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Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
No. Pieces
5
Height
13
Length
45
Width
32
Description
A. CASE, SPEED GUN, 45CM LONG X 32CM WIDE X 13CM TALL. BLACK SYNTHETIC LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH SILVER TRIM ALONG LID, TWO SILVER METAL CLASPS WITH LOCKS ON FRONT, FOUR ROUND, SILVER METAL FEET ON BACK, AND SILVER METAL HINGES ON BACK. FRONT OF CASE HAS BLACK PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED TO SILVER METAL MOUNT. CASE INTERIOR HAS GREEN FOAM INSERTS INSIDE LID AND BASE; BASE FOAM INSERT HAS CUT-OUTS FOR SPEED GUN TO REST. CASE EXTERIOR IS SCUFFED AND WORN; TOP AND FRONT OF CASE STAINED WHITE AND BROWN; HANDLE HAS LABEL RESIDE ON TOP AND INSIDE; FOAM INSIDE CASE IS HAS INDENTS FROM SPEED GUN. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. SPEED GUN, 75.4CM LONG WITH CORD, GUN 30.8CM LONG X 9.2CM WIDE. BLACK METAL GUN BODY WITH CONICAL FRONT END; SPEED GUN HAS BLACK HANDLE WITH ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED GRIP, AND BLACK TAPE WRAPPED AROUND THE BASE; BASE OF HANDLE HAS BLACK CORD ATTACHED. CORD HAS WHITE TAPE WOUND AROUND TOP, WHITE RUBBER CABLE GUARD; CORD IS SPIRALED WITH BLACK VEHICLE ADAPTER FITTED AT END; ADAPTER IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH ROUND SILVER METAL FITTING. SPEED GUN HAS BLACK PLASTIC TRIGGER AT FRONT OF HANDLE BELOW BODY; FRONT OF SPEED GUN HAS BLACK FOAM FITTED INSIDE CONICAL END. SPEED GUN BODY HAS WHITE TEXT ON SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH WORDS; BODY HAS SILVER SWITCH, TWO WHITE DIALS LABELLED “ALARM”, SILVER DIAL, AND BLACK PLASTIC SWITCH LABELLED “MAN.” “AUTO” “(REL).” BESIDE TEXT. SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT ON REVERSE SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH TEXT. UNDERNEATH OF SPEED GUN BODY HAS SILVER AND BLACK METAL PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “CMI INC, MINTURN, CO. USA, TRANSMITTER TYPE JF100, PAT. NO. 3,689,921 & RE 29, 401, S/N 38-001367”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS DARKENED GLASS DISPLAY WINDOW, WITH TWO GREEN AND TWO RED BULBS VISIBLE INSIDE. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “(CAL), MOV, STA.” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW, AND BELOW A SECOND SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “OFF, ON”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT “CMI INCORPORATED” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW. BODY OF SPEED GUN IS SCUFFED AND WORN, WITH CHIPS IN BLACK PAINT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. LEATHER CASE, 14.4CM LONG X 6.7CM WIDE. BLACK LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH BLACK COTTON AND FOAM-LINED INTERIOR; FRONT OF CASE HAS GOLD TEXT STAMPED NEAR TOP EDGE “DECATUR ELECTRONICS, INC, 715 BRIGHT STREET, DECATUR, ILLINOIS 82522”. CASE MACHINE-STITCHED ALONG RIGHT AND BOTTOM EDGES; TOP EDGE HAS RIM ENGRAVED IN LEATHER. CASE INTERIOR IS FLAKING; TEXT ON FRONT OF CASE IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “65 KPH, X BAND”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “11443”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “88 KPH”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “C22333”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MECHANICAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON DECEMBER 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED TIM STOBBS, FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES OFFICER, ON THE DONATION OF THE SPEED GUN. ON THE SPEED GUN, STOBBS ELABORATED, “[WHEN] THE SPEED GUN 8 CAME OUT, AND [IT] REALLY CHANGED THE WAY THE WORLD WORKED. THE SPEED GUN 8 ALLOWED US TO SET AN ALARM, IT COULD BE MOUNTED ON THE DASH OF THE CAR TO BE MOBILE, OR IT COULD BE HELD IN A STATIONARY POSITION.” “THIS IS THE LAST ITERATION OF THE SPEED GUN SERIES OF RADAR THAT THE POLICE SERVICES USED IN THE LATE ‘60S…PROBABLY A LOT OF PLACES USED THEM INTO THE EIGHTIES, AND LATER BECAUSE THEY WERE SUCH A GOOD UNIT. THE SPEED GUN 6 WAS A PRECURSOR TO THIS AND IT WOULD [BE] A PLAIN SPEED GUN WHICH LOOKED IDENTICAL TO [THIS] MODEL. BUT IT HAD NONE OF THE FANCY ITERATIONS LIKE ALARMS AND MANUAL AND AUTO SETTINGS ON IT. IT WAS THE FIRST ITERATION THAT ALLOWED THE POLICE, OR AN ENFORCEMENT AGENCY, TO ACTUALLY HAVE A PORTABLE UNIT THAT THEY COULD HOLD IN THEIR HAND [TO] GIVE THEM A READING ON A CAR…VERSUS EVERYTHING THAT THEY HAD WHICH WAS BUILT INTO THE CAR BEFORE AND ACTUALLY FIXED IN THE CAR. PRIOR TO THAT YOU WOULD BE OUTSIDE AND YOU WOULD HAVE A MOUNTED PIECE THAT WOULD BE A TIMING DEVICE, AND YOU WOULD HAVE PIECES OF TUBING ON THE GROUND AND IT WOULD GIVE YOU SPEED FROM TUBES. THIS WAS A STEP FORWARD INTO THE MODERN 2000 FUTURE. EVERYBODY THOUGHT THIS WAS FROM THE