OF THE YATES.” “IT WAS GREAT [HAVING THE LIGHTS]. WE FOUND THAT AFTER A WHILE WE BOUGHT SO MANY HIGHER POWERED LIGHTS INITIALLY FOR THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE, WHICH MEANS THE OLD BALCONY AREA IN FRONT OF THE STAGE THERE, TO LIGHT UP THE FRONT PART OF THE STAGE [USED] THE MAIN LIGHTING…THESE WERE USED AS AUXILIARY LIGHTING. THESE CAME A LITTLE BIT LATER BECAUSE WE FOUND OUT WHERE WE NEEDED THEM. IT WAS A CONVENIENT WAY OF LIGHTING SYSTEM.” “[THESE WOULD BE SUSPENDED UP IN THE AIR] ABOVE THE STAGE AND ALSO IN FRONT OF THE STAGE OR ON STANDS. [THEY WERE A GOOD LIGHT] THEY WERE EASY TO WORK WITH.” “IT WAS A BIG PART OF WHAT I DID SO IT WAS ENJOYABLE TO ME. YOU CAN MAKE QUITE AN EFFECT WITH LIGHTS, ONE WAY OR ANOTHER YOU COULD SEE THESE…MAKE IT EFFECTIVE. [YOU COULD] CREATE MOODS WITH DIFFERENT COLOURS. THE SLOTS ON THE FRONT [OF THE LAMP] ACCOMMODATED A FRAME. IT HAD GELS WHICH ARE DIFFERENT COLORED CELLOPHANE TRANSPARENCIES. YOU’D LIGHT THE STAGE WITH DIFFERENT COLOURS IF YOU WANTED, TO CREATE THE MOOD THAT YOU WERE ENDEAVORING TO CREATE.” “[THE CITY IN PROVIDING FUNDING FOR EXPENSES WAS] NOT BAD. WE TRIED TO KEEP THE EXPENSE DOWN. THAT WAS PART OF MY JOB TOO, TO TRY TO BE AS ECONOMICAL AS POSSIBLE. IT WORKED OUT PRETTY WELL. [IT WAS] SOMETIMES HARD TO CONVINCE THEM THAT THERE WAS A NEED FOR SOME OF THIS STUFF IF THEY WEREN’T FAMILIAR WITH WHAT IT WAS USED FOR.” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “I REMEMBER [ED] STANDING ON, IT SEEMED LIKE A HUNDRED FOOT LADDER BEFORE [HE] GOT THE SCAFFOLDING IN THERE, HOOKING LIGHTS AND MOVING THEM AND SHIFTING THEM ALONG THE LIGHTING RAILS…[IT] SCARED ME TO DEATH. SO, I STAYED OUT OF THERE.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE THEATRE LAMP, “I COULD TAKE IT APART, CLEAN IT, PUT A GEL IN IT, AND GET [IT] UP AND RUNNING. FOCUS IT. I’M GOING TO GUESS THAT IT WAS PROBABLY STILL ONE OF THE MAIN LAMPS IN USE UNTIL THE MID-EIGHTIES OR LATER IN THE YATES. WHEN THEY ADDED ON THE STERNDALE BENNETT THEATRE, JUST ON THE EAST SIDE, A LOT OF THE LAMPS FROM THE YATES TRAVELED OVER TO THAT THEATRE AND WE REPLACED THEM WITH THE TECHNOLOGY OF THE DAY WHICH ARE NOW THIRTY YEARS OLD. I RECALL THOSE AS WELL. BACK IN THE EARLY DAYS OF NEW WEST, WE DID EVERYTHING. WE WROTE THE SHOWS, CHOREOGRAPHED THE SHOWS, MADE OUR OWN COSTUMES, HUNG OUR OWN LIGHTS, DID ALL OUR OWN TECH WORK SO I’VE PROBABLY HAD MY FINGERS IN THAT LAMP AT SOME POINT IN ITS CAREER.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170029004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
61
Width
17.5
Description
HAND-PAINTED SIGN ON COMPRESSED WOOD BOARD; SIGN IS PAINTED WHITE WITH RED HAND-PAINTED TEXT “NO SMOKING”. SIGN HAS TWO ROUND HOLES (0.7CM DIAMETER) DRILLED AT EITHER END; FRONT OF SIGN HAS CHIPS AT LOWER LEFT CORNER AND RIGHT EDGE ON FRONT; FRONT OF SIGN HAS PAINT SMUDGES AND SCUFFS. BACK OF SIGN HAS CHIPS ON LEFT EDGE, UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND RIGHT EDGE; RIGHT HOLE ON BACK IS TORN AND SPLIT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE SIGN, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THAT WAS DONE BY OUR SIGN WRITER IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. WE HAD A REGULAR SIGN WRITER THAT DID THE…TRAFFIC SIGNS AND THINGS SUCH AS THAT. THEY USED TO PAINT THEM BUT THEY DON’T DO THAT ANYMORE OF COURSE. THEY USE THAT VINYL STUFF NOW. WE WERE SO DEPENDENT UPON VOLUNTEERS TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY DID THAT TYPE OF THING. WE COULDN’T HAVE OPERATED WITHOUT THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WERE THERE. THEY DID SO MUCH OF IT. IT HAS CHANGED LATELY…IT’S MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO FIND PEOPLE THAT ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO DO THAT.” “[THERE WAS NO SMOKING] IN THE AUDITORIUM. IT’S A PUBLIC PLACE YOU KNOW, WITH 500 PEOPLE IN THERE. IT MAKES IT DIFFICULT IF YOU DO HAVE ANY SORT OF FIRE IN THERE. [IN THE EARLIEST DAYS] YOU COULD SMOKE THEN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. IN MOVIE THEATRES AT THAT TIME YOU COULD SMOKE IN THERE WHICH OF COURSE IS A THING OF THE PAST NOW.” “[THAT WAS CHANGED BY THE] CITY.” “WITH THE SIGN LATER, YOU COULD POINT IT OUT TO THEM SAYING, 'REMEMBER, THIS IS WHAT WE EXPECT YOU TO DO.' AND THEY COULDN’T SAY, 'WELL, I DIDN’T KNOW THAT.'” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “THIS NO SMOKING SIGN RIGHT HERE REMINDS ME OF THE TIME WHEN MUSICAL THEATRE WAS DOING THE SOUND OF MUSIC AND THEY HAD SEVERAL LADIES DRESSED UP AS NUNS. ONE GIRL WAS A SMOKER. I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DID IT BECAUSE SHE WAS A SINGER AS WELL. I CAN SEE ALL THESE GIRLS IN THEIR NUN’S HABITS WAITING TO GO ON STAGE, STANDING UNDER THIS SIGN AND SMOKING LIKE A MAD FIEND. YOU THOUGHT, 'AHA, YOU SHOULDN’T BE DOING THIS', FOR ONE THING ON STAGE FOR ANOTHER BECAUSE YOU WEREN’T ALLOWED, ON STAGE, TO BE SMOKING. BUT PARTICULARLY IN THEIR NUN’S COSTUMES. THEY ALL LOOKED SO BEAUTIFUL EXCEPT FOR THIS ONE GIRL WHO JUST HAD TO HAVE THAT CIGARETTE BEFORE SHE WENT ON STAGE.” “ALL THE CURTAINS [WERE] MADE OUT OF FABRIC AND THERE’S PROPS AND ALL KINDS OF STUFF GOING ON ALL THE TIME. THERE’S OFTEN SAWDUST FROM THE WORKSHOP AND FROM THE PEOPLE WORKING BACKSTAGE. [IT TURNED TO NO SMOKING] FOR THE SAFETY AND A GOOD SENSE REASON.” “[THERE WAS NO SMOKING] IN THE AUDITORIUM, NO DRINKS, WATER OR ANYTHING. THEY’D TRY TO BUY POP OR SOMETHING AT THE CONCESSION AREA AND TAKE IT INTO THE THEATRE, NONE OF THAT WAS ALLOWED RIGHT FROM THE OUTSET.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE SIGN, “IT MAY HAVE BEEN IN THE LOADING DOCK. I’M TRYING TO RECALL WHERE IT WAS BUT I’M SURE I HAVE HUNDREDS OF PICTURES OF US SMOKING UNDERNEATH THIS SIGN BECAUSE THAT WAS THE ONLY PLACE WE SMOKED IN THE THEATRE. IT’S HARD TO IMAGINE NOW THAT WE SMOKED ALL THE TIME IN REHEARSALS, WE SMOKED ON STAGE. WE’D HAVE TO HAVE A GIANT ASHTRAY SITTING OUT THERE. WE USED TO SMOKE IN THE AUDITORIUM WHILE DIRECTING, SO TO SEE THE ‘NO SMOKING’ SIGN BRINGS BACK A LOT OF MEMORIES. WE JUST KEPT MOVING. FIRST WE COULD SMOKE ANYWHERE – THERE’S PHOTOS OF ED BAYLY WITH A CIGARETTE AND A BEER RUNNING LIGHTS IN THE BOOTH. THEN WE’RE ONLY ALLOWED TO SMOKE BACKSTAGE AND THEN EVENTUALLY, ONLY ALLOWED TO SMOKE IN THE LOADING DOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHAT YEAR THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN FROM BUT IT WAS THERE EVER SINCE I WAS IN THE BUILDING.” “BACK IN THE DAY, EVERYONE SMOKED. IN THEATRE, IN ANY OF THE PERFORMING ARTS, I THINK SMOKING WAS A BIT OF THE CULTURE EVEN TO THIS DAY. BALLET DANCERS AND ARTISTS ARE SOME OF THE…HEAVIEST CHAIN SMOKERS THERE ARE. WORKING BALLETS AT THE UNIVERSITY THEATRE AND THESE BEAUTIFUL DANCERS WILL BE OUT THERE…THEY WOULD WAFT INTO THE WINGS WHERE SOMEBODY WOULD HAVE A LIT CIGARETTE AND GIVE IT RIGHT TO THEM. THEY WOULD TAKE A COUPLE OF PUFFS, BLOW OUT, AND GO RIGHT BACK ONSTAGE. IT’S CRAZY TO ME ‘CAUSE WE SMOKED – WE’D DO A TWO-HOUR SHOW AND DURING THE SHOW, IF YOU WEREN’T ONSTAGE, YOU WERE PROBABLY IN THE BACK LOADING DOCK JUST OFF TO THE STAGE LEFT WING, SMOKING AWAY. EVERYONE IN THE AUDIENCE COULD SMELL IT. THESE ARE THINGS WE NEVER CONSIDERED UNTIL WE MADE THE INTELLIGENT CHOICE TO BAN SMOKING EVERYWHERE AND NOW IF SOMEBODY LIGHTS UP A CIGARETTE IN A TEN THOUSAND SQUARE-FOOT AREA, YOU SMELL IT IMMEDIATELY AND GO, ‘HOW DID WE USED TO DO THAT?’ THAT’S A GREAT OLD SIGN.” “THE SMOKERS ALWAYS HAD A PUSH-BACK ON IT. IN HINDSIGHT, IT MAKES PERFECT, INTENSE SENSE BUT AT THE TIME, THEY’RE LIKE 'THIS IS MY--I CAN SMOKE WHEREVER I DARN WELL WANT TO.' ONE OF THE CHALLENGES THAT WE FACE IN THEATRE NOWADAYS…[IS] SMOKING WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE PLAY. IT WAS WRITTEN INTO IT. EVERY TABLE HAD AN ASHTRAY AND A CIGARETTE CASE. YOU DIDN’T HAVE PACKAGES OF CIGARETTES, YOU HAD YOUR LOVELY CIGARETTE CASE THAT YOU OFFERED AROUND. NOW, YOU’RE NOT ALLOWED, SO HOW DO YOU DO THESE PLAYS WITH HISTORICAL VALUE WHERE SMOKING WAS, YOU KNOW FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE, SMOKING WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF PEOPLE’S LIVES? SOMETIMES THEY’RE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE PLAY, THEY’RE WRITTEN RIGHT INTO IT. WHEN WE DO CHANGE THE RULES, IT’S DIFFICULT AND I DON’T KNOW IF YOU GET WAIVERS OR HOW YOU GO ABOUT IT. I’M WORKING WITH ONE GROUP RIGHT NOW TRYING TO GET AN ELECTRONIC CIGARETTE TO FUNCTION AND BE SOMEWHAT BELIEVABLE ONSTAGE. WE’RE TRYING BUT NOW EVEN THE ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES…PEOPLE ARE LOOKING DOWN THEIR NOSE AT THEM SO IT’S A DIFFERENT WORLD…IT’S A CHALLENGE.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170029005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
