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Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.08
Width
12.4
Description
BLACK, CERAMIC ASHTRAY. THE INSIDE OPENING OF THE ASHTRAY IS 6.4 CM. THE LETTERING ON THE TOP SAYS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA.” THERE IS AN ABSTRACTED FLORAL DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF THIS LETTERING. THE FLOWERS ARE PAINTED RED AND THEIR STEMS PAINTED GREEN. THIS WORDING AND DESIGN REPEATS ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. THE LETTERING ON THE BOTTOM SAYS, “MADE IN JAPAN 29.” VERY GOOD CONDITION. USED WITH SOME WEAR APPARENT. BLACK PAINT IS WEARING OFF ON SOME PARTS OF THE SURFACE. SIGNIFICANT WEAR TO THE RED AND GREEN PAINT OF THE DECALS.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 16, 2015, DONOR CHRIS MORRISON INFORMED COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT SHE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE ASHTRAY WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BECAME STEWARDS OF A WATERTON CABIN IN 1976. THE CABIN, LOCATED AT 103 CAMERON FALLS, WAS OWNED BY HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY MORRISON (D. 1995). IT WAS AMONG ASSORTED FURNISHINGS LEFT BEHIND WHEN DOROTHY MOVED OUT AND CHRIS MOVED IN. THE DONOR’S RECOLLECTION OF THE ASHTRAY’S USE IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO IT BECOMING HER PROPERTY WAS AS A CONTAINER. MORRISON SAID, “IT WAS IN A [CABIN] WASHSTAND AND USED TO HOLD LITTLE OBJECTS LIKE ROLLED UP KEROSENE LANTERN TAPE WICKS”. ACCORDING TO MORRISON, IT WAS ALSO KNOWN AS “GRANDPA’S ASHTRAY”. GRANDPA REFERS TO JAMES J. MORRISON OF LETHBRIDGE. “HE ONLY SMOKED CIGARS” SAID THE DONOR, WHEREAS HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY DID NOT SMOKE AT ALL. THE ASHTRAY’S USE AS A CONTAINER FOR LANTERN WICKS AND SMALL ITEMS CONTINUED RIGHT UP TO THE DAY THAT IT WAS OFFERED TO THE GALT IN 2015. ACCORDING TO HER OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DOROTHY MORRISON, PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON NOVEMBER 26, 1995 AT THE AGE OF 83 YEARS. JAMES JACOB MORRISON, DOROTHY’S FATHER-IN-LAW, PASSED ON FEBRUARY 18TH, 1975 AT AGE 93. THE ASHTRAY IS MARKED WITH “MARQUIS HOTEL,” WHICH COULD REFER TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL THAT OPENED IN JUNE 1928. REALIZING A NEED FOR A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN LETHBRIDGE, ESPECIALLY ONE WITH A BANQUET HALL, THE BUSINESSMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRADE COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE HOTEL IN 1927. AFTER ITS OPENING, THE BOARD OF TRADE WOULD HOLD THEIR REGULAR, NOON-HOUR MEETINGS AT THE HOTEL FOR MANY YEARS TO COME. THE HOTEL CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1985 AND THE BUILDING WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A WRITE-UP ABOUT THE HOTEL IN THE PUBLICATION TITLED "WHERE WAS IT? A GUIDE TO EARLY LETHBRIDGE BUILDINGS," BY IRMA DOGTEROM. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A COPY OF THE INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION CITED ABOVE.
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RAILWAY SWITCH / C.P.R.
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, COPPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150023000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAILWAY SWITCH / C.P.R.