PLANET MARS, IT WAS AWESOME." “THE INITIAL ONES THAT STARTED OUT WERE 6’S…[BY 1979 WHEN I ARRIVED] WE WERE MOVING TO 8’S. 8’S HAD ALL THESE WONDERFUL FEATURES IN THEM, THEY HAD COME SO FAR [WITH] THE ALARM, THE AUTO AND MANUAL SETTINGS, THE STATIONARY MOVEMENT, VERY QUICKLY YOU COULD MOVE FROM STATIONARY TO MOVING. THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION WAS A BIG [FEATURE] BECAUSE YOU COULD VALIDATE YOUR SPEEDS WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, BUT IT WAS ALWAYS NICE TO JUST PERIODICALLY RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION TO MAKE SURE EVERYTHING WAS RUNNING GOOD.” “THEY ONLY LASTED PROBABLY ANOTHER 5 YEARS AFTER I GOT THERE, IF THAT, BECAUSE WE STARTED MOVING TO…A DOUBLE SYSTEM WHERE WE HAD HARD MOUNTED, MOVING RADAR. IT ALSO DID STATIONARY FRONT AND BACK. WE ALSO STARTED MOVING TO A HANDHELD STATIONARY RADAR, WHICH GAVE US MORE VERSATILITY AS WELL. NOW YOU HAD YOUR RADAR LIKE THIS [SPEED GUN] AND YOU COULD RUN TO THE SIDE, YOU COULD DO MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS AT ONCE.” “[WE RAN] 6’S AND 8’S AT THE SAME TIME.” “THIS PARTICULAR MODEL IS QUITE A HIGH END ONE, IT HAS A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT SETTINGS ON IT AND, YOU CAN LOOK ON THE SIDE AND IT SAYS “ALARM”. THIS WAS A UNIQUE THING BACK IN THE DAY—YOU COULD SET, WHEN YOU WERE TRAVELING DOWN THE HIGHWAY OR ON THE ROAD, A PRE-SET SPEED. LET’S SAY FOR AN EXAMPLE YOU GAVE A 15 KM/H DIFFERENTIAL. YOU WOULD SET THIS AT 65 KM/H AND YOU WOULD PUT THE TOP SWITCH TO THE “ON” POSITION, AND YOU LEAVE THIS BACK ROCKER SWITCH IN THE CENTER POSITION, AND WHEN YOU’RE TRAVELING DOWN THE ROAD, ANY VEHICLE THAT WAS IN VIOLATION OF THAT 65 IT WOULD AUTOMATICALLY BEEP AND IT WOULD LOCK THEIR SPEED ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE. YOUR PATROL SPEED WOULD BE DEMONSTRATED IN THE GREEN ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF THE BACK DISPLAY AND ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE WOULD BE THE RED DISPLAY WHICH WOULD BE YOUR TARGET SPEED. IT WOULD LOCK IT. WITH RADAR, THIS IS A DEVICE THAT CAN BE USED TO TEST A SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, BUT THE INITIAL OBSERVATION HAS TO BE MADE BY THE OFFICER TO SAY THAT, “I LOOKED AT A VEHICLE, I SAW THE VEHICLE WAS TRAVELLING AT WHAT I BELIEVE TO BE A SPEED OF FASTER THAN 65KM/H, I CHECKED AND VALIDATED IT WITH MY RADAR.” THIS [SPEED GUN], YOU COULD TOTALLY DEPEND UPON THE RADAR TO LOCK IT UP, EVEN IF YOU DIDN’T SEE THE VEHICLE. THIS ONE WAS A MILE STEP AHEAD OF ANYTHING AT THAT TIME THAT WE HAD.” “[THE SPEED GUNS] WORKED WELL IN COLD, THEY WORKED WELL IN HOT, THEY WERE VERY PORTABLE. WE COULD PUT A BATTERY PACK ON THESE, A 12 VOLT BATTERY PACK AND WE COULD STAND OUTSIDE THE VEHICLE WITH THE BATTERY PACK. THEY WERE A PRETTY GOOD UNIT FOR THE DAY. THE ONLY THING THAT YOU REQUIRED THE OFFICER FOR WAS TO ENSURE THAT YOU DIDN’T GET THE WRONG READING, BECAUSE IF YOU HAVE TWO CARS COMING AT YOU AND YOU HAVE TWO OF THEM IN THE BEAM, THE OFFICER HAS TO MAKE A DIFFERENTIAL WHETHER OR NOT IT WOULD WORK.” “WE HAD A NUMBER OF DASH MOUNTED UNITS WHICH HAD THE SAME CAPABILITIES, BUT NOTHING HAD THE ALLOWANCE FOR YOU TO BE ABLE TO PULL IT OUT IN A SECOND AND POINT IT OUT THE SIDE WINDOW TO CATCH SOMEBODY COMING AT YOU FROM THE SIDE OR THE REAR. IT WAS A VERY UNIQUE AND WELL THOUGHT OF BEAST. THE ONLY PROBLEMS WE HAD WITH THESE IS IF YOU CAN NOTICE THERE IS AT THE END [THERE’S A PIECE THAT LOOKS] LIKE A HORN. ONE OF THE BIGGEST ISSUES IS MOST POLICEMEN ARE RELATIVELY HARD ON EQUIPMENT IN THE CARS. THEY’VE GOT THE [SPEED GUN] AND THEY DROP IT ON THE GROUND AFTER THEY GET A SPEED. WE [USED] TO KNOCK THE HORNS OFF [SPEED GUNS] QUITE A BIT AND HAVE TO SEND THEM BACK, OR THE HORNS [BECAME] DEFORMED, AND THE REASON IT’S DEFORMED IS ITS BEEN DROPPED OR BANGED AGAINST SOMETHING. WHILE THAT WOULD BE A NORMAL FOR THIS TYPE OF INSTRUMENT, THAT WAS THE ONLY WEAK POINT IN THIS. IF YOU LOOK AT THE MORE MODERN HANDHELD UNITS THEY WENT AWAY FROM A HORN AND PUT A CONE ON THE OUTSIDE TO PROTECT THE INTAKE OF THE RADAR UNIT. THIS ONE HERE…HAS A STYROFOAM INSERT [IN] IT [TO PROTECT IT]. THOSE ALSO WERE VERY SUSCEPTIBLE TO BEING BANGED AND SMASHED OUT. WE WERE ALWAYS MAKING SOMETHING NEW TO PUT BACK IN THERE AND GLUE THEM BACK IN TO PROTECT THE INNARDS OF THE UNIT; THAT WAS PRETTY MUCH THE ONLY DOWNFALL OF THE UNIT.” “ANOTHER THING IT HAD, WHICH THE OLD ONES DIDN’T HAVE, IS IT HAS A STATIONARY MODE ON THE TOP SWITCH AND A MOVING MODE. THEN IT ALSO HAD A CALIBRATE MODE. IT HAD AN INTERNAL TESTING SYSTEM THAT WHEN YOU HIT CALIBRATE IT WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION ON IT TO HELP YOU, WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, TO ENSURE THAT THIS WAS WORKING RIGHT. YOU WOULD GENERALLY TEST THIS AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR SHIFT AND IF YOU STOPPED FOR LUNCH YOU WOULD TEST IT AGAIN DURING THE MIDDLE OF YOUR SHIFT. THEN YOU’D TEST AT THE END OF YOUR SHIFT TO VALIDATE THAT THIS INSTRUMENT HAD BEEN OPERATING CORRECTLY DURING THE DURATION OF YOUR SHIFT.” “THIS CALIBRATION INTERNALLY WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL TEST TO MAKE SURE THAT THE CALCULATIONS INSIDE WERE WORKING CORRECTLY, THE ELECTRONICS. BECAUSE THIS IS A PIECE OF ELECTRONICS AND IT IS SUSCEPTIBLE TO HOT AND COLD. THE WHOLE IDEA OF THIS IS TO ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU WENT TO COURT, WITH THE TUNING FORK TEST AND WITH THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION TEST, YOU COULD STAND UP BEFORE THE COURT AND [SAY], “I TESTED THE UNIT, AND IN MY OPINION, AND MY TRAINING, THIS UNIT WORKED CORRECTLY AND AS IT SHOULD TO DETERMINE ACCURATELY THE SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, EITHER WITH ME MOVING IT OR ME STATIONARY”. YOU HAVE TO GIVE THAT EVIDENCE…AND THAT [CALIBRATION] ALLOWED THAT. [THE] TUNING FORK TEST AND THE INTERNAL [MODE] VALIDATED YOUR ABILITY TO SAY THAT.” “EVERY TIME YOU TOOK OVER A CAR, OR SAY YOU CHANGE CARS MID-SHIFT, [AND] YOU HAD ONE OF THESE UNITS OR ANY RADAR UNIT IN IT, THE FIRST THING YOU’D DO IS YOU WOULD TEST AND ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF THIS UNIT. [THAT WOULD] ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU LEFT, IF YOU GOT SOMEBODY ON RADAR, IT WOULD BE GIVING YOU AN ACCURATE READING. THEY’RE USUALLY ACCURATE, PLUS OR MINUS LESS THAN 1%. AT A 100KM/H IT WOULD BE LESS THAN 1KM/H OFF. THERE ARE VARIOUS THINGS WITH RADAR THAT ARE [BENEFICIAL]. IF YOU’RE SITTING AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD AND YOU’RE SHOOTING AT AN ANGLE, THE HIGHER THE ANGLE THE LOWER THE SPEED BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A TONE. IF YOU THINK OF RADAR AS HEARING A TRAIN COMING TOWARDS YOU, YOU HEAR IT COMING, IT GETS LOUD, AND THEN IT GOES AWAY AND IT CHANGES TONE. [THE SPEED GUN] GIVES US THE SAME THING AND THAT’S WHAT THIS READS. SO THAT’S GOOD. THIS [SPEED GUN] WAS THE ULTIMATE IN THE SPEED GUNS, THIS WAS EXCELLENT.” “THE COOL THING ABOUT IT WAS FOR THE COURT SYSTEM, IT CAME WITH TWO SETS OF TUNING FORKS. THE TUNING FORKS WERE USUALLY CALIBRATED TO A SPEED. THESE ONES ARE X-BAND TYPE TUNING FORKS, AND THEY WERE SENT AWAY ANNUALLY TO BE CALIBRATED TO ENSURE THAT THEY MAINTAINED THEIR FREQUENCIES. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IS THAT YOU WOULD TAKE AND PUT [THE SPEED GUN] IN STATIONARY MODE, AND YOU WOULD TEST THE DEVICE TO ENSURE THAT IT WAS ACTUALLY READING CORRECTLY, ON BOTH OF [TUNING FORKS]. YOU TESTED THE COMPUTATIONAL SPEED OF THE UNIT. YOU’D STRIKE TWO OF THE TUNING FORKS AND PUT THEM TOGETHER IN FRONT OF THE UNIT, AND IT WOULD MAKE A COMPUTATION ON THE TWO TONES TO GIVE YOU THE BASIC SPEED DIFFERENTIAL BETWEEN THE TWO TUNING FORKS. THIS WAS ANOTHER MEANS TO ENSURE THAT WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS GETTING THE PROPER SPEED OUT OF YOUR UNIT. IT WAS REALLY A STEP FORWARD IN INSURING THAT THE CREDIBILITY AND CAPABILITY OF THE UNIT WAS VALIDATED, AND THE COURTS ACTUALLY LOVE THAT.” “ANNUALLY YOU RECERTIFY YOUR TUNING FORKS, YOUR TUNING FORK CERTIFICATION FOR TWO TUNING FORKS IS PROBABLY ABOUT $120 A YEAR. IF ANYTHING STARTS HAPPENING TO THESE, BECAUSE THEY GET BOUNCED IN THE CAR, VIBRATION, HOT, COLD, THEY’RE IN THE CAR ALL THE TIME. THEY START TO WEAR OUT. IT STARTS BECOMING COST PROHIBITIVE TO SEND THEM BACK TO THE FACTORY FOR REFURBISHING. THERE’S A THING IN [THE SPEED GUNS] CALLED THE OSCILLATOR. UNDER THE NEWER UNITS THE OSCILLATOR IS IN THE HEAD, AWAY FROM THE MAIN UNIT. THE OSCILLATOR FOR THIS [MODEL] IS BUILT INSIDE, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE [THE] WHOLE UNIT AND SHIP IT OFF. THEY HAVE TO PEAL IT ALL APART, PUT AN OSCILLATOR INTO IT. WHEREAS WITH THE NEW UNITS, WITH THE SEPARATE HEADS WITH THE OSCILLATOR, YOU CAN JUST GET ANOTHER HEAD, PUT ANOTHER HEAD ON, SEND THAT HEAD AWAY TO THE, AND FOR A $160 YOU GET THE OSCILLATOR FIXED. WHEN THESE START TO BREAK DOWN, IT’S USUALLY CATASTROPHIC. THIS IS USUALLY ALMOST COST PROHIBITIVE—LIKE MOST ELECTRONICS, THEY HAVE A VERY LIMITED SHELF LIFE. THEY DON’T GET TREATED EXACTLY THE NICEST. MOST POLICE CARS WILL HAVE POWER SEATS BECAUSE OF THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE THAT [HAVE] TO BE IN THEM AND THE DIFFERENT POSITIONS THEY HAVE TO BE IN, AND A REGULAR SLIDING SEAT GENERALLY DOESN’T GIVE ENOUGH TO FIT ENOUGH PEOPLE. IF SOMEBODY HAD USED THIS, AND PUT IT DOWN, AND IT FELL BEHIND THE SEAT, AND THEY PUSHED THE SEAT BACK, THOSE POWER SEATS ARE FAIRLY STRONG, THEY CAN DO A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF DAMAGE TO ONE OF THESE UNITS