91.6
Width
54.1
Description
WOOD BOARD WITH WHITE PAINTED BACKGROUND AND RED TEXT WITH YELLOW SHADOW READING “NOTICE” AND BLACK TEXT “AFTER YOUR REHEARSAL OR PERFORMANCE, PLEASE CLEAR THE STAGE AND RETURN EVERYTHING TO ITS PROPER PLACE. IF WE HAVE TO DO IT, THEN YOUR GROUP WILL BE CHARGED.” FRONT OF SIGN HAS BLACK PAINT SMEAR IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND LOWER LEFT CORNER; SIGN HAS PAINT STAINS ACROSS FRONT AND IS CHIPPED; SIGN HAS FOUR HOLES DRILLED IN EACH CORNER. BACK OF SIGN IS BROWN WITH WHITE PAINT SMEARS AND SPOTS, AND WHITE PAINT STAINING EDGES. BACK OF SIGN HAS GREY SPOTS STAINING AND LOWER EDGE OF SIGN SHOWS SIGNS OF WATER DAMAGER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE SIGN, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THAT WAS DONE BY OUR SIGN WRITER IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. WE HAD A REGULAR SIGN WRITER THAT DID THE…TRAFFIC SIGNS AND THINGS SUCH AS THAT. THEY USED TO PAINT THEM BUT THEY DON’T DO THAT ANYMORE OF COURSE. THEY USE THAT VINYL STUFF NOW. THAT SORT OF GIVES YOU AN IDEA – THAT SIGN THERE THAT SAYS 'AFTER YOUR REHEARSAL OR PERFORMANCE PLEASE CLEAR THE STAGE AND RETURN EVERYTHING TO ITS PROPER PLACE. IF WE HAVE TO DO IT, THEN YOUR GROUP WILL BE CHARGED.' WE WERE JUST SO DEPENDENT UPON VOLUNTEERS TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY DID THAT TYPE OF THING. WE COULDN’T HAVE OPERATED WITHOUT THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WERE THERE. THEY DID SO MUCH OF IT. IT HAS CHANGED LATELY, TOO, IT’S MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO FIND PEOPLE THAT ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO DO THAT. SIGN OF THE TIMES I THINK…” “[THAT SIGN] IS REMINISCENT OF THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WE HAD. IT REMINDS ME OF THEM.” “[VOLUNTEERS WERE] INVALUABLE. NO WAY THAT WE COULD OPERATE WITHOUT THEM. THE NUMBER OF HOURS THAT THEY PUT IN WAS PHENOMENAL. FOR INSTANCE IN MUSICAL THEATRE IT WOULD TAKE CLOSE TO A HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS TO MOUNT A PRODUCTION AND THAT WAS WITH NOBODY GETTING PAID.” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “THERE WAS AN ATTITUDE AT THE TIME OF ‘IT BEING JUST SO MUCH FUN TO BE INVOLVED’. ED’S FATHER USED TO COME OUT. HE WAS A CARPENTER BY TRADE AND HE JUST LOVED TO HELP. HIS MOTHER LOVED TO SEW COSTUMES AND THEY HAD THEIR LITTLE GROUP OF LADIES DOWN IN [THE] COSTUME ROOM MAKING COSTUMES. THE GUYS WOULD BUILD THE SET AND THEY WERE PART OF THEIR OWN LITTLE CREW. THERE WERE OTHERS THAT WERE KEEPING THINGS MOVING, STAGE MANAGERS, AND PEOPLE THAT WERE CUING. IT WAS JUST ALL A FUN THING TO DO. A LOT OF PEOPLE JUST WANT TO BE ON STAGE AND SING AND DANCE AND HEAR THE APPLAUSE AND IT’S WONDERFUL. IN THOSE YEARS WE WERE INVOLVED WITH MUSICAL THEATRE AND PLAYGOERS TO BE PART OF SOMETHING FUN TO GIVE TO THE AUDIENCE. THEY WOULD COME IN AND BUILD EVERYTHING, MAKE THE MESS, CLEAN UP THE MESS, LEAVE AND GO HOME FEELING GOOD ABOUT IT. TIMES HAVE CHANGED. ALL THEATRE GROUPS FOR EXAMPLE ARE SCRAMBLING RIGHT NOW BECAUSE OF THE YATES. THE YATES IS SO IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT’S A SMALLER THEATRE, BUT THEY’RE HAVING TO GO TO SCHOOLS AND THEY HAVE TO GO TO CHURCH BASEMENTS. THIS WAS A HOME FOR PEOPLE WHO LOVED THE ARTS AND IT WAS MUSIC AND DANCE…IT WAS GOOD.” “PEOPLE MADE LIFELONG FRIENDS - BECAUSE THEY HAD A PLACE TO GO.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE SIGN, “THIS WAS VERY RELEVANT. NEVER ENFORCED. IT’S THE JOY OF COMMUNITY THEATRE. YES, THE STAFF WANTS TO BE AS COST-EFFECTIVE AS POSSIBLE AND MAKE SURE THAT…IF TEN O’CLOCK COMES AND THEY LEAVE AND EVERYTHING NEEDS TO BE CLEANED UP, THE STAFF’S THERE FOR TWO MORE HOURS, THEY’LL BE BILLED BACK. TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, THAT’S NEVER BEEN ENFORCED BECAUSE IT IS COMMUNITY THEATRE, IT’S A COMMUNITY SPACE, AND EVERY PERSON THAT’S EVER WORKED IN THE YATES, THEIR HEART AND SOUL WAS THERE. IT WAS THERE TO DO WHAT’S RIGHT FOR THE COMMUNITY, SO I THINK IT WAS A STERN WARNING AND MOST OF US, BEING GOOD CANADIANS, FOLLOWED IT. I DON’T THINK IT WAS EVER ENFORCED. IT COULD HAVE BEEN AND THAT WAS THE THREAT.” “I DOUBT THIS WAS UP FIRST DAY. I COULD TELL YOU TALES ABOUT THE EARLY DAYS OF THEATRE WHERE…THE SHOW WOULD START AT EIGHT, BE DONE BY TEN THIRTY AND THEN WE WOULD DRINK AND SMOKE AND PLAY THE PIANO DOWN IN THE GREEN ROOM UNTIL THREE OR FOUR O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING. WE WERE A FAMILY, WE ALL LOVED AND TRUSTED EACH OTHER SO THERE WAS NEVER ANY FEAR THAT WE WERE GOING TO DAMAGE ANYTHING. I WISH PEOPLE WOULD SIGN THINGS ON THE BACK…SO YOU ALWAYS KNEW WHERE IT CAME FROM.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THIS BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS NOTED, “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, ON THE QUILT'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT", “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN. I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0284." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
202
Width
260
Description
PURPLE QUILT WITH DOUBLE WEDDING RING PATTERN ON FRONT; QUILT HAS MACHINE-STITCHED GRID OF 80 SQUARES. RINGS ARE INTERLOCKED AND MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-PATTERNED WITH YELLOW, BLUE, PINK, AND RED PRIMARY COLOURS IN RINGS. QUILT TOP IS HAND-STITCHED AND SEAMS ALONG EDGES ARE MACHINE-STITCHED. BACK OF QUILT HAS LIGHTER PURPLE SECTIONS IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. EDGES ARE FRAYED; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS LOOSE STUFFING EXPOSED FROM INSIDE, STUFFING IS WOOL. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS INTERIOR FABRIC EXPOSED AND IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “[MOM] WAS ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING, ’CAUSE SHE COULDN’T SIT DOWN IDLY. SHE HAD TO BE CROCHETING, OR EMBROIDERING OR MAKING QUILTS.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “[IT WAS MADE IN THE] ‘60S, MAYBE EVEN THE ‘70S.” “WHEN I FIRST MET [KATHERINE], I CAN REMEMBER COMING INTO THE HOUSE AND SHE WAS SITTING AT THE OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE. THAT THING WAS JUST [GOING] AND THAT’S WHAT SHE WAS DOING, WAS JUST PIECING PIECES OF MATERIAL TOGETHER.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
187.5
Width
147
Description