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BRASS, COPPER, METAL
No. Pieces
5
Length
12.3
Width
2.1
Description
5 RAILWAY KEYS OR SWITCHES ON A KEYRING. .A: BRASS. 5.0CM X 2.4CM (L X W). SKELETON KEY. ROUND TOP, WITH A SQUARE HOLE IN THE MIDDLE. AROUND THE TOP EDGE OF THE CIRCLE, STAMPED "C.P.R.". "T" STAMPED BELOW AND TO THE LEFT OF THE "C". ILLEGIBLE MAKER'S MARK ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE KEY. .B: SILVER COLOURED METAL. 5.3CM X 2.5CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A SMALL ROUND HOLE NEAR THE TOP. EMBOSSED "103" ON ONE SIDE OF THE ROUND TOP AND STAMPED "CPR" ON THE OTHER. .C: COPPER. 5.2CM X 2.3CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. AROUND THE EDGE, EMBOSSED WITH "R. M. CO." OPPOSITE SIDE HAS "C.P.R." EMBOSSED ALONG THE TOP, WITH AN "S" EMBOSSED BELOW AND TO THE LEFT OF THE "C". .D: BRASS. 5.0CM X 2.2CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. AROUND THE EDGE, STAMPED WITH "C.P.R.". MAKER'S MARK STAMPED ON REVERSE: "...ITCHE... CANADA" .E: COPPER. 12.3CM X 2.1CM (L X W). ROUND TOP, WITH A MEDIUM SIZED CIRCULAR HOLE IN THE CENTRE. NO IDENTIFYING MARKS. TEETH OF KEY FORM A SIDEWAYS 'E'. ALL KEYS IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. TWO COPPER KEYS HAVE TARNISHED.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THESE RAILWAY SWITCH KEYS WERE USED BY THE DONOR, ARNOLD “RED” ERVIN, WHEN HE WORKED ON THE RAILWAY. IN JULY 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH ARNOLD AND HIS WIFE JOYCE ERVIN. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ARNOLD WAS BORN IN 1932 IN NIPIWIN, SK AND CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO PLAY JUNIOR HOCKEY IN 1950. HE GOT A GOOD JOB WITH THE RAILWAY AND DECIDED TO STAY IN LETHBRIDGE. JOYCE WAS BORN IN 1931 IN FOREMOST, AB, ATTENDED MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE IN CALGARY AND WORKED FOR SEVERAL YEARS IN CALGARY. SHE WORKED FOR THE GOVERNMENT, IN DEFENCE PRODUCTION, THEN WENT ON TO SHELL OIL. SHE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1954 TO BE CLOSER TO HOME AND SHE GOT A JOB WITH THE RAILROAD. ARNOLD AND JOYCE MET THROUGH THEIR WORK AND WERE MARRIED IN 1955. THE FIVE KEYS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF ARNOLD’S JOB ON THE RAILWAY, ALLOWING HIM TO CHANGE SWITCHES AND HE RECEIVED THEM WHILE WORKING AS AN ENGINEER. HE KEPT THEM BECAUSE “THESE WERE OF NO INTEREST TO ANYBODY EXCEPT [THOSE WHO] WORKED ON THE RAILROAD … THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO HAVE TO BE AN ENGINEER ON THE RAILROAD.