INADVERTENTLY. YOU HAVE TO ASSESS HOW THEY’VE BEEN TREATED, WHAT THE COST IS GOING TO BE TO MAINTAIN THEM, LONG-TERM INVESTMENT. AS SOON AS A SPEED GUN 8 OSCILLATOR’S DONE, IT’S DONE. BECAUSE IT’S NOT WORTH SENDING IT BACK TO HAVE RE-DONE.” “[THE] TRAFFIC SERGEANT WOULD HAVE BEEN IN CHARGE OF THE PROCUREMENT OF [RADAR EQUIPMENT]. AT THAT TIME I’M NOT SURE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN SERGEANT, BUT IT WAS ONE OF MY SERGEANTS THERE. HE HAD BEEN ON TRAFFIC FOR QUITE A WHILE AT THE TIME…SHORTLY THEREAFTER, WHILE I WAS TENURED THERE, SERGEANT NORRIS VANHORN WAS ALSO ON TRAFFIC WHEN I WAS ON THERE. THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE FANTASTIC…WHEN WE GOT THESE, THESE WERE EYE OPENERS…YOU THOUGHT YOU’D DIED AND GONE TO HEAVEN BECAUSE OF THE VERSATILITY IT GAVE YOU TO DO YOUR JOB.” “YOU CHANGE THE TECHNOLOGY TO TRY TO KEEP UP WITH THE NEEDS OF THE GUYS THAT ARE WORKING. IT MAKES YOU MORE EFFICIENT…I MANAGED THE PEACE OFFICERS IN OKOTOKS, AND I CAN TELL YOU, I CAN BUY EQUIPMENT EVERY DAY…THAT STUFF’S CHEAP. PEOPLE ARE EXPENSIVE…YOU WOULD TRY TO KEEP THEM IN EQUIPMENT THAT KEEPS THEM VERY EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE, AND YOU’D GET THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK OUT OF THE PEOPLE WORKING…THIS TYPE OF EQUIPMENT HAS USUALLY A SHORT SHELF LIFE. WE DID OTHER THINGS WITH THEM. WE USED TO LEND OUT THESE RADAR GUNS TO THE SOFT BALL KIDS…OR THE HARD BALL KIDS…AND THEY COULD SEE HOW FAST THEY COULD PITCH. OR WHEN THEY HAD SOAPBOX DERBIES…YOU’D GIVE THESE [SPEED GUNS] AND THEY COULD POST IT ON THE NEWS “AH LITTLE JOHNNY CAME DOWN THE HILL AND HE WAS DOING 37 KM/H IN HIS HOME MADE THING”. THERE [WERE] LOTS OF OTHER APPLICATIONS THAT THIS WAS SORT OF RE-CIRCULATED TO, FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S NOT LIKE YOU’D JUST DISCARD THE [EQUIPMENT], YOU’D TRY TO MAKE ANOTHER USE FOR IT. A LOT OF THIS [EQUIPMENT] FOR MANY YEARS, MADE ITS WAY AROUND THE COMMUNITY IN OTHER SOCIAL EVENTS TO ASSIST THE COMMUNITY IN WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO AND SEE.” STOBBS RECALLED HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE, NOTING, “I WAS VERY FORTUNATE. I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE [STARTING IN 1979]. I ALSO WORKED FOR THE RED CLIFF POLICE SERVICE PRIOR TO THAT, AND WE RAN THESE UNITS WHEN I WAS A YOUNG CONSTABLE. I WORKED IN TRAFFIC FOR OVER 3 AND A HALF OR 4 YEARS.” “THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE VERY COMMON IN OUR CARS WHEN I CAME HERE. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE—I DROVE A BLACK WIDOW…ONE OF OUR WIDOWS HAD THIS IN IT…WE HAD TWO CARS IN TOWN THAT WERE RENOWNED WITH THE KIDS. THEY WERE TWO BLACK FORDS WITH BIG 429’S IN THEM. THEY HAD SPEED GUNS IN THEM AND THEY ALSO HAD OTHER RADARS IN THEM. THAT [SPEED GUN] WAS ONE OF THE ITERATIONS WE HAD IN THEM, AND WE USED THESE A LOT FOR OUR ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. THEY COULD GIVE US SUCH VERSATILITY FOR THE OFFICER TO SIT STATIONARY OR TO BE MOVING. WHEN YOU’RE IN A SCHOOL ZONE, SOMETIMES YOU WANT TO STAND OUTSIDE YOUR CAR, YOU WANT TO RUN BACKWARDS, OR YOU WANT TO RUN TO THE SIDE. IF YOU’RE IN A PLAYGROUND ZONE, IT’S MORE ADVANTAGEOUS TO BE SITTING ON A SIDE STREET THAN SITTING WITH THE CARS PASSING YOU. IT GAVE US SUCH VERSATILITY WHICH WE NEVER HAD BEFORE.” “BACK IN THE DAY, OUR FLEET WAS…WE CALLED IT THE ‘SMARTIE’ FLEET. IT WAS MULTIPLE COLOURS AND I DON’T KNOW THE PURPOSE BEHIND IT. WHEN I WAS IN [LETHBRIDGE], IF YOU WOUND UP WITH THE TRAFFIC FLEET WHEN I STARTED IN ‘79, THERE WERE TWO CARS. THERE WERE ALWAYS TWO BLACK CARS, AND THEY WERE CALLED THE BLACK WIDOWS. THERE WERE DIFFERENT ITERATIONS. THE FIRST TWO WERE FORD INTERCEPTORS WITH 429’S ALL DECKED OUT, AND THEY WERE PURSUIT TYPE CARS, THEY ALL WERE IN THOSE DAYS. THEN WE HAD A NUMBER OF OTHER VEHICLES. ONE OF THE CARS THAT, WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, I DROVE [WAS] A SECONDARY MARKED ENFORCEMENT CAR AND IT WAS A PINKIE SALMON COLOUR. I DON’T EVEN KNOW, AND IT WAS GREAT, BUT IT WAS A GREAT BIG LTD AS WELL. THEN WE HAD A COUPLE OTHER CARS THAT WERE A COLLISION CAR AND A HIT-AND-RUN CAR. THEY WERE DIFFERENT COLOURS AGAIN. I DON’T KNOW WHY THEY BOUGHT THEM THAT WAY, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER THAT WAS THE THOUGHT OF THE CHIEF AT THE TIME, BUT THAT WAS THE WAY THINGS WENT UNTIL FINALLY WE DECIDED LATER ON THAT OUR FLEET WAS GOING TO GO BLACK AND WHITE LIKE IN THE OLD DAYS. BEFORE THE “SMARTIE” FLEET IT WAS BLACK AND WHITE, WE WERE GOING BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE. WE WERE THE FIRST POLICE SERVICE IN ALBERTA THAT WENT BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE AND EVERYBODY’S FOLLOWING LETHBRIDGE SUIT, ACTUALLY. THAT’S A CULTURAL THING THOUGH