QUILT TOP WITH GRID OF 20 SQUARES; EACH SQUARE HAS A PATCHWORK FAN BLOCK MADE OF ASSORTED PATTERNED FABRICS. QUILT TOP IS HANDSTICHED WITH UNFINISHED EDGES. QUILT BACKING IS PATCHWORK WITH BLACK AND WHITE SQUARES; BACKING SQUARE IN THE SECOND COLUMN AND THE 12TH SQUARE DOWN HAS BLACK TEXT ON WHITE FABRIC, “CRANE LIMITED; AT POINT OF MAILING; VALVES, FITTINGS, PUMPS, FABRICATED PIPE, HEATING AND PLUMBING MATERIALS”. QUILT HAS MINOR STAINING ON FRONT AND ALONG TOP EGDE; EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT HAS RIP BELOW CENTER SQUARE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE FAN BLOCK QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “[THE QUILT BACKING IS] FLOUR SACKS…OR SUGAR SACKS, THEY ALL [CAME] IN WHITE SACKS.” GLORIA BETTS ADDED, “[SHE PROBABLY PUT A BACKING ON THIS QUILT TOP] BECAUSE USUALLY, EVEN TODAY IN QUILTING, THE FANS ARE DONE ON A BACKING BECAUSE EVERYTHING ON THE PIECES IS ON A BIAS SO IT STRETCHES. SO IT’S PUT ONTO A BACKING. BUT THE BACKING ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE BEING EITHER THE FLOUR SACKS OR THE SUGAR SACKS, TO ME, MADE IT UNIQUE.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE. [WE CHOSE THE FAN QUILT TOP] PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE BACKING ON IT. A LOT OF THE TIME, IN THE OLD DAYS, THAT’S WHAT THEY DID, THEY PUT [QUILT TOPS] ON A BACKING.” “ON THE FAN [QUILT], [LUCY WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] IDENTIFIED FABRICS THAT WERE BACK TO THE EARLY 1900S. ONE SHE THINKS MIGHT BE BACK INTO THE LATE 1800S WHICH WAS PROBABLY A DRESS THAT [KATHERINE] GOT SOMEWHERE. THE BLUE BACKED ONE, THEY FOUND THERE WERE STILL PINS LEFT INSIDE THE QUILT AND THEY LEFT THEM THERE BECAUSE THEY SAID TO TAKE THEM OUT WOULD DAMAGE THE FABRIC. THEY WERE IMPRESSED WITH THE WORKMANSHIP ON THAT…ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PUT TOGETHER FROM A DESIGN DRAWN ON NEWSPAPER.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS' QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0286." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
215.4
Width
165
Description
QUILT TOP WITH EIGHT POINT STAR PATTERN IN 48 SQUARE GRID; QUILT TOP HAS BLUE TRIM ALONG EDGES AND BETWEEN SQUARES; EIGHT POINT STARS FASHIONED FROM MULTICOLOURED AND PATTERNED FABRICS. RIGHT EDGE HAS TWO SQUARES MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE AND ONE SQUARE WITH RIPPED BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE; LEFT EDGE HAS SQUARE MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE. UPPER LEFT CORNER HAS THREE SEAMS SEWN IN BLUE TRIM. STARS IN SQUARES HANDSTITCHED; SQUARES ATTACHED WITH MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS; MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS ATTACHING SQUARES TO BLUE TRIM AND EDGES. EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT TOP HAS NO BACKING AND THREADS ARE EXPOSED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE EIGHT-POINT STAR QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.1
Width
9.5
Description
WOOD DIRECTIONAL SIGN WITH SIX TRIANGULAR POINTS CARVED AT HORIZONTAL ENDS; SIGN HAS STENCILED CREAM-COLOURED TEXT PAINTED ON FRONT, “300 – 307” WITH LINE PAINTED UNDER TEXT; LINE HAS LOWER HALF OF AN ARROW HEAD PAINTED AT END UNDER “300”. SIGN HAS TWO HOLES CARVED BESIDE “300” AND “307” FOR HANGING THE SIGN. BACK OF SIGN IS UNPAINTED. CARVED POINTS AT ENDS ARE CHIPPING AND PEELING; FRONT SHOWS WEAR AROUND CARVED HOLES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
ON JUNE 19, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RAY DJUFF REGARDING THE DONATION OF A PAIR OF SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA. ON THE SIGN, DJUFF ELABORATED, “[I CHOSE TO GIVE CHRIS MORRISON THE SIGN] INDICATING THE HALLWAY WITH ROOMS 300 TO 307 [BECAUSE] IT JUST LOOKED LIKE A GOOD SIGN. SOME OF THEM WERE A LITTLE MORE WORN THAN OTHERS AND I WANTED [TO] TRY AND PICK ONES THAT WERE IN REASONABLE CONDITION OR BETTER CONDITION…THE DIRECTION SIGNS ARE PRETTY WELL THE SAME.” “THE [SIGNS] ALL ORIGINAL TO THE OPERATION OF THE HOTEL. THE SIGNS DATE FROM 1957…THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS BUILT BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY, AND IN 1957, THE RAILWAY WAS LOOKING TO GET RID OF ITS HOTEL COLLECTION IN BOTH GLACIER AND WATERTON AND, IN THAT DRIVE, IT LEASED THE HOTELS. THIS WOULD INCLUDE GLACIER PARK LODGE, MANY GLACIER HOTEL, LAKE MCDONALD LODGE, THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF MOTOR INNS IN GLACIER PARK; THAT’S GLACIER NATIONAL PARK IN MONTANA. IT LEASED THE WHOLE KIT AND CABOODLE TO DONALD KNUTSON, A BUILDER AND HOTELIER OUT OF MINNESOTA. THE IDEA WAS THAT MR. KNUTSON WOULD UPDATE AND UPGRADE THE HOTELS WHICH WERE PRETTY WELL ORIGINAL FROM WHEN EACH OF THEM HAD BEEN BUILT, DATING FROM 1913 TO 1927.” “THESE SIGNS WERE INSTALLED AT THAT TIME TO MODERNIZE THE LOOK, AND THE HOTELS ALL TOOK ON A VERY DISTINCT 1950S, MID-CENTURY, MODERN LOOK…THE ROOM SIGNS I FOUND PARTICULARLY INTERESTING BECAUSE, AT EACH ONE OF THE HOTELS, THERE WAS A SIMILAR SHIELD SIGN THAT WAS USED. BUT ON EACH ONE, THERE WAS A DIFFERENT SYMBOL REPRESENTING THE HOTEL AND THIS WAS PART OF THE MARKETING CAMPAIGN THAT DONALD KNUTSON CAME UP WITH.” “[THIS SIGN] THAT YOU HAVE…ONE INDICATING ROOMS ON THE THIRD FLOOR, 300 TO 307, [IS] PRETTY STANDARD OF WHAT THEY DID AT THE TIME. RUSTIC-LOOKING, A LITTLE BIT, BUT STILL, VERY MID-CENTURY. IT’S INTERESTING, THE ONE INDICATING ROOMS DOWN THE HALLWAY, BECAUSE IT’S OBVIOUSLY A STENCIL WHERE THE OTHERS ARE WELL LETTERED; HAND-LETTERED, ALL HAND-DRAWN.” DJUFF RECALLED THE ACQUISITION OF THE SIGNS, STATING, “I WAS AT THE HOTEL IN LATE MAY, 2019. I WAS DOING A PRESENTATION FOR THE HOTEL STAFF ON THE HISTORY OF THE HOTEL, AND THE MANAGER OF THE HOTEL, CHRIS CAULFIELD…INDICATED THAT THE SIGNAGE WAS BEING CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL BECAUSE THE COMPANY THAT OWNS THE HOTEL [GLACIER PARK COLLECTION BY PURSUIT] WAS STANDARDIZING THE SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE COMPANY. THEREFORE, THESE WERE TAKEN DOWN AND AT THE TIME, HE INDICATED THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HOTEL IN THE REPAIRMAN’S OFFICE AND IF I WISHED TO HELP MYSELF TO THEM, GO AHEAD.” “I [TOOK THE SIGNS] FOR A COUPLE OF REASONS. ONE WAS TO PRESERVE THE SIGNS. I WAS FEARFUL, AS I’VE SEEN HAPPEN IN OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES, SIGNS WOULD SIMPLY BE DISPOSED OF AND NO RECORD OF THEM WOULD BE KEPT OTHER THAN MAYBE IN A PHOTOGRAPH. I HAD PERSONAL REASONS AS WELL. SINCE I’D WORKED AT THE HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS…THIS WAS THE SIGNAGE THAT WAS IN PLACE AT THAT TIME AND IT CAPTURED A LITTLE BIT OF PERSONAL MEMORY FOR ME.” “I KNOW THAT WHEN KNUTSON DID THE RENOVATIONS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN THE ‘50S…MANY THINGS GOT THROWN OUT AND SOME ITEMS OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE. IN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL DINING ROOM…[THERE] WERE DRAWINGS BY JOHN FERY, AN ARTIST WHO HAD BEEN HIRED BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY, IN 1910, 1911, 1912, TO PAINT SCENES OF GLACIER NATIONAL PARK. WHEN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS OPENED, FERY WAS BROUGHT IN TO AGAIN PAINT SCENES AND THESE WERE MOUNTED ON THE WALL IN THE DINING ROOM. MOST OF THOSE SCENES WERE SIMPLY CUT OFF THE WALL WITH AN EXACT-O-KNIFE AND, TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, WERE THROWN OUT OR TAKEN BY A FEW OF THE STAFF OR OTHER PEOPLE. I’VE SEEN ONE OF THOSE IMAGES AND I KNOW WHERE IT WAS.” “I KNEW THOSE GOT THROWN OUT. I KNEW IN LATER RENOVATIONS, OTHER ITEMS WERE SIMPLY DISPOSED OF, SO THAT’S MY MOTIVATION IN LATCHING ONTO THESE. THEY’RE SMALL ITEMS BUT INDICATIVE OF AN ERA, AND HAVING BEEN AT THE HOTEL FOR MORE THAN HALF ITS LIFE.” “I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT [THE ORIGINAL 1927-28 SIGNS WOULD] LOOK LIKE. THERE ARE VERY FEW PICTURES OF PARTS OF THE INTERIOR OF THE HOTEL FROM THOSE EARLY YEARS...IF I HAD MY DRUTHERS, I WOULD PREFER THAT THESE WOULD HAVE STAYED THERE, MAYBE SOME COULD HAVE BEEN UPDATED…I KNOW THAT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, WHICH IS NOW UNDER THE CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES, THAT THERE HAS BEEN A PUSH TO PRESERVE THIS SORT OF SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL IN RECOGNITION THAT IT IS PART OF AN ERA IN THE OWNERSHIP OF THE HOTEL.” “I UNDERSTAND THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION OR OWNERS, AND EVEN GREAT NORTHERN AT THE TIME, LOOKING TO HAVE THE HOTELS RENOVATED TO MAKE THEM SELLABLE…IT’S ALSO UNDERSTANDABLE, HAVING WORKED THERE IN THE 1970S AT…THE PRINCE OF WALES, SOME OF THE THINGS WE FACED FROM CUSTOMERS WHO WERE WALKING IN, LOOKING AT THE HOTEL ROOMS AND BALKING BECAUSE THEY HAD COME TO EXPECT A CERTAIN LEVEL OF FURNISHING AT A HOTEL AND JUST SERVICES OFFERED, AND WHEN YOU WALK INTO A ROOM AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL NOW, WE APPRECIATE IT FOR ITS HISTORIC VALUE. BACK IN THE ‘50S AND ‘70S, PEOPLE WERE WALKING IN SAYING, ‘THIS JUST LOOKS LIKE AN OLD, CRAPPY ROOM. WHY AM I PAYING GOOD MONEY, EVEN IF IT IS A RESORT, FOR SOMETHING THAT IS SUBSTANDARD IN WHAT I CAN GET AT A MORE MODERN HOTEL?’ SOME OF THE UPGRADES WERE CERTAINLY NECESSARY. I’M GLAD THEY WERE DONE TO KEEP THE HOTEL FUNCTIONAL, ONGOING, AND I WON’T NECESSARILY SAY A PROFITABLE VENTURE BUT CERTAINLY ENOUGH THAT NO ONE WANTED TO TEAR IT DOWN OR REPLACE IT.” ON HIS TIME WORKING WITH THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, DJUFF SHARED, “I WORKED AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS, 1973, ’74, ’75, AND ’78, AND MY APPRECIATION OF THE HOTEL REALLY STARTED THAT FIRST SUMMER. MY INITIAL POSITION WAS AS A BUSBOY, AND I DIDN’T QUITE KNOW WHAT THE POSITION WAS. I SIMPLY ACCEPTED IT WAS IN A NATIONAL PARK, IT WAS IN THE ROCKIES…I’D SPENT A SUMMER IN BANFF IN 1970 AND I JUST WANT TO BE BACK IN THE MOUNTAINS SO I TOOK THE POSITION. DIDN’T MATTER WHAT IT WAS, I GOT A POSITION AT THE HOTEL.” “THEY REQUIRED US TO WORK A TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFT IN THE DINING ROOM. YOU WOULD OPEN UP AT EIGHT IN THE MORNING AND SERVE BREAKFAST UNTIL ABOUT TEN. IT WOULD SHUT DOWN, YOU’D GO BACK TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK, HAVE LUNCH, OPEN UP AT NOON, DINING ROOM IS CLOSED AT 1:30, YOU MIGHT HAVE DUTIES IN THE AFTERNOON—ADDITIONAL ONES—OTHERWISE YOU RETURN TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK UP, EAT DINNER AND THEN OPEN THE DINING ROOM AT SIX AND IT WAS OPEN UNTIL ABOUT 8:30…IT WAS TIRING, IT WAS EXHAUSTING, IT WAS HARD WORK. BEING A BUSBOY, YOU’RE A GRUNT.” “I WAS FORTUNATE IN THAT ONE OF THE BARTENDERS WAS NEW AT THE HOTEL, THE OTHER WAS THE MORE SENIOR ONE AND HE’D BEEN THERE ALMOST TEN YEARS. THE NEW BARTENDER WASN’T WORKING OUT WELL, AND THE SENIOR BARTENDER SAW POTENTIAL IN ME, ALTHOUGH I’D NEVER SERVED ALCOHOL IN MY LIFE. AFTER MY TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFTS, I STARTED TRAINING OVER THERE AND I WOULD CONTINUE WORKING UNTIL MIDNIGHT…I SWITCHED POSITIONS WITH THE BARTENDER. HE BECAME A BUSBOY, EVENTUALLY A WAITER. I BECAME A BARTENDER AND IT TURNED MY LIFE AROUND BECAUSE THEN I WAS WORKING A SINGLE SHIFT; BETTER CONDITIONS. I WAS EARNING TIPS—WHICH ENHANCED MY SAVINGS TO RETURN TO UNIVERSITY, PAY FOR MY EDUCATION—AND THE INTERACTION WITH CUSTOMERS IS WHAT MADE THE JOB PHENOMENAL, FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE FACT THE WINDSOR LOUNGE AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL LOOKS SOUTH DOWN UPPER WATERTON LAKE AND IS ONE OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE VIEWS IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES.” “THERE’S AN EXPRESSION A FRIEND OF MINE HAS, AND HE’S TALKING ABOUT GLACIER NATIONAL PARK ACROSS THE BORDER FROM WATERTON, BUT IT APPLIES TO WATERTON AS WELL. THE EXPRESSION IS, ‘WHEN THE GLACIER BUG BITES YOU, THERE IS NO CURE,’ AND THE WATERTON BUG BIT ME. THERE IS NO CURE. I’VE BEEN GOING BACK FOR FOUR DECADES MORE AND I CAN’T GET ENOUGH. I WANT[ED] TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HOTEL, KEPT DOING RESEARCH, IT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE PUBLICATION OF A NUMBER OF BOOKS RELATED TO WATERTON AND GLACIER, AND I CONTINUED GOING BACK AND I CONTINUE DOING RESEARCH AND THE FASCINATION HASN’T ENDED.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE SIGNS, DJUFF NOTED, “THERE WERE TWO THOUGHTS IN MIND. THE FIRST WAS THAT I WAS ABLE TO ACQUIRE A NUMBER OF THESE SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, AND I HAD MORE THAN I NEEDED. IN FACT, I TOOK THESE ADDITIONAL ONES WITH THE IDEA OF SHARING THEM WITH MY WRITING PARTNER AND CO-CREATOR, CHRIS MORRISON, OF LETHBRIDGE, AND ALSO, WATERTON. SO, I PICKED SOME OUT AND GAVE HER SOME THAT I THOUGHT SHE MIGHT ENJOY AND SHE DECIDED SHE DIDN’T NEED MORE PHYSICAL THINGS IN HER LIFE. [SHE] APPRECIATED THE OFFER, AND TOLD ME SHE WAS GOING TO DONATE THEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHICH I AM INCREDIBLY HAPPY ABOUT; THAT THEY’RE PRESERVED IN A MORE PERMANENT WAY THAN JUST IN OUR POSSESSION.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND INFORMATION ON THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL SIGNAGE REBRANDING, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190025001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190025001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190025002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.7
Width
15.2
Description
HARDWOOD/FIBERBOARD SIGN, FRONT PAINTED WHITE WITH A BLACK CROWN ABOVE RED ITALICIZED TEXT, “214”. SIGN FASHIONED IN THE SHAPE OF A SHIELD; SIGN HAS TWO HOLES DRILLED IN UPPER CORNERS AND HOLE DRILLED IN LOWER POINT OF SHIELD. BACK OF SIGN IS BROW WITH TEXTURED-LEATHER APPEARANCE; BACK IS STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
ON JUNE 19, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RAY DJUFF REGARDING THE DONATION OF A PAIR OF SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA. ON THE SIGN, DJUFF ELABORATED, “[THE ROOM DOOR SIGNS WERE THE] SAME SIZE, SAME SHAPE…THE SAME CROWN ON EACH ONE…THERE’S NO WORDING, WHATSOEVER. THEY JUST HAD A CROWN ON THEM…214 WAS JUST A NUMBER THAT STRUCK ME; NO PARTICULAR MEANING FOR THE HOTEL.” “EACH ROOM SIGN HAD A CROWN ON IT INDICATING ROYALTY AND THE NAME, ‘PRINCE OF WALES’, REFERRING TO THE PRINCE OF WALES OF BOTH ENGLAND AND CANADA. AT GLACIER PARK LODGE, EACH HOTEL ROOM HAD A SILHOUETTE OF A NATIVE AMERICAN HEAD—WITH LIKE A WAR BONNET ON. AT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, THE SYMBOL WAS A SWISS CROSS AND THE THEME THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL WAS SWISS. AT GLACIER PARK LODGE, THE THEME WAS NATIVE AMERICAN/WESTERN WRANGLER OR COWBOY AND, IN PART, A REFLECTION OF THE POPULARITY OF…THE COWBOY GENRE BOTH ON T.V. AND IN THE MOVIES DURING THAT ERA. THAT WAS PART OF THE MARKETING THAT THEY DID. IF YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT LETTERHEAD OF THE HOTEL COMPANY DURING THAT TIME, WHEN KNUTSON HAD THE HOTELS AS A LEASE, FROM ’57 TO ’59, YOU WILL SEE THOSE SYMBOLS USED ON THE LETTERHEAD, KIND OF INDICATING THE FOUR, PRIMARY HOTELS.” “THE ROOM SIGNS [HAVE A] SMALL, INTERESTING DIFFERENCE WHICH IS, ALL THE ROOM SIGNS…FOR THE FIFTH FLOOR TO THE SECOND FLOOR…THE NUMERALS ARE ALL IN ITALICS. THE NUMERALS FOR THE SIXTH FLOOR ROOMS ARE ALL UPRIGHT, NOT LEANING, AND THOSE WERE DONE AFTER THE ORIGINAL SIGNS WERE PUT IN, WHEN THOSE ROOMS BECAME AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL. THEY HAD TO RECREATE THE SIGNS THEY INSTALLED LOWER DOWN IN THE HOTEL.” “THE [SIGNS ARE] ALL ORIGINAL TO THE OPERATION OF THE HOTEL. THE SIGNS DATE FROM 1957…THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS BUILT BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY, AND IN 1957, THE RAILWAY WAS LOOKING TO GET RID OF ITS HOTEL COLLECTION IN BOTH GLACIER AND WATERTON AND, IN THAT DRIVE, IT LEASED THE HOTELS. THIS WOULD INCLUDE GLACIER PARK LODGE, MANY GLACIER HOTEL, LAKE MCDONALD LODGE, THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF MOTOR INNS IN GLACIER PARK; THAT’S GLACIER NATIONAL PARK IN MONTANA. IT LEASED THE WHOLE KIT AND CABOODLE TO DONALD KNUTSON, A BUILDER AND HOTELIER OUT OF MINNESOTA. THE IDEA WAS THAT MR. KNUTSON WOULD UPDATE AND UPGRADE THE HOTELS WHICH WERE PRETTY WELL ORIGINAL FROM WHEN EACH OF THEM HAD BEEN BUILT, DATING FROM 1913 TO 1927.” “THESE SIGNS WERE INSTALLED AT THAT TIME TO MODERNIZE THE LOOK, AND THE HOTELS ALL TOOK ON A VERY DISTINCT 1950S, MID-CENTURY, MODERN LOOK…THE ROOM SIGNS I FOUND PARTICULARLY INTERESTING BECAUSE, AT EACH ONE OF THE HOTELS, THERE WAS A SIMILAR SHIELD SIGN THAT WAS USED. BUT