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THIS IS THE OLD RAILROAD KEYS, UNLOCKED EVERY SWITCH FROM HERE TO VANCOUVER. YOU PUT THAT KEY IN THERE TO GET THE SWITCH TO COME UP … YOU DIDN’T GO ANYWHERE WITHOUT SWITCH KEYS … YOU HAD TO HAVE THEM WHEN YOU WERE OUT THERE WORKING.” ARNOLD STARTED WORKING FOR THE RAILWAY IN 1951 IN THE ROUND HOUSE, AFTER DECIDING TO NOT PURSUE HOCKEY BEYOND THE JUNIOR LEVEL: “THEY PUT YOU IN [THE ROUND HOUSE] TEAMED UP, STARTED UNTIL YOU WORKED YOUR WAY UP TO A FIREMAN – FROM FIREMAN TO ENGINEER.” HE CONTINUED TO PLAY HOCKEY FOR FUN: “I STILL PLAYED HOCKEY WITH A BUNCH OF PEOPLE THAT [I] KNEW AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO GO ON TO THE BIG LEAGUES BUT JUST ENTERTAINMENT. LETHBRIDGE WAS A GOOD HOCKEY PLACE. AND A NICE CITY TO LIVE IN.” IN RECALLING HIS FIRST DAYS AND WEEKS AT HIS JOB, HE SAID: “WELL, IT WAS WORKING IN THE ROUNDHOUSE. THE ENGINES WERE THERE AND YOU HAD TO GET UP AND THERE WAS COAL ENGINES AND YOU HAD TO SHOVEL THE COAL TO GET IT BACK INTO PLACES WHERE IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE, SO ALL OVER. … YEAH, TECHNICALLY THEY CALLED YOU A WIPER. YOU HAD TO GO IN AND CLEAN THE WINDOWS … FOR THE ENGINEER COMING OUT EVERYTHING HAD TO BE CLEAN OR HE CALLED YOU BACK UP AND YOU DID IT OVER AGAIN. SO, IT WAS BETTER TO DO IT GOOD AND GET IT DONE.” ARNOLD CONTINUED: “I LIKED WORKING WITH THE RAILROAD, ENJOYED IT, AND STARTED IN THAT ROUNDHOUSE AND YOU WORKED YOUR WAY UP TO A FIREMAN AND UP TO AN ENGINEER AND THEN I WAS IN CHARGE OF ALL THE ENGINEERS. SO IT WAS A CAREER FROM NOT EVEN KNOWING WHAT THE RAILROAD LOOKED LIKE TO FIFTY/FIFTY-ONE WHEN I FINISHED. … IT WAS A PRETTY COMPATIBLE BUNCH OF PEOPLE AND AS IT TURNED OUT THE MANAGER OF THE HOCKEY TEAM WAS YARDMASTER HERE SO KNOWING THE BOSS KIND OF HELPED A LITTLE BIT. HE WAS LOOKING AFTER THE YARDS AND HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM UNTIL HE RETIRED FROM THE RAILROAD. IT WAS A GOOD PLACE TO WORK, PEOPLE TREATED YOU RIGHT.” STEAM ENGINES WERE STILL IN USE WHEN HE FIRST STARTED: “[THE STEAM ENGINES] WERE WHEN I FIRST STARTED YES. FROM STARTING IN THE SHOP YOU GREW UP TO BE ON A FIRE AND THEN ENGINES AND JUST ABOUT THAT TIME THE DIESEL ENGINES WERE COMING IN AND OPERATING AND [IT WAS A] TOTALLY DIFFERENT RAILROAD FROM A HAND-FIRED COAL ENGINE TO A DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE. SO, IT WAS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT EITHER COULD BE AS GOOD AS YOU WANTED OR AS BAD AS YOU WANTED. KINDA HAD NO BOSSES IN THE RAILROAD - YOU WERE KIND OF THE CREW - YOU HAD TO LIKE THE JOB OR YOU DIDN’T STAY THERE. AND I LIKED THE RAILROAD, LIKED THE TRAVELLING, TRAVELLING IN THE ENGINES AND SOME PEOPLE WOULD GIVE THEIR EYE TEETH TO GET UP ON ONE OF THEM ENGINES, RIDE UP TO CROWSNEST AND IN THE MOUNTAINS.” HE WAS NOT DISAPPOINTED TO SEE THE STEAM LOCOMOTIVES GO OUT OF SERVICE: “IF YOU HAD YOUR CHOICE TO GO ON A STEAM ENGINE ON A TRIP, GETTING ON A DIESEL ENGINE WAS A LOT EASIER THAN GETTING ON AN OLD COAL ENGINE, COAL-FIRED ENGINE, WHERE YOU BASICALLY TOOK COAL AND THREW IT IN THE BOILER. YOU TOOK IT FROM A CAR RIGHT BEHIND YOU AND PUT THE COAL IN THE ENGINES THEN BOIL IT AND THAT’S WHERE ALL THE POWER CAME FROM.” BY 1975, ARNOLD WAS WORKING AS AN ENGINEER FIREMAN AND CONTINUED TO RECEIVE ON THE JOB TRAINING: “YEAH, ALL ON-THE-JOB TRAINING. MOST OF IT - THERE WAS OTHER THINGS GOING ON BUT THE BASIC THING