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Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.5
Length
57
Width
11.3
Description
CAMCORDER COMPRISED OF LENS, BETACAM DECK, AND COLOR CAMERA. BETACAM DECK AT BACK OF CAMERA IS TWO-TONE GREY WITH TWO PLUG-INS FOR “AUDIO IN, CH-1, CH-2” AND ONE PLUG-IN FOR “DC-IN, 12V”. BETACAM DECK HAS TWO BLACK SLIDE BUTTONS ON TOP LABELLED IN WHITE “EJECT” AND “REW”. BETACAM DECK HAS GREY METAL HANDLE AT TOP THAT FASTENS TO BETA CASSETTE DECK. BETACAM DECK HAS YELLOWED PLASTIC WINDOW ON SIDE TO VIEW INSIDE MECHANISMS; BELOW WINDOW IS GREEN, RED AND BLUE DECAL READING “45 NEWS, 45”. REVERSE SIDE HAS SILVER “POWER ON/OF” SWITCH ABOVE METER MEASURING BATTERY CHARGE, “SONY VU”; BETACAM DECK HAS TWO ROUND BLACK BUTTONS LABELLED “RESET” AND “LIGHT” ABOVE BLACK SWITCH LABELLED “TAPE TIMER, TIME CODE”; SIDE HAS DIGITAL DISPLAY SCREEN READING “HOUR, MIN, SEC”. SIDE HAS ROW OF SIX RED LIGHTS NEAR BOTTOM LABELLED WITH WORN WHITE PAINT WITH FIRST TWO ILLEGIBLE, “HUMID, SLACK, TAPE END, BATTERY”. SIDE HAS PANEL THAT OPENS AT BOTTOM EDGE WITH SIX DARK GREY BUTTONS LABELLED IN PAIRS “HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND” AND TWO BLACK SWITCHES LABELLED “U-BIT, TIME” AND “REC RUN, FREE RUN”. SIDE HAS SILVER PLATE FIXED READING “SONY”. BACK OF BETACAM DECK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH RED, GREEN AND BLUE LOGO “45 CFCN TELEVISION”; BACK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY BETACAM, MODEL BVV-1, VIDEOCASSETTE BETACAM DECK, DCIN, 12V, 10W, NO. 11085, SONY CORPORATION, MADE IN JAPAN, 3-676-119-01”. TOP OF BETACAM DECK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SAVE MODE ONLY”. COLOR CAMERA IN MID-SECTION IS LIGHT GREY WITH SMALL PIECE OF SILVER TAPE FIXED TO TOP. SIDE OF CAMERA HAS YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK “1”; SIDE HAS DARK GREY CONTROL PANEL AT BOTTON EDGE WITH EMBOSSED TEXT AND SILVER SWITCHES AND BUTTONS, “AUTO WHITE BAL, CAMERA, PRE HEAT/ON, VTR, SAVE/STOP, GAIN, 12/6/0, OUTPUT, BASS/CAM, WHITE BAL, PRE SET/AUTO”. SIDE HAS DARK GREY BUTTON ABOVE CONTROL PANEL LABELLED “VTR START”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING BESIDE PANEL LABELLED “PEDESTAL”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH WORN BLACK TEXT “SONY MODEL NO. BVP-1, COLOR VIDEO CAMERA, DC, 12V, 11W, NO. 10505”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “FILTER, 1 3200’K, 2 5200’K + 1/4ND, 3 5200’K, 4 6800’K”. REVERSE SIDE HAS BLACK PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY” ABOVE BLACK LABEL WITH RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LOGO “TRINICON”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING AT LOWER EDGE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “MONITOR OUT”; LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER KEY HOLE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “BATTERY”. CAMERA HAS ATTACHED BLACK ABOVE-VIEWFINDER WITH RUBBER GUARD OVER GLASS LENS. VIEWFINDER IS FIXED TO FRONT OF CAMERA; VIEWFINDER HAS WHITE TAPE ATTACHED TO TOP WITH BLUE HANDWRITTEN TEXT “PASS JULZ DAMAGE TO TUBE OR MULT.PLER”. BACK OF VIEWFINDER HAS SILVER SWITCH “TALLY, ON/OF” AND TWO BLACK METAL TURN-KNOBS “BRIGHT, CONTR”. FRONT OF VIEWFINDER HAS BLACK PLATE ATTACHED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY”. BLACK LENS AT FRONT FIXED IN LENS STAND WITH LEATHER STRAP ON SIDE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS “VTR, RET, IRIS M”; SIDE OF LENS STAND HAS BLACK SWITCHES “W/T” AND “IRIS, A/M”. LENS HAS WHITE LABEL AROUND MID-SECTION “CANON MACRO TV ZOOMJ13X9C, 9-117MM, 1.1.6, NO.80581, CANON, JAPAN”. LENS ROTATES TO ADJUST FOCUS AND DEPTH. BETACAM HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND DISCOLORATION ON PLASTIC WINDOW; COLOR CAMERA HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND ADHESIVE RESIDUE ON SIDE; HANDLE ON TOP HAS WORN AND CHIPPED PAINT; VIEWFINDER IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARREN KRONLUND REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A SONY BVV-1 BETACAM AND CAMCORDER. THE CAMCORDER WAS USED IN THE 1980S BY THE CTV LETHBRIDGE FILM CREW. ON THE FUNCTION OF THE CAMERA IN THE CTV STUDIO, KRONLUND ELABORATED, “THE TECHNOLOGY WITH CAMERAS PROGRESSED QUICKER THAN THE DECKS DID. THESE CAMERAS AND DECKS ARE USED FOR ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION [AND ARE] CALLED THE EFP CAMERAS. THE DECKS KIND [ARE] THAT TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE MAJORITY OF STATIONS USED FOR THE LONGEST TIME [IN] SONY BETA CAM FORMAT. THAT’S WHAT THE DECK IS, BUT THE CAMERAS THEMSELVES HAD AT ONE TIME THREE TUBES FOR COLOUR CAMERAS. THEN TECHNOLOGY CAME WHERE THEY COULD DO IT WITH JUST SENSORS…SO YOU DIDN’T HAVE TUBES. IT WAS MORE SENSITIVE TO LIGHT AND THAT WAS AN IMPROVEMENT. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE TO BRING A BUNCH OF LIGHTS ALONG WITH YOUR SHOOTS. AS THOSE CAMERAS CAME OUT, THEY JUST DID SUCH A BETTER JOB, THAT THESE CAMERAS WERE NO LONGER USED. ALTHOUGH THEY WORKED, THEY WOULD JUST GET STORED AND NEWER TECHNOLOGY, BETTER PICTURES AND LIGHTER [WOULD BE USED].” “[THIS CAMERA] IS A COMPOSITE. AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVED, THEY COULD SUPPLY [THE] UPPER HALF, THE CAMERA HALF, [AND] YOU COULD CONTINUE TO USE THE OLDER DECK.” TO ME [THE DECK AND CAMERA] ARE DIFFERENT [AGES]. I THINK THE DECK IS NEWER THAN THE CAMERA. OTHERWISE THEY’D BE THE SAME COLOUR. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE OLD, ORIGINAL DECK BUT YOU COULD SWAP OUT DECKS BECAUSE THEY DID MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WITH DECKS AS WELL. THERE WAS A TIME THEY USED METAL TAPES WHICH WAS FOR AUDIO. IT HELPED, YOU COULD GET BETTER AUDIO QUALITY. THEY CALLED THEM METAL, IT’S JUST METAL PARTICLES IN THE TAPE.” “I WOULD SAY THIS CAMERA PROBABLY GOT USED, I’M GOING TO GUESS ’84…IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE…I PROBABLY SERVICED THE] CAMERA AND/OR DECK…[BY 1990 IT WAS] PROBABLY REPLACED WITH THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY. NOT THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY BUT NEWEST TO US, CALGARY WOULD HAVE HAD THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY.” “BETA WAS THE STAPLE FORMAT FOR VIDEO FOR MANY YEARS. PROBABLY LEADING RIGHT UP TO INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD IT WAS THE KING. PANASONIC HAD A FORMAT [TOO]…HITACHI HAD THEIR OWN TOO, BUT THEY EVEN MADE THEIR CAMERAS COMPATIBLE WITH BETA DECKS THAT’S HOW BIG INFLUENCE [WAS]. SOME SMALLER, INDEPENDENT STATIONS MAYBE WENT WITH SOME OF THAT STUFF, BUT I’D SAY 90% OF THE INDUSTRY WAS BETA.” “IT WAS [FOR] REPORTERS. IT WAS FOR NEWS AND VIDEO PRODUCTION.” KRONLUND ELABORATED ON THE CAMERA’S HISTORY IN PRODUCTION, NOTING, “IT’S BEEN IN THE BASEMENT FOR PROBABLY [TEN YEARS]…I FOUND IT IN AN OLD SHIPPING CONTAINER. THERE’S BEEN NUMEROUS UPGRADES TO CAMERAS SINCE THEN, SO NOTHING WAS DONE WITH IT. THE LAST TIME IT WAS USED I’M GOING TO GUESS [WAS] ROUGHLY TEN YEARS AGO, MAYBE MORE.” “I DOUBT YOU WOULD FIND ANYONE USING IT, BUT I WOULDN’T BE SURPRISED IF SOMEBODY HAD IT IN THEIR BASEMENT [FOR] THE SAME REASON OURS WAS. JUST OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND AND YOU’RE JUST GOING ABOUT YOUR DAY–TO-DAY BUSINESS, UNTIL YOU START CLEANING OUT THINGS AND YOU GO, “OH YEAH, THE OLD BBB1.”” “[WE ACQUIRED EQUIPMENT] USUALLY USED. CALGARY WOULD GET THE NEW STUFF AND THEN THE WORKING STUFF THAT THEY WERE REPLACING WOULD COME DOWN TO US, FOR THE MOST PART. THE CAMERAS WE HAVE NOW WERE BOUGHT BRAND NEW, STATE-OF THE-ART, SO THAT WAS NICE. IT IS NICE FOR THAT, BUT THIS WAS PROBABLY PRE-DATED EVEN ME AND I HAVE BEEN HERE TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS. IT WAS PROBABLY THE CAMERA THEY WERE USING, IF NOT AT THE TIME, BUT LIKELY BEFORE I STARTED.” “THIS [CAMERA] FUNCTIONS TODAY. I’M SURE YOU COULD MAKE PICTURES WITH IT, BUT THE USE OF IT WOULD PROBABLY BE, I’M GOING TO GUESS, MAYBE FIVE OR SIX YEARS. THEN [THE] BUDGETS WOULD [GROW], THEY GOT THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN SHOOT UNDER LESS LIGHT. IT’S A LIGHTER CAMERA AND [THEY] HAVE THESE BENEFITS, SO THEY WOULD BUDGET IN TO UPDATE THE CAMERAS AND DECKS. THROUGH THAT CYCLE, THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD PROBABLY GET A COUPLE OF NEW CAMERAS, THE OLDER STUFF WE’D PUT IN THE BASEMENT.” “I’M [NOW] CLEANING OUT OLD