ON EACH ONE, THERE WAS A DIFFERENT SYMBOL REPRESENTING THE HOTEL AND THIS WAS PART OF THE MARKETING CAMPAIGN THAT DONALD KNUTSON CAME UP WITH.” DJUFF RECALLED THE ACQUISITION OF THE SIGNS, STATING, “I WAS AT THE HOTEL IN LATE MAY, 2019. I WAS DOING A PRESENTATION FOR THE HOTEL STAFF ON THE HISTORY OF THE HOTEL, AND THE MANAGER OF THE HOTEL, CHRIS CAULFIELD…INDICATED THAT THE SIGNAGE WAS BEING CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL BECAUSE THE COMPANY THAT OWNS THE HOTEL [GLACIER PARK COLLECTION BY PURSUIT] WAS STANDARDIZING THE SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE COMPANY. THEREFORE, THESE WERE TAKEN DOWN AND AT THE TIME, HE INDICATED THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HOTEL IN THE REPAIRMAN’S OFFICE AND IF I WISHED TO HELP MYSELF TO THEM, GO AHEAD.” “I [TOOK THE SIGNS] FOR A COUPLE OF REASONS. ONE WAS TO PRESERVE THE SIGNS. I WAS FEARFUL, AS I’VE SEEN HAPPEN IN OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES, SIGNS WOULD SIMPLY BE DISPOSED OF AND NO RECORD OF THEM WOULD BE KEPT OTHER THAN MAYBE IN A PHOTOGRAPH. I HAD PERSONAL REASONS AS WELL. SINCE I’D WORKED AT THE HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS…THIS WAS THE SIGNAGE THAT WAS IN PLACE AT THAT TIME AND IT CAPTURED A LITTLE BIT OF PERSONAL MEMORY FOR ME.” “I KNOW THAT WHEN KNUTSON DID THE RENOVATIONS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN THE ‘50S…MANY THINGS GOT THROWN OUT AND SOME ITEMS OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE. IN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL DINING ROOM…[THERE] WERE DRAWINGS BY JOHN FERY, AN ARTIST WHO HAD BEEN HIRED BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY, IN 1910, 1911, 1912, TO PAINT SCENES OF GLACIER NATIONAL PARK. WHEN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS OPENED, FERY WAS BROUGHT IN TO AGAIN PAINT SCENES AND THESE WERE MOUNTED ON THE WALL IN THE DINING ROOM. MOST OF THOSE SCENES WERE SIMPLY CUT OFF THE WALL WITH AN EXACT-O-KNIFE AND, TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, WERE THROWN OUT OR TAKEN BY A FEW OF THE STAFF OR OTHER PEOPLE. I’VE SEEN ONE OF THOSE IMAGES AND I KNOW WHERE IT WAS.” “I KNEW THOSE GOT THROWN OUT. I KNEW IN LATER RENOVATIONS, OTHER ITEMS WERE SIMPLY DISPOSED OF, SO THAT’S MY MOTIVATION IN LATCHING ONTO THESE. THEY’RE SMALL ITEMS BUT INDICATIVE OF AN ERA, AND HAVING BEEN AT THE HOTEL FOR MORE THAN HALF ITS LIFE.” “I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT [THE ORIGINAL 1927-28 SIGNS WOULD] LOOK LIKE. THERE ARE VERY FEW PICTURES OF PARTS OF THE INTERIOR OF THE HOTEL FROM THOSE EARLY YEARS…I KNOW THAT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, WHICH IS NOW UNDER THE CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES, THAT THERE HAS BEEN A PUSH TO PRESERVE THIS SORT OF SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL IN RECOGNITION THAT IT IS PART OF AN ERA IN THE OWNERSHIP OF THE HOTEL.” “I UNDERSTAND THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION OR OWNERS, AND EVEN GREAT NORTHERN AT THE TIME, LOOKING TO HAVE THE HOTELS RENOVATED TO MAKE THEM SELLABLE…IT’S ALSO UNDERSTANDABLE, HAVING WORKED THERE IN THE 1970S AT…THE PRINCE OF WALES, SOME OF THE THINGS WE FACED FROM CUSTOMERS WHO WERE WALKING IN, LOOKING AT THE HOTEL ROOMS AND BALKING BECAUSE THEY HAD COME TO EXPECT A CERTAIN LEVEL OF FURNISHING AT A HOTEL AND JUST SERVICES OFFERED, AND WHEN YOU WALK INTO A ROOM AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL NOW, WE APPRECIATE IT FOR ITS HISTORIC VALUE. BACK IN THE ‘50S AND ‘70S, PEOPLE WERE WALKING IN SAYING, ‘THIS JUST LOOKS LIKE AN OLD, CRAPPY ROOM. WHY AM I PAYING GOOD MONEY, EVEN IF IT IS A RESORT, FOR SOMETHING THAT IS SUBSTANDARD IN WHAT I CAN GET AT A MORE MODERN HOTEL?’ SOME OF THE UPGRADES WERE CERTAINLY NECESSARY. I’M GLAD THEY WERE DONE TO KEEP THE HOTEL FUNCTIONAL, ONGOING, AND I WON’T NECESSARILY SAY A PROFITABLE VENTURE BUT CERTAINLY ENOUGH THAT NO ONE WANTED TO TEAR IT DOWN OR REPLACE IT.” ON HIS TIME WORKING WITH THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, DJUFF SHARED, “I WORKED AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS, 1973, ’74, ’75, AND ’78, AND MY APPRECIATION OF THE HOTEL REALLY STARTED THAT FIRST SUMMER. MY INITIAL POSITION WAS AS A BUSBOY, AND I DIDN’T QUITE KNOW WHAT THE POSITION WAS. I SIMPLY ACCEPTED IT WAS IN A NATIONAL PARK, IT WAS IN THE ROCKIES…I’D SPENT A SUMMER IN BANFF IN 1970 AND I JUST WANT TO BE BACK IN THE MOUNTAINS SO I TOOK THE POSITION. DIDN’T MATTER WHAT IT WAS, I GOT A POSITION AT THE HOTEL.” “THEY REQUIRED US TO WORK A TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFT IN THE DINING ROOM. YOU WOULD OPEN UP AT EIGHT IN THE MORNING AND SERVE BREAKFAST UNTIL ABOUT TEN. IT WOULD SHUT DOWN, YOU’D GO BACK TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK, HAVE LUNCH, OPEN UP AT NOON, DINING ROOM IS CLOSED AT 1:30, YOU MIGHT HAVE DUTIES IN THE AFTERNOON—ADDITIONAL ONES—OTHERWISE YOU RETURN TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK UP, EAT DINNER AND THEN OPEN THE DINING ROOM AT SIX AND IT WAS OPEN UNTIL ABOUT 8:30…IT WAS TIRING, IT WAS EXHAUSTING, IT WAS HARD WORK. BEING A BUSBOY, YOU’RE A GRUNT.” “I WAS FORTUNATE IN THAT ONE OF THE BARTENDERS WAS NEW AT THE HOTEL, THE OTHER WAS THE MORE SENIOR ONE AND HE’D BEEN THERE ALMOST TEN YEARS. THE NEW BARTENDER WASN’T WORKING OUT WELL, AND THE SENIOR BARTENDER SAW POTENTIAL IN ME, ALTHOUGH I’D NEVER SERVED ALCOHOL IN MY LIFE. AFTER MY TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFTS, I STARTED TRAINING OVER THERE AND I WOULD CONTINUE WORKING UNTIL MIDNIGHT…I SWITCHED POSITIONS WITH THE BARTENDER. HE BECAME A BUSBOY, EVENTUALLY A WAITER. I BECAME A BARTENDER AND IT TURNED MY LIFE AROUND BECAUSE THEN I WAS WORKING A SINGLE SHIFT; BETTER CONDITIONS. I WAS EARNING TIPS—WHICH ENHANCED MY SAVINGS TO RETURN TO UNIVERSITY, PAY FOR MY EDUCATION—AND THE INTERACTION WITH CUSTOMERS IS WHAT MADE THE JOB PHENOMENAL, FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE FACT THE WINDSOR LOUNGE AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL LOOKS SOUTH DOWN UPPER WATERTON LAKE AND IS ONE OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE VIEWS IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES.” “THERE’S AN EXPRESSION A FRIEND OF MINE HAS, AND HE’S TALKING ABOUT GLACIER NATIONAL PARK ACROSS THE BORDER FROM WATERTON, BUT IT APPLIES TO WATERTON AS WELL. THE EXPRESSION IS, ‘WHEN THE GLACIER BUG BITES YOU, THERE IS NO CURE,’ AND THE WATERTON BUG BIT ME. THERE IS NO CURE. I’VE BEEN GOING BACK FOR FOUR DECADES MORE AND I CAN’T GET ENOUGH. I WANT[ED] TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HOTEL, KEPT DOING RESEARCH, IT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE PUBLICATION OF A NUMBER OF BOOKS RELATED TO WATERTON AND GLACIER, AND I CONTINUED GOING BACK AND I CONTINUE DOING RESEARCH AND THE FASCINATION HASN’T ENDED.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE SIGNS, DJUFF NOTED, “THERE WERE TWO THOUGHTS IN MIND. THE FIRST WAS THAT I WAS ABLE TO ACQUIRE A NUMBER OF THESE SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, AND I HAD MORE THAN I NEEDED. IN FACT, I TOOK THESE ADDITIONAL ONES WITH THE IDEA OF SHARING THEM WITH MY WRITING PARTNER AND CO-CREATOR, CHRIS MORRISON, OF LETHBRIDGE, AND ALSO, WATERTON. SO, I PICKED SOME OUT AND GAVE HER SOME THAT I THOUGHT SHE MIGHT ENJOY AND SHE DECIDED SHE DIDN’T NEED MORE PHYSICAL THINGS IN HER LIFE. [SHE] APPRECIATED THE OFFER, AND TOLD ME SHE WAS GOING TO DONATE THEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHICH I AM INCREDIBLY HAPPY ABOUT; THAT THEY’RE PRESERVED IN A MORE PERMANENT WAY THAN JUST IN OUR POSSESSION.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND INFORMATION ON THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL SIGNAGE REBRANDING, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190025001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190025002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Date
1945