WAS DOING TRAINING AS AN ENGINEER TO BECOME AN ENGINEER. IT WAS WHERE I WANTED TO BE, WAS AN ENGINEER, AND THE RAILROAD WORKS IN SENIORITY - THEY DON’T CARE IF YOU’RE EVEN BETTER, YOU HAD TO WORK YOUR WAY THROUGH. WHEN THEY NEEDED YOU, YOU GOT THE BEST JOB WHEN YOU GOT MORE SENIORITY. IT WASN’T NECESSARILY ALWAYS THE BEST GUY [THAT] GOT IT, SENIORITY PREVAILED ON THE RAILROAD AND YOU GOT YOUR JOBS AS YOU BECAME OLDER … THE BETTER JOBS BEING MAYBE A DIESEL ENGINES ON ONE JOB AND A FIREMAN ON THE OTHER JOB.” HE RECALLED A COUPLE OF ACCIDENTS WHILE WORKING ON THE RAILROAD: WHILE WORKING AS AN ENGINEER, ARNOLD’S TRAIN HIT A CAR ON THE TRACKS NEAR BLAIRMORE AND HE RECALLED SEEING THE EYES OF THE CAR DRIVER: “I LOOKED UP AND [SAW] HER EYES LOOKING AT [ME].” ARNOLD REMEMBERED THAT ONE OF THE SCARIEST ROUTES WAS THE ONE GOING TO PINCHER CREEK, WHERE THERE WAS A HILL WITH A 2.3 GRADE, WHICH MADE CONTROLLING THE TRAIN CHALLENGING. HE SAID: “YOU’D LIKE TO KNOW IF YOU’D SET THE BRAKE, YOU HAD CONTROL OVER IT BUT IT WAS SUCH A HILL AND SUCH A HEAVY TRAIN BEHIND YOU THAT IT WAS SCARY SOMETIMES … THAT WAS A VERY INTERESTING TRIP DOWN THERE THEN WITH THE DOWN 2.3 GRADE AND THEN 100,000 TON POTASH BEHIND YOU, PUSHING YOU. … YOU KNOW TRAINS STOP BUT IT TOOK A LONG TIME TO STOP … EVERY BRAKE ON THE TRAIN IS ON AND YOU’D STILL GO ANOTHER HALF A MILE DOWN THE TRACK. NOBODY COULD BELIEVE YOU WHY YOU COULDN’T STOP THAT THING – IT DOESN’T WORK THAT WAY – YOU COULD HARDLY EXPLAIN THAT IT TAKES THAT LONG TO STOP A TRAIN, BUT IT DOES.” HE ALSO RECALLED A RUNAWAY TRAIN THAT HE WAS CALLED IN TO HELP WITH: “THEY STOPPED AT COLEMAN TO SET A CAR OFF AND DIDN’T PUT THE BRAKES ON [AND] THE AIR SLEAKED OFF [OF] THE AIRBRAKES … YOU HAD TO HAVE THE COMPRESSORS WORKING TO KEEP THE TRAINS PUMPED UP TO KEEP [THE] BRAKES ON AND IT STARTED CREEPING DOWN.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THE TRAIN STARTED “GOING BACKWARDS AND AS THE HILL GOT A LITTLE STEEPER [THE TRAIN] GOT GOING FASTER AND IT CAME DOWN TO LUNDBRECK WHERE YOU GO ACROSS THE RIVER THERE [AT] THE BRIDGE. [AT] THAT TIME, I WAS MANAGEMENT, [SO] I GOT IN A CAR AND WENT UP THERE AND TOLD THEM EXACTLY WHERE THAT TRAIN WAS GOING TO BE. [THE TRAIN WAS MOVING] TOO FAST TO GO ON THE REVERSE CURVE JUST COMING INTO LUNDBRECK AND IT FLEW LIKE A PLANE INTO THE RIVER THERE.” IT WAS ESTIMATED THAT THE TRAIN WAS TRAVELLING AT MORE THAN SEVENTY MILES PER HOUR. ARNOLD SAID: “THERE’S A REVERSE CURVE JUST BEFORE YOU GET TO LUNDBRECK. [THE TRAIN] LIFTED UP QUITE A BIT BECAUSE IT WAS GOING WAY TOO FAST AND THEN WHEN IT REVERSED THE OTHER SIDE, IT DIDN’T COME DOWN ON THE RAILS - IT LIFTED AND EVERY CAR ENDED UP IN THE LUNDBRECK RIVER.” FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING DETAILS ABOUT JOYCE ERVIN’S TIME WITH THE CPR, AND INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20150023000
Acquisition Date
2015-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT DIAMOND FARE BOX
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2012