EQUIPMENT, BECAUSE IT BUILDS UP AND WE RUN OUT OF ROOM. IT’S SOMETHING HARD TO GET RID OF BECAUSE THEY’RE ALWAYS WORKING AND USUALLY WORKING AND FUNCTIONING FINE, BUT TECHNOLOGY PROGRESSES AND THEY BECOME BIGGER AND BETTER--OR THERE BECOMES BIGGER AND BETTER WAYS OF DOING THE SAME JOB. IT JUST GETS OUTDATED AND HITS THE SHELF. [I] HATE TO SEE IT JUST GET RECYCLED.” “I’M NOT REALLY THAT TYPE OF [NOSTALGIC] PERSON. THE CAMERAS TODAY ARE ALL DIGITAL, THEY GO RIGHT TO A SD CARD IN DIGITAL FORMAT. THERE’S NO MECHANICAL PARTS AND THAT’S PART OF THE REASON I WAS EMPLOYED BECAUSE SO MUCH OF WHAT I DID WAS BECAUSE PARTS WEAR OUT AND NEED TO BE FIXED AND REPLACED, WHERE THE NEW CAMERAS…IT’S NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO IF IT’S IN DIGITAL FORMAT AND [HAS] NO MECHANICAL MOVING PARTS. I DON’T MISS WORKING ON THEM, THAT COULD BE FRUSTRATING BECAUSE A LOT OF TINY LITTLE GEARS AND TIMING…YOU CAN SPEND HOURS AND NOT GET ANYWHERE, AND THEN FINALLY SHIP IT OUT TO THE MANUFACTURER BECAUSE YOU JUST COULDN’T GET ANYWHERE. YOU SPENT A WEEK WORKING ON IT AND NOW YOU’VE GOT TO, IN THE END, PAY SOMEONE TO DO IT. THOSE ARE FRUSTRATIONS, BUT IT IS SATISFYING WHEN YOU DO FIX A PROBLEM AND ARE ABLE TO FIX IT. BUT THOSE DAYS ARE BEHIND US AND I CAN’T SAY I MISS THEM. IT’S JUST DIFFERENT WAYS OF MAINTAINING CAMERAS NOW.” “IT’S HARD TO THROW OUT BECAUSE THE VALUE OF IT IS LIKE BUYING A CAR…AT THAT TIME. THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS PUTTING A CAR ON YOUR SHOULDER, MAYBE NOT QUITE A CAR, BUT I’M GOING TO GUESS THIS CAMERA WAS PROBABLY FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS BACK THEN. THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180005000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CTV AUDIO BOARD/CONSOLE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
2014
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160013000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CTV AUDIO BOARD/CONSOLE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
2014
Materials
METAL, WOOD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2 1
Height
40.5
Length
71.5
Width
44.5
Description
A: AUDIO BOARD. RECTANGULAR SHAPED BASE. MEDIUM BLUE METAL BOTTOM WITH MEDIUM BROWN WOOD AND PLASTIC UPPER PORTION. UPPER PORTION SITS ON A DIAGONAL INCLINE, WITH A SILVER COLOURED METAL STRIP ALONG THE BOTTOM. ABOVE THIS ARE FOUR RECTANGULAR HOLES: TWO LEFT MOST RECTANGLES ARE EMPTY AND REVEAL THE BOARD MODULES BENEATH. THE NEXT TWO RECTANGLES EACH HAVE WHITE BUTTONS IN THEM: FOUR WHITE BUTTONS LABELED BLANK, “START”, “STOP”, “RESET” IN ONE, WITH TWO IN THE NEXT: :”FULL TRK.” AND “HALF TRK.” JUST ABOVE THIS IS A LINE OF EIGHT LARGE CIRCULAR BLACK AND SILVER KNOBS NEAR BOTTOM OF THE CONSOLE. TO THE RIGHT OF THE KNOBS ARE THREE SMALL CIRCULAR SILVER COLOURED KNOBS, LABELED FROM TOP: “HDST”, “FX SEND”, “MONITOR”, AND THEN 10 SMALL SQUARE BUTTONS, LABELED FROM TOP: “CUE”, “CH8”, “CH7”, “CH6”, “CH5”, “CH4”, “CH3”, “CH2”, “CH1”, “PGM”. IMMEDIATELY TO THE RIGHT OF THIS LINE OF BUTTONS IS A LONG RECTANGLE WITH TEXT: “FX SEND SELECT”. ABOVE THE EIGHT LARGE KNOBS IS A STRIP OF SILVER METAL WITH A SERIES OF OFF-WHITE BUTTONS ABOVE. THE STRIP IS LABELED, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: “CDP”, “RSWR-24”, “CASS”, “MIC 1”, “MIC 2”, “DIGICART”, “FX RTN”, “COMPUTER CH1”, “COMPUTER CH2”, “EDIT B”. JUST ABOVE “EDIT B” IS A COUNTER, WHICH IS PRESENTLY STOPPED AT “666”. AT THE VERY TOP OF THE BOARD, IS A RECTANGULAR SECTION, WHICH IS 63.5CM LONG AND 9.7CM TALL. IN THIS SECTION, THERE ARE TWO SQUARE SPEAKERS ON EITHER END. BELOW THE LEFT SPEAKER IS AN EMBOSSED MAKERS LABEL: “MCCURDY RADIO INDUSTRIES LIMITED.” A VU METER IS IN THE CENTRE. IT’S BACKGROUND HAS YELLOWED, HAS A SCALE IN BLACK AND RED INK. REVERSE IS MOSTLY MEDIUM BLUE METAL, WITH A HINGED UPPER PORTION THAT IS TOPPED IN WOOD. ALONG THE BACK THERE ARE TEN VENTILATION SECTIONS: EACH HAS THREE HORIZONTAL LINES. TOP LEFT CORNER IS A BLACK AND SILVER LABEL: “MCCURDY RADIO INDUSTRIES LIMITED. TORONTO, ONTARIO CANADA. MODEL NO. SS4388A. SERIAL # C505084. 