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
214
Width
168.5
Description
BLUE AND PINK QUILT WITH PATTERN OF 56 PINK DIAMONDS INTERLAID WITH BLUE DIAMONDS; PINK FABRIC DIAMONDS HAVE NAMES EMBROIDERED IN BLUE THREAD, LISTED BELOW. BLUE DIAMONDS HAVE AN EMBROIDERED FOUR PETAL DESIGN STITCHED IN FABRIC. QUILT HAS BLUE EMBROIDERED TEXT ON TWO CENTER DIAMONDS, “1945” AND “RED CROSS”. QUILT HAS FINISHED EDGES WITH PINK BORDERS. QUILT HAS FRAYING AND LOSS ON UPPER RIGHT EDGE; FABRIC AND EMBROIDERED TEXT IS FADED; QUILT HAS MINOR BROWN STAIN ON BACK AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. EMBROIDERED NAMES ON FRONT OF QUILT [ALPHABETICAL]: ANNAND, ASHMAN, BAILEY, BAKER, BARNES, BELL, BURNS, CARLSON, CARNELL, CHAMBERS, CHRISTIANSEN, CYNCH, DAYMON, DELANY, DEVEBER, DICKSON, DILATUSH, FALLON, FOSTER, GAIRNS, GIDDIE, GLADSTONE, GOBLE, GOING, GREGORY, HAGGLUND, HARRISON, HARWOOD, HATFIELD, HAUG, HINTON, HOLROYD, KEMMIS, KLOPPENBORG, MATKIN, MCEWEN, MCKENZIE, O’BRAY, PITTAWAY, PRESLEY, RACKETTE, REEVES, ROPER, SHERMAN, STEWART, STRATE, THOMAS, UDELL, WACHER, ZORN.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
THE WATERTON PARK RED CROSS QUILT WAS CREATED BY WATERTON FAMILIES DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND WAS EMBROIDERED WITH THE SURNAMES OF WATERTON RESIDENTS LIVING IN THE PARK DURING THE HOMEFRONT PERIOD. THE QUILT FEATURES 50 NAMES EMBROIDERED ON THE SURFACE, ALL SURNAMES OF WATERTON FAMILIES IN THE COMMUNITY DURING WORLD WAR 2 ACCORDING TO BERT PITTAWAY IN A LETTER TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION. THE QUILT WAS PART OF A RED CROSS SOCIETY INITIATIVE THAT SAW GLOBAL AND CANADIAN COMMUNITIES CREATE QUITS FOR SENDING OVERSEAS AND FOR RAISING FUNDS FOR THE RED CROSS. ACCORDING TO ONLINE INFORMATION FROM HALIFAX WOMEN’S HISTORY [HTTP://HALIFAXWOMENSHISTORY.CA/CANADIAN-COMFORT-QUILTS] AND ACTIVE HISTORY [HTTP://ACTIVEHISTORY.CA/2017/07/RED-CROSSES-AND-WHITE-COTTON-MEMORY-AND-MEANING-IN-FIRST-WORLD-WAR-QUILTS/], RED CROSS QUILTS WERE COMMONLY CREATED BY CANADIAN COMMUNITIES AS CIVILIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO WAR EFFORTS DURING BOTH WORLD WARS. THE QUILTS WERE SENT TO THE RED CROSS FOR DISTRIBUTION TO FAMILIES DISPLACED BY THE WAR OVERSEAS AND TO REFUGEES; QUILTS WERE ALSO RAFFLED PUBLICLY IN COMMUNITIES TO RAISE FUNDS FOR QUILTING GROUPS AND THE RED CROSS. THE WATERTON QUILT WAS RAFFLED IN 1945 AND WON BY MARY PITTAWAY OF WATERTON. BERT PITTAWAY DONATED THE QUILT TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION FOR DISPLAY AT THE WATERTON HERITAGE CENTRE IN THE 1980S, IN MEMORY OF BERT’S PARENTS MARY AND JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY. JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY, FATHER OF JACK, BERTRAM, AND DENNIS PITTAWAY, BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER AS AN ARMY TRUMPETER IN AN IRISH MILITIA UNIT. J.E. PITTAWAY JOINED THE REGULAR ARMY IN NOVEMBER 1893, SERVING IN WORLD WAR 1 AND WORLD WAR 2, IN WORLD WAR 2 ACHIEIVING THE RANK OF BATTERY SERGEANT MAJOR. J.E. PITTAWAY MOVED TO WATERTON IN 1927 FROM IRELAND. J.E. PITTAWAY WORKED FOR THE PARKS DEPARTMENT AS A GARDENER AND THEN AS A CAMPGROUND CARETAKER. J.E. PITTAWAY DIED MARCH 13, 1956, WITH HIS FINAL TRIBUTE IN CALGARY ON MARCH 17, 1956. ACCORDING TO THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, MEMORY OF THE WARS WERE “…INSCRIBED ON LANDFORMS IN PLACE NAMES…AND THE CELEBRATION OF PEACE WAS GIVEN SYMBOLIC FORM IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK IN 1932.” WATERTON NATIONAL PARK FEATURES LAKES, RIDGES, AND PEAKS NAMED WITH REFERENCES TO THE WORLD WARS, INCLUDING AVION RIDGE, FESTUBERT MOUNTAIN, AND MOUNT ALDERSON. IN 2017, THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION DISSOLVED AND REPRESENTATIVES FROM WATERTON LAKES PARK FACILITATED THE TRANSFER OF THE COLLECTIONS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS. THE 1945 WATERTON QUILT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AS PART OF THE EFFORTS TO RE-HOME THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION’S COLLECTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE LETTER FROM BERT PITTAWAY, DONATION NOTES FROM THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION, INFORMATION FROM THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON LAKES PARK, AND NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON THE PITTAWAY FAMILY, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170035000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, DYE
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1929
Materials
WOOL, DYE
No. Pieces
1
Length
182.5
Width
117.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN RUG MADE FROM HAND-DYED, HANDSPUN WOOL. THERE IS A 3-4 CM WIDE BLACK BORDER AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG, WITH FRINGE ON THE SHORT ENDS. INSIDE THE BLACK BORDER IS A SINGLE WOVEN BORDER OF LIGHT BLUE WOOL. INSIDE OF THIS BORDER IS A PATTERN SET ON A DARK BURGUNDY-COLOURED BACKGROUND. THERE IS A BLUE FLOWER IN THE CENTER OF THE RUG. ON ONE END THE DATE “1924” IS WOVEN IN RAW-COLOURED WOOL. THE “9” HAS BEEN WOVEN UPSIDE DOWN. ON THE OPPOSITE END OF THE RUG, THE INITIALS “ ” FOR THE NAME LISAVETA PETROVNA WISHLOW, ARE WOVEN IN LIGHT BLUE. THERE ARE 20 HARPS COLOURED EITHER BLUE, ORANGE, PINK, OR YELLOW AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG. UNDER THE HARPS IS A GREEN VINE PATTERN AND A RED DECORATIVE BORDER. THE DESIGN ELEMENTS ARE LAID OUT SYMMETRICALLY OVER THE RUG AND CONSIST OF FLOWERS, DUCKS, AND BUTTERFLIES. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. SLIGHT WEAR TO THE WOOL FROM USE.
Subjects
FLOOR COVERING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS RUG WAS HAND-WOVEN BY ELIZABETH KONKIN IN 1924. THE RUG WAS USED AS A WALL COVER IN THE WINTER AND ACTED AS AN INSULATOR. LATER IT WAS USED ON THE FLOOR AT CHRISTMASTIME. IT WAS INHERITED BY MORRIS PRIOR TO THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER: “I CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF IT] FROM MY MOTHER. SHE DIED IN 2003 AND I GOT THE RUG SLIGHTLY BEFORE THEN AND YES THAT WOULD BE ABOUT THE TIME… I HAVE NO OTHER SIBLINGS AND SO OBVIOUSLY EVERYTHING SHE MADE WOULD GO TO ME. MY SON SAID HE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE THE RUG, BUT CHANGED HIS MIND. HIS WIFE WAS NOT KEEN ON HAVING IT, SO I HAD TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT. TO ME IT IS A VERY BEAUTIFUL RUG AND I WANTED IT SOME PLACE WHERE IT WON’T GET TRASHED BY DOGS OR ANIMALS.” AFTER ACQUIRING THE RUG, MORRIS PLACED IT ON THE FLOOR OF HER HOME IN LETHBRIDGE: “THE LINO [ON THE FLOOR] STARTED TO WEAR OUT AND I THOUGHT YOU CAN’T PUT A RUG LIKE THAT ON ANOTHER LINO. IT JUST DOESN’T GO. BUT I DO LIKE HARDWOOD SO WE HAD HARDWOOD PUT THROUGHOUT THE BEDROOMS. THE LAST ROOM IS MY OFFICE, FIRST OF ALL, I HAD THE RUG IN THIS BEDROOM AND THEN IT WASN’T VERY CONVENIENT TO CLEAN BECAUSE THERE WASN’T THAT MUCH SPACE SO I PUT IT IN MY OFFICE WHERE I LOVED IT, BUT I KEPT STUMBLING OVER IT. I THOUGHT I MIGHT BREAK A LEG IF I DO THIS SO I BETTER GET RID OF IT… THE HARDWOOD WAS PUT IN BEFORE THE GST WENT IN. I DIDN’T HAVE THE RUG THEN BUT I THOUGHT THAT I WOULD BE GETTING THE RUG AND SO I WOULD HAVE IT HARDWOOD… WAS IT 1995? ANYWAY BEFORE GST WENT IN.” THE RUG HAD BEEN PRESENT THROUGHOUT MORRIS’ LIFE – FROM TIME SPENT ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE, ALBERTA TO LIFE ON A FARM OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL, ALBERTA: “I CAN REMEMBER WHEN I WAS BORN. THE RUG WAS IN MY PARENT’S HOME. WE LIVED ON A DOUKHOBOR COLONY, WE HAD MUD PLASTERED WALLS AND OUR HOUSE WAS WELL BUILT. MY DAD BUILT IT. SOME OF THE HOUSES ONLY HAD ONE LAYER OF WOOD AND THEY WERE VERY COLD, HOWEVER OUR BEDROOMS HAD WALLS ON THE NORTH SIDE. IN WINTER THEY GOT CHILLY, SO EVERY WINTER THEY WOULD NAIL UP THIS RUG UP AGAINST THE WALL. IT STAYED THERE FOR THE WINTER. FOR SUMMER IT CAME DOWN, I DON’T [KNOW] WHERE SHE STORED