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140018000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT DIAMOND FARE BOX
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2012
Materials
STEEL, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
58.5
Length
16
Width
15
Description
CYLINDER WITH STEEL BASE BOLTED TO CLEAR PLASTIC CANISTER, TOPPED WITH ROUNDED ALUMINIUM CAP WITH BEVELED SLOT THAT OPENS INTO PLASTIC CANISTER WITH TWO TOOTHED, METAL, ANGLED FLAPS. BASE HAS TWO IRREGULAR METAL SHAPES EMERGING FROM ONE SIDE, AND A RED, WHITE, AND YELLOW LABEL STUCK TO THE OPPOSITE SIDE THAT READS “CASH FARES – PLEASE OBTAIN A TRANSFER WHEN PAYING FARE… L.A. TRANSIT…”. BASE BOTTOM IS STOPPED WITH BRASS PLUG, STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “DIAMOND MFG. CO. – KANSAS CITY, MO.” AND “47” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER. GENERAL WEAR, NICKS IN METAL, CLOUDING OF PLASTIC, SCUFFS AND TEARS ON LABEL, TAPE RESIDUE ALONG BOTTOM EDGE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
RETAIL TRADE
History
THIS FARE BOX WAS PRODUCED BY DIAMOND MANUFACTURING IN KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI, AND USED IN LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT BUSES BETWEEN 1970 AND 2012. ON APRIL 23, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED DIANE BOULTON, AN EMPLOYEE WITH LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT FROM 1975 TO 2014. BOULTON SAID: “I WAS A BUS DRIVER AND THEN WENT ON TO BECOME PART OF MANAGEMENT… [THIS TYPE OF FARE BOX] WAS IN SERVICE WHEN I STARTED WITH THE DEPARTMENT IN 1975 AND HAD PROBABLY BEEN IN SERVICE FOR MAYBE FIVE TO 10 YEARS [ALREADY]. IT IS CALLED A DIAMOND FARE BOX… IT WOULD BE MOUNTED ON A STANCHION NEXT TO THE DRIVER’S COMPARTMENT… IT’S A STAINLESS STEEL CYLINDER THAT IS OPEN… AND WE WOULD SLIDE A SOLID BRASS CYLINTER UP INSIDE OF IT THAT WAS A LOCKING MECHANISM FOR THE FARE BOX… THERE WAS A LOCKING MECHANISM ON [THE] FLANGE THAT WOULD LOCK IT IN PLACE AND [IT] REQUIRED A TWO-KEY SYSTEM TO GET IN AND OUT OF… AT THE TOP, IT’S AN OPEN CYLINDER, SO SOMEBODY COULD COME IN WITH A HANDFUL OF CASH AND… YOU ARE GOING TO GET MULTIPLE TYPES OF COINS… IT’S REALLY HARD TO COUNT THE PHYSICAL FARE… SO YOU’RE TAKING THE CUSTOMER ON THEIR HONESTY… THE DRIVERS [ALSO] HAD TO PHYSICALLY COUNT WHEN WE WERE DOING PASSENGER COUNTS TO TRY AND GET SOME SORT OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF HOW MANY PEOPLE WERE RIDING, WHAT FARE CATEGORIES WERE RIDING… WITH THE ELECTRONIC FARE BOX [ADOPTED BY LETHBRIDGE TRANSIT IN 2012], IT TELLS EXACTLY WHEN IT’S GOT THE ALLOTTED FARE [AND] AT THE SAME TIME IT’S TAKING YOUR FARE, IT’S COUNTING YOU AS A PASSENGER… THE ELECTRONIC FARE BOX GIVES US A HUGE AMOUNT OF DATA, THAT VERY EASILY IT OBTAINED, WHILE THIS ONE WAS MORE ONEROUS… [ANOTHER REASON] THAT WE STARTED TO SWITCH OUT WAS THAT WE STARTED TO GET DIFFICULTY IN GETTING PARTS BECAUSE THE [DIAMOND] FARE BOX ITSELF WAS FAIRLY OLD.” BOULTON