117 V. ___ VA. 60 CPS.” A SHORT, LIGHT GREY CORD WITH A BLUE TIP, COMES OUT OF THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BACK. TOP RIGHT CORNER IS A SILVER COLOURED METAL CIRCLE, WITH A LIGHT GREEN CENTRE. THE LIGHT GREEN CENTRE HAS THREE HOLES. ABOVE THE HOLES IS A SMALL BUTTON “PUSH”. EMBOSSED IN THE METAL BELOW THE THREE HOLES: “SWITCHCRAFT”. A BLACK POWER CORD COMES OUT OF THE BOTTOM OF THE UNIT. OVERALL GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. UNIT IS SLIGHTLY DISCOULOURED/STAINED. A FEW SMALL SCRATCHES IN THE SURFACE, ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP WOODEN PORTION. B: A COMB BOUND MANUAL WITH BLUE PLASTIC COVERS. A CUT OUT IN THE FRONT COVER SHOWS THE FRONT PAGE, DISPLAYING THE TITLE “INSTRUCTIONS SS4 388A CFCN COMMUNICATIONS CALGARY ALBERTA 760083C.” THE BLUE FRONT COVER ITSELF READS “MCCURDY RADIO INDUSTRIES LIMITED”, AND “MCCURDY RADIO INDUSTRIES INCORPORATED”, EACH FOLLOWED BY AN ADDRESS. THE BOOK IS DIVIDED BY PALE BLUE DIVIDERS INTO SIX SECTIONS. EACH SECTION IS AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL COMPLETE WITH DIAGRAMS, FOR A COMPONENT OF THE SS4388A, WITH THE FIRST SECTION BEING A MANUAL FOR THE SS4388A AS A WHOLE. AT THE BACK OF THE BOOKLET SIT A NUMBER OF LOOSE PAGES, SOME WITH HOLES FOR THE COMB BINDING, SOME FOLD OUT DIAGRAMS. DIMENSIONS OF MANUAL ARE: LENGTH 25.9 CM; HEIGHT 31.1 CM; WIDTH 25.9. CONDITION: THE PAGES AND DIVIDERS STICKING OUT OF THE BOOK IS BENT AND CURLED, WORN SOFT. THE FRONT COVER IN SPLITTING AT THE BOTTOM CORNERS.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH DARREN KRONLUND CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN MAY 2016, BROADCAST TECHNICAL ENGINEER & IT SUPPORT AT CTV IN LETHBRIDGE. DARREN STARTED WORKING FOR CTV IN 1989. AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE FOUR BROADCAST ENGINEERS AND NOW DARREN IS THE ONLY ONE. CTV OFFERED THE CONSOLE TO THE MUSEUM BECAUSE, ACCORDING TO DARREN, “ALTHOUGH IT STILL WORKS AND FUNCTIONS, IT HAS BECOME NOT RELEVANT ANYMORE BECAUSE WE’RE IN A DIGITAL WORLD NOW. THAT’S THE MAIN REASON. IT HASN’T BEEN USED BY US IN, 2016, IN PROBABLY 18 MONTHS - IT’S BEEN USED NOT THAT LONG AGO. IT TOOK US RIGHT THROUGH, AND INCLUDING THE TRANSITION INTO DIGITAL. IT WAS PART OF THAT [TIME], WHERE WE WOULD VOICE THROUGH THE BOARD, WHICH IS IN THE ANALOG WORLD, AND WE PUT SOME EQUIPMENT IN LINE THAT WOULD CONVERT ANALOG TO DIGITAL, AND GET IT INTO OUR COMPUTERS, AND WE COULD E-MAIL IT, SO IT WAS USED EVEN THEN.” THE CONVERSION TO DIGITAL FROM ANALOG STARTED IN THE SPRING OF 2014 AND THE PRIMARY DELAY IN CONVERTING ENTIRELY TO DIGITAL WAS THE COST: “THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY TO GET ALL OF THE EQUIPMENT, ALL AT ONCE, AND MAKE THE SWITCH OVER, AND THEN STILL PUT OUT NEWSCASTS, AND SO THAT WAS JUST FINDING THE RIGHT TIME TO JUMP, AND IT TURNED OUT THAT IT WAS A BUDGET YEAR THAT SOME CAPITAL BECAME AVAILABLE, AND LET’S MAKE THE JUMP. SO, WE WENT OUT AND BOUGHT THE EQUIPMENT, SO THAT WE COULD GATHER IT IN DIGITAL, EDIT IT IN DIGITAL, AND THEN HAVE THE MEANS TO FILE IN DIGITAL. AND THAT WAS ACTUALLY ALL DONE LIKE WITHIN 3 MONTHS. THAT WAS A QUICK LITTLE PROJECT. AND, THIS WAS STILL WORKING. IT JUST FILLED A NEED ALL THROUGH THAT." DARREN RELATED THAT, AT THE TIME OF THE INTERVIEW, CTV WAS “PROBABLY 80% DIGITAL.” FURTHER CONVERSION IS HELD UP DUE TO COST: “IF WE HAD THE MONEY TO DO IT, WE WOULD. WE STILL HAVE SOME VIDEO EQUIPMENT THAT WE ARE USING ANALOG HERE, WHERE IT’S TAKING ABOUT FOUR PIECES OF EQUIPMENT TO ACHIEVE STUFF, BECAUSE WE HAVE TO BRING THE DIGITAL WORLD BACK TO ANALOG. IT’S KIND OF REVERSE, BUT COST-WISE, IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE TO REPLACE IT WHEN WE HAVE SOMETHING WORKING ALTHOUGH IT’S GOING TO TAKE SOMETHING FAILING IN THAT CHAIN TO MAYBE PROMPT THE … MOVE OVER TO DIGITAL THERE. SO, WE STILL HAVE SOME EQUIPMENT THAT IS IN THE OLD ANALOG WORLD, BUT RIGHT NOW IT HAS GONE SO FAR AS WE ARE CONVERTING DIGITAL TO ANALOG AND IT COMES DOWN TO US MONITORING IT. OUR MONITORING EQUIPMENT IS IN THE ANALOG WORLD.” DARREN EXPLAINED WHY THIS BOARD CONTINUED TO BE USED, DURING THE TRANSITION TO DIGITAL: “EVERYTHING COMES DOWN TO MONEY, AND TO REPLACE IT WITH THE DIGITAL WORLD, AT THE COST, AND WE COULD ACHIEVE IT JUST BY BUYING SOME IN-LINE EQUIPMENT, AND GET THE SAME