IT, I THINK POSSIBLY IN ONE OF THE BIGGER TRUNKS AND THEN TOOK IT OUT… THIS HOME [WHERE THE RUG WAS PLACED], IT’S OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL. WE LEFT THE COLONY, MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND MOVED THE HOUSE. THE HOUSE WAS EXPANDED AND THEN WE LIVED IN THAT HOUSE. I LEFT HOME AND MY PARENTS HAD A HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE WHICH DAD BUILT ALSO AND HE SOLD THE FARM. THEY ASKED IF WE WANTED TO GO AND WE DIDN’T. SO THEY SOLD THE FARM AND THERE WAS A BEAUTIFUL POND WHERE WE SWAM AND BOATED AND WE HAD LOTS OF TREES AROUND THE HOUSE. IT WAS ABOUT AN ACREAGE IF NOT MORE AND WHEN HE SOLD IT THE NEW OWNERS, VERY FRUGAL PEOPLE, [THEY] BURNT DOWN THE HOUSE, THE STEAM BATHROOM, THE GARAGE, THE WORKS. NOW MIND THEY WERE OLD STATE BY NOW AND THEY PLOWED [IT ALL INTO] IN THE POND BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO MAKE MONEY FROM THE GRAIN [FIELDS], SO WHEN I WENT THERE A COUPLE OF YEARS LATER, [I WAS] SURPRISED EVERYTHING WAS GONE, SO THAT WAS THAT." THE RUG MAY HAVE BEEN WOVEN BY MORRIS’ MOTHER ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE OR DURING THE WINTER SPENT IN COWLEY: “… IT COULD HAVE BEEN WOVEN IN COWLEY BECAUSE THEY STAYED IN COWLEY FOR THE WINTER BUT I CAN’T BE TOO SURE. IT ALSO COULD HAVE BEEN MADE ON THE COLONY… TWENTY MILES EAST OF MOSSLEIGH.” ELIZABETH KONKIN WAS MARRIED IN 1927, SO THE INITIALS WOVEN ON THE RUG ARE OF HER MAIDEN NAME: “THAT’S AN “L” [ ] THAT’S LISAVETA (SIC.) BUT HER NAME IS YALALISAVETA (SIC.) BUT SHE PUT DOWN LISAVETA. PETROVNA THAT’S A “P” [ ] THAT’S DAUGHTER OF PETRO AND WISHLOW [ ] THAT WAS HER MAIDEN NAME. ... [AFTER MAKING THE RUG] THERE WAS SOME WARP LEFT OVER. … WARP IS THE STUFF THAT RUNS DOWN AND WEFT IS WHAT YOU PUT IN BETWEEN WITH A SHUTTLE BUT THIS WASN’T PUT IN WITH A SHUTTLE. EACH INDIVIDUAL THREAD WAS KNOTTED. IT’S LIKE DIFFAGHAN (SIC.) - A SWEDISH METHOD - AND THAT’S HOW IT WAS DONE. IF THERE WAS SOME LEFT OVER AND HER MOM INSISTED THAT SHE DO ANOTHER RUG. WELL SHE DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT. SHE SAYS “YOU MAKE IT FOR YOUR BROTHER.” SHE FELT HIS WIFE SHOULD DO HER OWN HOPE CHEST BUT SHE DID AND THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT HIS RUG THEY USED IT ON THE FLOOR. MY MOTHER DIDN’T USE THIS ONE ON THE FLOOR EXCEPT AT CHRISTMAS TIME SO THE WISHLOW FAMILY WHO HAD THE OTHER RUG, THE MOTHER WASN’T TOO KEENLY INTERESTED IN IT. THEY HAD IT IN THE LIVING ROOM AND THEN IT WENT UP FOR SALE TO A PLACE THAT WAS OWNED BY A MAN NAMED, HIS LAST NAME WAS EWASHEN (SIC.) …THAT’S [THE RUG’S] TWIN, YES.” MORRIS THEN GOES ON TO DESCRIBE SOME OF THE OTHER PATTERNING FOUND ON THE RUG: “OKAY THOSE ARE HARPS. SHE HAD PATTERNS TO GET THEM FROM OTHER WEAVERS AND THEN SHE’D TRACE THEM OUT. I DON’T KNOW WHAT SHE USED TO TRACE THEM ON THE WARP [WITH] AND THEN SHE’D WEAVE AWAY WITH THE THREAD THAT WERE THE WEFT. SHE PUT THE DESIGNS HERSELF ONTO THE RUG” THE RUG WAS BROUGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WHEN ELIZABETH AND WILLIAM KONKIN RETIRED THERE: “I WAS TEACHING SCHOOL IN COALDALE WHEN THEY MOVED AND DAD MADE THE HOUSE IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE… THE HOUSE IS NICELY BUILT AND IT’S WARM, IT’S COMFORTABLE SO THERE’S NO USE PUTTING IT UP ON THE WALL. EVERY CHRISTMAS SHE’D TAKE IT OUT AND WE’D ROLL AROUND ON THIS RUG AND SHE WOULD HANG IT UP AFTER THE NEW YEAR SO I SAID TO HER ‘WHY DON’T YOU PUT IT ON THE FLOOR?’ AND SHE SAID, 'WELL I DON’T WANT TO MESS IT UP.' HOWEVER, I SAID, 'WELL I’M GOING TO PUT IT ON THE FLOOR,' SO THAT’S WHERE IT WAS UNTIL I STARTED STUMBLING OVER IT.” AMONG THE OTHER ARTIFACTS DONATED BY MORRIS THAT WERE OWNED BY HER MOTHER, THE RUG WAS A SIGNIFIER OF THE HARD WORK REQUIRED WITHIN THE DOUKHOBOR LIFESTYLE: “[THE BLANKET AND THE SPINNING WHEEL] MEANT A LOT WELL AFTER THE WAR AND THINGS WERE CHEAP. THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WEAVE THEIR OWN STUFF. PRIOR TO THAT, NOT IN MY MOTHER’S TIME EVEN BEFORE THAT MY GRANDMOTHER’S TIME, EVERY GIRL HAD TO WEAVE A TROUSSEAU FOR HERSELF TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE SHE STARTED HAVING CHILDREN AND SHE WOULDN’T HAVE THE TIME TO DO IT. THERE WERE THINGS THAT WERE ANCIENT THAT WERE USED AND USED UNTIL THEY DIED HOWEVER, IN MY MOTHER’S DAY THEY KNITTED THEIR OWN SOCKS, THEY MADE THEIR OWN QUILTS. THE MEN DID THE BUILDING AND THEY LIVED OFF THE GARDENS BECAUSE THEY WERE VEGETARIANS SO THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT MEAT. THEY BOUGHT EGGS FROM THE NEIGHBOURS WHO WERE FARMERS. THE INTERESTING THING THERE WAS THAT THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO EAT MEAT AND I ATE MEAT WHEN I WAS CLOSE TO TWENTY. WHEN I TELL MY VEGETARIAN RELATIVES WHAT ABOUT YOUR SHOES AND YOU’VE GOT LEATHER, COWHIDE WHATEVER AND THEY COULDN’T COME UP WITH AN ANSWER SO… THEY REPRESENTED HARD WORK THAT’S, THIS TAKES A LONG TIME WHEN YOU THINK OF EVERY KNOT THAT HAD TO BE TIED AND IT WAS PART OF HER TROUSSEAU. THE SPINNING WHEEL MEANT A LOT BECAUSE YOU HAD TO SPIN THE WOOL SO.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1991
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
35
Width
25.3
Description
WHITE PAPER CALENDAR WITH RED FRONT. FRONT HAS BLACK TEXT “1991 CALENDAR ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL, ROYAL CANADIAN MULTICULTURAL POLICE, (FARCE), “COSTUME SUGGESTIONS”; FRONT HAS WHITE BOX WITH BLUE TRIM AND BLUE TEXT “WARNING!! MATERIAL CONTAINED HEREIN IS FICTITIOUS AND MAY BE OBJECTIONAL TO SOME PEOPLE. VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED.” CALENDAR HAS HOLE PUNCHED IN TOP FOR HANGING. FIRST PAGE INSIDE CALENDAR INCLUDES EXAGGERATED PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN WEARING A TURBAN IN RCMP UNIFORM AND CAPTION “1991, SGT. KAMELL DUNG, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”, PAGE FOR MONTHS JANUARY AND FEBRUARY. SECOND PAGE INCLUDES EXAGGERATED PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN IN RCMP UNIFORM AND KILT WITH CAPTION “1991, SCOTTY MACDRAFTY, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”, PAGE FOR MONTHS MARCH AND APRIL. THIRD PAGE INCLUDES EXAGGERATED PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN WEARING HEADGEAR FEATURING QUEBEC FLAG AND RCMP UNIFORM, HOLDING A QUEBEC FLAG, WITH CAPTION “1991, FRANCOIS LES SPLIT, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”, PAGE FOR MONTHS MAY AND JUNE. FOURTH PAGE INCLUDES EXAGGERATED PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN WEARING BLACK BRAIDS, BEADED HEADDRESS AND FEATHERS, RCMP UNIFORM AND HOLDING A KNIFE AND BOW WITH CAPTION “1991, CHARLIE MANY BEEFS, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”, PAGE FOR MONTHS JULY AND AUGUST. FIFTH PAGE INCLUDES PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN WEARING GERMAN LEDERHOSEN AND RCMP UNIFORM, HOLDING A BEER STEIN, WITH CAPTION “1991, HANS HOSENSCHEISER, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”; PAGE FOR MONTHS SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER. SIXTH PAGE INCLUDES PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN WEARING BLACK BRAID, MUSTACHE, BROAD-BRIMMED STRAW HAT, AND RCMP UNIFORM WITH CAPTION “1991, WHO FLUNG DUNG, [COPYRIGHT SYMBOL] HERMAN B. 1991”, PAGE FOR MONTHS NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER. CALENDAR HAS MAY 25 CIRCLED IN BLUE INK WITH BLUE INK INSCRIPTION BESIDE “SANDI B DAY”; CALENDAR HAS DATES CIRCLED IN BLACK INK OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 22, 23, DECEMBER 2, 11.FRONT OF CALENDAR HAS BROWN STAIN IN LOWER LEFT CORNER AND CREASING ALONG LOWER EDGE; BACK HAS PINK, RED AND BLACK STAINING. CALENDAR IS STAPLED TOGETHER AT TOP WITH TWO STAPLES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE ACQUISITION OF THE CALENDAR, IT WAS NOTED, “THE CALENDAR WAS BEING SOLD, ‘CAUSE I BOUGHT IT MYSELF, OUT OF LETHBRIDGE…AT A STORE.” “IN THE LATE ‘80S, EARLY 1990S…THERE’S A MEMBER OF THE [NATIONAL] SIKH COMMUNITY WHO WANTS TO WEAR A