CONTINUED: “BECAUSE IT’S WHAT I USED ALL THE TIME [AS A BUS DRIVER] THERE’S SOME NOSTALGIA THERE… THE SIMPLICITY OF IT… AS THINGS CHANGE AND MOVE FORWARD… IT’S KINDA NEAT… I THINK WHEN I FIRST STARTED IT WAS… $0.65 FOR AN ADULT FARE, AND $0.25 OR $0.35 FOR 17 OR UNDER CHILD FARE, AND SENIORS HAD A PASS THAT THEY RODE FREE… THERE WAS THE ODD TIME WHERE PEOPLE WOULD TRY AND FIGURE OUT A WAY TO GET THE CYLINDER OUT OF A BOTTOM OF IT… AND OCCASIONALLY THE CYLINDERS WOULD FALL OUT IF [YOU] WERE IN A HURRY WHEN YOU WERE PUTTING THEM IN AND YOU DIDN’T QUITE GET THE LOCKING MECHANISM SHUT… YOU’D BE DRIVING DOWN THE ROAD AND ALL OF A SUDDEN, BOOM! THE CYLINDER WOULD DROP OUT OF THE BOTTOM… WE HAD 50-60 OF THE DIAMOND FARE BOXES [AND] THE ACTUAL COIN CYLINDERS THAT WENT UP INSIDE, WE PROBABLY HAD 120-150 OF THOSE BECAUSE, FOR EVERY [FULL] ONE YOU DROPPED OUT, YOU HAD TO PUT ANOTHER UP AND THEY WOULD GET DROPPED OUT AT NIGHT, SO THEY WOULDN’T GET OPENED UNTIL THE NEXT MORNING [FOR FARES TO BE COUNTED].” ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE “DIAMOND FAREBOXES ARE FOREVER”, PUBLISHED IN FEBRUARY 2013 ON BUSRIDE.COM, DIAMOND MANUFACTURING HAS PRODUCED ROUND FAREBOXES FOR COIN FARES SINCE 1947. DIAMOND-BRAND FAREBOXES ARE USED BY TRANSIT SYSTEMS IN EVERY AMERICAN STATE, THROUGHOUT CANADA, AND IN MEXICO, VENEZUELA, BERMUDA AND GUAM. THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN OF A DIAMOND FAREBOX IS 30 YEARS, WITH LITTLE MAINTENANCE REQUIRED DUE TO THE SIMPLICITY OF THE DESIGN. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140018000
Acquisition Date
2014-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
“HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING”
Date
1968
Materials
SILVER, WOOD, FELT
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.25
Length
18.5
Width
10
Description
RECTANGULAR BOX WITH HINGED LID, MADE OF SILVER WITH WOOD INTERIOR LINING. SCROLLWORK ON UPPER AND LOWER EDGES, WITH SCALLOPED SHAPE ON LIP OF LID. LID IS ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “PRESENTED TO HONOURARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRED T. KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS MARRIAGE JANUARY TWENTY FOURTH NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY EIGHT BY THE COMMANDING OFFICER AND OFFICERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY (MILITIA)”. BOTTOM OF BOX HAS FOUR CIRCLES OF GREEN FELT GLUED ON AT THE BOX’S CORNERS. A FAINT MAKERS’ STAMP AND SILVER HALLMARK ARE BARELY VISIBLE AT THE CENTER OF THE BOX’S BOTTOM – ONLY THE WORDS “OLD”, “MADE IN CANADA” AND “98” ARE LEGIBILE. BOX’S WOOD INTERIOR HAS SOME AREAS OF WHITE STAINING FROM REMNANTS OF SILVER POLISH. EXTERIOR IS TARNISHED. VERY GOOD CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
CONTAINER
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