RESULTS, SO, IT STILL FUNCTIONS AND WORKED, AND DID WHAT WE REQUIRED WHICH WAS TO MIX SIGNALS, OR EVEN JUST TO TAKE A SIGNAL AND GET IT WHERE WE WANTED, WHICH WAS THROUGH THIS OTHER EQUIPMENT, TO DO THE CONVERSION, AND IT JUST WORKED, AND IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO PUT A BUNCH OF MONEY INTO SOMETHING TO REPLACE THE WHOLE CONSOLE WHEN WE DIDN’T NEED TO.” THE BOARD CAME FROM A ROOM CALLED THE AUDIO BOOTH, WHICH IS “USED FOR VOICING. IT’S GOT A SM4, I THINK, MICROPHONE WHICH IS A VERY EXPENSIVE MIC, AND IT’S COMMON THROUGHOUT THE BROADCAST INDUSTRY, AND THE ROOM ITSELF IS ACOUSTICALLY-TREATED SO THAT, YOU KNOW, YOU DON’T WANT NOISE FROM OUTSIDE COMING IN. SO, EVEN THE TELEPHONE HAS A FLASHING LIGHT IF IT’S RINGING. IF YOU NEED TO GET HOLD OF SOMEBODY IN THE AUDIO BOOTH, IT FLASHES. IT’S JUST A ROOM SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR VOICING.” DARREN EXPLAINED HOW THE CONSOLE ENDED UP AT CTV: “THE MANUAL TELLS ME THAT IT WAS BRAND-NEW IN 1972, AND, I’VE TALKED TO A FEW PEOPLE. THE PEOPLE THAT ORIGINALLY PROBABLY BOUGHT THIS, IT WAS USED UP IN CALGARY FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, AND I DON’T HAVE THE HISTORY FROM CALGARY. BUT, I’M GOING TO GUESS THAT, SOMEWHERE, PROBABLY, IF IT WAS NEW IN 1972, AND I CAME ONBOARD HERE IN ’89, SO, SOMEWHERE IN THE ‘80’S, PROBABLY MID ‘80’S, I’M GUESSING THAT WE RECEIVED IT, AND PUT IT INTO USE – I’M PRETTY SURE DIRECTLY INTO AN AUDIO BOOTH. THE AUDIO BOOTH MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN THERE AT THE TIME, BECAUSE, I KNOW, WHEN I CAME, THERE WAS ANOTHER BOARD, VERY SIMILAR TO THIS, THAT WAS IN A CONTROL ROOM, AND IT WAS USED AS PART OF PRODUCTION.” DARREN DOESN’T FIND HIMSELF FEELING VERY NOSTALGIC ABOUT OLD EQUIPMENT: “THE MORE PROBLEMS THEY CREATE, THE LESS ATTACHED I AM TO THEM, (LAUGHS) BECAUSE PART OF MY JOB IS TO KEEP THEM RUNNING. TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, ACTUALLY I WOULD BE QUITE FOND OF THIS, BECAUSE I RARELY, IN ALL MY YEARS, I CAN’T EVEN REMEMBER, MAYBE 2 OR 3 TIMES, I’VE HAD TO DEAL WITH PROBLEMS WITH IT. SO IT HAS PROBABLY BEEN, IF NOT THE MOST RELIABLE, RIGHT UP THERE. AND, ONE OF THE THINGS I WAS GOING TO MENTION, WITH THESE, THE COMPONENTS ARE ALL DISCRETE. EACH BOARD HAS DISCRETE COMPONENTS, MEANING INDIVIDUAL TRANSISTORS. WHEREAS NOWADAYS BOARDS, THEY HAVE CHIPS AND IC’S, YOU DON’T SEE THAT ON THESE. YOU SEE – YOU’D WORK ON THESE; AND YOU’D LOOK AT A SCHEMATIC, AND YOU WOULD ISOLATE IT RIGHT DOWN TO A RESISTOR, OR A CAPACITOR AND TODAY, YOU CAN’T WORK ON EQUIPMENT. IT’S MORE DISPOSABLE TODAY.” DARREN SEES THIS TRANSITION AS BOTH “GOOD AND BAD. THIS LEVEL OF TROUBLESHOOTING IS REWARDING WHEN YOU ‘GET IT’, BUT IT CAN BE PRETTY FRUSTRATING WHEN YOU ARE JUST KIND OF CHASING YOUR TAIL, WHERE WITH THE NEW STUFF, IT’S MORE BOARD REPLACEMENT, AND IT’S A LOT QUICKER PROCESS. BUT ALSO, THE REASON I SAY IT’S MORE DISPOSABLE, BECAUSE, YOU DON’T SPEND THE TIME ON IT LIKE YOU WOULD HERE, BECAUSE THE TIME THAT IT TAKES AT THIS BOARD, THEY JUST DON’T SUPPLY YOU BOARDS ANYMORE. THEY WOULD SEND LOANERS AND SUPPORT FOR STUFF WAS A LOT BETTER BACK THEN. NOW, IT’S BECOME A DISPOSABLE WORLD. IF YOU DON’T HAVE A CARD, YOU BUY A NEW CARD, AND THAT KIND OF THING. COMPONENTS JUST HAD MORE LONGEVITY. THIS ERA – I STILL HAVE SOME DISTRIBUTION AMPS THAT ARE STILL IN SERVICE AND THEY OUTLIVE STUFF THAT WAS BOUGHT 10 YEARS AFTER THEM. THERE’S A LOT MORE RESILIENCY TO STUFF THAT WAS BUILT THEN.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPY OF INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20160013000
Acquisition Date
2016-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
No. Pieces
4
Height
14.4
Length
221.5
Width
51.2
Description