TURBAN AS A MEMBER OF THE R.C.M.P. THERE’S A LOT OF ANGST BY PEOPLE WHO DON’T UNDERSTAND WHY THIS SHOULD BE THE CASE AND THERE’S A BACKLASH THAT IS HAPPENING. I THINK SOME OF THAT BACKLASH IS COMING OUT OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “AT THE SAME TIME, IN THE EARLY 1990S…YOU HAVE THE RISE OF THE QUEBEC SEPARATIST MOVEMENT OUT IN EASTERN CANADA. YOU HAVE THIS RISE OF WESTERN VALUE-TYPE STUFF AND PEOPLE FEEL, MAYBE, AS THOUGH THEY’RE BEING CHALLENGED. SO YOU HAVE THE REFORM PARTIES COMING UP. [BECAUSE] I’M A NEWS JUNKIE, I’M ACTIVELY INTERESTED IN THAT. THE FIRST AND ONLY TIME, IN 1992, THAT I ATTENDED A NOMINATION FOR A POLITICAL PARTY…IT WAS A REFORM PARTY [NOMINATION IN 1992]…I REMEMBER BEING AT THE ENMAX. I REMEMBER THE OTHER COMPETING NOMINEES AND I REMEMBER THE POLITICS OF THAT PARTICULAR MEETING. WITH THE UPCOMING ELECTION, A LOT OF MY MOTIVATION [I VOTED REFORM] WAS THAT THERE WAS A GREAT POTENTIAL THAT THE PQ WAS GOING TO FORM THE OFFICIAL OPPOSITION IN CANADA AND I JUST THOUGHT, THERE’S NO WAY THAT CAN HAPPEN.” “AT THE SAME TIME, PEOPLE, I DON’T KNOW WHO, PRODUCED THIS CALENDAR WHICH IS RACIST AND OFFENSIVE AND IT’S HORRIBLE. [I HAVE BEEN] ASHAMED [OF HAVING IT] BUT I RECOGNIZED THAT IT’S MATERIAL CULTURE. IT HAS POTENTIAL HISTORIC VALUE. THAT’S WHY IT’S BEEN KEPT. IT’S JUST THAT I COULD NOT BRING MYSELF TO SHARE THAT IT WAS IN MY POSSESSION AND THAT I BOUGHT IT.” “IT WOULD BE HARD TO SAY [WHAT THE LOCAL REPONSE TO THE PRODUCTION AND SALE OF THE CALENDAR WAS AT THE TIME] BECAUSE OUTSIDE OF MY IMMEDIATE CIRCLE…THAT CIRCLE WOULD BE CERTAINLY IN FAVOUR OF THIS THOUGHT. I DON’T REMEMBER ANY RESPONSE FROM LOCALS…AS AN EXAMPLE, IF THIS CALENDAR WAS BEING SOLD TODAY, MAYBE EVEN PRODUCED IN LETHBRIDGE, THERE WOULD BE PROTESTS. DO I REMEMBER ANYTHING LIKE THAT BACK, THEN? NOT AT ALL. IT’S REALLY EASY TO TARGET PEOPLE AND FEEL THIS WAY ABOUT PEOPLE WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE TO INTERACT WITH THEM OR SEE THEM. THEY’RE NOT EVEN ON THE LANDSCAPE SO IT’S REALLY EASY ‘CAUSE AGAIN, IT’S REALLY ABSTRACT, I THINK.” ON HIS DONATION OF THE CALENDAR, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “I’M OBVIOUSLY CONSCIOUS ABOUT CONFORMITY AND, FOR THE MOST PART…[PEOPLE] NOT ONLY WOULD WORK TO LOOK THE SAME…THEY DID [DRESS] THE SAME—SAME RUNNERS, SAME BLUE JEANS, TEE-SHIRT—GENERALLY SPEAKING, THROUGH THE ‘70S AND ‘80S, INTO THE ‘90S. I DON’T THINK THERE WAS A LOT OF DIVERSITY REFLECTED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. THAT’S MY OPINION. THERE CERTAINLY WASN’T OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE AND WHEN I’M VISITING LETHBRIDGE, I’M NOT SEEING IT OUTSIDE OF THE TRADITIONAL DIVERSITY WHICH WOULD BE JAPANESE-CANADIANS, WHICH WOULD BE HUTTERITES IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE, WHICH WOULD BE MEMBERS OF THE CHINESE POPULATION. THE OTHER THING IS THAT BECAUSE THE JAPANESE-CANADIANS ARE REPRESENTED OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE, I’M DATING A MEMBER OF [THE JAPANESE-CANADIAN] COMMUNITY AS WELL BY 1985.” “I STARTED ATTENDING UNIVERSITY IN THE SPRING OF ’92, AND THEN THE PEOPLE WHO I WOULD HAVE BEEN SHARING TIME WITH, I WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN SHARING TIME WITH ANYMORE. I THINK YOUR OUTLOOK BECOMES MUCH BROADER WHEN YOU’RE AT THE UNIVERSITY. THAT’S WHEN THE CHANGE HAPPENED. [THE CALENDAR IS] LITERALLY 1991 AND I’M IN UNIVERSITY BY 1992. I WOULDN’T SAY THAT THERE WAS THIS LIGHT SWITCH [MOMENT]. THAT WOULDN’T BE THE CASE BUT IT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED RELATIVELY SOON AFTER I STARTED UNIVERSITY.” “I WOULD HOPE THAT [THE CALENDAR] COULD BE USED IN SOME POSITIVE WAY TO CAST THE LIGHT ON CRAPPINESS…I LIKE TO HEAR FROM PEOPLE THAT [COMMUNITY VALUES ARE] CHANGING BUT THEN I KNOW, AT THE SAME TIME, THAT THERE’S A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT HAVEN’T CHANGED. THE DIFFERENCE THOUGH, I THINK, IS THAT WE’RE A MUCH MORE DIVERSE PLACE IN 2018 AND I THINK IT STARTED TWENTY YEARS AGO.” “[THE CALENDAR] SHOULD HAVE BEEN THROWN OUT IN 1993 BUT I THINK I RECOGNIZED IT FOR WHAT IT WAS; THAT POTENTIALLY IT COULD BE USED FOR GOOD NOW, THIRTY YEARS LATER, TO TELL A BROADER STORY ABOUT SOMETHING THAT STILL, TO SOME EXTENT, EXISTS TODAY.” ACCORDING TO ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND BRANDON SUN [MANITOBA], IN 1989 RCMP COMMISSIONER NORM INKSTER ANNOUNCED HIS RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHANGES TO THE RCMP UNIFORM TO ALLOW SIKH MEN TO WEAR CULTURAL, RELIGIOUS TURBANS AND BEARDS. FOLLOWING THE ANNOUNCEMENT, IN 1989, BILL HIPSON OF CALGARY BEGAN PRODUCING PINS WITH THE DESIGN OF A SIKH MAN IN TURBAN AND RCMP UNIFORM, WITH TEXT WRITTEN DIAGONALLY ACROSS THE IMAGE “KEEP THE RCMP CANADIAN”. BY OCTOBER 1989, FACING BACKLASH ACROSS CANADA FOR THE DISCRIMINATORY MESSAGING OF THE PIN, HIPSON AGREED TO END PRODUCTION OF THE PIN AFTER FULFILLING PENDING ORDERS, HOWEVER INDICATED THAT OTHER DESIGNS MIGHT BE RELEASED. IN DECEMBER 1989, PETER KOUDA OF CALGARY BEGAN PRODUCING A PIN WITH THE DESIGN OF A CAUCASIAN MAN SURROUNDED BY THREE INDIVIDUALS OF VISIBLE MINORITIES, WITH TEXT AROUND THE PIN EDGE “WHO IS THE MINORITY IN CANADA?” THE PIN WAS SOLD ACROSS CANADA FOR $5.00. IN THE LATE 1980S AND EARLY 1990S, QUOTES ON STATISTICS FROM NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS INDICATED THAT VISIBLE MINORITIES COMPRISED 6.3% OF THE CANADIAN POPULACE. IN JANUARY 1990, AFTER FACING NATIONAL CONDEMNATION FROM COMMUNITIES AND POLITICIANS, KOUDA BEGAN SELLING THE PIN INDEPENDENTLY WHEN SELLERS AND SUPPLIERS DROPPED IT FOR ITS DISCRIMINATORY MESSAGING, FOR FEAR OF OFFENDING CUSTOMERS OF VISIBLE MINORITIES. KOUDA CONTINUED TO SELL THE PIN, WITH NATIONAL PROTESTS TO HAVE CHARGES LAID FOR INCITING HATE PROPAGANDA. MANITOBA’S JUSTICE MINISTER, JAMES (JIM) MCCRAE DETERMINED THAT PRODUCTION OF THE PIN COULD NOT BE HALTED WITH CRIMINAL CHARGES, STATING THAT THE PINS COULD NOT BE DEFINED AS PROMOTING HATRED UNDER THE CANADIAN CRIMINAL CODE. CANADIAN CUSTOMS AND REVENUE CANADA ALSO STATED THAT THE PINS WERE NOT CLASSIFIED AS HATE PROPAGANDA UNDER THE CRIMINAL CODE, AND ALLOWED IMPORTATION OF THE PINS INTO CANADA. ON THE PINS, ALBERTA CULTURE MINISTER DOUG MAIN IN 1990 STATED THAT THEY WERE AN ISSUE FOR THE PEOPLE OF ALBERTA, AND NOT NECESSARILY FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A QUOTE FROM A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE. IN FEBRUARY OF 1990, A CALENDAR PRODUCED BY HERMAN BITTNER OF LANGDON, ALBERTA BROUGHT ABOUT SIMILAR CHALLENGES OF HATE PROPAGANDA. BITTNER POSED IN A PHOTOGRAPH FOR THE CALENDAR AS A SIKH MAN IN A TURBAN AND RCMP UNIFORM, WITH THE PHOTOGRAPH CAPTIONED “SGT. KAMELL DUNG” AND THE INSCRIPTION “IS THIS CANADIAN OR DOES THIS MAKE YOU A SIKH?” JUSTICE MINISTER MCCRAE STATED THAT THE POSTER CONSTITUED INCITEMENT TO HATRED, AND THAT HE WOULD CHARGE ANYONE POLICE FOUND SELLING THE CALENDARS. THE 1990 CALENDAR WAS THEN BEING DISTRIBUTED BY TRAVELLING SALESMEN IN BARS ACROSS CANADA. A SECOND POSTER FEATURING DISCRIMINATORY MESSAGING AND IMAGES OF MULTIPLE VISIBLE MINORITIES EMERGED IN 1991. THE POSTER WAS ATTRIBUTED TO THE “ROYAL CANADIAN MULTICULTURAL POLICE”, WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHS COPYRIGHTED TO “HERMAN B.” [BITTNER]. THE WIDESPREAD MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DISCRIMINATORY PINS AND CALENDARS GARNERED FURTHER SUPPORT FOR PROTESTS AGAINST SIKH MEN WEARING TRADITIONAL TURBANS AND BEARDS IN THE RCMP. THE PINS AND CALENDAR SAW HIGHER SALES AND DEMAND FOR THE PRODUCTS IN SHOPS ACROSS CANADA, AS STATED BY KOUDA AND BITTNER IN ARTICLES FROM 1990. IN 1990, FEDERAL SOLICITOR GENERAL PIERRE CADIEUX APPROVED THE DECISION TO ALLOW SIKH MEN TO WEAR TURBANS AND BEARDS IN THE RCMP. THE DECISION WAS MET WITH A PROTESTING PETITION SIGNED BY OVER 200,000 CANADIANS, ACCORDING TO ARTICLES FROM 1990. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029004
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 1.