AND LETHBRIDGE IS VERY PROUD OF THEIR BLACK AND WHITE CARS.” “RADAR WAS A DAY-TO-DAY THING; IT WAS INVOLVED HEAVILY IN A DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. WE USED TO HAVE A PIN-MAP, AND WE DIRECTED OUR ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES AROUND A NUMBER OF THINGS. FIRST AND FOREMOST WOULD BE OUR PIN-MAP AND OUR PIN-MAP WAS OUR COLLISION MAP. EVERY COLLISION WAS PINNED AND THEY WERE PINNED IN DIFFERENT COLOURS—THIS [IS] OLD TECHNOLOGY. A FATAL WOULD BE BLACK, AN INJURY WOULD BE RED, A NON-INJURY WOULD BE BLUE. WE COULD VISUALLY SEE FROM THE ENFORCEMENT ASPECT WHERE WE SHOULD BE INVESTING OUR TIME TO SLOW PEOPLE DOWN AT THESE COLLISION POINTS. SECONDLY IS, LETHBRIDGE HAD ALWAYS HAD OUR SCHOOLS CLOSE TOGETHER, SO WE INVESTED A LOT OF OUR TIME AND ENERGY AROUND THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I WAS PROUD OF IS, FOR THE SIZE OF THE CITY AND THE TRAFFIC FLOWS THAT WE HAD, OUR FATALITY WITH YOUTH WAS VERY LOW. WE HAD A FEW KIDS HIT IN MY TIME AND A FEW OBVIOUSLY PASSED AWAY, IN A CITY OF THIS SIZE, BUT OVER THE YEARS MOST OF US TOOK GREAT PRIDE IN THE FACT THAT WE HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY MAKE A VISUAL AND A NOTED IMPACT ON BEHAVIORS IN SCHOOLS, WHETHER IT BE U-TURNS, SPEEDING, IN THIS. PEOPLE WERE WELL AWARE WE WERE THERE.” “WE HAD AN EXCELLENT RELATIONSHIP WITH THE KIDS…[IN THE 1970S-1980S WHEN] MUSCLE CARS WERE BIG. WE USED TO HAVE A COOL THING GOING WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS WHEN YOU’RE IN THE ENFORCEMENT GAME. WE USED TO HAVE A [SYSTEM OF] EVERY THIRD ONE’S FREE TYPE THING. THEY’D WORK ALL WINTER, A LOT OF THESE KIDS DIDN’T SMOKE, THEY DIDN’T DRINK, THEY DIDN’T DO ANYTHING. ALL THEY WORKED [ON] WAS THEIR CARS, BUT ONCE SPRING ROLLED OUT, OUT CAME THE MUSCLE CARS. OVER THE COURSE OF THE SUMMER THEY DROVE THEM. THEY WOULD END UP AFOUL OF US, WHETHER IT BE FOR STUNTING OR SPEEDING. WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS, WE WOULD HAVE THIS FREQUENT FLYER MILE PROGRAM BECAUSE THEY WOULD GET THEMSELVES INTO A BIND, BUT THEY WERE SUCH GOOD KIDS THEY WERE JUST STUPID WITH THEIR CARS. WE USED TO CATCH THEM FOR SPEEDING WITH THESE [SPEED GUNS], OR STUNTING. THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE YOUTH, SOME OF THE YOUNGER PEOPLE, THAT ARE LATE-TEENS OR EARLY-TWENTIES WAS PRETTY GOOD, THESE GUYS THAT BUILT THESE CARS UP. WE HAD A PRETTY GOOD KNOWLEDGE OF THEM AND WE WORKED WELL WITH THEM.” “WE RAN WHAT THEY CALLED A “DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM”. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF OPTIONS FOR THE GUYS TO GO WHERE THEY WANTED, BUT FIRST AND FOREMOST WE CONCENTRATED ON HIGH COLLISION AREAS AND SCHOOLS. OBVIOUSLY WE KNEW WE HAD THE STRIP…WE HAD 3RD AVENUE AND MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE AND KIDS DROVE THE STRIP IN THE SUMMER, THAT’S WHERE THEY DID THEIR DRAG RACING…BACK IN THE DAY, WHEN I FIRST STARTED, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE WENT STRAIGHT THROUGH TO NORTH MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE. THAT INTERSECTION [OF] 3RD AVENUE, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE USED TO GO STRAIGHT THROUGH ON THE HIGHWAY. IT WAS A BUSY PLACE [WITH] LOTS OF COLLISIONS. WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME DOWN IN THERE ON MAYOR MAGRATH, AND THERE WERE OTHER PLACES IN TOWN WHICH WERE CONCERNS. YOU’D GET CITIZENS COMPLAINING ABOUT LOTS OF TRAFFIC AND SPEED, WE WOULD GO DOWN AND MONITOR IT, AND WE WOULD TRY TO RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY BY ATTENDING THAT AREA. USUALLY IT WAS ONE OR TWO PEOPLE IN THE AREA THAT WERE DOING IT AND YOU CAUGHT AND DEALT WITH THEM, AND THE PROBLEM PRETTY MUCH WENT AWAY. ONE OF THE THINGS I WAS TAUGHT AS A YOUNG CONSTABLE [WAS WHEN YOU] COME TO WORK AFTER YOUR DAYS OFF, THE FIRST THING YOU DO IS YOU GO LOOK AT YOUR PIN BOARD AND YOU SEE IF ANYTHING CHANGED, IF HAVE WE HAD A FATALITY. HAS THERE BEEN SOME SERIOUS COLLISIONS, HAS SOMETHING CHANGED? YOU ALWAYS KNEW IN YOUR MIND WHERE YOU HAD TO BE.” “WE SPENT LOTS OF TIME ON SCENIC DRIVE ANYWHERE. AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE. IF YOU’RE RUNNING A MARKED VEHICLE, SOMETIMES WE WOULD JUST PARK ON A BOULEVARD SOMEWHERE IT WAS BUSY AND JUST SIT THERE. YOU’D MONITOR TRAFFIC AND OF COURSE SOMEBODY WOULD EVENTUALLY DO SOMETHING SILLY AND YOU’D HAVE STOP THEM, BUT THE WHOLE IDEA WOULD BE FOR THE VISIBILITY ASPECT.” “I REMEMBER WHEN WE GOT THE 8’S [SPEED GUNS] AND WE COULD PROGRAM THEM, WE THOUGHT WE’D DIED AND WENT TO HEAVEN. WE ARE ALL ABOUT EFFICIENCY. EVERY SHIFT YOU WOULD DEAL WITH TWENTY, THIRTY PEOPLE OR MORE. NOT INCLUDING COMPLAINTS, WE’RE TALKING ABOUT INTERACTIONS WITH PEOPLE THAT WERE VIOLATIONS SOMEHOW. [THE SPEED GUNS] GAVE YOU A TOOL TO INTERACT WITH SOMEBODY…AND A LOT OF OTHER THINGS COME FROM THIS. A LARGE AMOUNT OF CRIME IS SOLVED BY SOMEBODY STOPPING A CAR AND TALKING TO SOMEBODY, AND THE CAR’S STOLEN, THERE’S STOLEN PROPERTY IN THE CAR, THE GUY’S WANTED ON WARRANTS. THIS TOOL WAS A LEVERAGE AND AN ABILITY TO ENTER A WHOLE NEW REALM IN ASSISTING OUR COMMUNITY AND KEEPING OUR COMMUNITY SAFE. IT JUST WASN’T FROM THE TRAFFIC END OF IT, IT GAVE YOU AN OPPORTUNITY TO INTERACT WITH PEOPLE THAT NORMALLY YOU WOULD NOT HAVE THE CAPACITY TO INTERACT WITH. AND DO IT IN A LAWFUL MANNER.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120014000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