EMERGENCY FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER. ADJUSTABLE, MEDIUM BURGUNDY COLOURED VINYL WITH SILVER COLOURED METAL, AND FOUR BLACK RUBBER WHEELS. OUTER RECTANGULAR FRAME WITH A SMALLER, ADJUSTABLE FRAME WITHIN. STRETCHER HAS THREE STRAPS: TWO WINE COLOURED NYLON SEATBELT STYLE STRAPS, WITH METAL AND BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLES, ON THE UPPER BODY. BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLE AT CHEST HEIGHT HAS "FERNO" IN GREY. THIRD BUCKLE IS A BLACK NYLON AND PLASTIC BUCKLE, ON THE LOWER BODY. BACK OF PLASTIC BUCKLE IS EMBOSSED WITH "ACCULOC CSR-10 A.C.W. ASIA, WOONSOCKET RI". RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING ON RIGTH SIDE OF STRETCHER, AT WAIST AREA, READS "FERNO". TWO RUBBER FEET AT THE FOOT END OF STRETCHER TO STABILIZE STRETCHER WHEN FULLY EXTENDED. VINYL IS IN TWO PIECES AND CAN BE REMOVED FROM INNER FRAME. GOLD COLOURED ZIPPERS AND SILVER COLOURED SNAPS HOLD VINYL IN PLACE. THERE ARE TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE FOOT PORTION, BOTH RUNNING VERTICALLY. THERE ARE ALSO TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE UPPER BODY PORTION, WITH ONE RUNNING HORIZONTALLY AND ONE VERTICALLY. METAL LABEL RIVETED ONTO FRAME AT FOOT OF STRETCHER READS "FERNO - WASHINGTON, INC. WILMINGTON, OHIO, U.S.A. SERIAL NUMBER 07-052255." FOUR FOLDABLE HANDLES, TWO AT HEAD AND TWO AT FEET. HANDLES HAVE TEXTURED BLACK PLASTIC GRIPS. GRIPS EMBOSSED WITH "HUNTWILDE CORPORATION". LOWER HANDLES (AT FOOT) HAVE METAL CYLINDERS THAT SLIDE OVER THE JOINT TO PREVENT HANDLES FROM FOLDING BACK IN. CROSSBAR AT KNEE AREA HAS A SMALL RECTANGULAR PIECE THAT SWINGS OUT AND ONTO A BOLT WHEN STRETCHER IS FOLDED INTO SITTING POSITION, WHICH PREVENTS STRETCHER FROM GOING BACK TO A LAYING DOWN POSITION. UPPER BODY PORTION CAN BE ADJUSTED TO FOUR DIFFERENT POSITIONS: LAYING TOTALLY FLAT TO SITTING AT AN APPROXIMATELY 45 DEGREE ANGLE. AT SHOULDER AREA ON RIGHT SIDE THERE IS A TRIANGULAR SHAPED CLIP, WHICH RELEASES THE UPPER BODY PORTION AND ALLOWS IT TO BE ADJUSTED TO A SITTING POSITION. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. VINYL IS STRUCTURALLY VERY GOOD, WITH NO RIPS OR TEARS. SCUFF MARKS AND BLACK STAINS ALL OVER, ESPECIALLY ALONG THE EDGES. METAL FRAME IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. WHEELS AT THE FOOT ARE WORN MORE THAN THOSE AT THE HEAD.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-HUMAN-POWERED
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS EMERGENCY FOLDING STRETCHER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE STRETCHER WAS “USED PRIMARILY IN AMBULANCES FOR MOVING PATIENTS DOWN STAIRS OR AROUND TIGHT CORNERS. WE USE A MORE STAIR FRIENDLY VERSION NOW.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED: “IT WAS MORE OR LESS TO TAKE PEOPLE DOWN STAIRS. SIT THEM UP, STRAP THEM IN, HAD WHEELS ON IT. IT WAS FOR A PERSON THAT DIDN’T HAVE ANY SERIOUS INJURIES MORE OR LESS … IT WAS LIKE A LITTLE CHAIR, FOLD UP, SIT THEM DOWN … GO DOWN THE STAIRS ONE AT A TIME – THUNK, THUNK, THUNK, THUNK.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “I HATED THIS STRETCHER. THIS WAS A FOLDING STRETCHER … ACTUALLY THE OLD STAIR-CHAIR, BASICALLY. THEY HAVE MODERNIZED AND IMPROVED THIS DRAMATICALLY. BUT THIS PUZZLE OF A STRETCHER – YOU USED TO BE ABLE TO SET IT UP SO THAT IT CAME INTO A CHAIR … ANY TIME YOU WENT UP INTO AN APARTMENT BUILDING THAT WAS UNDER THREE STORIES, THERE’S NO ELEVATOR, SO YOU SOMETIMES HAD TO CARRY PEOPLE DOWN THREE FLIGHTS OF STAIRS. THIS WAS THE CHAIR OF CHOICE A LOT OF TIMES, IT WAS THE STRETCHER OF CHOICE, BECAUSE IT WAS LIGHTER THAN THE OTHER ONE AND IT WAS EASIER TO MANEUVER AROUND CORNERS … IT WAS A PUZZLE TO PUT TOGETHER AND TO TAKE APART AND I JUST NEVER EVER – I HATED THIS THING. TO THIS DAY, WHEN THE PARAMEDICS SAY ‘WE’RE GONNA NEED THE STAIR CHAIR’, I GRIT MY TEETH AND I CRINGE A LITTLE BIT, I THINK BECAUSE I THINK OF THIS THING, EVEN THOUGH THE NEW ONE IS WAY BETTER. THIS WAS IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE AND I WOULD SAY THAT THIS WAS IN SERVICE ON THE AMBULANCES UNTIL ABOUT … 7 YEARS AGO, GIVE OR TAKE. SO THE BETTER PART OF 15 YEARS THAT THAT WAS IN SERVICE WHILE I WAS HERE.” HE CONTINUED: “THE WORST PART ABOUT THIS IS THAT WHEN YOU PUT A PATIENT ON IT AND YOU LIFTED THEM UP TO GO DOWN THE STAIRS, IT FELT UNSTABLE ENOUGH FOR THEM THAT THEY ALWAYS WANTED TO PUT THEIR ARMS OUT, AND THE SECOND THAT THEY GRABBED ON TO SOMETHING, WELL THEN YOUR CENTRE OF GRAVITY IS LOST AND THEN YOU WERE REALLY IN IT. LIKE YOU THOUGHT, ‘GEEZ, WE COULD ACTUALLY DROP THIS GUY.’ BUT THAT’S WHAT I DISLIKED PROBABLY THE MOST ABOUT THIS THING, OUTSIDE OF HAVING TO PUT IT TOGETHER.” PETIT ADDED: “IF YOU GO TO THE BUILDINGS UP HERE ON LONDON ROAD, SOME TWO STORY BUILDINGS AND THE STAIRS ARE VERY NARROW AND VERY TIGHT, WE USED TO USE THIS TYPE. SO IN OTHER WORDS, INSTEAD OF PUTTING HIM ON A STRETCHER, YOU’D PUT HIM ON THE SEAT. ONE GUY GETS AT THE BACK AND ONE GUY GETS AT THE FRONT AND TAKE THE PERSON DOWN … OVER THE YEARS I GOT A BAD BACK AND GUESS WHERE I GOT THE BAD BACK FROM? IT WAS LIFTING, DOING THINGS LIKE THIS, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY CUMBERSOME.” DZUREN AGREED: “THAT’S JUST A CONFINED SPACE STRETCHER … YOU CAN’T [ALWAYS] GET THE BIG STRETCHER IN, SO YOU CAN PUT THEM ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE. IN AN ELEVATOR, YOU CAN’T GET THAT BIG ONE IN THERE. SOME OF THE ELEVATORS, THE RESIDENTIAL ONES, THEY DON’T, AT LEAST IN THE DAYS GONE BY, THEY DIDN’T THINK ABOUT HAVING TO ACCOMMODATE STRETCHERS. I WOULD PROBABLY SAY IT’S A RARE OCCASION THAT WE HAD TO USE THAT. CAUSE A LOT OF TIMES … IF THE PERSON WAS FAIRLY PHYSICALLY OKAY, YOU COULD TAKE HIM OUT, JUST HOLD HIM. ONE GUY BY THE ARMS, ONE GUY BY THE LEGS, WE HAD A TECHNIQUE THERE WHERE YOU COULD QUITE EASILY TAKE HIM OUT THAT WAY WITHOUT DOING HIM ANY HARM, YOU KNOW. IF HE HAD A BROKEN ARM, WELL, WE COULDN’T DO THAT, SO YOU’D HAVE TO USE ONE OF THOSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
31
Height
100.75
Length
103.25
Width
46
Description
.1 – WOOD CABINET CONTAINING 30 DRAWERS IN SIX ROWS (.2 - .31). CABINET’S FOUR LEGS AND EDGES ARE SQUARED, WITH THREE METAL ANGLED BRACKETS AND TWO WOODEN CORNER BRACES ATTACHING THE CABINET BODY TO THE LEGS. WOOD IS STAINED BLONDE. STAMPED TEXT IN BLUE INK ON UNDERSIDE OF CABINET READS "MADE IN CANADA". GENERAL WEAR AND SCUFFS OVERALL, ESPECIALLY ALONG TOP FRONT EDGE AND BOTTOM FRONT SKIRTING PANEL. DRIPS OF WHITE PAINT ON EDGES OF BOTH FRONT LEGS AND CABINET BACK EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 100.75 X 46 X 103.25 ALL DRAWERS (.2 - .31) ARE WOOD WITH BRASS LABELPLATES AND MEASURE 9.75 X 14.5 X 41. .2 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .3 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .4 – EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .5 – HALF FULL OF LOOSE CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .6 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .7 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .8 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. DRAWER ROD BRACKET IS MISSING ONE SCREW AND HANGS LOOSE. .9 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .10 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .11 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL; DRAWER ROD IN PLACE. .12 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .13 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .14 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .15 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .16 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .17 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1990”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .18 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .19 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 A-J”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .20 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 J-S”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .21 – HALF FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 S-Z”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .22 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1990 A-K DONE”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .23 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .24 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .25 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .26 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .27 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .28 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .29 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “CDN… PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .30 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .31 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK.