THIS BOX WAS GIVEN TO FRED KING TO COMMEMORATE HIS MARRIAGE TO NANCY TIDMARSH ON JANUARY 24, 1968, FROM THE OFFICERS OF THE 18TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. AFTER KING’S DEATH IN 1986, NANCY KEPT THE BOX, PASSING IT ALONG TO FAMILY FRIENDS CAROLE AND JACK ROBERTS, THE DONORS. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE ROBERTS ABOUT THEIR POSSESSION OF THE BOX ON JANUARY 19, 2015. CAROLE SAID: “WE BECAME GOOD FRIENDS [WITH NANCY]. WE HELPED HER MOVE [BECAUSE] SHE WAS ON HER OWN – HER HUSBAND HAD PASSED AWAY YEARS AGO AND SHE WAS A LADY THAT HAD MOVED HERE AS A YOUNG ENGLISH GIRL AFTER THE WAR TO WORK AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL… WE CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF THE BOX] BECAUSE SHE THOUGHT WE SHOULD GIVE IT TO THE MUSEUM OR GIVE IT TO THE LEGION. WE WERE DOWNSIZING FOR HER... I POLISHED IT AND PUT IT IN A PLACE OF HONOUR.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON FRED KING WAS FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P19790097000 - KING’S RCA SERGE UNIFORM. ACCORDING TO FREDERICK “FRED” THOMAS KING’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, “KING PASSED AWAY ON SATURDAY MARCH 8TH 1986, AT THE AGE OF 82 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. NANCY KING OF 1416, 15TH AVENUE SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE. BORN IN LONDON ENGLAND IN 1904, THE LATE MR. KING IMMIGRATED TO CANADA IN 1919 TO MAPLE CREEK SASKATCHEWAN. HE LATER MOVED TO WINNIPEG, MANITOBA WHERE HE TRAINED AS A MECHANIC FOR THE CPR. FRED LATER MOVED TO ALBERTA WHERE HE BECAME INVOLVED IN THE AUTOMOBILE BUSINESS IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1927, FORMING FRED KING MOTOR CO. LTD., IN 1945, AND OPERATED A SUCCESSFUL AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP UNTIL RETIRING IN 1971. MR. KING WAS APPOINTED HONORARY LIEUTENANT COLONEL 18TH FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1965 AND HONORARY COLONEL 1969-1977. HE WAS ALSO APPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ARMY CADET LEAGUE OF CANADA FROM 1971-1977 AND SERVED ON THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE ALBERTA ARMY CADET LEAGUE FROM 1971-78 AND WAS PRESIDENT FROM 1975-1976.” ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHY IN THE PERMANENT FILE, “KING ENLISTED AS GUNNER 112TH FIELD BATTERY, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1940 AND WAS COMMISSIONED LIEUTENANT 41ST FIELD REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY IN 1944. KING WAS ALSO AN HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL STEWART BRANCH OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION (AT THE TIME OF DONATION IN 1982).” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING SERVICE RECORDS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P19790097000. OTHER COLLECTED ARTIFACTS RELATED TO KING INCLUDE: P19820020000, P19820021000, P19820022001-6, P19820023000, P19820024000, AND P19860039000.
Catalogue Number
P20130018000
Acquisition Date
2013-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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