Acquisition Date
2012-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, VINYL, NYLON
No. Pieces
4
Height
14.4
Length
221.5
Width
51.2
Description
EMERGENCY FOLDING CHAIR STRETCHER. ADJUSTABLE, MEDIUM BURGUNDY COLOURED VINYL WITH SILVER COLOURED METAL, AND FOUR BLACK RUBBER WHEELS. OUTER RECTANGULAR FRAME WITH A SMALLER, ADJUSTABLE FRAME WITHIN. STRETCHER HAS THREE STRAPS: TWO WINE COLOURED NYLON SEATBELT STYLE STRAPS, WITH METAL AND BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLES, ON THE UPPER BODY. BLACK PLASTIC BUCKLE AT CHEST HEIGHT HAS "FERNO" IN GREY. THIRD BUCKLE IS A BLACK NYLON AND PLASTIC BUCKLE, ON THE LOWER BODY. BACK OF PLASTIC BUCKLE IS EMBOSSED WITH "ACCULOC CSR-10 A.C.W. ASIA, WOONSOCKET RI". RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING ON RIGTH SIDE OF STRETCHER, AT WAIST AREA, READS "FERNO". TWO RUBBER FEET AT THE FOOT END OF STRETCHER TO STABILIZE STRETCHER WHEN FULLY EXTENDED. VINYL IS IN TWO PIECES AND CAN BE REMOVED FROM INNER FRAME. GOLD COLOURED ZIPPERS AND SILVER COLOURED SNAPS HOLD VINYL IN PLACE. THERE ARE TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE FOOT PORTION, BOTH RUNNING VERTICALLY. THERE ARE ALSO TWO GOLD ZIPPERS ON THE BACK OF THE UPPER BODY PORTION, WITH ONE RUNNING HORIZONTALLY AND ONE VERTICALLY. METAL LABEL RIVETED ONTO FRAME AT FOOT OF STRETCHER READS "FERNO - WASHINGTON, INC. WILMINGTON, OHIO, U.S.A. SERIAL NUMBER 07-052255." FOUR FOLDABLE HANDLES, TWO AT HEAD AND TWO AT FEET. HANDLES HAVE TEXTURED BLACK PLASTIC GRIPS. GRIPS EMBOSSED WITH "HUNTWILDE CORPORATION". LOWER HANDLES (AT FOOT) HAVE METAL CYLINDERS THAT SLIDE OVER THE JOINT TO PREVENT HANDLES FROM FOLDING BACK IN. CROSSBAR AT KNEE AREA HAS A SMALL RECTANGULAR PIECE THAT SWINGS OUT AND ONTO A BOLT WHEN STRETCHER IS FOLDED INTO SITTING POSITION, WHICH PREVENTS STRETCHER FROM GOING BACK TO A LAYING DOWN POSITION. UPPER BODY PORTION CAN BE ADJUSTED TO FOUR DIFFERENT POSITIONS: LAYING TOTALLY FLAT TO SITTING AT AN APPROXIMATELY 45 DEGREE ANGLE. AT SHOULDER AREA ON RIGHT SIDE THERE IS A TRIANGULAR SHAPED CLIP, WHICH RELEASES THE UPPER BODY PORTION AND ALLOWS IT TO BE ADJUSTED TO A SITTING POSITION. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. VINYL IS STRUCTURALLY VERY GOOD, WITH NO RIPS OR TEARS. SCUFF MARKS AND BLACK STAINS ALL OVER, ESPECIALLY ALONG THE EDGES. METAL FRAME IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. WHEELS AT THE FOOT ARE WORN MORE THAN THOSE AT THE HEAD.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-HUMAN-POWERED
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS EMERGENCY FOLDING STRETCHER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE STRETCHER WAS “USED PRIMARILY IN AMBULANCES FOR MOVING PATIENTS DOWN STAIRS OR AROUND TIGHT CORNERS. WE USE A MORE STAIR FRIENDLY VERSION NOW.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED: “IT WAS MORE OR LESS TO TAKE PEOPLE DOWN STAIRS. SIT THEM UP, STRAP THEM IN, HAD WHEELS ON IT. IT WAS FOR A PERSON THAT DIDN’T HAVE ANY SERIOUS INJURIES MORE OR LESS … IT WAS LIKE A LITTLE CHAIR, FOLD UP, SIT THEM DOWN … GO DOWN THE STAIRS ONE AT A TIME – THUNK, THUNK, THUNK, THUNK.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “I HATED THIS STRETCHER. THIS WAS A FOLDING STRETCHER … ACTUALLY THE OLD STAIR-CHAIR, BASICALLY. THEY HAVE MODERNIZED AND IMPROVED THIS DRAMATICALLY. BUT THIS PUZZLE OF A STRETCHER – YOU USED TO BE ABLE TO SET IT UP SO THAT IT CAME INTO A CHAIR … ANY TIME YOU WENT UP INTO AN APARTMENT BUILDING THAT WAS UNDER THREE STORIES, THERE’S NO ELEVATOR, SO YOU SOMETIMES HAD TO CARRY PEOPLE DOWN THREE FLIGHTS OF STAIRS. THIS WAS THE CHAIR OF CHOICE A LOT OF TIMES, IT WAS THE STRETCHER OF CHOICE, BECAUSE IT WAS LIGHTER THAN THE OTHER ONE AND IT WAS EASIER TO MANEUVER AROUND CORNERS … IT WAS A PUZZLE TO PUT TOGETHER AND TO TAKE APART AND I JUST NEVER EVER – I HATED THIS THING. TO THIS DAY, WHEN THE PARAMEDICS SAY ‘WE’RE GONNA NEED THE STAIR CHAIR’, I GRIT MY TEETH AND I CRINGE A LITTLE BIT, I THINK BECAUSE I THINK OF THIS THING, EVEN THOUGH THE NEW ONE IS WAY BETTER. THIS WAS IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE AND I WOULD SAY THAT THIS WAS IN SERVICE ON THE AMBULANCES UNTIL ABOUT … 7 YEARS AGO, GIVE OR TAKE. SO THE BETTER PART OF 15 YEARS THAT THAT WAS IN SERVICE WHILE I WAS HERE.” HE CONTINUED: “THE WORST PART ABOUT THIS IS THAT WHEN YOU PUT A PATIENT ON IT AND YOU LIFTED THEM UP TO GO DOWN THE STAIRS, IT FELT UNSTABLE ENOUGH FOR THEM THAT THEY ALWAYS WANTED TO PUT THEIR ARMS OUT, AND THE SECOND THAT THEY GRABBED ON TO SOMETHING, WELL THEN YOUR CENTRE OF GRAVITY IS LOST AND THEN YOU WERE REALLY IN IT. LIKE YOU THOUGHT, ‘GEEZ, WE COULD ACTUALLY DROP THIS GUY.’ BUT THAT’S WHAT I DISLIKED PROBABLY THE MOST ABOUT THIS THING, OUTSIDE OF HAVING TO PUT IT TOGETHER.” PETIT ADDED: “IF YOU GO TO THE BUILDINGS UP HERE ON LONDON ROAD, SOME TWO STORY BUILDINGS AND THE STAIRS ARE VERY NARROW AND VERY TIGHT, WE USED TO USE THIS TYPE. SO IN OTHER WORDS, INSTEAD OF PUTTING HIM ON A STRETCHER, YOU’D PUT HIM ON THE SEAT. ONE GUY GETS AT THE BACK AND ONE GUY GETS AT THE FRONT AND TAKE THE PERSON DOWN … OVER THE YEARS I GOT A BAD BACK AND GUESS WHERE I GOT THE BAD BACK FROM? IT WAS LIFTING, DOING THINGS LIKE THIS, BECAUSE IT WAS VERY CUMBERSOME.” DZUREN AGREED: “THAT’S JUST A CONFINED SPACE STRETCHER … YOU CAN’T [ALWAYS] GET THE BIG STRETCHER IN, SO YOU CAN PUT THEM ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE. IN AN ELEVATOR, YOU CAN’T GET THAT BIG ONE IN THERE. SOME OF THE ELEVATORS, THE RESIDENTIAL ONES, THEY DON’T, AT LEAST IN THE DAYS GONE BY, THEY DIDN’T THINK ABOUT HAVING TO ACCOMMODATE STRETCHERS. I WOULD PROBABLY SAY IT’S A RARE OCCASION THAT WE HAD TO USE THAT. CAUSE A LOT OF TIMES … IF THE PERSON WAS FAIRLY PHYSICALLY OKAY, YOU COULD TAKE HIM OUT, JUST HOLD HIM. ONE GUY BY THE ARMS, ONE GUY BY THE LEGS, WE HAD A TECHNIQUE THERE WHERE YOU COULD QUITE EASILY TAKE HIM OUT THAT WAY WITHOUT DOING HIM ANY HARM, YOU KNOW. IF HE HAD A BROKEN ARM, WELL, WE COULDN’T DO THAT, SO YOU’D HAVE TO USE ONE OF THOSE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010023
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
31
Height
100.75
Length
103.25
Width
46
Description
.1 – WOOD CABINET CONTAINING 30 DRAWERS IN SIX ROWS (.2 - .31). CABINET’S FOUR LEGS AND EDGES ARE SQUARED, WITH THREE METAL ANGLED BRACKETS AND TWO WOODEN CORNER BRACES ATTACHING THE CABINET BODY TO THE LEGS. WOOD IS STAINED BLONDE. STAMPED TEXT IN BLUE INK ON UNDERSIDE OF CABINET READS "MADE IN CANADA". GENERAL WEAR AND SCUFFS OVERALL, ESPECIALLY ALONG TOP FRONT EDGE AND BOTTOM FRONT SKIRTING PANEL. DRIPS OF WHITE PAINT ON EDGES OF BOTH FRONT LEGS AND CABINET BACK EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 100.75 X 46 X 103.25 ALL DRAWERS (.2 - .31) ARE WOOD WITH BRASS LABELPLATES AND MEASURE 9.75 X 14.5 X 41. .2 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .3 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .4 – EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .5 – HALF FULL OF LOOSE CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .6 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .7 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .8 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. DRAWER ROD BRACKET IS MISSING ONE SCREW AND HANGS LOOSE. .9 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .10 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .11 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL; DRAWER ROD IN PLACE. .12 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .13 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .14 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .15 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .16 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .17 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1990”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .18 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .19 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 A-J”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .20 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 J-S”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .21 – HALF FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 S-Z”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .22 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1990 A-K DONE”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .23 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .24 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .25 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .26 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .27 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .28 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .29 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “CDN… PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .30 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .31 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK.