Subjects
FURNITURE
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS CARD CATALOGUE WAS PRODUCED AND USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY EXPLAINED THE CATALOGUING PROCESS AND SUGGESTED THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN HOUSED IN THE LIBRARY’S SENATOR BUCHANAN ROOM (A REFERENCE RESOURCE OF LOCAL HISTORIES AND GENEALOGIES) AT ONE TIME. MCELRAVY SAID: “WE USED [CARD CATALOGUES] PRIOR TO AUTOMATING OUR CATALOGUE WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘80S… THERE ARE AT LEAST THREE INDEXES [INSIDE THIS SPECIFIC CATALOGUE]… WE USED TO CREATE CARD INDEXES FOR COLLECTIONS AND THINGS THAT YOU COULDN’T FIND… THROUGH NORMAL CATALOGUING PROCESSES. SO, THE FIRST ONE IS… THE SONG INDEX AND THAT WAS MADE UP OF ANALYTICS OF SHEET MUSIC MAGAZINE AND COLLECTIONS AND SONGS – ALL MUSIC AS OPPOSED TO JUST THE LYRICS. SO WE WOULD TAKE COLLECTIONS OF SONGS IN OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION, WE DIDN’T USE ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY – SO IT WASN’T A GENERAL THING IT WAS SPECIFIC, A SPECIFIC TOOL TO OUR COLLECTION… IF SOMEONE WANTED A PARTICULAR PIECE OF MUSIC… WE WOULD BE ABLE TO FIND THAT HERE RATHER THAN PEOPLE STANDING AT THE SHELF, LEAFING THROUGH ALL OF THAT… [AT] THE OTHER END OF THE BANK OF CARDS IS THE PLAY INDEX AND THAT’S THE SAME IDEA – THERE WOULD BE ‘AUTHOR’, ‘PLAYWRIGHT’ AND ‘TITLE’ CARDS PUT IN FOR EACH OF THE PLAYS IN COLLECTIONS THAT WE HAD AT LPL. AND THE MIDDLE ONE WAS THE INDEX TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD – I THINK SOME OF IT GOES BACK TO ’99 AND BEFORE AND FOR THAT ONE THE STAFF WOULD CUT OUT ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT SUBJECT HEADINGS ON THEM AND MAKE A CORRESPONDING CARD FOR THE CATALOGUE SO THAT THAT WOULD GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO THAT [FILE]...” MCELRAVY CONTINUED: “I THINK [THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY CATALOGUE] WAS IN THE MID ‘80S… [AFTER THAT PROCESS] I’M NOT SURE HOW OFTEN THEY USED [THE CARD CATALOGUES] ANYMORE… PERHAPS IT WAS JUST A QUESTION OF HANGING ON TO IT FOR THE SAKE OF HANGING ON TO IT.. I DON’T SUPPOSE REALLY FOR TOO LONG AFTER THAT IT WOULD [HAVE BEEN] USEFUL… [THE CARD CATALOGUE] REPRESENTS A LOT OF WORK… IT WAS EXPENSIVE TIME-WISE, IT WAS EXPENSIVE MATERIALS-WISE AND IT WAS EXPENSIVE SPACE-WISE… EVEN WITH THE DIGITIZED, AUTOMATED CATALOGUE, THOSE GENERIC ENTRIES DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE ANALYTICS… SO THAT’S WHY WE CONTINUED WITH THIS FOR A WHILE AND THEN EVENTUALLY IT JUST SEEMED TO BE NOT WORTH THE EFFORT TO DO IT… IT JUST SEEMED SAD TO ME THAT IT WAS ALMOST LIKE IT WASN’T RECOGNIZED BECAUSE IT WAS TOO OLD – IT HAD HAD ITS DAY BUT THERE’S NO PURPOSE FOR IT ANYMORE… I THINK THAT THIS CERTAINLY SERVED ITS PURPOSE FOR ITS TIME AND IT’S PART OF THE CONTEXT OF THE PERIOD… I OFTEN THINK TODAY WITH INTERNET AND WITH ALL THE ONLINE ACCESS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO INFORMATION… WHEN YOU HAVE A QUESTION WHAT DO PEOPLE DO NOW? THEY PULL OUT THEIR PHONE, AND THEY GOOGLE, AND THEY GET THE ANSWER. WHEREAS, BEFORE ANY OF THIS HAPPENED THAT WAS WHAT THE LIBRARY DID, THAT WAS THE ROLE OF THE REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. THE LIBRARY IS THERE NOT JUST TO PROVIDE RECREATIONAL READING BUT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION. I’M NOT SAYING THEY’RE NOT DOING THAT ANYMORE, THEY ARE, IN A VERY MUCH MORE SOPHISTICATED WAY BUT THIS WAS ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE HANDLED THE NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO PEOPLE.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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