Subjects
FURNITURE
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS CARD CATALOGUE WAS PRODUCED AND USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY EXPLAINED THE CATALOGUING PROCESS AND SUGGESTED THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN HOUSED IN THE LIBRARY’S SENATOR BUCHANAN ROOM (A REFERENCE RESOURCE OF LOCAL HISTORIES AND GENEALOGIES) AT ONE TIME. MCELRAVY SAID: “WE USED [CARD CATALOGUES] PRIOR TO AUTOMATING OUR CATALOGUE WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘80S… THERE ARE AT LEAST THREE INDEXES [INSIDE THIS SPECIFIC CATALOGUE]… WE USED TO CREATE CARD INDEXES FOR COLLECTIONS AND THINGS THAT YOU COULDN’T FIND… THROUGH NORMAL CATALOGUING PROCESSES. SO, THE FIRST ONE IS… THE SONG INDEX AND THAT WAS MADE UP OF ANALYTICS OF SHEET MUSIC MAGAZINE AND COLLECTIONS AND SONGS – ALL MUSIC AS OPPOSED TO JUST THE LYRICS. SO WE WOULD TAKE COLLECTIONS OF SONGS IN OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION, WE DIDN’T USE ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY – SO IT WASN’T A GENERAL THING IT WAS SPECIFIC, A SPECIFIC TOOL TO OUR COLLECTION… IF SOMEONE WANTED A PARTICULAR PIECE OF MUSIC… WE WOULD BE ABLE TO FIND THAT HERE RATHER THAN PEOPLE STANDING AT THE SHELF, LEAFING THROUGH ALL OF THAT… [AT] THE OTHER END OF THE BANK OF CARDS IS THE PLAY INDEX AND THAT’S THE SAME IDEA – THERE WOULD BE ‘AUTHOR’, ‘PLAYWRIGHT’ AND ‘TITLE’ CARDS PUT IN FOR EACH OF THE PLAYS IN COLLECTIONS THAT WE HAD AT LPL. AND THE MIDDLE ONE WAS THE INDEX TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD – I THINK SOME OF IT GOES BACK TO ’99 AND BEFORE AND FOR THAT ONE THE STAFF WOULD CUT OUT ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT SUBJECT HEADINGS ON THEM AND MAKE A CORRESPONDING CARD FOR THE CATALOGUE SO THAT THAT WOULD GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO THAT [FILE]...” MCELRAVY CONTINUED: “I THINK [THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY CATALOGUE] WAS IN THE MID ‘80S… [AFTER THAT PROCESS] I’M NOT SURE HOW OFTEN THEY USED [THE CARD CATALOGUES] ANYMORE… PERHAPS IT WAS JUST A QUESTION OF HANGING ON TO IT FOR THE SAKE OF HANGING ON TO IT.. I DON’T SUPPOSE REALLY FOR TOO LONG AFTER THAT IT WOULD [HAVE BEEN] USEFUL… [THE CARD CATALOGUE] REPRESENTS A LOT OF WORK… IT WAS EXPENSIVE TIME-WISE, IT WAS EXPENSIVE MATERIALS-WISE AND IT WAS EXPENSIVE SPACE-WISE… EVEN WITH THE DIGITIZED, AUTOMATED CATALOGUE, THOSE GENERIC ENTRIES DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE ANALYTICS… SO THAT’S WHY WE CONTINUED WITH THIS FOR A WHILE AND THEN EVENTUALLY IT JUST SEEMED TO BE NOT WORTH THE EFFORT TO DO IT… IT JUST SEEMED SAD TO ME THAT IT WAS ALMOST LIKE IT WASN’T RECOGNIZED BECAUSE IT WAS TOO OLD – IT HAD HAD ITS DAY BUT THERE’S NO PURPOSE FOR IT ANYMORE… I THINK THAT THIS CERTAINLY SERVED ITS PURPOSE FOR ITS TIME AND IT’S PART OF THE CONTEXT OF THE PERIOD… I OFTEN THINK TODAY WITH INTERNET AND WITH ALL THE ONLINE ACCESS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO INFORMATION… WHEN YOU HAVE A QUESTION WHAT DO PEOPLE DO NOW? THEY PULL OUT THEIR PHONE, AND THEY GOOGLE, AND THEY GET THE ANSWER. WHEREAS, BEFORE ANY OF THIS HAPPENED THAT WAS WHAT THE LIBRARY DID, THAT WAS THE ROLE OF THE REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. THE LIBRARY IS THERE NOT JUST TO PROVIDE RECREATIONAL READING BUT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION. I’M NOT SAYING THEY’RE NOT DOING THAT ANYMORE, THEY ARE, IN A VERY MUCH MORE SOPHISTICATED WAY BUT THIS WAS ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE HANDLED THE NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO PEOPLE.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
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